English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Meadow English
A topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow. The form meadow derives from mǣdwe, the dative case of Old English mǣd.
Medcalf English (British)
Variant spelling of Metcalfe.
Medd English
Dweller at the meadow.
Medley English
Habitational name, either a variant of Madeley (a name common to several places, including one in Shropshire and two in Staffordshire), named in Old English as ‘Mada’s clearing’, from an unattested byname, Mada (probably a derivative of mad ‘foolish’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’; or from Medley on the Thames in Oxfordshire, named in Old English with middel ‘middle’ + eg ‘island’... [more]
Medlicott English
Derivative from a location in Shropshire, England
Meed English
Dweller at the meadow.
Meehan English
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Miadhacháin 'descendant of Miadhacháin', a diminutive of Miadhach, a byname meaning 'honorable'... [more]
Mefford English
It is the Old English name given to a point where two streams cross each other.... [more]
Megarry Irish, English
From the Irish 'Mag Fhearadhaigh', meaning "descendant of the fearless one"
Mehoff Bulgarian, English (American)
Variant transcription of Mehov.
Mellor English
Parishes in Derbyshire, and Lancashire, meaning the mill bank. ... [more]
Melloy English
Variant of Molloy.
Mendenhall English
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous place in Wiltshire.
Menear Cornish, English (British)
English (Devon; of Cornish origin): topographic name for someone who lived by a menhir, i.e. a tall standing stone erected in prehistoric times (Cornish men ‘stone’ + hir ‘long’). In the United States, it is a common surname in Pennsylvania & West Virginia.
Menzel German, English
Derived from a short form of MENZ, Clemens or Hermann.
Merch English
A variant of the surname March
Mercury English
In some cases this may represent an anglicized form of French Mercure or Italian Mercuri, Mercurio or Di Mercurio... [more]
Merivale English
The surname Merivale was first found in Cornwall and Devon, where this prominent family flourished. Walter Merifild was recorded in Devon in 1200 but it is believed the family had established itself earlier in St... [more]
Meriwether English
Means "happy weather" in Middle English, originally belonging to a cheery person.
Merlin English, French, German
From the given name Merlin.
Merridew English
A different form of Meredith (from the Welsh personal name Meredydd, perhaps literally "lord of splendour"). It occurs in Wilkie Collins' 'The Moonstone' (1868) belonging to Mrs Merridew, widowed sister to Sir John Verinder.
Merrifield English
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Merryfield in Devon and Cornwall or Mirfield in West Yorkshire, all named with the Old English elements myrige 'pleasant' + feld 'pasture', 'open country.' See also Merivale.
Merriman English, Irish
1. English: nickname, an elaborated form of Merry.... [more]
Merriweather English
From a medieval nickname for someone of a cheerful disposition (cf. Meriwether).
Merton English
From a place name meaning "town on a lake" in Old English.
Mervin Welsh, English
From the given name Mervin
Mervyn English
(i) from the medieval personal name Merewine, literally "fame-friend"; (ii) from the Old English personal names Mǣrwynn, literally "famous joy", and Merefinn, from Old Norse Mora-Finnr; (iii) from the Welsh personal name Merfyn, literally probably "marrow-eminent"
Messam English (British)
originates from a place called Measham in the county of Leicestershire. The placename is first recorded in the famous Domesday Book of 1086, as Messeham, and in the Pipe Rolls of the county of 1182 as Meisham... [more]
Metcalfe English
An occupational name from Northern England, from Old English mete, 'food' and calf, 'calf', i.e calfs being fattened for consumption in late summer. Thus, making this surname an occupational name for either a slaughterer or herdsman... [more]
Metheny English
Originated from the village name of Methley in Yorkshire.
Mewborn English
Rare English name. The only place I have found it in the phone directory (other than several small towns in eastern North Carolina) is in Northumberland, UK. The word mew has to do with stables, and of course born is an English word.
Mich Polish, English
From Michaj or Michal in Polish usage. From Michael in English.
Michelle English (American)
Directly taken from the given name Michelle.
Mickelson English (American, Anglicized)
Anglicization of the Danish-Norwegian surname Mikkelsen, which means "son of Mikkel," a variant of the personal name Michael.
