English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Parkin English
From the given name Parkin
Parkington English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun 'settlement (tun) associated with Pearta', a personal name not independently recorded.
Parley English
A place name meaning "pear field" from Old English 'per' with 'lee' or 'lea' meaning a field or clearing, perhaps where land was cleared to cultivate pear trees. Therefore this name denotes someone who lived near or worked at such a location or came from a habitation associated with the name... [more]
Parmley English
Variant of Parley. This form is found more in northern England, specifically Cumberland and Durham, but is of like derivation.
Parnham English
English habitational name from Parnham in Beaminster, Dorset.
Parr English
From a place so named in England. Derived from Old English pearr "enclosure".
Parsley Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
Parson English
Surname given to the parson (priest).
Partington English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun "Pearta's town".
Parton English
Habitational name from any of various places called Parton; most are named with Old English peretun ‘pear orchard’. A famous bearer of the surname is Dolly Parton.
Pash English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
Pashley English
From the an Old English personal name Pæcca, and with the Old English word "le-ah," meaning "clearing in the wood. ''
Passmore English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone who crossed marshy moorland (e.g. who lived on the opposite side of a moor, or who knew the safe paths across it); or (ii) perhaps from an alteration of Passemer, literally "cross-sea", an Anglo-Norman nickname for a seafarer... [more]
Pate English
Derives from the given name Pat(t), a short form of the personal name Patrick from the Latin Patricius meaning "son of a noble father".
Patricks English
Patronymic form of Patrick.
Patters English
History not available.
Pauley English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
Pavey English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Pavia, perhaps from Old French pavie "peach"; or (ii) "person from Pavia", Italy.
Paxson English
This surname means "son of Pack." Pack may be a survival of the Old English personal name Pacca or it may have been a Middle English personal name derived from Paschalis (meaning "relating to Easter"), the Latin form of Pascal.
Payan English
Variant of Payne.
Peabody English
Probably from a nickname for a showy dresser, from Middle English pe "peacock" (see Peacock) and body "body, person". Alternatively it may be from the name of a Celtic tribe meaning "mountain men" from Brythonic pea "large hill, mountain" combined with Boadie, the tribe's earlier name, which meant "great man" (or simply "man") among the Briton and Cambri peoples... [more]
Peach English (Rare)
Derived from the name of the fruit, which itself derived its name from Late Latin persica, which came from older Latin malum persicum meaning "Persian fruit."
Peachy English (Anglicized)
Means “lived near a peach tree, sold peaches, or was associated with the fruit in some other way”. Originally arrived with the in England after the Norman conquest of 1066.
Pearcy English (American)
Variant of Percy, which is a name derived from Perci, a parish and canton near St. Lo, in Normandy
Pearks English
Sir Stuart Edmond Pearks (1875–1931) served as the Chief Commissioner of the North-West Frontier Province of British India from 1930 until 1931. Sourced from Wikipedia.... [more]
Pearl English
Metonymic occupational name for a trader in pearls, which in the Middle Ages were fashionable among the rich for the ornamentation of clothes, from Middle English, Old French perle (Late Latin perla).
Pearsall English
a British surname of French origin derived from the pre-9th-century word "pourcel", which described a breeder of animals or a farmer
Peartree English
Means "pear tree".
Pease English
English: from Middle English pese ‘pea’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of peas, or a nickname for a small and insignificant person. The word was originally a collective singular (Old English peose, pise, from Latin pisa) from which the modern English vocabulary word pea is derived by folk etymology, the singular having been taken as a plural.
Peele English
This surname was given topographically to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. A famous bearer of this surname is actor, comedian, writer, producer, and director Jordan Peele.
Peet English, Dutch
Derived from a pet form of the given name Peter. As a Dutch nickname, it is derived from Middle Dutch pete meaning "godfather, godmother, godchild".
Peete English
Variant spelling of Peet.
Peevey Norman, English
Means "a place with a fine view". Composed of the Old French roots beu, which means "fair" and "lovely", and voir, which means "to see".
Pegg English, Welsh
Son of "Margaret", in Old English.
Peirce English
From the given name Piers.
Pelham English
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
Pelton English
Habitational name from Pelton, a place in County Durham, named from an unattested Old English personal name Peola + tun 'farmstead', 'settlement'.
