English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Pridmore English
unexplained; perhaps a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name.
Priest English
Derived from the occupation priest, which is a minister of a church. It could also be a nickname for a person who is / was a priest.
Prince English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
Prior English
Occupational surname for a prior (a high-ranking official in a monastery), ultimately from Latin prior meaning "superior, first".
Privett French, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see Privatus). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
Proctor English
Occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour "steward" (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator "agent", from procurare "to manage"). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.
Prophet English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
Providence English
From the name of the capital city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island, derived from Middle English providence meaning "divine guidance, care", ultimately from Latin providentia.
Provost English, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
Prowse English
Nickname for a person who was proud, haughty, brave or valiant, derived from Old French prous, prou, preux, proz and prouz meaning "proud, brave, valiant". A famous bearer was David Prowse (1935-2020), an English bodybuilder, weightlifter and character actor who portrayed the villain Darth Vader in the Star Wars movies.
Prude English (American)
This surname comes from the English word prude. The definition for the word prude is a person who is or claims to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity.
Prudhomme French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
Prue English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
Pruett English
Derived from the Middle English word "prou," meaning "brave," or "valiant," with the addition of either of two common diminutive suffixes: "-et" or "-ot." As such, this name is thought to have originally been a nickname for someone small, but brave.
Pruitt English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
Prutton English (British)
it's a cool name
Prynne English
Derived from an Anglo-Norman form of the Late Latin name Primus. A fictional bearer is Hester Prynne, the protagonist of Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel 'The Scarlet Letter' (1850).
Puckett English
Of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Pocket(t), from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French poque "small pouch", hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of purses and pouches or a nickname... [more]
Puddephat English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a roly-poly physique (from Middle English puddy fat "round-bellied vat").
Puett English (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
Pulsifer English
Probably a variant of Percival.
Pulver Low German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
Purdey English
Variant of Purdie (see Purdie on the given name site)
Purdie English
The first name Purdie is transferred usage of this surname, which means "by God" in Norman French.
Purdom English
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
Purdum English
Variant spelling of English Purdom.
Purple English
Nickname for someone wore purple clothing or has a purple complexion
Pusey English
Habitational name from Pusey in Oxfordshire (formerly in Berkshire), so called from Old English peose, piosu ‘pea(s)’ + ēg ‘island’, ‘low-lying land’, or from Pewsey in Wiltshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Pevesie, apparently from the genitive case of an Old English personal name Pefe, not independently attested + Old English ēg ‘island’.
Pussett English (British)
Affectionately applies to a little 'minx' of a girl.
Puttick English (British)
A variant spelling of the Sussex surname Puttock from the Village of Puttock, which itself derives from the Old English "Puttocke" a bird of prey, the kite. ... [more]
Pyburn English (?)
Apparently from some lost or minor place so named. 1881 British census has 109; KH.
Pygall English (Hellenized, Rare)
From ancient Greek for rump, associations with prostitution across Europe, commonly given to illegitimate children of prostitutes, found especially in North East England and Nottinghamshire.
Pyke English
Most likely originates from the words pike (the weapon or the fish), having to do with fishermen or soldiers, or pick, having to do with miners or somebody who tills the ground.
Pyle English
From the Middle English word pile, meaning "stake" or "post", which is derived via Old English from Latin pilum, meaning "spike" or "javelin". This was a topographic name for someone who lived near a stake or post serving as a landmark, a metonymic occupational name for a stake maker, or a nickname for a tall, strong man.
Pym English
Recorded in several forms including Pim, Pimm, Pimme, Pym, and Pymm, this is a surname which at various times has been prominent in the history of England... [more]
Pyne English
Means "pine" from the Old French pin. This was originally given as a topographical name for someone who lived by a conspicuous pine tree or in a pine forest.
Quail English, Manx
A variant of Quayle, derived from various patronymics meaning "son of Paul". Alternately, an English nickname derived from the bird, perhaps given to a person who was timid, or known for being promiscuous.
