English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Olin English, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
Oliphant English
Means "elephant" (from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German olifant "elephant"), perhaps used as a nickname for a large cumbersome person, or denoting someone who lived in a building distinguished by the sign of an elephant.
Olivia English
From the given name of Olivia
Ollis English
Unexplained surname found in records of Bristol and Bath.
Ollson English
Variant of Olsson or Olsen.
Olmstead English (British)
Comes from the Old French ermite "hermit" and Old English stede "place".... [more]
Olwell English
possibly a habitational name from Ulwell in Swanage Dorset named with Old English ule "owl" and wille "stream".
Olyphant English, Scottish, French, German
Variant form of Oliphant. A famous bearer is American actor Timothy Olyphant (1968-).
Oman Arabic, English
From the place Oman.
Ong English
Variant of Yong
Onge English
Variant of Ong or Yonge
Onslow English
Locational name from a place called Onslow described in Victorian times as being "a place within the liberty of Shrewsbury, in Salop', the original and still confusingly used, name for the county of Shropshire.
Ophel English
19th century name from the Cambridgeshire area. Probably derived from Oldfield. Variants include Opheld, Oful and Offel.... [more]
Opie English, Cornish
From the medieval personal name Oppy or Obby, a diminutive of such names as Osbert, Osborn, and Osbald... [more]
Orange Medieval English, Medieval French, English
Derived from the medieval female name, or directly from the French place name. First used with the modern spelling in the 17th century, apparently due to William, Prince of Orange, who later became William III... [more]
Orbison English
From a village in Lincolnshire, England originally called Orby and later Orreby that is derived from a Scandinavian personal name Orri- and the Scandinavian place element -by which means "a farmstead or small settlement."
Orchard English, Scottish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by an orchard, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower, from Middle English orchard.... [more]
Orcutt English
Perhaps a much altered spelling of Scottish Urquhart used predominantly in Staffordshire, England.
Ord English, English (American)
Ord is an English descent surname that also has Gaelic roots. It's also short for many English surnames that end with "Ord". people include US Army general Edward Ord who practiced in California and had many street names after him.
Ordwald English
English name meaning "spear strength".
Ore English
Habitational name from Woore (Shropshire, England).
Oregon English (American, Rare)
From the state of Oregon. Meaning “River of the west”
Organ English
Metonymic occupational name for a player of a musical instrument (any musical instrument, not necessarily what is now known as an organ), from Middle English organ (Old French organe, Late Latin organum ‘device’, ‘(musical) instrument’, Greek organon ‘tool’, from ergein ‘to work or do’).
Organ English
From a rare medieval personal name, attested only in the Latinized forms Organus (masculine) and Organa (feminine).
Orley Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
Ormay English (American)
Believed to be the Americanization of the last name Ormoi from Hungary.
Orpin English
Means "herbalist" (from Middle English orpin "yellow stonecrop", a plant prescribed by medieval herbalists for healing wounds). A variant spelling was borne by British painter Sir William Orpen (1878-1931).
Orris English (Canadian)
This unusual and interesting name is of Italian, Latin origin, and derives from one of the earliest Roman names, "Horatius". The name is thought to mean something connected with "hora", the Latin for "hour", but the original meaning has been lost... [more]
Orry English
1 English: unexplained.... [more]
Osbaldeston English
From a town from England called Osbaldeston derived from the name of a king named Osbald and tun "town".
Osborn English
From the given name Osborn.
Oscar English
From the given name Oscar.
Osgood English, Jewish
English: Old Norse personal name Asgautr, composed of the elements as'god'+the tribal name Gaul. This was established in England before the Conquest, in the late old English forms Osgot or Osgod and was later reinforce by the Norman Ansgot.... [more]
Osler English
Possibly derived from Ostler (from the the Norman 'Hostelier') meaning clerk or bookkeeper. First used in England after the Norman invasion of 1066. Surname of a 19th cent... [more]
Osmar English
Variant of Hosmer.
Osmond English
From the given name Osmond
Oss English (American)
Americanized Varient of Aas
Ostrom English (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Swedish Öström.
Ostrum English (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Swedish Öström.
Oswalt English
From the given name Oswald.
Osward English
From the Medieval English given name Osward.
Otter English
An otter is a type of animal
Ottoway English
From the Norman male personal names Otoïs, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-wide" or "wealth-wood", and Otewi, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-war".