Pendarvis English (American)
The American English spelling of the Cornish surname Pendarves. Ultimately, the surname is traced back to Pendarves Island, Cornwall.
Pendlebury English
Likely originated from the area Pendlebury, in the Borough of Swindon and Pendlebury in Greater Manchester. Formed from the Celtic pen meaning "hill" and burh meaning "settlement".... [more]
Pendleton English
An Old English name meaning "overhanging settlement".
Pendragon English
From 'Pen Dragon' meaning head dragon or dragons head. This was the name of the king Uther Pendragon who was King Arthurs father
Peniston English
Denoted someone who came from the town of Penistone in South Yorkshire.
Penketh English (British)
The surname Penketh was first found in Lancashire at Penketh, a township, in the chapelry of Great Sankey, parish of Prescot, union of Warrington, hundred of West Derby.
Penney English
Variant of Penny.
Penning English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
Pennington English
Habitational surname denoting someone originally from any of the various locations in England named Pennington, derived from Old English penning meaning "penny" (used as a byname or from a tribute due on the land) and tun meaning "town".
Pennock Cornish, English
From the Cornish 'pennknegh', meaning "hilltop".
Pennyfield English (Rare, ?)
Probably derives from the two English words, 'Penny' and 'Field'.
Pennywell English
English habitational name from Pennywell in Tyne and Wear or from a similarly named lost place elsewhere.
Pennyworth English
From Old English pening, penig meaning "penny (the coin)" and worþ meaning "enclosure". A notable fictional bearer is Alfred Pennyworth, a DC Comics character notable for being the butler of the superhero Batman.
Penwell English
English probably a variant of Pennywell.
Pepys English
From the medieval personal name Pepis, a form of Old French Pepin, brought into England by the Normans. It may have been based on an earlier nickname meaning "awesome"... [more]
Percher English
In textile mills, woven fabric coming off the mill / loom would pass over a frame, or rod, called a 'perch'. It was the job of the 'Percher' to examine the cloth for defects, and repair them when they were found... [more]
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Peregrine English, Popular Culture
Derived from the given name Peregrine. A fictional bearer is Alma LeFay Peregrine, a character from the novel "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" (2011) by Ransom Riggs.
Perham English
A variation of the English name Parham, based on the village of Parham (one in county Suffolk, another in county Sussex). From the Old English peru, meaning "pear" (the fruit), and ham, meaning "homestead".
Perkin English, Welsh
"Variant of Surname Perkins "
Perkinson English
"Son of Perkin."
Perley English
Variant of Parley or Burley.
Perpich English (American)
Americanized spelling of Croatian and Serbian Prpić. Prporuše was a term denoting young girls who, in the dry season, would visit houses in the village and pray for rain.
Perri English
Variant of Perry 1.
Person English
Americanised version of Persson.
Petrie English
Patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Peter.
Pett English
The name Pett has a history dating as far back as the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It was a name for a person who was referred to as Peat. The surname Pett was originally derived from the Old English word which meant a spoiled or pampered child.
Pettinger English
English version of Pottinger.
Pettis English
From the possessive or plural form of Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pett in East Sussex.
Petty English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French petit, 'small', thus a nickname for a small or insignificant individual.... [more]
Pettyjohn English
Combination of petty (derived from petit meaning "small") and the given name John, hence a nickname for a small or little man.
Pheonix English
A rare nickname given for someone's appearance of blonde and red hair just as a phoenix has colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet.
Philbert English
From the medieval French male personal name Filibert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "very bright, very famous".
Philipson English
Means Son Of Philip
Phillip English
Derived from the given name Philip
Phillipson English
Means "son of Phillip"
Philliskirk English (Rare)
From a 'lost' medieval parish in England or Scotland, named with the Old Norse element kirk meaning 'church' or 'place of worship'.... [more]
Philpot English
English (chiefly southeastern): from the Middle English personal name Philipot/Philpot, a pet form of Philip.
Philson English
Patronymic from Phil, a short form of the personal name Philip.