Quaker English, Scottish
This surname was used to indicate someone who worked as a son of a vicar, who was a priest in charge of a parish in which most or all of the tithes were paid to another recipient, while the vicar received a stipend.
Quantrell English
From a medieval nickname for an elegantly or flamboyantly dressed person (from Middle English quointerel "dandy, fop", from quointe "known, knowledgeable, crafty, elegant").
Quarry English
From Middle English quarey "quarry", a topographic name for someone who lived near a stone quarry, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in one. ... [more]
Quartermain English
From a medieval nickname for a very dextrous person, or for someone who habitually wore gloves (from Old French quatremains, literally "four hands"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Allan Quartermain, the hero of 'King Solomon's Mines' (1886) and other adventure novels by H. Rider Haggard... [more]
Quartermaine English
Variant of Quartermain. This surname was borne by British actor Leon Quartermaine (1876-1967).
Quelch English (British)
Mid 16th Century variant of the name Wels(c)he, Welsh or Welch, itself deriving from the Middle English "walsche", Celtic, foreign, (Olde English "woelisc", a derivative of "wealh", foreign), and originally given as a distinguishing nickname to a Celt... [more]
Quenby English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Quarmby, a habitational name from a place so called in West Yorkshire.
Quennell English
From the medieval female personal name Quenilla, from Old English Cwēnhild, literally "woman-battle". This was borne by Peter Quennell (1905-1993), a British poet, critic and historian.
Quested English (British)
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly derived from the lost village of Questers.
Quimby English
Perhaps a variant of Quenby.
Quin English
Variant of Quinn.
Quinley English, Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Apparently an altered form of Scottish McKinley or a reduced form of Irish Mcquinnelly, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
Quinton English
From a place name meaning "queen's town" in Old English.
Rachel English, German
From the English female given name Rachel or derived from German rau "rough".
Rackham English
Means "person from Rackham", Sussex ("homestead or enclosure with ricks"). This surname was borne by British watercolourist and book illustrator Arthur Rackham (1867-1939).
Rackley English
It means ‘mound’ ‘homestead’ and ‘ham’.
Radford English
Habitational name from any of the various places so named, for example in Devon, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire, and Hereford and Worcester. Most are named from Old English read "red" + ford "ford", but it is possible that in some cases the first element may be a derivative of Old English ridan "to ride", with the meaning "ford that can be crossed on horseback".
Ragan English
A variant of Reagan.
Ragsdale English
Apparently an English habitational name from Ragdale in Leicestershire, which is probably named from Old English hraca "gully", "narrow pass" + dæl "valley", "dale".
Raider English
Taken from a village called "Rait".
Rainbird English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-bright" (cf. Raginbert)... [more]
Rainbow English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbaut, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-brave" (cf. Raginbald)... [more]
Rainwater English (American)
Americanized form of the German family name Reinwasser, possibly a topographic name for someone who lived by a source of fresh water, from Middle High German reine ‘pure’ + wazzer ‘water’.
Raisbeck English
Raisbeck is a hamlet in the civil parish of Orton, in the Eden district, in the county of Cumbria, England. The surname Raisbeck originates from the hamlet. The name of the hamlet derives from Hrridarr, a personal name and beck, a stream or river.
Raish English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Raisch.
Raison English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
Raleigh English
English habitation name in Devon meaning "red woodland clearing".
Rallison English
Rallison came from the Norman given name Radulphus.
Ralls English (Anglicized, Rare)
From old English or Saxon. Originally Rallf ( Raulf) which meant Wolf Council
Ralph English
From a Middle English personal name composed of Germanic rad "counsel, advice" and wolf "wolf". This was first introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Ráðulfr, and was reinforced after the Conquest by the Norman form Ra(d)ulf... [more]
Rambert English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert (see Rainbird). It was borne by Dame Marie Rambert (original name Cyvia Rabbam, later Miriam Rambach; 1888-1982), a Polish-born British ballet dancer and choreographer.
