English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
source
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Wodehouse English
The name "de Wodehouse" is attested as early as in the 11th century, of one Bertram, of Wodehouse-tower, Yorkshire, who lived at the time of the Norman conquest.... [more]
Wolfenden English
derived from the place called Wolfenden in the parish of Newchurch-in-Rossendale, Lancashire. The placename means "Wulfhelm's valley", or "the valley of Wulfhelm" derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name Wulfhelm, composed of the elements wulf "wolf" and helm "helmet, protection" and denu "valley".
Wolfit English
From the medieval male personal name Wolfet or Wolfat (from Old English Wulfgēat, literally "wolf-Geat" (the name of a Germanic people)). This surname was borne by Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), a British actor and manager.
Wolfram English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
Wolfson English
Means "son of Wolf" in English.
Wolsey English
From the medieval male personal name Wulsi (from Old English Wulfsige, literally "wolf-victory"). A famous bearer of the surname was English churchman and statesman Thomas Wolsey (Cardinal Wolsey), ?1475-1530.
Wolstenholme English (British, Rare)
A famous bearer is Chris Wolstenholme, bassist and sometimes vocalist of British alternative rock band Muse.
Wolston English
From the Middle English personal name Wolfstan or Wolstan, Old English Wulfstan, composed of the elements wulf ‘wolf’ + stan stone or a habitational name from any of a large number of places called Woolston(e) or Wollston, all of which are named with Old English personal names containing the first element Wulf (Wulfheah, Wulfhelm, Wulfric, Wulfsige, and Wulfweard) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Wolveridge English (British)
Derived from the personal name Wulfric.
Woodbine English (Rare)
From the English word "woodbine" that means "honeysuckle(plant)"in English.It seems uncommon in the English-speak culture for a surname.Also some American place names,too.
Woodbridge English
Originated in old England and likely linked to the town of Woodbridge in Suffolk, East Anglia, United Kingdom. Well known Woodbridge's include the Australian Tennis player Todd Woodbridge. There was a famous lineage of six English John Woodbridge's in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, all Church ministers... [more]
Woodfall English
English surname used as a first name. The name means "dweller by a fold in the woods" - in this case, "fold" means "sheep-pen".... [more]
Woodfork English
"fork in the road in woodland"
Woodger English (British)
Woodger comes from the occupation of wood cutter in old english
Woodhull English
Meaning "wood hill".
Woodland English
A habitational name for a person who lives in or by a woodland.
Woodley English (American)
"From the wooded meadow". The actress Shailene Woodley's last surname
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Woodman English
Occupational name for a woodcutter or a forester (compare Woodward), or topographic name for someone who lived in the woods. ... [more]
Woodnut English
From a rare Anglo-Saxon personal name meaning "bold as Wade" and meant to honor the legendary Germanic sea-giant named Wade.
Woodruff English, Caribbean
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of land where woodruff grew, Anglo-Saxon wudurofe composed of wudu "wood" with a second element of unknown origin.
Woodson English
From a location in Yorkshire, England earlier spelled Woodsome and meaning "from the houses in the wood" or possibly a patronymic meaning "descendant of a wood cutter or forester."
Woodwin English (British)
Mix of words "Wood" and "Win".
Woolard English
from the Middle English personal name Wolfward (Old English Wulfweard from wulf "wolf" and weard "guard").
Wooldridge English
From the medieval personal name Wolrich (from Old English Wulfrīc, literally "wolf-power").
Woolgar English
From the medieval male personal name Wolgar (from Old English Wulfgār, literally "wolf-spear").
Woolley English
A habitational name from any of various places so-called. Most, including those in Berkshire, Cambridgeshire, and West Yorkshire in England, are derived from the Old English wulf, meaning "wolf", and leah, meaning "wood" or "clearing"... [more]
Woolnough English
From the medieval male personal name Wolnoth or Wolnaugh (from Old English Wulfnōth, literally "wolf-daring").