Overbeck Low German, German (Modern), English (American, Americanized), Anglo-Saxon
From Low German over meaning "über" (over as a direct english translation) and beck meaning "Bach" (creek, stream). As opposed to many other germanic names it doesn't stem from someone's occupation rather from their address, with the exact meaning being something like "über dem Bach" (over the creek)... [more]
Overfelt English
Derived from the Old English "ofer," meaning "seashore," or "riverbank" and "felt" meaning "field".
Overson English
Derived from the Old French name Overson, meaning "dweller by the river-banks". The name was probably brought to England in the wake of the Norman conquest of 1066.
Overstreet English
A notable bearer is Chord Paul Overstreet.
Owner English
From English owner meaning "a person who owns something".
Owsley English
Habitational name form a now lost place name in Southern England. Possibly derived from the name of the river name Ouse and Old English -leah meaning "wood".
Oxby English
fortification where oxen are kept (From the Old English words “oxa” and “burh”)
Oxendine English
From an English place name meaning "valley of the oxen", which was derived from Old English oxa "ox" (genitive plural oxena) and denu "valley".
Oyaski English (American)
A surname created by Michael Oyaski (formally Michael O'Yaski). The surname is currently known to only be used by one particular branch of the O'Yaski family tree. The surname means "Dragon Rider of the West" according to members of the Oyaski family.
Oyelowo English (African, Rare)
surname born by British actor David Oyelowo (1976-)
Pacey English
"Habitation name from Pacy-sur-Eure" which took its name from the Gallo-Roman personal name Paccius and the local suffix -acum.
Packard English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
Packman English
Variant of Pack.
Packwood English
Habitational name from a place in Warwickshire, so named from the Old English personal name Pac(c)a + wudu ‘wood’.
Paddington English
Believed to mean "Pada's farm", with the Anglo-Saxon name Pada possibly coming from the Old English word pad, meaning "toad".
Paddock English
Derived from Middle English parrock meaning "paddock, small enclosure", hence a topographic name for a dweller by a paddock or an enclosed meadow. It could also be a nickname for a person who resembled a toad or frog in some way (derived from Middle English paddock meaning "toad, frog"), or denote a person hailing from one of the many places in England that bear this name, for example the town and civil parish of Paddock Wood in Kent.
Paden English
Derivative of the surname Paddon
Padgett English
Diminutive form of Page, which is of Old French origin, and an occupational name for a young servant, a personal attendant in a noble's house, from the Old French, Middle English "page", ultimately deriving from the Greek "paidion", a boy, child... [more]
Padgham English
A habitational name.
Padley English
A habitational name from a place named Padley, which was probably named with the Old English personal name Padda and lēah meaning ‘glade, woodland clearing’. Alternatively, the first element may have been padde, meaning ‘toad’.
Paine English
From the Middle English personal name Pain(e), Payn(e) (Old French Paien, from Latin Paganus), introduced to Britain by the Normans. The Latin name is a derivative of pagus "outlying village", and meant at first a person who lived in the country (as opposed to Urbanus "city dweller"), then a civilian as opposed to a soldier, and eventually a heathen (one not enrolled in the army of Christ)... [more]
Painter English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
Paish English
From Pasci, a department in Euce, Normandy
Paiton English
Locational surname derived from the village of Peyton in Essex, England; Variant of Peyton
Pakenham English
From the parish of Pakenham in Suffolk, meaning "Pacca's settlement" from Old English ham "estate, settlement".
Paley English
English surname, either a habitational name denoting a person from a lost or unidentified place in Lancashire or Yorkshire (which was apparently named with Old English leah "woodland, clearing" as the final element), or derived from the Old Danish personal name Palli, from Old Danish páll meaning "pole"... [more]
Palfreyman English
Occupational name for a man responsible for the maintenance and provision of saddle-horses.
Palin English
(i) "person from Palling", Norfolk ("settlement of Pælli's people") or "person from Poling", Sussex ("settlement of Pāl's people"); (ii) from the Welsh name ap Heilyn "son of Heilyn", a personal name perhaps meaning "one who serves at table"
Palliser English
Means "maker of palings and fences" (from a derivative of Old French palis "palisade"). In fiction, the Palliser novels are a series of six political novels by Anthony Trollope, beginning with 'Can You Forgive Her?' (1864) and ending with 'The Duke's Children' (1880), in which the Palliser family plays a central role.
Pally English
Variant of Paley.
Papamichael Greek, English (Rare)
Means "son of priest Michael".
Pappin English (Canadian)
Southeastern Ontario, Canada. My dad and uncle are the only two I met. I was told their family background was Metis/Cree.
Paradise English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who "lived by a park or pleasure garden".
Pardoe English
From a medieval nickname based on the Old French oath par Dieu "by God" (cf. Purdie).