Mickley English
It comes the French name Michelet, which comes from the name Michael, as in the angel. ... [more]
Middaugh English
Variant of German Mittag meaning "midday, south".
Middle English
Derived from the word middle
Middleton English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of the places so called. In over thirty instances from many different areas, the name is from Old English midel "middle" + tun "enclosure","settlement".
Midler English
Nickname for a person who causes trouble or meddles in the affairs of others, derived from Middle English medeler meaning "meddler, troublemaker, one who interferes". This name is borne by the American singer, actress and comedienne Bette Midler (1945-).
Mier Spanish, English (American)
As a Spanish name relates to late summer and means "harvest" or "ripened".... [more]
Mifflin English
An English West Country variant of the original Welsh-Breton personal name Merlin.
Mikel English, Nigerian
From the given name Mikel.
Milbourne English
Variant form of Milburn.
Mildmay English
From a medieval nickname for an inoffensive person (literally "mild maiden").
Milhous English
Variant spelling of English Millhouse.
Milhouse English
Variant spelling of Millhouse.
Milk English
Probably from Middle English milk ‘milk’, applied as a metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of milk.In some instances, probably a translation of German Milch, a variant of Slavic Milich or of Dutch Mielke (a pet form of Miele), or a shortening of Slavic Milkovich.
Mill Scottish, English
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived near a mill, Middle English mille, milne (Old English myl(e)n, from Latin molina, a derivative of molere ‘to grind’)... [more]
Millar English
Variant of Miller.
Millay English
This surname is thought to be a respelling of Millais, which may come from the French surname Millet, a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of millet or panic grass (derived from a diminutive form of Old French mil which is then derived from Latin milium meaning "millet").... [more]
Milley English
Habitational name from a lost or unidentified place possibly in Lincolnshire.
Millington English
Parishes in Cheshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.
Millsap English (American), English
Judging by the name and how it sounds, I guess it's occupational. This is the name of a town in Texas, named after Fuller Millsap.
Millwood English, Anglo-Saxon
The name was originally given to a miller or the keeper of a mill. The surname Millwood is derived from the Old English word mylenweard.
Milman English
From the old English word mylen meaning "mill" and mann meaning "man", which in this sense means a worker
Milner English, Scottish
Northern English (mainly Yorkshire) and Scottish: variant of Miller, retaining the -n- of the Middle English word, which was a result of Scandinavian linguistic influence, as in Old Norse mylnari.
Milo English
Derived from the given name Milo.
Mims English (British)
Habitational name from Mimms (North and South Mimms) in Hertfordshire, most probably derived from an ancient British tribal name, Mimmas.
Minden German, English
Habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Westphalia (German) or Shropshire (English).
Miner English
English occupational name for someone who built mines, either for the excavation of coal and other minerals, or as a technique in the medieval art of siege warfare. The word represents an agent derivative of Middle English, Old French mine ‘mine’ (a word of Celtic origin, cognate with Gaelic mein ‘ore’, ‘mine’).
Minghella English (British)
It derives from the Roman (Latin) "Dominicus", meaning "belonging to the lord god", from "dominus", lord or master. The name was given considerable impetus by the fame of the Spanish saint "Dominicus", who founded the Dominican order of monks, although it was already well established.
Minnow English
Possibly derived from the English word "minnow", a small fish.
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Missingham English
The name means "lost home", and it's from the Old English words "missan" and "ham".
Mistry English
Influenced by the English word mystery meaning unknown.
Mitten English
English surname, meaning "from Mitten" various towns with the name or similar spelling. The towns were presumably named after the glove.
Mixon English
Means "Mick's son".... [more]
Moats English
Variant of Moat.
Moberley English
English habitational name from Mobberley in Cheshire, named in Old English as ‘clearing with a fortified site where assemblies are held’, from (ge)mot ‘meeting’, ‘assembly’ + burh ‘enclosure’, ‘fortification’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
Mobley English
English reduced form of Moberley.
Mochan Scottish, English, Irish
From the given name Mochan.