Wooten English
Habitational name from any of the extremely numerous places named with Old English wudu "wood" + tun "enclosure", "settlement",
Worden English
Guardian
Workman English
Ostensibly an occupational name for a laborer, derived from Middle English work and man. According to a gloss, the term was used in the Middle Ages to denote an ambidextrous person, and the surname may also be a nickname in this sense.
Worley English
mostly found in Lancashire and Sussex. very old english surname. something to do with a hill near a stream.
Wormwood Popular Culture, English
The surname is used in the novel Matilda (1988).
Worship English (British)
Registered with the Guild of One Name Studies... [more]
Worsley English
Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname from either of the places called Worsley in Lancashire and in Worcestershire. The place in Lancashire was recorded as "Werkesleia" in 1196, and means Weorchaeth's wood or glade, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Weorchaeth", from weorc, work, fortification, and leah, a wood, or clearing in a wood... [more]
Worth English
From the Old English WORÞ, meaning "enclosure".
Worthington English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
Woulfe English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
Wrangler English
Given to a person who worked as a wrangler.
Wraye English
Variant of the habitational name Wray or Ray, from any of various minor places in northern England named Wray, Wrea, or Wreay, from Old Norse vrá ‘nook’, ‘corner’, ‘recess’.
Wren English
Nickname from the bird, Middle English wrenne, probably in reference to its small size.
Wrenn English
Derived from the surname Wren... [more]
Wrightson English
Means "son of Wright".
Wriothesley English (British)
Name is of unknown origin, deriving from older Wrotteslega, who were a family that held estates in Staffordshire in the late 1100s. Possibly a combination of wrot "snout" and leah "meadow, cleaning", suggesting it's origin as a pig farm.
Wurðingtun English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
Wycherley English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
Wyeth English
May come either from the Old English word "withig" meaning "willow" or from Guyat, a pet form of the Old French given name Guy. Probably unrelated to Wyatt.
Wylde English (British)
It is a nickname for a person who was of wild or undisciplined character. Looking back even further, the name was originally derived from the Old English word "wilde," meaning "untamed" or "uncivilized."... [more]
Wylden English
Variant of Wilden.
Wyler English
English: variant of Wheeler or a respelling of Jewish Weiler.
Wymer English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Wymer (from Old English Wīgmǣr, literally "war-famous"); or (ii) from the Old Breton male personal name Wiumarch, literally "worthy-horse".
Wyn Welsh, English
English: from the Old English personal name and byname Wine meaning ‘friend’, in part a short form of various compound names with this first element. Welsh: variant of Gwynn.
Wynn Welsh, English
The surname Wynn ,(also spelled Winn, and Gwynn), is derived from the Welsh element, Gwynn, which can loosely be translated as "white" or "fair". It features in the name of the North Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd, (meaning "white head" or "white land")... [more]
Wynnman English (British)
as Wimbledon is said to be rooted in words that mean "Wynnman's Hill," I searched and the closest results indicated that 'Wynnman' must mean 'Heir of Wynn'
Wynter English
Variant of Winter.
Wyoming English (American)
From the name of the US state.
Wyss English
Nickname for someone with pale or white skin.
Xavier English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
Xavier Portuguese, French, English
Derived from the given name Xavier.
Xavierson English (Rare)
Means “son of Xavier”.
Yabsley English
It is believed to be a derived spelling of Abboldesi, a place now more commonly known as Abbotsley or Abbotsleigh. However, the original surname had nothing to do with "Abbots" in any spelling, and derives from to the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Eadbeald" meaning "Prosperity-bold".
Yankoviac English
Variant of the name Yankovic.
Yapp English (British)
Derives from Old English ġēap meaning "crooked, bent" and could either refer to a cunning person or someone with crooked features (e.g. curved nose). Famous bearers of this name include English botanist Richard Henry Yapp and Sir Stanley Graham Yapp, Labour politician and first leader of West Midlands County Council.
Yardley English
Habitational name for someone from any of the various locations in England named Yardley, derived from Old English gierd meaning "branch, twig, pole, stick" and leah meaning "wood, clearing".
Yardy English
The most likely origin of this surname is that it was used to denote someone who held a piece of land known as a "yarde", from the Middle English word "yerd".
Yarian English
Americanized form of Irion.