Pardy English (Modern)
English (Dorset) variant of Perdue.
Pare English
Variant of Parr.
Parfitt English, Welsh
Derived from Middle English parfit meaning "perfect."
Parham Irish, English
This name has been used amongst the Irish and English. This user's great grandmother came from Ireland and her maiden name was Parham. However, in English (London) it is a habitational name from places in Suffolk and Sussex, named in Old English with pere ‘pear’ + ham ‘homestead’.
Parke English
Variant spelling of Park.
Parkes English
Variant of Parks.
Parkin English
From the given name Parkin
Parkington English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun 'settlement (tun) associated with Pearta', a personal name not independently recorded.
Parkis English
Variant of Perkins or Parks.
Parley English
A place name meaning "pear field" from Old English 'per' with 'lee' or 'lea' meaning a field or clearing, perhaps where land was cleared to cultivate pear trees. Therefore this name denotes someone who lived near or worked at such a location or came from a habitation associated with the name... [more]
Parmley English
Variant of Parley. This form is found more in northern England, specifically Cumberland and Durham, but is of like derivation.
Parnham English
English habitational name from Parnham in Beaminster, Dorset.
Parr English
From a place so named in England. Derived from Old English pearr "enclosure".
Parsley Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
Parson English
Surname given to the parson (priest).
Partington English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun "Pearta's town".
Parton English
Habitational name from any of various places called Parton; most are named with Old English peretun ‘pear orchard’. A famous bearer of the surname is Dolly Parton.
Pash English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
Pashley English
From the an Old English personal name Pæcca, and with the Old English word "le-ah," meaning "clearing in the wood. ''
Passmore English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone who crossed marshy moorland (e.g. who lived on the opposite side of a moor, or who knew the safe paths across it); or (ii) perhaps from an alteration of Passemer, literally "cross-sea", an Anglo-Norman nickname for a seafarer... [more]
Pate English
Derives from the given name Pat(t), a short form of the personal name Patrick from the Latin Patricius meaning "son of a noble father".
Pateman English
The name Pateman is rooted in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It is a name for someone who worked as a boatman. The surname Pateman is derived from the Anglo-Saxon word bat, which means a boat.
Patricks English
Patronymic form of Patrick.
Patters English
History not available.
Pattinson English, Scottish
Derived from the name of an ancestor. 'The son of Patrick' (which see), from the nick. Pate and diminutive Patt-in; compare Colin, Robin.
Pauley English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
Pavey English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Pavia, perhaps from Old French pavie "peach"; or (ii) "person from Pavia", Italy.
Pawley English
English variant of Pauley.
Paxson English
This surname means "son of Pack." Pack may be a survival of the Old English personal name Pacca or it may have been a Middle English personal name derived from Paschalis (meaning "relating to Easter"), the Latin form of Pascal.
Payan English
Variant of Payne.
Paytas Hungarian, English (American)
From the Hungarian nickname pajtás meaning "comrade, pal". Possibly originates from the Ottoman Turkish word پایداش‎ (paydaş) meaning "partner, sharer". A notable bearer of the surname is the American YouTuber Trisha Paytas.
Peabody English
Probably from a nickname for a showy dresser, from Middle English pe "peacock" (see Peacock) and body "body, person". Alternatively it may be from the name of a Celtic tribe meaning "mountain men" from Brythonic pea "large hill, mountain" combined with Boadie, the tribe's earlier name, which meant "great man" (or simply "man") among the Briton and Cambri peoples... [more]
Peach English (Rare)
Derived from the name of the fruit, which itself derived its name from Late Latin persica, which came from older Latin malum persicum meaning "Persian fruit."
Peachy English (Anglicized)
Means “lived near a peach tree, sold peaches, or was associated with the fruit in some other way”. Originally arrived with the in England after the Norman conquest of 1066.
Pearcy English (American)
Variant of Percy, which is a name derived from Perci, a parish and canton near St. Lo, in Normandy
Pearks English
Sir Stuart Edmond Pearks (1875–1931) served as the Chief Commissioner of the North-West Frontier Province of British India from 1930 until 1931. Sourced from Wikipedia.... [more]
Pearl English
Metonymic occupational name for a trader in pearls, which in the Middle Ages were fashionable among the rich for the ornamentation of clothes, from Middle English, Old French perle (Late Latin perla).
Pears English
Patronymic from the given name Piers (see Pearson).
Pearsall English
a British surname of French origin derived from the pre-9th-century word "pourcel", which described a breeder of animals or a farmer
Peartree English
Means "pear tree".