Mock English
english for the german surname maag
Mockford English
Mockford comes from "Mocca's ford", with Mocca being an Old English name of uncertain origin. An alternative theory is that it comes from "Motholfr's ford" from the Old Norse meaning "renown-wolf". Either way, Mockford was once a place in Sussex, near Rottingdean, and it is from there that most branches of the name originate.
Mole English
Mole is (in some but not all cases) the English form of the German Möhl meaning mill.
Mollison English, Scottish
Derived from the female given name Molly, wich is diminutive of Mary.
Molten English
The surname Molten refers to one who melts lead.
Monarch English
Origin unidentified. Perhaps a translation of French Monarque, Monarc, a nickname for a high-handed or haughty person, from Old French monarque 'monarch'.
Monckton English
Possibly meaning "estate of monks"
Moneymaker English (American)
Translated form of German Geldmacher or Geldschläger, occupational names for a coiner.
Moneypenny English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a rich person or a miser. A fictional bearer is Miss Moneypenny, secretary to M (the head of MI6) in the James Bond novels of Ian Fleming and in the films based on them.
Monger English
Name for a retail trader or a stallholder in a market, Middle English monger, manger.
Monier French, English, French (Huguenot)
French variant of Monnier and occupational name for a moneyer from Middle English monier "moneyer" (Old French monier) or for a miller from Old French monier "miller".
Montford English
As a Shropshire name believed to mean "from a communal ford or water crossing" while the Norfolk origin is "from Munda's ford," Munda being an old English personal name meaning "protector, guardian," as seen in names such as Edmund.
Montgomerie Scottish, English
Variation of Montgomery. A famous bearer was Margaret Montgomerie Boswell (1738 to 1789), wife of author James Boswell.
Monty French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
Moody English, Irish
Either from Middle English modie "angry, haughty, impetuous", or Old English modig "brave, proud".
Moorcock English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a moorcock (the male of the red grouse). It is borne by British author Michael Moorcock (1939-).
Moorehouse English
Variant spelling of Morehouse.
Moorhouse English (British)
This derives from the surname Morehouse, with Old English mōr meaning "marsh", "fen" + hūs meaning "house".... [more]
Moralee English, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
Morant English, French
From the Old French personal name Morant, perhaps from a nickname meaning "steadfast", or alternatively of Germanic origin and meaning literally "courage-raven". A known bearer was the British-born Australian soldier and poet Breaker Morant, original name Edwin Henry Murrant (?1864-1902).
Mordaunt English
Recorded as Mordant, Mordaunt (English), Mordagne, Mordant (French) and apparently Mordanti in Italy, this is a surname of French origins. According to the famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley writing in the year 1880, the name was originally Norman, and was brought to England by a follower of Duke William of Normandy, when he conquered England in 1066... [more]
Mordecai English
From the given name Mordecai
Morden English
Parish in Surrey; one mile from Mitcham. "Moor Hollow" in Old English.
More English, Scottish
Variant of Moore 3. A famous bearer was the English lawyer, humanist, and martyr Saint Thomas More (1478-1535).
Moredock English
From the fact that boats get moored at a dock.
Morehouse English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example Moorhouse in West Yorkshire, named from Old English mōr meaning "marsh", "fen" + hūs meaning "house".
Morey Irish, English
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Mórdha, and in English (of Norman origin), derived from the Old French given name Mory, a short form of Amaury (see Emery).
Morgans English, Irish
Variation of Morgan.
Morganton English (Canadian)
Created by combining the last names Morgan and Middleton in Calgary, Alberta, Canada in September of 2013.
Morningstar English, Jewish
English transcription of Morgenstern.
Morrell English
Anglicization of Morel, related to Morell.
Mort English
Perhaps from a Norman nickname based on Old French mort "dead", possibly referring to someone with a deathly pallor or otherwise sepulchral appearance.
Mortenson English
Means "Son of Morten".
Mortonson English
Means "Son of Morton".
Moscow English (American, Rare)
From the city of Moscow in Russia.
