Celtic Submitted Surnames

These names are used by Celtic peoples.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Creevey Celtic
Variant of Creevy.... [more]
Crellin Manx
Manx: shortened form of Gaelic Mac Nialláin ‘son of Niallán’ a diminutive of the personal name Níall. This name has been explained as a metathesized form of Crennall
Cremins Irish
An Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic Ó Cruimín
Crennall Manx
Contracted form of "Mac Raghnaill" meaning "son of Raghnall
Croan Irish
Variant of Croghan.
Croghan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’... [more]
Cronine Irish
Variant of Cronin
Crossan Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’... [more]
Crowley Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
Croy Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
Cuadro Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
Cubbon Manx
Manx contracted form of the Irish Gaeilge "Mac Ghiobúin". See also McCubbon
Cuddihy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of Cuidightheach".
Culbert Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
Culkin Irish
Reduced anglicization of Irish Gaelic Mac Uilcín meaning "descendant of Uilcín", a diminutive of Ulick, itself an Irish diminutive of William... [more]
Cullin Irish
Variant of Cullen 2.
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Cumming Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
Cunniff Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
Curnow Cornish
Ethnic name for someone from Cornwall.
Curphey Manx
Shortened Anglicization of Manx Mac Murchadha "son of Murchad".
Current Irish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
Currie Scottish, Irish, English
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
Curtin Irish (Anglicized)
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín, meaning "son of Cruitín", a byname for a hunchback.
Cusack Irish
An Irish family name of Norman origin, originally from Cussac in Guienne (Aquitaine), France. The surname died out in England, but is common in Ireland, where it was imported at the time of the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century.
Dade Irish
Anglicized form of MacDaibheid, meaning "son of David".
Dady Irish
Variant of Deady.
Daffy Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Deabhthaigh. The modern spelling form is also Ó Deafaigh.
Dailey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of DÁLACH".
Daily Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, meaning "descendent of DÁLACH". The name has strong roots in the county Cork.
Dalais Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
Dale Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dall.
Dall Irish
Derived from Old Irish dall, a byname meaning "blind".
Danvers Irish, English
For someone from Anvers, which is the French name of a port called Antwerp, located in what is now Belgium.
Darragh Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dhubhdarach, a personal name meaning "black one of the oak tree".
Darrah Irish
Variant of Darragh.
Davey English, Welsh
Derived from the given name David. Alternately, it may be a variant spelling of Welsh Davies or Davis, which could be patronymic forms of David, or corrupted forms of Dyfed, an older Welsh surname and the name of a county in Wales.
Davine Irish
Variant of Devin 1.
Davoran Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Dabhoireann
Daw Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin... [more]
Dawes Irish
The surname Dawes means ‘Irish Guard’
Dawkins English, Welsh
A derivitive of the Hebrew name David which translates to “beloved”. (see Daw)
Dawley English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
Daye Irish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
Days Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Dai, a pet form of Dafydd, with the redundant addition of the English patronymic suffix -s.
Dea Irish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
Deady Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.
De Brún Irish, French
Derived from Brun, meaning brown in French
Deegidan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Duibhgeadáin.
Deere Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibhidhir (see Dwyer).
Deery Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daighre ‘descendant of Daighre’, a byname meaning ‘fiery’.
Dees Irish
The surname Dees refers to the grandson of Deaghadh (good luck); dweller near the Dee River; one with a dark or swarthy complexion. Also considered of Welsh origin.
Dempster Manx, English, Scottish
The name for a judge or arbiter of minor disputes, from Old English dem(e)stre, a derivative of the verb demian ‘to judge or pronounce judgement’. Although this was originally a feminine form of the masculine demere, by the Middle English period the suffix -stre had lost its feminine force, and the term was used of both sexes... [more]
Demsey Irish
Variant of Dempsey
Deneen Irish
Variant of Irish Dineen.
Dennehy Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Duineachdha meaning "descendant of Duineachaidh", a given name meaning "humane". A famous bearer was American actor Brian Dennehy (1938-2020).
Denning Irish
Variant of Dineen.
Dennings English, Irish, German
Variant spelling of Denning. A famous bearer is American actress Kat Dennings (1986-).
Derry Irish, English
English variant of Deary, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree... [more]
Devaney Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibheannaigh ‘descendant of Duibheannach’, a personal name of uncertain origin; the first element is dubh ‘black’, the second may be eanach ‘marshy place’... [more]
Devanney Irish
Irish: variant of Devaney.