Phoenix English
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years... [more]
Pickersgill English
This famous Yorkshire name is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational surname deriving from the place in West Yorkshire called Pickersgill, or "Robber's Ravine". The placename is derived from the Middle English "pyker", thief, robber, and "gill", gully, ravine, deep glen.
Pickett English
of Norman origin, from the personal name "Pic", here with the diminutive suffixes "et" or "ot", and recorded as "Picot, Pigot" and Piket". The name is ultimately of Germanic derivation, from "pic", meaning "sharp", or "pointed", which was a common element in names meaning for instance, residence near a "pointed hill", use of a particular sharp or pointed tool or weapon, or a nickname for a tall, thin person.
Pickford English
This surnames origins lie with the Anglo-Saxons. It is a product of their having lived in the parish of Pitchford in Shropshire. ... [more]
Pickup English
The name is derived from when the family resided in Pickup or Pickup Bank in Lancashire. This place-name was originally derived from the Old English word Pic-copp which referred to those individuals who "lived on a hill with a sharp peak."
Picot English
Norman-French
Pierpont English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Aisne and Calvados, so called from Old French pierre ‘stone’ + pont ‘bridge’.
Pigg English
Derived from Middle English pigge meaning "young hog".
Pike English, Irish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point, from Old English pic ‘point’, ‘hill’, which was a relatively common place name element.... [more]
Pilch English
From Middle English pilch, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches or a nickname for a habitual wearer of these. A pilch (from Late Latin pellicia, a derivative of pellis "skin, hide") was a kind of coarse leather garment with the hair or fur still on it.
Pilcher English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches, from an agent derivative of Pilch. In early 17th-century English, pilcher was a popular term of abuse, being confused or punningly associated with the unrelated verb pilch "to steal" and with the unrelated noun pilchard, a kind of fish.
Pilkey English
Shortened variant of Pilkington
Pilkington English (British), Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, England.
Pillsbury English
Derived from a place in Derbyshire, England, so named from the genitive of the Old English given name Pil, and burh meaning "fortified place".
Pilot English
Means a person who operates the flying controls of an aircraft.
Pin English
Variant spelling of Pinn.
Pinch English
Nickname for a chirpy person, from Middle English pinch, pink ‘(chaf)finch’. Compare Finch. possibly a metonymic occupational name from Middle English pinche ‘pleated fabric’, from Middle English pinche(n) ‘to pinch (pastry)’, ‘to pleat (fabric)’, ‘to crimp (hair, etc.)’, also ‘to cavil’, ‘to be niggardly’.
Pinches English (British, Rare)
This is one of the very earliest of surnames. This is an English name. First recorded in the 12th century it was a nickname of endearment for a bright, chirpy, person, thought by his peer group to be active like a finch... [more]
Pinckney English
The surname Pinckney originally denoted someone from Picquigny, France, which derives from a Germanic personal name, Pincino (of obscure derivation) and the Latin locative suffix -acum... [more]
Pinder English (African)
Pinder originated in England as a surname used in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.
Pine English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a pine forest or who sold pine firs for a living.
Pines English (American)
Surname of the characters, Dipper, Mabel and Stan from Gravity Falls.
Pink English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
Pinkham English
habitational name from a lost or unidentified place in or bordering on Devon
Pinkney English
Variant spelling of Pinckney.
Pinn English, German
Derived from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne, both meaning "peg" or "pin". This was an occupational name from a maker of these things. The German name can in some cases be an occupational name for a shoemaker.
Pinn English (British)
A topographic or habitational name from a place named with Middle English pinne, meaning "hill" (Old English penn).
Pinner English (Rare)
Parish in Middlesex.
Pistolet English (Americanized, Modern)
Mishgan Pistolet is the first waiter of the surname.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Pitcock English
Old English pytta
Pittman English
Described someone who lived in a hollow or pitt (see Pitt).
Plant English
An occupational surname for a gardener.
Platten English
Diminutive of Platt.
Playfair English
From a medieval nickname for an enthusiastic competitor in sports and games (from Middle English pleyfere "companion in play, playmate"), or else a different form of Playford (from a Suffolk place-name meaning "ford where sports are held")... [more]
Plaza English
From the english word "plaza". A mostly famous bearer is actress Aubrey Plaza (1984-)
Pleasance English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Plaisance, literally "pleasantness"; or (ii) "person from Piacenza", Italy (from Latin Placentia, literally "pleasing things").
