Celtic Submitted Surnames

These names are used by Celtic peoples.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ADAIRCeltic
Mostly Scottish surname meaning "at the oak ford".
AHEARNAIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
ALAN CROMScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
AM MAGH FADAScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous former burgh.
ANDERSONScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Ghille Andrais meaning 'Son of the devotee of St. Andrew'. ... [more]
ANNAEnglish, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name ANNA.
ÀNSRUTHAIRScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous town.
ARDIESIrish
Irish Isle Of Ards
ARGYLEScottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
ARGYLLScottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
BACLANCeltic (Rare)
Form of the surname Backlund
BAILE PHÙIRScottish Gaelic
Proper, non-Anglicized form of Balfour.
BAINEBRIDGEEnglish, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BARONIrish
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Bearáin (see Barnes).
BARRINGTONEnglish, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
BEACOMIrish
Northern Irish variant of Beauchamp.
BEDDOEWelsh
Variant of Beddow.
BEDDOWWelsh
From the personal name Bedo, a pet form of Meredydd (see Meredith).
BETHELEnglish, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of ITHEL".
BIDDLEEnglish, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIHANBreton
Bihan means small in Breton.
BLACKERBYEnglish, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLAINScottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLANEYIrish
Topographic name from Welsh blaenau, plural of blaen "point, tip, end", i.e. uplands, or remote region, or upper reaches of a river.
BLEDIGWelsh
"like a wolf"
BLINWelsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
BLOODWelsh
Anglicized form of Welsh ap Llwyd ‘son of Llwyd’.
BODENIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOHANNONIrish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadhachanáin, a double diminutive of buadhach ‘victorious’
BOITEUXFrench, Breton
From a Breton nickname meaning "lame".
BOLLARDEnglish, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BOLLORÉBreton
Bolloré derives from bod which means bush and lore which means laurel in Breton
BONARIrish
A "translation" of Irish Gaelic Ó Cnáimhsighe "descendant of Cnáimhseach", a nickname meaning literally "midwife" and ostensibly a derivative of Gaelic cnámh "bone".
BOSSERBreton
Bosser means butcher in Breton.
BOWDENIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOWEMedieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWIEScottish Gaelic
Scots Gaelic Bhuidhe or Buidhe meaning "golden yellow". Name was originally Mac Gille Bhuid, meaning "son of the yellow-haired lad". It was shortened to MacilBuie and MacilBowie in the 1600's, and further shortened in the 1700's to Buie and anglicised to Bowie by English speaking census takers and record keepers on the Scottish mainland.
BRACKENIrish
From Irish Ó Breacáin meaning "descendant of Breacán", a personal name from a diminutive of breac 'speckled', 'spotted', which was borne by a 6th-century saint who lived at Ballyconnel, County Cavan, and was famous as a healer; St... [more]
BRAGGEnglish, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRAINScottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
BRANNOCKIrish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
BRAZILEnglish (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREANIrish
Variant of Breen or Brain.
BREEZEWelsh
Derived from the surname Breese, which came from the surname Rees.
BRESLINIrish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see Brazil).
BRICKIrish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRIDEIrish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRINGHENTTIBreton
Not sure about the origin, but after researches, roughly could say it's from "Breton" origins. Mostly used in north/northwest of Italy (Genova, Mantova and surroundings.
BRODERICKIrish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROPHYIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bróithe ‘descendant of Bróth’, a personal name or byname of unknown origin. Also Anglicized as Broy.
BROWNLEEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BWYEWelsh (Rare)
many of this name moved from south wales to india to work for the east india company around 1900's then came back to wales.
BYCHANWelsh
Proper, unanglicized form of Vaughan.
BYNESIrish
This is the surname of American actress Amanda Bynes (born April 3, 1986).
CADDICKWelsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadog, a pet-form of Cadfael (a derivative of Welsh cad "battle").
CADOGANWelsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadwgan, literally probably "battle-scowler". Cadogan Estate is an area of Chelsea and Belgravia, including Cadogan Square, Sloane Street and Sloane Square, owned by the earls of Cadogan, descended from Charles Sloane Cadogan (1728-1807), 1st Earl Cadogan.
CAHILLIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of Cathal’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
CALEWelsh
Possibly derived from the River Cale. A famous barer of this name is Welsh musician John Cale (1942- ).