Devilly Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
One of the anglicized versions of Ó Duibhghiolla, and Ancient Irish name meaning "Of the Black Attendant"
Devitt Irish
Comes from McDevitt, means "son of David."
Devon Irish
Variant of DEVIN.
Diamond Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Diamáin "descendant of Diamán", earlier Díomá or Déamán, a diminutive of Díoma, itself a pet form of Diarmaid.
Dickey Irish
Northern Irish: from a pet form of the personal name Dick 1.
Dillion Irish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
Dillon Irish
Dillon is a surname of Irish origin but with Breton-Norman roots. It is first recorded in Ireland with the arrival of Sir Henry de Leon (c.1176 – 1244), of a cadet branch of Viscounty of Léon, Brittany... [more]
Dimond English, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
Dineen Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duinnín which meant "descendant of Duinnín". The byname Duinnín was derived from a diminutive of Gaelic donn meaning "brown" (i.e. "brown-haired man") or "chieftain".
Diskin Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Díscín "descendant of Díscín", which may be derived from díosc "barren". The place name Ballyeeskeen, now Ballydiscin, in County Sligo, is derived from the surname.
Doane Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dubháin ‘descendant of Dubhán’, meaning ‘the little black one’, a common name in the 16th century in southern Ireland, or Ó Damháin ‘descendant of Damhán’ meaning ‘fawn’, ‘little stag’, a rare Ulster name... [more]
Dole English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
Dollahan Irish
Variant of Hallahan, meaning "Descendent of Áilleacháin"
Dolphin English, Irish
Derived from the Old Norse personal name Dólgfinnr.
Donaghy Irish
Irish: variant of Donahue.
Donavan Irish
Meaning unknown. Possibly transferred use or Irish word for Don or Donald.
Donegan Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Donnagáin. Diminutive of "donn" which means "brown," referring to hair color.
Donel Irish
Variant of Donnel
Donell Irish
Variant of Donnell
Donn Scottish, Irish
Variant of Donne.
Donnel Irish
Variant of Donnell
Donnellan Irish
From the Gaelic Domhnallain, a diminutive of Donnell/Domhnall meaning "world mighty" (Irish form of the Scottish Donald).
Donnrin Irish
Irish origin derived from Donn. ... [more]
Donough Irish
From the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha meaning "the descendent of Donnchadh" (cf. Donoghue).
Dornan Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname Ó Dornáin
Dorney Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of O'Doirinne.
Doud English, Irish
Variant of Dowd.
Dow Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
Doward English, Welsh
Indicated that the bearer lived by two hills, from Old Welsh dou "two" and garth "hill"
Dowd Irish
From Irish Ó Dubhda meaning "descendant of Dubhda", where Dubhda is a byname derived from Irish dubh "black, black-haired".
Dowdall Irish
Of English origin
Dowell English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic name Dubhgall, composed of the elements dubh meaning "black" and gall, "stranger". This was used as a byname for Scandinavians, in particular to distinguish the dark-haired Danes from fair-haired Norwegians.
Downey Irish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
Doyne Irish
From the word donn meaning "brown".
Drach Irish
Variant of Drake.
Drennan Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
From Gaelic Ó Draighneáin meaning "descendant of Draighneán", a byname meaning "blackthorn".
Druimeanach Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Drummond.
Drury English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
Dubhagáinn Irish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
Duck English, Irish
English from Middle English doke "duck", hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck, or an occupational name for someone who kept or hunted ducks. Alternatively, a variant form of Duke... [more]
Duggan Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
Dulaney Irish
Variant of Delaney.
Dullea Irish
Variant of Dunleavy. A well-known bearer is American actor Keir Dullea (1936-).
Dunleavy Irish, English
Anglicized form of Mac Duinnshléibhe meaning "son of Donn Sléibhe".
Dunne Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
Dunwoody Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
It is said that the origin is pre 7th century Gaelic from ''dun'' or ''din'' meaning a wood or forest and ''gwydd'' which means much the same. Arguably the name means wood - wood, a result of language and dialect changing several times in the past 1500 years.
Durkin Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Mac Duarcáin meaning "son of Duarcán".
Durning Irish
First found in County Antrim, Ireland, Durning is possibly an Anglicized form of O'Duirnin. The name is derived from "dorn", which means "fist".