Plemmons English, Irish, German
Altered spelling of Fleming.
Plemons English, Irish, German
Variant form of Plemmons. A famous bearer is American actor Jesse Plemons (1988-).
Plum English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Plummer English
1. Occupational name for a worker in lead, especially a maker of lead pipes and conduits, from Anglo-Norman French plom(m)er, plum(m)er ‘plumber’, from plom(b), plum(b) ‘lead’ (Latin plumbum)... [more]
Plunket English
Either an occupational name for someone who sold plunket, a "coarse white woollen cloth", or a location in France with the name Planquette or Planquenet.
Plymouth English (Rare)
Derived from the place name Plymouth.
Pobjoy English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
Poe English
From a medieval nickname for a vain or flamboyantly dressed person (from Old Norse "peacock"). American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was a famous bearer.
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Pole English
Variant of Poole, from Old English pól.
Poling English, Welsh
Altered form of Bolling, possibly also of Bollinger or Pollinger.
Polite English
Derived from the English word polite. This name was most likely given to a person who was considered to be polite.
Pollak English, German
A name for someone who came from the place called Poland.
Pollett English
Patronymic of Paul, with the diminutive suffix -et.
Poltimore English (Rare)
Rare English surname derived from a Devon place name of Celtic origin, allegedly meaning “pool by the large house”.
Pomeroy English
From an English surname meaning "dweller by the apple orchard".
Pompey French, English
Variant of Italian Pompei.
Ponce Spanish, English
The Ponce name was carried into England after the migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066.'Ponce' is derived from 'Ponsoby',a place in Cumberland, where the family settled. The Ponce motto is 'Pro rege, lege grege' meaning "For the King, law, and people"
Ponsonby English
From a place name in England.
Pook English
Pooke was the original version... [more]
Pool English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pool or pond, Middle English pole (Old English pōl), or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Poole in Dorset, South Pool in Devon, and Poole Keynes in Gloucestershire.
Pooley English
Habitational name from Pooley Bridge in Cumbria, so named from Old English pol ‘pool’ + Old Norse haugr ‘hill’, ‘mound’. topographic name from Middle English pole ‘pool’ + ey ‘low-lying land’ or hey ‘enclosure’
Poplar English
Nickname for someone living by a poplar tree.
Popp English
Derived from an Old English personal name, Poppa, of unknown origin and meaning.
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Porcari Italian, English
From Italian porci "pigs", denoting someone who worked as a pig herder.
Portman English (Anglicized), German (Anglicized), Dutch
Either an elaborated form of English Port, an Americanised form of German Portmann or a Dutch name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town, derived from Dutch poort meaning "gate" and man meaning "man"... [more]
Portugal Spanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
Posey English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
Posy English
Variant of Posey
Poteet English, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
Pothier English
One of the Many spellings of Pottier
Poulton English
English surname that means "settlement by a pool".
Powalski English (American)
Surname of Leon Powalski from the Star Fox 64 series.
Powis English
The English of Welsh Surname Powys, which derives from the place "Powys" in Wales.
Powles Welsh, English
Patronymic form of Powell or the given name Paul.
Powyes English
Unknown source. Surname of many early American pilgrims.
Prat English
Variant of Pratt.
Pratley English
Originates from a now "lost" medieval village believed to have been in the south east of England.
Preece Welsh (Anglicized), English
Variant of Price. From Welsh ap Rhys meaning "son of Rhys". ... [more]
Prentice English
Derived from apprentice.
Prescod English
A cognate of Prescott.
Preshaw English (British, Rare)
This surname is a habitational name from a locality near Upham on the slopes of the South Downs. It is entirely within a private estate and has its own chapel.
Press English, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
Prett English
Variant of Pratt.
Prewitt English
English surname meaning brave, valor.
Pridmore English
unexplained; perhaps a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name.
Priest English
Derived from the occupation priest, which is a minister of a church. It could also be a nickname for a person who is / was a priest.
Prince English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
Prior English
Occupational surname for a prior (a high-ranking official in a monastery), ultimately from Latin prior meaning "superior, first".