Mosher English
It is one of several variants of the name Mauger, also spelt Moger and Major, which itself comes from the Old French Maugier and Old German Malger, a compound name meaning "council-spear"... [more]
Mosley English
Habitational name from any of several places called Mos(e)ley in central, western, and northwestern England. The obvious derivation is from Old English mos ‘peat bog’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’, but the one in southern Birmingham (Museleie in Domesday Book) had as its first element Old English mus ‘mouse’, while one in Staffordshire (Molesleie in Domesday Book) had the genitive case of the Old English byname Moll.
Mossman English
This interesting name is a variant of the surname Moss which is either topographical for someone who lived by a peat bog, from the Old English pre 7th Century 'mos' or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example Mosedale in Cumbria or Moseley in West Yorkshire.
Mothersbaugh English
Anglicized form of Muttersbach.
Motley English
This surname may come from a nickname for someone wearing parti-coloured clothes (from Anglo-French motteley, which may come from Old English mot meaning "speck").
Mott English
The surname Mott was first found in Essex, where the family held a family seat from very early times, having been granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. Moate (Irish: An Móta) is a town in County Westmeath, Ireland... [more]
Moulton English
Derived from various places with the same name, for example in the counties of Cheshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Suffolk and North Yorkshire in England. It is either derived from the Old English given name Mūla, the Old Norse name Múli or Old English mūl meaning "mule" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
Mount English
Mount is often used as part of the name of specific mountains.
Mountain English
Topographic name from Old French montagne "mountain" (see Montagne).
Mountjoy English
Habitational surname for a person from Montjoie in La Manche, France, named with Old French mont "hill", "mountain" + joie "joy".
Mountstuart English
Possibly derived from the mountain in the Cascade Range, in the state of Washington, United States.
Mousall English
The surname Mousall was first found in Lancashire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence of English history diminished after the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
Mousel German (Austrian, Anglicized), English
Anglicisation of the German Mäusl, from the German word maus - "mouse" combined with a diminutive suffix, literally meaning "little mouse"... [more]
Mowbray English
Ultimately from the name of a place in Normandy meaning "mud hill" in Old French.
Mowers Scottish, English
English: variant of Mower
Moxley English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish
From the name of a minor place in the West Midlands.
Moxon English
Means "son of Magge", a pet-form of Margaret, a female personal name which came into English via French from Late Latin Margarita, literally "pearl".
Moyes English
From the medieval personal name Moise, a vernacular variant of Moses (the biblical name of the Hebrew prophet who led the Children of Israel out of captivity).
Mudd English
Either (i) "person who lives in a muddy area"; (ii) from the medieval female personal name Mudd, a variant of Maud (variously Mahalt, Mauld, Malt, vernacular versions of Anglo-Norman Matilda); or (iii) from the Old English personal name Mōd or Mōda, a shortened form of various compound names beginning with mōd "courage".
Mudge English
A location surname for someone who lives or dwells near the swamps. A famous bearer of this surname is Angela Mudge, a champion fell runner and trail runner from Scotland.
Mudgett English
Derived from a pet form of Mudge.
Mudie English
Possibly from Old English 'modig', meaning "brave", or "reckless".
Muffet English
Variant of Moffat.
Mulberry English
From the name of the fruit.
Mulcaster English (Modern)
The surname Mulcaster was first found in Cumberland where they trace their lineage back to the place name Muncaster, home of Muncaster Castle, a privately owned castle overlooking the Esk river, near the west-coastal town of Ravenglass in Cumbria which dates back at least 800 years. 
Mullis English
As either Mulles and Mullis, the surname first found in Parish Registers in Cornwall Co. by 1548 in Michaelstow. Manorial tenement rolls trace that particular family to 1483. Between 1337 and 1453 random tenants were recorded between Tintagel and Altarnun as Molys and Mollys... [more]
Mumford English (?)
No available.
Mumphery English
Variant spelling of Mumphrey.
Mumphrey English
Variant spelling of the surname Humphrey.
Munden English
From the name of a parish in Hertfordshire, England.
Munger English
Variant of Monger.
Munn Scottish, English
Variant form of McMunn. In English, it is a nickname or an occupational name for a person who worked for monks, derived from Anglo-Norman French moun meaning "monk" (see Monk).