Dwiggins Irish
Anglicized form (with English genitive -s) of Gaelic Ó Dubhagáin (see Dugan) or, more likely, of Ó Duibhginn (see Deegan).Possibly a variant (by misdivision) of English Wiggins.
Dye English, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name Dennis. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
Earley German, Irish
The surname Earley originally derived from the Old English word Eorlic which referred to one who displayed manly characteristics.... [more]
Early Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
Edevane Welsh, Cornish
A rare Welsh surname, believed to be of Cornish origin. This surname is made up of two elements. ‘Ed’ is not a shortened form of Edward, but derives from the ancient (Old English?) ‘ead’ meaning ‘prosperity’ and/or ‘happiness’... [more]
Edmunds English, Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Edmund (see Edmond).
Egan Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAodhagáin (see Hagan).
Eilish Irish, English (American)
From the given name Eilish.
Elias Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name Elias. Compare Ellis.
Elwy Welsh
From the river Elwy in Wales, whose name likely derives from the Welsh elw "gain", "profit". Also sometimes used as a male first name in Wales.
Emanuel English, German, Welsh, Jewish, African
From the given name Emanuel.
Emory English, Irish
English variant spelling of Emery.
Enis Irish
Variant of Ennis
Enright Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Indreachtach, literally "attacker". The surname was borne by British poet D.J. Enright (1920-2002).
Enys Cornish (Rare), Celtic (Rare)
Enys is an ancient Celtic word meaning a circle, and island or a clearing in the forest, so it is possible that the first owners took their name from the land.
Erwin English, German, Irish, Scottish
From the given name Erwin. From the Middle English personal name Everwin Erwin perhaps from Old English Eoforwine (eofor "boar" and wine "friend") but mostly from an Old French form of the cognate ancient Germanic name Everwin or from a different ancient Germanic name Herewin with loss of initial H- (first element hari heri "army")... [more]
Esau Welsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
Estes Welsh, Spanish, English
a popular surname derived from the House of Este. It is also said to derive from Old English and have the meaning "of the East." As a surname, it has been traced to southern England in the region of Kent, as early as the mid-16th century.
Fadden Irish, Scottish
Shortened form of Mcfadden.
Fagan Irish
'The name Fagan in Ireland is usually of Norman origin, especially in Counties Dublin and Meath. In the County Louth area the name is derived from the native Gaelic O'Faodhagain Sept of which there are a number of variants including Feighan, Fegan and Feehan.' (from irishsurnames.com)
Fahey Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fathaidh or Ó Fathaigh meaning "descendant of Fathadh", a given name derived from the Gaelic word fothadh "base, foundation".... [more]
Fahy Irish
Variant of Fahey.
Fain French, English, Welsh
Deriving from the Latin fanum meaning "temple."
Fair English, Irish
English: nickname meaning ‘handsome’, ‘beautiful’, ‘fair’, from Middle English fair, fayr, Old English fæger. The word was also occasionally used as a personal name in Middle English, applied to both men and women.... [more]
Fallon Irish
Anglicized form of the surname Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan", the name being a byname meaning "leader" (derived from follamhnas meaning "supremacy").
Fanjoy Celtic
Such As Dales, Danes Of Ireland, From A House And Line Of What Would Be Called, Mythical.... [more]
Fanning Irish
The roots of the name are unclear. It seems the name is Native Irish Gaelic. It is thought to be derived from the Gaelic name Ó Fionnáin which means "fair".
Faraday Irish
From Irish Gaelic Ó Fearadaigh "descendant of Fearadach", a personal name probably based on fear "man", perhaps meaning literally "man of the wood". A famous bearer was British chemist and physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867).
Faragher Manx
Manx variant of Farquhar
Farey Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname Ó Faircheallaigh.
Faries Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic Faries (meaning: fair, beautiful, or handsome) is derived from ancient Scottish Dalriadan MacFergus clans of the mountainous west coast of Scotland... [more]
Farley Irish
anglicized form of the Gaelic surname O'Faircheallaigh.
Farling Irish
Perhaps a variant of Scottish and northern Irish Farland.
Farmer Irish
Anglicized (part translated) form of Gaelic Mac an Scolóige "son of the husbandman", a rare surname of northern and western Ireland.