Pease English
English: from Middle English pese ‘pea’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of peas, or a nickname for a small and insignificant person. The word was originally a collective singular (Old English peose, pise, from Latin pisa) from which the modern English vocabulary word pea is derived by folk etymology, the singular having been taken as a plural.
Peele English
This surname was given topographically to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. A famous bearer of this surname is actor, comedian, writer, producer, and director Jordan Peele.
Peet English, Dutch
Derived from a pet form of the given name Peter. As a Dutch nickname, it is derived from Middle Dutch pete meaning "godfather, godmother, godchild".
Peete English
Variant spelling of Peet.
Peevey Norman, English
Means "a place with a fine view". Composed of the Old French roots beu, which means "fair" and "lovely", and voir, which means "to see".
Pegg English, Welsh
Son of "Margaret", in Old English.
Peirce English
From the given name Piers. A notable bearer was the American philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), who is considered to be one of the founders of pragmatism, along with William James and John Dewey.
Pelham English
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
Pelton English
Habitational name from Pelton, a place in County Durham, named from an unattested Old English personal name Peola + tun 'farmstead', 'settlement'.
Pendarvis English (American)
The American English spelling of the Cornish surname Pendarves. Ultimately, the surname is traced back to Pendarves Island, Cornwall.
Pendlebury English
Likely originated from the area Pendlebury, in the Borough of Swindon and Pendlebury in Greater Manchester. Formed from the Celtic pen meaning "hill" and burh meaning "settlement".... [more]
Pendleton English
An Old English name meaning "overhanging settlement".
Pendragon English
From 'Pen Dragon' meaning head dragon or dragons head. This was the name of the king Uther Pendragon who was King Arthurs father
Peniston English
Denoted someone who came from the town of Penistone in South Yorkshire.
Penketh English (British)
The surname Penketh was first found in Lancashire at Penketh, a township, in the chapelry of Great Sankey, parish of Prescot, union of Warrington, hundred of West Derby.
Penley English
habitational name from Penleigh in Dilton Wiltshire. The place name probably derives from Old English penn "fold enclosure" or perhaps Celtic penn "head" and Old English leah "wood woodland clearing"... [more]
Penney English
Variant of Penny.
Penning English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
Pennington English
Habitational surname denoting someone originally from any of the various locations in England named Pennington, derived from Old English penning meaning "penny" (used as a byname or from a tribute due on the land) and tun meaning "town".
Pennock Cornish, English
From the Cornish 'pennknegh', meaning "hilltop".
Pennyfield English (Rare, ?)
Probably derives from the two English words, 'Penny' and 'Field'.
Pennywell English
English habitational name from Pennywell in Tyne and Wear or from a similarly named lost place elsewhere.
Pennyworth English
From Old English pening, penig meaning "penny (the coin)" and worþ meaning "enclosure". A notable fictional bearer is Alfred Pennyworth, a DC Comics character notable for being the butler of the superhero Batman.
Penry Welsh, Cornish, English
Derived from Welsh ap Henry meaning "son of Henry". It is also a variant of Pendray, which is derived from a place name in Cornwall meaning "top of the village" in Middle Cornish... [more]
Penwell English
English probably a variant of Pennywell.
People English
Possibly a variant of Pepall, a patronymic form of the given name Pepin. Alternatively, may be a habitational name.
Pepall English
Variant of People.
Pepys English
From the medieval personal name Pepis, a form of Old French Pepin, brought into England by the Normans. It may have been based on an earlier nickname meaning "awesome"... [more]
Perceval English, Norman
Derived from either the Old French given name Perceval, or from one of two places called Perceval in the department of Calvados in Normandy, France... [more]
Percher English
In textile mills, woven fabric coming off the mill / loom would pass over a frame, or rod, called a 'perch'. It was the job of the 'Percher' to examine the cloth for defects, and repair them when they were found... [more]
Percival English, Norman
Variant of Perceval, derived from the given name Percival.
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Peregrine English, Popular Culture
Derived from the given name Peregrine. A fictional bearer is Alma LeFay Peregrine, a character from the novel "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" (2011) by Ransom Riggs.
Perham English
A variation of the English name Parham, based on the village of Parham (one in county Suffolk, another in county Sussex). From the Old English peru, meaning "pear" (the fruit), and ham, meaning "homestead".
Perkinson English
"Son of Perkin."
Perley English
Variant of Parley or Burley.
Perpich English (American)
Americanized spelling of Croatian and Serbian Prpić. Prporuše was a term denoting young girls who, in the dry season, would visit houses in the village and pray for rain.
Perri English
Variant of Perry 1.
Person English
Americanised version of Persson.