CALKINIrish
Variant of Culkin.
CALVEYIrish
Variation of McKelvey. Meaning rich in possessions or Irish from the French word bald
CAMMONScottish, Irish
Reduced form of McCammon.
CANAVANIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ceanndubháin "descendant of Ceanndubhán", a byname meaning "little black-headed one", from ceann "head" combined with dubh "black" and the diminutive suffix -án.
CANNINGEnglish, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANTWELLIrish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CARLINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish, French, Swedish, Italian, Jewish (Anglicized), German
Irish (now also common in Scotland) anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin, an Ulster family name, also sometimes Anglicized as Carlton, meaning ‘descendant of Caireallán’, a diminutive of the personal name Caireall... [more]
CARNAHANIrish
From the Irish Cearnaghan, meaning "victorious"
CARNEYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Catharnaigh "descendant of Catharnach", a byname meaning "warlike".
CARVILLEFrench, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
CASEMENTManx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Asmuint "son of Ásmundr", an Old Norse male personal name meaning literally "god-protection". The surname was borne by Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), an Irish-born British consular official and rebel.
CASHIONIrish
Anglicized form of either Mac Caisin or Ó Caisin meaning "descendant of Caisín" (see Cassidy).
CASSEYScottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
CAULFIELDIrish
Comes from the Irish Gaelic Mac Cathmhaoil, which was Anglicized to McCawell and then morphed into Caulfield. Mac Cathmhaoil comes from a word meaning "chieftan".
CAWTEManx
Originates from a Manx nutcase.
CHALLONERFrench, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
CHARLESFrench, Welsh, English
Derived from the given name Charles.
CINNAMONDScottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CLAREYIrish
Anglicized form of Ó Cléirigh and variant of O'Clery and Cleary.
CLARYIrish
Variant of CLEARY
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
CLOYDWelsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Clwyd.
CLWYDWelsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
COAKLEYIrish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COCHRANEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
CODEYIrish
Based off of the given name Cody
COFFEEIrish
Variant of Coffey.
COFFEYIrish
Ireland County Cork
COILLIrish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COLESEnglish, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
CONAHANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham).
CONDONIrish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton. This seems to have been imported from Wales, but probably derives ultimately from Caunton in Nottinghamshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Caluno{dh} (composed of the elements calu "bald" + no{dh} "daring") + Old English tun "enclosure", "settlement".
CONEIrish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONKLINIrish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
CONLONIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONRANIrish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROYIrish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONWAYWelsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGANIrish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLANIrish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of Coghlan.
COOLEYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
CORBETTEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORKERYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORLETTManx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
CORNISHCeltic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALLCeltic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORRIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
COSGROVEIrish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
COSTELLOIrish, Italian
Costello (Irish: Mac Coisdealbha) is a common Irish surname originating in County Mayo. The surname derives from Jocelyn de Angulo (fl.1172), an Anglo-Norman knight.... [more]
COVEYIrish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
COYIrish
Reduced form of McCoy.
COYLEIrish
Irish reduced variant of McCool.
CRAGGScottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
CRAVENIrish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
CRAWLEYEnglish, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley. ... [more]
CREELScottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
CROANIrish
Variant of Croghan.
CROGHANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’. Croghan in county Roscommon was the ancient royal site of the province of Connacht.
CROSSANIrish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’. Sometimes translated as 'bard' or 'storyteller.'
CROWLEYIrish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
CROYIrish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
CRUMPEnglish, Welsh, Anglo-Norman
"Crooked or deformed person" in Old English. An ancient Worcestershire surname.
CUADROCeltic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
CULBERTAnglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULVÉRTFrench, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMMINGIrish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUNNIFFIrish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
CUNNINGHAMIrish
Surname adopted from Scottish by bearers of Gaelic Ó Cuinneagáin "descendant of Cuinneagán", a personal name from a double diminutive of the Old Irish personal name Conn meaning "leader, chief".
CURPHEYManx
Sea warror from the Viking
CURRENTIrish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
CURRIEScottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
CURTINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see McCurtain). ... [more]
DADEIrish
Anglicized form of MacDaibheid, meaning "son of David".
DADYIrish
Variant of Deady.
DAILEYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of DÁLACH".
DAILYIrish
Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, meaning "descendent of DÁLACH". The name has strong roots in the county Cork.
DALAISScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
DALEIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic DALL.
DALLIrish
Derived from Old Irish dall, a byname meaning "blind".
DARRAGHIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dhubhdarach, a personal name meaning "black one of the oak tree".
DARRAHIrish
Variant of DARRAGH.
DAVINEIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Duibhín meaning "descendant of Duibhín" (Duibhín meaning "little black one") or Ó Daimhín meaning "descendant of Daimhín" (Daimhín: "fawn").
DAWIrish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin. It may be composed of the elements deagh- ‘good’ + ádh ‘luck’, ‘fate’; some such association seems to lie behind its Anglicization as Goodwin.
DAWLEYAnglo-French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
DAYEIrish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
DAYSWelsh
Patronymic from the personal name Dai, a pet form of Dafydd, with the redundant addition of the English patronymic suffix -s.
DEAIrish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
DEADYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.
DEANEIrish
Surname found in Ireland, it is the name of one of the Tribes of Galway.
DEEWelsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Chinese (Latinized)
Welsh: nickname for a swarthy person, from Welsh du ‘dark’, ‘black’. ... [more]
DEERYIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daighre ‘descendant of Daighre’, a byname meaning ‘fiery’.
DEESIrish
The surname Dees refers to the grandson of Deaghadh (good luck); dweller near the Dee River; one with a dark or swarthy complexion. Also considered of Welsh origin.
DENEENIrish
Variant of Irish Dineen.
DERRYIrish, English
English variant of Deary, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree. ... [more]
DEVANEYIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibheannaigh ‘descendant of Duibheannach’, a personal name of uncertain origin; the first element is dubh ‘black’, the second may be eanach ‘marshy place’... [more]
DEVANNEYIrish
Irish: variant of Devaney.
DEVILLYIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
One of the anglicized versions of Ó Duibhghiolla, and Ancient Irish name meaning "Of the Black Attendant"
DEVITTIrish
Comes from McDevitt, means "son of David."
DEVONIrish
Variant of DEVIN.
DIAMONDIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Diamáin "descendant of Diamán", earlier Díomá or Déamán, a diminutive of Díoma, itself a pet form of DIARMAID.
DILLIONIrish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
DILLONIrish
Comes from the Irish origin
DIMONDEnglish, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
DINEENIrish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duinnín ‘descendant of Duinnín’, a byname from a diminutive of donn ‘brown-haired man’ or ‘chieftain’.
DISKINIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Díscín "descendant of Díscín", which may be derived from díosc "barren". The place name Ballyeeskeen, now Ballydiscin, in County Sligo, is derived from the surname.
DOANEIrish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dubháin ‘descendant of Dubhán’, meaning ‘the little black one’, a common name in the 16th century in southern Ireland, or Ó Damháin ‘descendant of Damhán’ meaning ‘fawn’, ‘little stag’, a rare Ulster name... [more]
DOLEEnglish, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
DONAGHYIrish
Irish: variant of Donahue.
DONAVANIrish
Meaning unknown. Possibly transferred use or Irish word for Don or Donald.
DONNELLANIrish
From the Gaelic Domhnallain, a diminutive of Donnell/Domhnall meaning "world mighty" (Irish form of the Scottish Donald).
DONOUGHIrish
From the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha meaning "the descendent of DONNCHADH" (cf. DONOGHUE).
DOWScottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOWDALLIrish
Of English origin
DOWNEYIrish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
DRUIMEANACHScottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Drummond.
DRURYEnglish, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DUBHAGÁINNIrish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
DUCKEnglish, Irish
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUGGANScottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DUNNEIrish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
DURKINIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Mac Duarcáin meaning "son of Duarcán".
DWIGGINSIrish
Anglicized form (with English genitive -s) of Gaelic Ó Dubhagáin (see Dugan) or, more likely, of Ó Duibhginn (see Deegan).Possibly a variant (by misdivision) of English Wiggins.
DYEEnglish, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name Dennis. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
EARLYIrish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EDEVANEWelsh, Cornish
A rare Welsh surname, believed to be of Cornish origin. This surname is made up of two elements. ‘Ed’ is not a shortened form of Edward, but derives from the ancient (Old English?) ‘ead’ meaning ‘prosperity’ and/or ‘happiness’... [more]
EDMUNDSEnglish, Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Edmund (see Edmond).