Rampling English
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, derived from Latin ramus meaning "branch" (see Ramos). Famous bearers include English actress Charlotte Rampling (1946-) and her father, English athlete and British Army officer Godfrey Rampling (1909-2009).
Ramsbottom English (British)
Denoted a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. It is also a habitational name from a market town named Ramsbottom, located in Greater Manchester, England.
Randle English
English: variant spelling of Randall or Americanized spelling of Randel.
Randolf English
From the given name Randolf
Randolph English, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Rannells English
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Rannulf, Ranel, of continental Germanic origin.
Raphael English, German
From the given name Raphael
Rapson English
Means "son of Rab" or "son of Rap". Both Rab and Rap are diminutives of Robert.
Rasberry English
Possibly a habitational name from Ratsbury in Lynton, Devon.
Rashleigh English
From a location in Devon, derived from Old English "roe buck" + léah "clearing".
Rason English
Variant of Reason.
Raspberry English
Variant spelling of Rasberry.
Raspberry English
Variant of Rasberry influenced by the name of the fruit but has no connection to it.
Rassmussen English (American, Rare)
Americanized spelling of Danish and Norwegian Rasmussen.
Ratcliff English
Habitational name from any of the places, in various parts of England, called Ratcliff(e), Radcliffe, Redcliff, or Radclive, all of which derive their names from Old English rēad meaning "red" + clif meaning "cliff", "slope", "riverbank".
Rathbone English
Of unknown origin, but might denote a person with short legs. From Olde English rhath, meaning "short, and bon, "legs".
Rau English
From a medieval personal name, a variant of Ralph.
Ravenel English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
Ravenhill English
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
Ravenscar English (British)
From a coastal village with the same name, located in the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England.
Ravenswood English (American)
Ravenswood is a gothic surname.
Rawlings English
Patronymic formed from the given name Roul.
Rawls English
From the Olde German and Anglo-Saxon personal name Rolf. Originally derived from the Norse-Viking pre 7th Century 'Hrolfr' meaning "Fame-Wolf".
Raymond English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
Raynard English
Derived from the baptismal name Rainer.
Rayner English
From the given name Rayner
Raynes English (American)
Patronymic version of many Germanic names with the first element starting with "ragin"
Reade English
English variant spelling of Read.
Reading English
Habitational name from the county seat of Berkshire, which gets its name from Old English Readingas ‘people of Read(a)’, a byname meaning ‘red’. Topographic name for someone who lived in a clearing, an unattested Old English ryding.
Reason English
A different form of Raison.
Reaves English
Variant of Reeves.
Rector English
Status name for the director of an institution, in particular the head of a religious house or a college. Also an anglicized form of Richter.
Red English
Variant of Read 1.
Redden English
Location name meaning "clearing or cleared woodland." Communities called Redden include one in Roxburghshire, Scotland and another in Somerset, England. A notable bearer is actor Billy Redden who played the dueling banjoist Lonnie in the 1972 film 'Deliverance.'
Reddick English
Habitational name from Redwick in Gloucestershire, named in Old English with hrēod "reeds" and wīc "outlying settlement".
Redding English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
Reddish English
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. 'of Reddish,' a village near Stockport, Cheshire.
Redford English
Variant of Radford. A famous bearer is American actor Robert Redford (1936-).
Redhage English
This surname originated in Germany
Redman English, Irish
Variant of Raymond. Also a nickname for a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion, from Middle English rudde "red" and man "man".
Redpath Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Berwickshire, probably so called from Old English read ‘red’ + pæð ‘path’. This name is also common in northeastern England.
Redvers English (British)
Variant of Revere originating in Devon.
Redwood English
Name possibly derived from the colour of the bark of trees or the name of the town Reedworth between Durham and Devon
Reedus English, Scottish
An English and Scottish name of uncertain origin. Possibly a reduced form of English Redhouse, a habitational name from any of the numerous places named Redhouse, including over ninety farms.
Reidhead English
The origins of the Reidhead surname are uncertain. In some instances, it was no doubt derived from the Old English word "read," meaning "red," and was a nickname that came to be a surname. Either way, we may conclude that it meant "red-haired" or "ruddy complexioned."
