Celtic Submitted Surnames

These names are used by Celtic peoples.
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ADAIR Celtic
Mostly Scottish surname meaning "at the oak ford".
AHEARNA Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
ALAN CROM Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
AM MAGH FADA Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous former burgh.
ANDERSON Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Ghille Andrais meaning 'Son of the devotee of St. Andrew'. ... [more]
ANNA English, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name ANNA.
ÀNSRUTHAIR Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous town.
ARAN Irish, Galician
From the given name ARAN (1).
ARDIES Irish
Irish Isle Of Ards
ARGYLE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
ARGYLL Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
ARZUR Breton
Derived from the Breton given name of Arzhur.
BACLAN Celtic (Rare)
Form of the surname BACKLUND
BAILE PHÙIR Scottish Gaelic
Proper, non-Anglicized form of BALFOUR.
BAINEBRIDGE English, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BALCH Welsh
From the Welsh adjective balch, which has a range of meanings—"fine", "splendid", "proud", "arrogant", "glad"—but the predominant meaning is "proud" and from this the family name probably derives.
BARNEWALL Anglo-Norman, Irish
A locational surname given to those who lived by a stream in either Cambridgeshire, which derives its name from the Olde English beorna meaning "warrior" and wella meaning "stream", or from one in Northamptonshire, which got its name from the Olde English byrge meaning "burial mound" and well, which also means "stream." a burial mound and 'well(a)'... [more]
BARRACH Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic spelling of DUNBAR.
BARRINGTON English, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name BEORN + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
BARRY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Beargha meaning, 'descendant of BEARGH.'
BEACOM Irish
Northern Irish variant of BEAUCHAMP.
BEDDOE Welsh
Variant of BEDDOW.
BEDDOW Welsh
From the personal name Bedo, a pet form of Meredydd (see MEREDITH).
BETHEL English, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of ITHEL".
BIDDLE English, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIHAN Breton
Bihan means small in Breton.
BLACKERBY English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLACKSMITH English, Welsh, Scottish
This last name is an occupation last name. A "blacksmith" means a person who makes and repairs things in iron by hand.
BLAIN Scottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN... [more]
BLANEY Irish
Topographic name from Welsh blaenau, plural of blaen "point, tip, end", i.e. uplands, or remote region, or upper reaches of a river.
BLEDIG Welsh
"like a wolf"
BLEUZEN Breton
Derived from the feminine given name Bleuzenn.
BLEVENS Welsh
Alternate spelling of BLEVINS.
BLIN Welsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
BLOOD Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh ap Llwyd ‘son of Llwyd’.
BLYTHIN Welsh
Recorded as Blethin, Bleythin, Bleything, Blythin, and others, this is a surname which has Welsh royal connections. It derives from the Ancient British personal name "Bleddyn," translating as the son of Little Wolf... [more]
BODEN Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOHANNON Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadhachanáin, a double diminutive of buadhach ‘victorious’
BOITEUX French, Breton
From a Breton nickname meaning "lame".
BOLLARD English, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BOLLORÉ Breton
Bolloré derives from bod which means bush and lore which means laurel in Breton
BONAR Irish
A "translation" of Irish Gaelic Ó Cnáimhsighe "descendant of Cnáimhseach", a nickname meaning literally "midwife" and ostensibly a derivative of Gaelic cnámh "bone".
BONNAR Irish, Gaelic
Translation of the Gaelic "O'Cnaimhsighe", descendant of Cnaimhseach, a byname meaning "Midwife
BOSSER Breton
Bosser means butcher in Breton.
BOWDEN Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOWE Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWIE Scottish Gaelic
Scots Gaelic Bhuidhe or Buidhe meaning "golden yellow". Name was originally Mac Gille Bhuid, meaning "son of the yellow-haired lad". It was shortened to MacilBuie and MacilBowie in the 1600's, and further shortened in the 1700's to Buie and anglicised to Bowie by English speaking census takers and record keepers on the Scottish mainland.
BRACKEN Irish
From Irish Ó Breacáin meaning "descendant of Breacán", a personal name from a diminutive of breac 'speckled', 'spotted', which was borne by a 6th-century saint who lived at Ballyconnel, County Cavan, and was famous as a healer; St... [more]
BRAGG English, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRAIN Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
BRANNAN Irish
Variant of BRENNAN.
BRANNOCK Irish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
BRAZIL English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREAN Irish
Variant of BREEN or BRAIN.
BREEZE Welsh
Derived from the surname BREESE, which came from the surname REES.
BRESLIN Irish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see BRAZIL).
BRIAN Irish, English, French
1) Variant spelling of BRYAN. ... [more]
BRICK Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of BROC’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRIDE Irish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MACBRIDE, from the root for BRIGID.