EGANIrish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAodhagáin (see Hagan).
EMORYEnglish, Irish
English variant spelling of Emery.
ENISIrish
Variant of Ennis
ENRIGHTIrish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Indreachtach, literally "attacker". The surname was borne by British poet D.J. Enright (1920-2002).
ESAUWelsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
ESTESWelsh, Spanish, English
a popular surname derived from the House of Este. It is also said to derive from Old English and have the meaning "of the East." As a surname, it has been traced to southern England in the region of Kent, as early as the mid-16th century.
FAGANIrish
From a surname, "The name Fagan in Ireland is usually of Norman origin, especially in Counties Dublin and Meath. In the County Louth area the name is derived from the native Gaelic O'Faodhagain Sept of which there are a number of variants including Feighan, Fegan and Feehan." (from irishsurnames.com)
FAHEYIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fathaidh or Ó Fathaigh ‘descendant of Fathadh’, a personal name derived from fothadh ‘base’, ‘foundation’. This name is sometimes Anglicized as Green(e as a result of erroneous association with faithche ‘lawn’.
FAHYIrish
Variant of Fahey.
FAIREnglish, Irish
English: nickname meaning ‘handsome’, ‘beautiful’, ‘fair’, from Middle English fair, fayr, Old English fæger. The word was also occasionally used as a personal name in Middle English, applied to both men and women.... [more]
FALLONIrish
Anglicized form of the surname Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan", the name being a byname meaning "leader" (derived from follamhnas meaning "supremacy").
FANJOYCeltic
Such As Dales, Danes Of Ireland, From A House And Line Of What Would Be Called, Mythical.... [more]
FANNINGIrish
The roots of the name are unclear. It seems the name is Native Irish Gaelic. It is thought to be derived from the Gaelic name Ó Fionnáin which means "fair".
FARADAYIrish
From Irish Gaelic Ó Fearadaigh "descendant of Fearadach", a personal name probably based on fear "man", perhaps meaning literally "man of the wood". A famous bearer was British chemist and physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867).
FARLEYIrish
anglicized form of the Gaelic surname O'Faircheallaigh.
FARLINGIrish
Perhaps a variant of Scottish and northern Irish Farland.
FARMERIrish
Anglicized (part translated) form of Gaelic Mac an Scolóige "son of the husbandman", a rare surname of northern and western Ireland.
FARNANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish shortened Anglicization of Gaelic Ó Farannáin ‘descendant of Forannán’, a personal name possibly based on forrán ‘attack’. The family bearing this name was connected with the church of Ardstraw in Ulster.
FARRAGUTBreton, French, Catalan, American
A Breton-French surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was American naval flag officer David Farragut (1801-1870), who is known for serving during the American Civil War. His father was of Catalan ancestry... [more]
FEEIrish
Variant of O'FEE.
FENNESSEYIrish
An ancient Irish name. Presumed to come from the name Fionnghusa, or sometimes O'Fionnghusa.... [more]
FERREIRECeltic
It means smith. In the Gaelic languaje is gofaint or ngfaint.
FERREIRICeltic (Latinized, Archaic)
Ferreiri or Ferreiro is a Galician surname in the north of Spain. It's a last name belonging to ancient Celtic tribes.
FERRELLIrish
Irish variant of Farrell.
FIELDEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Jewish (Anglicized)
English: topographic name for someone who lived on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into cultivation, from Old English feld ‘pasture’, ‘open country’, as opposed on the one hand to æcer ‘cultivated soil’, ‘enclosed land’ (see Acker) and on the other to weald ‘wooded land’, ‘forest’ (see Wald)... [more]
FINANIrish
Means "descendant of FIONNÁN", anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fionnáin.
FINNIGANIrish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
FIRTHEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
FITZGIBBONIrish
Means "son of Gibbon" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZHENRYIrish
Irish Hiberno-Norman surname, meaning "son of Henry".
FITZWILLIAMIrish
Fitz appears to be a Norman term derived from the French word fils and the Latin word filius, each of which means son. The name is most common in England and Ireland, each of which was conquered by Normans between 1066-1167.
FLAHERTYIrish (Anglicized)
Irish (Connacht) reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Flaithbheartaigh ‘descendant of Flaithbheartach’, a byname meaning ‘generous’, ‘hospitable’ (from flaith(eamh) ‘prince’, ‘ruler’ + beartach ‘acting’, ‘behaving’).