Yarwood English
habitational name from Yarwood Heath in Rostherne Cheshire earlier Yarwode. The placename derives from Old English earn "eagle" or gear "yair enclosure for catching fish" and wudu "wood".
Yaryan English
Americanized form of Irion.
Yaw Irish, English, Chinese
Irish: reduced and altered Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Eochadha Chinese : Cantonese variant of Qiu.
Yaxley English
Meant "person from Yaxley", Cambridgeshire and Suffolk ("glade where cuckoos are heard").
Yeager English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of German Jäger.
Yeardley English
Means "enclosed meadow" in Old English, from Old English g(e)ard (“fence, enclosure”) + lēah (“woodland, clearing”).
Yeats English
Scottish and northern English variant spelling of Yates.
Yelley English (British)
The surname Yelley was first found in Oxfordshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence of English history diminished after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed... [more]
Yellman English
Yellman comes from the English words yell and man creating Yellman. The last name Yellman was also given to a person who consistently yelled a lot.
Yellow English
Nickname for someone who has yellow hair; wore yellow clothing or has a yellow complexion
Yerian English
Americanized form of Irion.
Yetman English
"gate keeper"
Yett English
Derived from the Old English word geat, meaning gate.
Yetts English
Variant of Yates
Yewdale English
Derived from Yewdale, which is the name of a village near the town of Skelmersdale in Lancashire. Its name means "valley of yew trees", as it is derived from Middle English ew meaning "yew tree" combined with Middle English dale meaning "dale, valley".... [more]
Yoakum English (American)
Americanized version of Jochim
Yocum German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
Yonge English
Variant of Yong
Yonover English (British)
The surname Yonover was first found in Somerset where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor.
Yore English (Rare)
Not available.
Yorke English
Variant of York.
Yorkey English
Variant spelling of York.
Yorkman English
Variant form of York.
Yorks English
Variant of York.
Youngblood English
Americanisation of the German surname Jungbluth.
Younger English, American
English (mainly Borders) from Middle English yonger ‘younger’, hence a distinguishing name for, for example, the younger of two bearers of the same personal name. In one case, at least, however, the name is known to have been borne by an immigrant Fleming, and was probably an Americanized form of Middle Dutch jongheer ‘young nobleman’ (see Jonker)... [more]
Youngman English
From Middle English yunge man "young servant", ultimately from Old English geong mann "young man".
Youngson English
Means "son of Young".
Yvenson English
Meaning, "son of Evan" or "son of Ivan."
Zachariah English
From the given name Zachariah
Zachary English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
Zacher English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
Zachry English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
Zackert English, German
An Americanization of the German surnames Zacher and Zachert. It comes from a vernacular form of the personal name Zacharias.
Zackowski English (American)
Americanized version of the surname Zakowski
Zale English, Polish (Anglicized)
Possibly from a Polish surname, the meaning of which is uncertain (it may have been a variant of the surname Zalas which originally indicated one who lived "on the other side of the wood", from za "beyond" and las "forest").
Zalick English
Comes from the Greek surname Tsalikis.
Zane English
Meaning unknown. It could be a Americanization of the German surname Zahn. Zane is also used as a given name.
Zeagler English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ziegler.
Zeches English
The surname Zeches was first found in Silesia, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history. The name would later be associated with noble family with great influence, having many distinguished branches, and become noted for its involvement in social, economic and political affairs.
Zeller German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
Zescoi English
derived from the word zesty when used to describe someone
Zhane English (?), Popular Culture
meaning "z," used by Aidan Zhane on RuPaul's Drag Race
Zimmon English (American)
Variant of Zinon
Zohn English
Probably a variant of John.
Zueena English (American, Modern)
The Name Zueena Means Black Feathers & it originated with The Analuka Family of America.
Zuill English, Scottish
From the town of Zuill, Scotland. The "Z" pronounced as "Y" comes from ancient yogh representing a variety of sounds. The name itself is of unknown origin.
Zylstra Dutch, Frisian, English
Derived from Dutch zijl "canal" or "sluice". Originally indicated someone who lives near a canal or sluice.