BRODERICK Irish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of RHYDDERCH". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROPHY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bróithe ‘descendant of Bróth’, a personal name or byname of unknown origin. Also Anglicized as Broy.
BROWNLEE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BURK English, Irish
Variant of BURKE
BURNEY English, Irish
Form of the French place name of 'Bernay' or adapted from the personal name BJORN, ultimately meaning "bear".
BWYE Welsh (Rare)
many of this name moved from south wales to india to work for the east india company around 1900's then came back to wales.
BYCHAN Welsh
Proper, unanglicized form of VAUGHAN.
BYNES Irish
This is the surname of American actress Amanda Bynes (born April 3, 1986).
CADDICK Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadog, a pet-form of CADFAEL (a derivative of Welsh cad "battle").
CADOGAN Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadwgan, literally probably "battle-scowler". Cadogan Estate is an area of Chelsea and Belgravia, including Cadogan Square, Sloane Street and Sloane Square, owned by the earls of Cadogan, descended from Charles Sloane Cadogan (1728-1807), 1st Earl Cadogan.
CAGNEY Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Caingnigh meaning "descendant of Caingneach", a given name meaning "pleader, advocate". A famous bearer was American actor and dancer James Cagney (1899-1986).
CAHILL Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of CATHAL’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
CALE Welsh
Possibly derived from the River Cale. A famous barer of this name is Welsh musician John Cale (1942- ).
CALKIN Irish
Variant of CULKIN.
CALLIGAN Irish (Rare)
Before Irish names were translated into English, Calligan had a Gaelic form of O Ceallachain, possibly from "ceallach", which means "strife".... [more]
CALVEY Irish
Variation of McKelvey. Meaning rich in possessions or Irish from the French word bald
CAMMON Scottish, Irish
Reduced form of MCCAMMON.
CANAVAN Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ceanndubháin "descendant of Ceanndubhán", a byname meaning "little black-headed one", from ceann "head" combined with dubh "black" and the diminutive suffix -án.
CANNELL Manx
Manx cognate of MCCONNELL or O'CONNELL.
CANNING English, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANTWELL Irish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CARLAN Irish
Anglicized form of Irish O'Carlain or O'Caireallain, from the Irish carla meaning a "wool-comb" and an meaning "one who" which roughly translates as "one who combs wool"... [more]
CARLIN Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin (sometimes also anglicized as CARLTON), meaning "descendant of Caireallán"... [more]
CARNAHAN Irish
From the Irish Cearnaghan, meaning "victorious"
CARNEY Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Catharnaigh "descendant of Catharnach", a byname meaning "warlike".
CARREY Irish
Variant spelling of CAREY. A famous bearer is Canadian-American actor Jim Carrey (1962-).
CARTAN Irish
Variant of MCCARTAN.
CARTEN Irish
Variant of MCCARTAN.
CARTIN Irish
Variant of MCCARTAN.
CARTON Irish
Variant of MCCARTAN.
CARVILLE French, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
CASEMENT Manx
Anglicized and reduced form of Manx Gaelic Mac Asmuint meaning "son of ÁSMUNDR". A notable bearer was Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), an Irish-born British consular official and rebel.
CASHION Irish
Anglicized form of either Mac Caisin or Ó Caisin meaning "descendant of Caisín" (see CASSIDY).
CASSEY Scottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
CAULFIELD Irish
Comes from the Irish Gaelic Mac Cathmhaoil, which was Anglicized to McCawell and then morphed into Caulfield. Mac Cathmhaoil comes from a word meaning "chieftan".
CAWTE Manx
Originates from a Manx nutcase.
CHALLONER French, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
CINNAMOND Scottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CLAINE Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Gille Eathain, a patronymic name meaning "son of the servant of Saint John."
CLAREY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó CLÉIRIGH and variant of O'CLERY and CLEARY.
CLARY Irish
Variant of CLEARY
CLELAND Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of MCCLELLAND. ... [more]
CLELLAND Scots, Irish
Scottish and Irish topographical name meaning "clay land".
CLOONEY English, Irish
From Gaelic Ó Cluanaigh meaning "descendant of Cluanach". Cluanach was a given name derived from Irish clauna "deceitful, flattering, rogue".
CLOYD Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of CLWYD.
CLWYD Welsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
COACH Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of MCCAIG.
COAKLEY Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COCHRANE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
CODEY Irish
Based off of the given name Cody
COFFEE Irish
Variant of COFFEY.
COFFEY Irish
Ireland County Cork
COILL Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COINEAGAN Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of CUNNINGHAM.
COLES English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of NICHOLAS.... [more]
COLTRANE Irish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coltaráin.