FLANNERYIrish
Appears originally in Irish Gaelic as O Flannabhra derived from flann, meaning "red", and abhra, meaning "eyebrow". First appeared in County Tipperary, Ireland.
FLOODIrish
There are some English Flood's, but the name mainly derives from the Irish O'Taicligh or Mac an Tuile and was Anglicized to Flood, Floyd, and Tully when the Gaelic language was outlawed in Ireland by the English.
FLOWERWelsh
Anglicized form of the Welsh personal name Llywarch, of unexplained origin.
FLUELLENWelsh
Anglicized form of Welsh Llewellyn.
FOGARTYIrish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fógartaigh ‘son of Fógartach’, a personal name from fógartha meaning "proclaimed", "banished", "outlawed". It is sometimes Anglicized as Howard.
FOLEYIrish
As a northern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic personal name Searrach, which was based on searrach "foal, colt" and anglicized as Foley because of its phonetic similarity to English foal.
FOODYIrish
Anglicized version of ó Fuada, or 'descendent of Fuada'. It comes from the personal name 'fuad' or 'swift' but also 'rush' and 'speed'.
FORBESIrish, Scottish
Comes from a Scottish place meaning "field" in Gaelic. It can also be used as a first name.... [more]
FORDEEnglish, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
FORSYTHEScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic personal name Fearsithe, composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + sith ‘peace’. Some early forms with prepositions, as for example William de Fersith (Edinburgh 1365), seem to point to an alternative origin as a habitational name, but no place name of suitable form is known... [more]
FOYIrish (Anglicized)
A different form of Fahy (from Irish Gaelic Ó Fathaigh "descendant of Fathach", a personal name probably based on Gaelic fothadh "foundation").
FOYIrish
Variant of FEE.
FROSTWelsh
Originally spelled Ffrost (the double ff is a Welsh letter). The Welsh word ffrost refered to someone who is excessively bold or a brag, especially with regard to warrior feats. Edmund Ffrost signed his name this way on the ship's register of the boat which brought him to the Massachussett's Bay Colony in 1631... [more]
FURLONGEnglish, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
GADDWelsh
Means "battlefield" in Welsh. Comes from the Welsh word gad which means battlefield.
GAINESEnglish, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
GALBRAITHScottish, Scottish Gaelic
Ethnic name for someone descended from a tribe of Britons living in Scotland, from Gaelic gall ‘stranger’ + Breathnach ‘Briton’ (i.e. ‘British foreigner’). These were either survivors of the British peoples who lived in Scotland before the Gaelic invasions from Ireland in the 5th century (in particular the Welsh-speaking Strathclyde Britons, who survived as a distinctive ethnic group until about the 14th century), or others who had perhaps migrated northwestwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasions.
GALLScottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
GALVANIrish
Variant form of O'Galvin (see also Galvin).
GALVINIrish
Variant form of O'Galvin.
GAMONIrish
This name is a last name for the Irish it means Liam Gamon.
GANNONIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mag Fhionnáin, a patronymic from the personal name Fionnán. This name, from a diminutive of fionn ‘white’, ‘fair’, was borne by several early Irish saints.
GARRIGHANIrish
to denote 'son of Geargain' a name which originally in derived from 'gearg' which meant grouse but which was often used figuratively for warrior
GAULScottish (Latinized, Rare), Irish, German
Scottish and Irish: variant of Gall ... [more]
GEDDESScottish, Irish
There is a place of this name in Nairn, but the name is more likely to be a patronymic from Geddie.
GEEIrish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GEESONIrish
This unusual name is the patronymic form of the surname Gee, and means "son of Gee", from the male given name which was a short form of male personal names such as "Geoffrey", "George" and "Gerard"... [more]
GERRITYIrish
the son of Oireachtach (member of an assembly).
GETTYIrish
Meaning: Hill, valley.... [more]
GILLESPIEScottish, Irish
Gillespie can be of Scottish and Irish origin. The literal meaning is "servant of bishop", but it is a forename rather than a status name. The Irish Gillespies, originally MacGiollaEaspuig, are said to to be called after one Easpog Eoghan, or Bishop Owen, of Ardstraw, County Tyrone... [more]
GILMOREEnglish, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
GILPINEnglish, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]