Farnan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish shortened Anglicization of Gaelic Ó Farannáin ‘descendant of Forannán’, a personal name possibly based on forrán ‘attack’... [more]
Farragut Breton, French, Catalan, American
A Breton-French surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was American naval flag officer David Farragut (1801-1870), who is known for serving during the American Civil War. His father was of Catalan ancestry... [more]
Farrelly Irish
A variant of Irish surname Farrell
Fee Irish
Variant of O'fee.
Feehily Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac Fithcheallaigh.
Fenlon Irish
Gaelic: Derived from old Gaelic name O'Fionnalain,"Son of the Fair one". Found most commonly in Carlow and Wexford counties.
Fennessey Irish
An ancient Irish name. Presumed to come from the name Fionnghusa, or sometimes O'Fionnghusa.... [more]
Fergus English, Scottish, Irish
From the given name Fergus.
Ferreire Celtic
It means smith. In the Gaelic languaje is gofaint or ngfaint.
Ferreiri Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
Ferreiri or Ferreiro is a Galician surname in the north of Spain. It's a last name belonging to ancient Celtic tribes.
Ferrell Irish
Irish variant of Farrell.
Finan Irish
Means "descendant of Fionnán", anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fionnáin.
Finnan Irish
Variant of Finan.
Finnerty Irish
Reduced anglicisation of Irish Ó Fionnachta meaning "descendant of Fionnachta", a given name derived from fionn meaning "fair, white" and sneachta meaning "snow".
Finnigan Irish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
Firth English, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
Fitzclarence Irish
Means "son of Clarence" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzgerald Irish
Alternate capitalization of Fitzgerald
Fitzgibbon Irish
Means "son of Gibbon" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzharris Irish
Means "son of Harry" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzhenry Irish
Means "son of Henry" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzherbert Irish
Derives from Anglo-Norman French fi(t)z "son" and the personal name Herbert to mean "son of Herbert".
Fitzmaurice Irish
Means "son of Maurice" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzmorris Irish
Variant spelling of Fitzmaurice.
Fitzsimons Irish
Fitzsimons (also spelled FitzSimons, Fitzsimmons or FitzSimmons) is a surname of Norman origin common in both Ireland and England. The name is a variant of "Sigmundsson", meaning son of Sigmund. The Gaelicisation of this surname is Mac Shíomóin.
Fitzwilliams Irish
Means "son of William" in Anglo-Norman French.
Flaherty Irish (Anglicized)
Irish (Connacht) reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Flaithbheartaigh ‘descendant of Flaithbheartach’, a byname meaning ‘generous’, ‘hospitable’ (from flaith(eamh) ‘prince’, ‘ruler’ + beartach ‘acting’, ‘behaving’).
Flannery Irish
Appears originally in Irish Gaelic as O Flannabhra derived from flann, meaning "red", and abhra, meaning "eyebrow". First appeared in County Tipperary, Ireland.
Flewelling Welsh
Derived from the Welsh personal name Llewellyn, which was also spelled Llywelin
Fling Irish, English
Perhaps derived from Flynn.
Flood Irish
There are some English Flood's, but the name mainly derives from the Irish O'Taicligh or Mac an Tuile and was Anglicized to Flood, Floyd, and Tully when the Gaelic language was outlawed in Ireland by the English.
Flower Welsh
Anglicized form of the Welsh personal name Llywarch, of unexplained origin.
Fluellen Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh Llewellyn.
Flyn Irish
Variant of Flynn.
Fogarty Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fógartaigh ‘son of Fógartach’, a personal name from fógartha meaning "proclaimed", "banished", "outlawed". It is sometimes Anglicized as Howard.
Fogerty Irish (Anglicized)
Variant spelling of Fogarty.
Foley Irish
As a northern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic personal name Searrach, which was based on searrach "foal, colt" and anglicized as Foley because of its phonetic similarity to English foal.
Foody Irish
Anglicized version of ó Fuada, or 'descendent of Fuada'. It comes from the personal name 'fuad' or 'swift' but also 'rush' and 'speed'.
Forbes Irish, Scottish
Comes from a Scottish place meaning "field" in Gaelic. It can also be used as a first name.... [more]
Forde English, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
Foy Irish
Variant of Fee.
Foy Irish (Anglicized)
A different form of Fahy (from Irish Gaelic Ó Fathaigh "descendant of Fathach", a personal name probably based on Gaelic fothadh "foundation").