COMMONS Breton
It's generally believed this name comes from a Breton personal name, derived from element "cam," meaning "bent," or "crooked;" or from the herb "cummin" (cumin). Or from the place name Comines, in Flanders, Northern France.... [more]
CONAHAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó CONNACHAÍN (see CUNNINGHAM).
CONDON Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
CONE Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONKLIN Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish COUGHLIN.
CONLEY Irish
Variant of CONNOLLY.
CONLIN Irish
Variant of Conlon.
CONLON Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONRAN Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROY Irish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONWAY Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGAN Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLAN Irish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of COGHLAN.
COOLEY Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
CORBETT English, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORKERY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORLETT Manx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
CORNISH Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALL Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORR Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
CORRIN Manx, Scottish
First documented in 1290, sources suggest prototypes to be of Norse and/or Irish origins or a Manx contraction of Mac Oran from Mac Odhrain.
COSGROVE Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
COSSACK Irish
Variant of CUSACK
COSTELLO Irish, Italian
Costello (Irish: Mac Coisdealbha) is a common Irish surname originating in County Mayo. The surname derives from Jocelyn de Angulo (fl.1172), an Anglo-Norman knight.... [more]
COTTER Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oitir "son of Oitir", a personal name borrowed from Old Norse Óttarr, composed of the elements ótti "fear, dread" and herr "army".
COULLSON Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic MacCumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
COURT English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
COVEY Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see COFFEY).... [more]
COY Irish
Reduced form of MCCOY.
COYLE Irish
Irish reduced variant of MCCOOL.
CRAGG Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of CRAIG, from Middle English Crag.
CRANLEY Irish
The surname Cranley was first found in Ulster (Irish: Ulaidh), where they held a family seat but were also to be found in County Offaly and Galway. The sept is styled the Princes of Crich Cualgne and are descended from Cu-Ulladh, a Prince in 576.
CRAVEN Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
CRAWLEY English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare CROWLEY... [more]
CREEL Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
CROAN Irish
Variant of CROGHAN.
CROGHAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’... [more]
CROSSAN Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’... [more]
CROWLEY Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
CROY Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
CUADRO Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
CUDDIHY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH".
CULBERT Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULVÉRT French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMMING Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUNNIFF Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
CUNNINGHAM Irish
Surname adopted from Scottish by bearers of Gaelic Ó Cuinneagáin "descendant of Cuinneagán", a personal name from a double diminutive of the Old Irish personal name Conn meaning "leader, chief".
CURPHEY Manx
Sea warror from the Viking
CURRENT Irish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
CURRIE Scottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see CORRIE).... [more]
CURTIN Irish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see MCCURTAIN)... [more]
CUSACK Irish
An Irish family name of Norman origin, originally from Cussac in Guienne (Aquitaine), France. The surname died out in England, but is common in Ireland, where it was imported at the time of the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century.
DADE Irish
Anglicized form of MacDaibheid, meaning "son of David".
DADY Irish
Variant of DEADY.
DAILEY Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of DÁLACH".
DAILY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, meaning "descendent of DÁLACH". The name has strong roots in the county Cork.
DALAIS Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
DALE Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic DALL.
DALL Irish
Derived from Old Irish dall, a byname meaning "blind".
DANVERS Irish, English
For someone from Anvers, which is the French name of a port called Antwerp, located in what is now Belgium.
DARRAGH Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dhubhdarach, a personal name meaning "black one of the oak tree".
DARRAH Irish
Variant of DARRAGH.
DAVEY English, Welsh
Derived from the given name DAVID. Alternately, it may be a variant spelling of Welsh DAVIES or DAVIS, which could be patronymic forms of DAVID, or corrupted forms of Dyfed, an older Welsh surname and the name of a county in Wales.
DAW Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó DEAGHAIDH, ‘descendant of DEAGHADH’, a personal name of uncertain origin... [more]
DAWES Irish
The surname Dawes means ‘Irish Guard’
DAWLEY English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
DAYE Irish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
DAYS Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Dai, a pet form of Dafydd, with the redundant addition of the English patronymic suffix -s.
DEA Irish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
DEADY Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.
DEANE Irish
Surname found in Ireland, it is the name of one of the Tribes of Galway.
DE BRÚN Irish, French
Derived from Brun, meaning brown in French
DEE Welsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Chinese (Latinized)
Welsh: nickname for a swarthy person, from Welsh du ‘dark’, ‘black’. ... [more]
DEERE Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibhidhir (see DWYER).
DEERY Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daighre ‘descendant of Daighre’, a byname meaning ‘fiery’.
DEES Irish
The surname Dees refers to the grandson of Deaghadh (good luck); dweller near the Dee River; one with a dark or swarthy complexion. Also considered of Welsh origin.