Relph English
From the Old French male personal name Riulf, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "power-wolf" (cf. Riculf).
Rendall Scottish, English
Variant of Randall. Habitational name from Rendall in Orkney. Possibly also an Americanization of Swedish Rendahl.
Renley Jewish (Rare), English (Rare)
Possibly derived from the Old English rinc "man, warrior" or rim 'edge, circular edge' or possibly wraenna 'wren', and leah "field, clearing".
Renn English (British)
The surname Renn was first found in Durham where they held a family seat from early times, and were originally descended from Ralph de Raines who was granted lands by William, Duke of Albany in that shire... [more]
Renshaw English, Scottish
A habitational surname from any of the so-called or like-sounding places in the United Kingdom. These include Renishaw in Derbyshire, Ramshaw in Durham, the lost Renshaw in Cheshire and Radshaw in Yorkshire... [more]
Reston English
Location name from northern England meaning "brush wood settlement" or place where brush wood, also known as rispe, grew.
Revell English
From a medieval nickname for someone who is full of noisy enthusiasm and energy (from Middle English revel "festivity, tumult").
Revere English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
Rex English, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
Reynard English
From the given name Reynard.
Reynold English
From the given name Reynold
Reynoldson English
Means "son of Reynold".
Rhea English
English: variant spelling of Rea.
Rhett English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel".
Rhine German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
Rial English
Variant of Royle.
Ribchester English
This name originates from the small village in Lancashire that shares the same name. Interestingly, most people with the name 'Ribchester' are in Lancashire, but a lot are also found in Newcastle Upon Tyne.
Rich English
Patronymic derived from a short form of Richard.
Rich English
From a nickname of a wealthy person, ultimately derived from Germanic ric "powerful". A notable fictional bearer is Richie Rich who first appeared as a comic book character in 1953.
Rich English
Derived from the name of a (former) village in Lincolnshire, England named with the Old English element ric "stream, drainage channel".
Riche English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Richers English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
Richie English (Rare), Italian
Diminutive form of Richard. It could also have been a nickname for one who was rich or wealthy, or, in Italy, a variant of Ricci... [more]
Richmond English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places so named, in northern France as well as in England. These are named with the Old French elements riche "rich, splendid" and mont "hill"... [more]
Rick English
1 English: variant of Rich 2.... [more]
Ricketson English
It was brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. It comes from the Old German name Ricard, meaning "powerful" and "brave."
Rickman English
Means "son of Rick". A famous bearer was American Alan Rickman (1946-2016).
Riddell Scottish, English
Derived from the given name Ridel.
Rideout English
Means "outrider (a municipal or monastic official in the Middle Ages whose job was to ride around the country collecting dues and supervising manors)".
Ridges English
Variant of Ridge.
Ridgeway English
Comes from Middle English 'riggewey', hence a topographic name for someone who lived by such a route or a habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Cheshire, Derbyshire, Dorset, and Staffordshire.
Ridgway English
Variant spelling of Ridgeway.
Ridout English
A variant of the other surname Rideout.
Right English
Variant spelling of Wright.
Rilo English
Transferred use of the surname derived from the Old English elements ryge (rye) and lēah (wood, clearing, meadow). See also Riley.
Rinard English (American)
An Americanized version of the German Surname Reinhardt.
Ringer English
From the Norman name Reinger or Rainger derived from the Germanic elements ragin meaning "advice, counsel" and ger meaning "spear"... [more]
Ripper English
Means "maker, seller or carrier of baskets" (from a derivative of Middle English rip "basket").
Ripple English
From the word ripple. Could mean that they live near a river, lake, brook, stream, or ocean.
Ritch English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Ritchard English
Variant spelling of Richard that was altered by the diminutive Ritchie. Or possibly from a surname derived from Richard... [more]
Ritchings French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
Rittman German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
Rivet French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
Rivett English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
Ro English
Possibly a variant of Rowe.