Frost Welsh
Originally spelled Ffrost (the double ff is a Welsh letter). The Welsh word ffrost refered to someone who is excessively bold or a brag, especially with regard to warrior feats. Edmund Ffrost signed his name this way on the ship's register of the boat which brought him to the Massachussett's Bay Colony in 1631... [more]
Furey Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Fiúra and Ó Fiodhabhra. Means "bushy eyebrows" derived from Irish fiodh "wood" and (f)abhra "eyebrow."
Furlong English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
Furlow English (British), Irish
the warrens came over to America on the Mayflower. they made settlements and went through the revolutionary war. the name changed to Baughman then Furlow. the furlows fought in the cival war and were slave owners... [more]
Gadd Welsh
Means "battlefield" in Welsh. Comes from the Welsh word gad which means battlefield.
Gaines English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
Galbraith Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Ethnic name for someone descended from a tribe of Britons living in Scotland, from Gaelic gall ‘stranger’ + Breathnach ‘Briton’ (i.e. ‘British foreigner’). These were either survivors of the British peoples who lived in Scotland before the Gaelic invasions from Ireland in the 5th century (in particular the Welsh-speaking Strathclyde Britons, who survived as a distinctive ethnic group until about the 14th century), or others who had perhaps migrated northwestwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasions.
Gall Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
Galligan Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gealagáin 'descendant of Gealagán' a personal name from a double diminutive of geal 'bright white'.
Gallogly Irish, Irish (Anglicized)
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac An Ghalloglaigh from galloglach "foreign warrior" or "galloglass". Galloglasses were a class of mercenary warriors retained by Irish chieftains... [more]
Galvan Irish
Variant form of O'Galvin (see also Galvin).
Gambon English, Irish
Derived from Anglo-Norman French gambon meaning "ham", itself derived from a Norman-Picard form of Old French jambe meaning "leg". A famous bearer is the Irish-English actor Sir Michael Gambon (1940-).
Gamon Irish
This name is a last name for the Irish it means Liam Gamon.
Gannon Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mag Fhionnáin, a patronymic from the personal name Fionnán... [more]
Garrighan Irish
to denote 'son of Geargain' a name which originally in derived from 'gearg' which meant grouse but which was often used figuratively for warrior
Gaul Scottish (Latinized, Rare), Irish, German
Scottish and Irish: variant of Gall ... [more]
Geddes Scottish, Irish
There is a place of this name in Nairn, but the name is more likely to be a patronymic from Geddie.
Gee Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
Geeson Irish
This unusual name is the patronymic form of the surname Gee, and means "son of Gee", from the male given name which was a short form of male personal names such as "Geoffrey", "George" and "Gerard"... [more]
Geohegan Irish
a patronymic from the personal name Eochagán
Gerahty Irish
Anglicised form of the Gaelic Mag Oireachtaigh, meaning "son of Oireachtach", which in turn means "member of the assembly".
Gerrity Irish
the son of Oireachtach (member of an assembly).
Getty Irish
Meaning: Hill, valley.... [more]
Gheen Irish
Anglicised form of Geoghegan.
Gibney Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname Ó Gibne.
Gibsey Irish
A variant of the surname Gibson.
Gibson Irish
Anglicized form of Irish-Gaelic Ó Gibealláin.
Gihon Irish
Anglicized form of Irish-Gaelic Ó Gaoithín
Gillan Irish
The Gillan surname is a reduced Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic Mac Gille Fhaoláin, which means "son of the servant of St Faolán." While the name may have originated in Ireland, this line was extant by the beginning of the 17th century, only to find many of the family to return to Ireland about 100 years later with the Plantation of Ulster.... [more]
Gillespie Scottish, Irish
Gillespie can be of Scottish and Irish origin. The literal meaning is "servant of bishop", but it is a forename rather than a status name. The Irish Gillespies, originally MacGiollaEaspuig, are said to to be called after one Easpog Eoghan, or Bishop Owen, of Ardstraw, County Tyrone... [more]
Gillicuddy Irish
Angliczed from the Irish surname Mac Giolla Chudha means 'descendant of sea warrior'.
Gilligan Irish
English translation of Gaelic name Mac Giollagain, derived from the word, giolla, meaning: lad.
Gillooly Irish
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ghuala "son of the gluttonous lad" from gola "gullet gut".
Gilmore English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
Gilpin English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
Gilroy Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish
"Red servant" in Gaelic.