DEMPSTER Manx, English, Scottish
The name for a judge or arbiter of minor disputes, from Old English dem(e)stre, a derivative of the verb demian ‘to judge or pronounce judgement’. Although this was originally a feminine form of the masculine demere, by the Middle English period the suffix -stre had lost its feminine force, and the term was used of both sexes... [more]
DENEEN Irish
Variant of Irish DINEEN.
DENNEHY Irish
Means Ireland and someone who likes Chinese food
DENNING Irish
Variant of DINEEN.
DERRY Irish, English
English variant of DEARY, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree... [more]
DEVANEY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibheannaigh ‘descendant of Duibheannach’, a personal name of uncertain origin; the first element is dubh ‘black’, the second may be eanach ‘marshy place’... [more]
DEVANNEY Irish
Irish: variant of DEVANEY.
DEVILLY Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
One of the anglicized versions of Ó Duibhghiolla, and Ancient Irish name meaning "Of the Black Attendant"
DEVITT Irish
Comes from MCDEVITT, means "son of DAVID."
DEVON Irish
Variant of DEVIN.
DIAMOND Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Diamáin "descendant of Diamán", earlier Díomá or Déamán, a diminutive of Díoma, itself a pet form of DIARMAID.
DILLION Irish, English
Possibly a variant of DILLON.
DILLON Irish
Dillon is a surname of Irish origin but with Breton-Norman roots. It is first recorded in Ireland with the arrival of Sir Henry de Leon (c.1176 – 1244), of a cadet branch of Viscounty of Léon, Brittany... [more]
DIMOND English, Irish
English and Irish variant of DIAMOND.
DINEEN Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duinnín which meant "descendant of Duinnín". The byname Duinnín was derived from a diminutive of Gaelic donn meaning "brown" (i.e. "brown-haired man") or "chieftain".
DISKIN Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Díscín "descendant of Díscín", which may be derived from díosc "barren". The place name Ballyeeskeen, now Ballydiscin, in County Sligo, is derived from the surname.
DOANE Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó DUBHÁIN ‘descendant of Dubhán’, meaning ‘the little black one’, a common name in the 16th century in southern Ireland, or Ó DAMHÁIN ‘descendant of Damhán’ meaning ‘fawn’, ‘little stag’, a rare Ulster name... [more]
DOLE English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
DOLPHIN English, Irish
Derived from the Old Norse personal name DÓLGFINNR.
DONAGHY Irish
Irish: variant of DONAHUE.
DONAVAN Irish
Meaning unknown. Possibly transferred use or Irish word for DON or Donald.
DONEGAN Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Donnagáin. Diminutive of "donn" which means "brown," referring to hair color.
DONN Scottish, Irish
Variant of DONNE.
DONNELLAN Irish
From the Gaelic Domhnallain, a diminutive of Donnell/Domhnall meaning "world mighty" (Irish form of the Scottish Donald).
DONNRIN Irish
Irish origin derived from Donn. ... [more]
DONOUGH Irish
From the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha meaning "the descendent of DONNCHADH" (cf. DONOGHUE).
DOW Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOWDALL Irish
Of English origin
DOWELL English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic name Dubhgall, composed of the elements dubh meaning "black" and gall, "stranger". This was used as a byname for Scandinavians, in particular to distinguish the dark-haired Danes from fair-haired Norwegians.
DOWNEY Irish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
DRENNAN Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
From Gaelic Ó Draighneáin meaning "descendant of Draighneán", a byname meaning "blackthorn".
DRUIMEANACH Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of DRUMMOND.
DRURY English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DUBHAGÁINN Irish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
DUCK English, Irish
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUGGAN Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of DUGAN. ... [more]
DULANEY Irish
Variant of Delaney.
DUNNE Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
DURKIN Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Mac Duarcáin meaning "son of Duarcán".
DWIGGINS Irish
Anglicized form (with English genitive -s) of Gaelic Ó Dubhagáin (see Dugan) or, more likely, of Ó Duibhginn (see Deegan).Possibly a variant (by misdivision) of English WIGGINS.
DYE English, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name DENNIS. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
EARLY Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó MOCHÁIN (see MOHAN; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EDEVANE Welsh, Cornish
A rare Welsh surname, believed to be of Cornish origin. This surname is made up of two elements. ‘Ed’ is not a shortened form of Edward, but derives from the ancient (Old English?) ‘ead’ meaning ‘prosperity’ and/or ‘happiness’... [more]
EDMUNDS English, Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Edmund (see Edmond).
EGAN Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAodhagáin (see HAGAN).
ELIAS Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name ELIAS. Compare ELLIS.
EMORY English, Irish
English variant spelling of EMERY.
Apply this search to the main name collection