Surnames via Occupations

Given Name   Occupation   Location   Nickname   Ornamental   Other
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FATTORE Italian
Means "land agent, bailiff, steward, farmer" in Italian.
FAUCHER French
Occupational name meaning "mower" in French, ultimately from Latin falx meaning "sickle, scythe".
FAULKNER English, Scottish
Occupational name for a keeper of falcons, from Middle English and Scots faulcon, from Late Latin falco, of Germanic origin.
FAURE French
Southern French variant of FÈVRE.
FAVA Italian
From Italian fava referring to a type of broad bean.
FAVERO Italian
Variant of FABBRI.
FAVRE French
Southern French variant of FÈVRE.
FAVREAU French
Diminutive of FAVRE.
FAZEKAS Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "potter" in Hungarian.
FENSTERMACHER German
Means "window maker" in German.
FERBER German
Variant of FÄRBER.
FERRARI Italian
Occupational name for a metalworker or smith, derived from Latin ferrarius, a derivative of ferrum meaning "iron".
FERREIRO Galician
Galician cognate of FERRARI.
FERRER Catalan
Catalan cognate of FERRARI.
FERRERO Italian
Regional variant of FERRARI. It is typical of the area around Turin.
FERRO Italian, Portuguese
Means "iron", ultimately from Latin ferrum. This was an occupational name for one who worked with iron.
FÈVRE French
Occupational name meaning "blacksmith" in Old French, derived from Latin faber.
FIDDLER English
English form of FIEDLER.
FIEDLER German
Means "fiddler" in German.
FISCELLA Italian
Derived from Italian fiscella, which was a basket used to conserve cheese. The name was probably used to denote a person who made cheese.
FISCHER German
Occupational name meaning "fisherman" in German.
FISHMAN English
Occupational name for a fisherman.
FISKER Danish
Means "fisherman" in Danish.
FLEISCHER German
Occupational name meaning "butcher" in German.
FLETCHER English
Occupational name for a fletcher, someone who attached feathers to the shaft of an arrow. It is derived from Old French fleche meaning "arrow".
FORESTER English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORESTIER French
French cognate of FORESTER.
FORTIER French
Derived from Old French fort "stronghold", indicating a person who lived near or worked at such a place.
FOSTER (2) English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
FOSTER (3) English
Occupational name for a maker of saddle trees, derived from Old French fustier.
FOURNIER French
Occupational name for a baker, from French fourneau meaning "oven".
FOWLER English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
FRANKLIN English
Derived from Middle English frankelin meaning "freeman". It denoted a landowner of free but not noble birth, from Old French franc meaning "free".
FUHRMANN German
Derived from Middle High German vuorman meaning "cartwright".
FULLER English
Occupational name for a fuller, a person who thickened and cleaned coarse cloth by pounding it. It is derived via Middle English from Latin fullo.
FUNAR Romanian
Means "rope maker" in Romanian.
FURNADJIEV Bulgarian
Occupational name for a baker, derived from Bulgarian фурна (furna) meaning "oven".
GABLER German
Occupational name for someone who made or sold forks, from Old High German gabala "fork".
GADHAVI Indian, Gujarati
Meaning unknown, related to the Charan caste of Gujarat.
GAERTNER German
German form of GARDENER.
GAGE French, English
Occupational name derived either from Old French jauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge, payment" (a name for a moneylender). Both words were ultimately of Frankish origin.
GAGNE French
Variant of GAGNEUX.
GAGNEUX French
Derived from Old French gagnier meaning "to farm, to cultivate".
GARB German
Variant of GARBER.
GARBER German
Variant of GERBER.
GARÇON French
Means "boy" in French, referring to a servant.
GARDENER English
Occupational surname for one who was a gardener, from Old French jardin meaning "garden" (of Frankish origin).
GARDINIER French
French form of GARDENER.
GARNER (1) English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a granary or lived near one.
GARNETT (1) English
Occupational name referring to a person who made hinges, from Old French carne "hinge".
GÄRTNER German
German form of GARDENER.
GARVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GEIGER German
Means "fiddle player" in German, derived from Old High German giga "fiddle".
GEISSLER German
Occupational name for a goat herder, from southern German Geiss meaning "goat" and the suffix ler signifying an occupation.
GERBER German
Means "tanner, leather dresser" in German, derived from Old High German garawen meaning "to prepare".
GEREBEN Hungarian
Means "hackle, hatchel" in Hungarian (a hackle is a tool used to comb out fibers).
GERST German
Occupational name for a barley farmer, derived from Old High German gersta "barley".
GERSTLE German
Variant of GERST.
GERVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GHASABYAN Armenian
From Armenian ղասաբ (ghasab) meaning "butcher", of Arabic origin.
GLAS German, Dutch
German and Dutch cognate of GLASS.
GLASS English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLAZIER English
Means "glass worker, glazier", from Old English glæs meaning "glass".
GLÖCKNER German
Derived from Middle High German glocke "bell". It may have referred to a person who worked at or lived close to a bell tower.
GLOVER English
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
GOFFE English
Derived from Breton or Cornish goff meaning "smith", and referred to a metalworker.
GOLDSCHMIDT German
Occupational name meaning "goldsmith" in German.
GOMÓŁKA Polish
Derived from Polish gomółka, a type of round cheese, ultimately from an old Polish word meaning "round".
GRAF German
From the German noble title Graf meaning "count", ultimately from Greek γραφευς (grapheus) meaning "scribe".
GRANGER English, French
Means "farm bailiff" from Old French grangier, ultimately from Latin granum meaning "grain". It is borne in the Harry Potter novels by Harry's friend Hermione Granger.
GRAVES English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
GRIEVE Scottish
Occupational name meaning "steward, farm manager" in Middle English, related to the German title Graf.
GUERRERO Spanish
Means "warrior" in Spanish, an occupational name for a soldier. It is derived from Late Latin werra "war", of Germanic origin.
GUERRIERO Italian
Italian form of GUERRERO.
GULYÁS Hungarian
Means "herdsman, tender of cows" in Hungarian.
GWÓZDEK Polish
Derived from either archaic Polish gwozd meaning "forest" or gwóźdź meaning "nail".
HAAK Dutch
Occupational name meaning "peddler" in Dutch.
HABER German, Jewish
Occupational name for one who grew or sold oats, derived from Old High German habaro "oat". As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
HABERKORN German
Occupational name for a dealer in oats, derived from Old High German habaro "oat" and korn "kernel, grain".
HAFNER German
Occupational name for a potter, derived from Old High German havan "pot, vessel".
HAJÓS Hungarian
Means "boatman, sailor" in Hungarian.
HALÁSZ Hungarian
Means "fisherman" in Hungarian.
HALLMAN Swedish
Occupational variant of HALL.
HANLEY English
From various English place names meaning "high meadow" in Old English.
HARPER English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
HAUER German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to chop", referring to a butcher or woodchopper.
HAUMANN German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to chop" and man "man", referring to a butcher or woodchopper.
HAUPT German
German cognate of HEAD.
HAVENER German
Variant of HAFNER.
HAYWARD English
Occupational name for a person who protected an enclosed forest, from Old English hæg "enclosure, fence" and weard "guard".
HEAD English
From Middle English hed meaning "head", from Old English heafod. It may have referred to a person who had a peculiar head, who lived near the head of a river or valley, or who served as the village headman.
HEEREN Dutch
From Dutch heer "lord, master", a nickname for a person who acted like a lord or who worked for a lord.
HEGEDŰS Hungarian
Means "fiddler" in Hungarian, from hegedű "violin".
HERCEG Croatian
Croatian form of HERZOG.
HERCZEG Hungarian
Hungarian form of HERZOG.
HERCZOG Hungarian
Hungarian form of HERZOG.
HERREMA Frisian
Frisian variant of HEEREN.
HERRERO Spanish
Spanish cognate of FERRARI.
HERSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2). A famous bearer was the British-German astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822), as well as his sister Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) and son John Herschel (1792-1871), also noted scientists.
HERZOG German
From a German title meaning "duke", a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke's household.
HICKEY Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hÍcidhe meaning "descendant of the healer".
HIERRO Spanish
Spanish form of FERRO.
HIRSCH (1) German
Means "deer, hart" in German. This was a nickname for a person who resembled a deer in some way, or who raised or hunted deer.
HIRSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2).
HOEDEMAKER Dutch
Occupational name for a hat maker, from Dutch hoed "hat" and maker "maker".
HOEFLER German
Variant of HOFER.
HOFER German
Occupational name for a farmer, from German Hof "farm", from Old High German hof "house, estate, courtyard".
HOFFMANN German
From Middle High German hofmann meaning "farmer".
HÖFLER German
Variant of HOFER.
HOFMEISTER German
Means "master of the household", from Old High German hof "house, estate, courtyard" and meistar "master" (from Latin magister).
HOGGARD English
Occupational name meaning "pig herder", from Old English hogg "hog" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
HOLTMAN Dutch
Dutch cognate of HOLZMANN.
HOLZKNECHT German
Occupational name for a forester's helper, from Old High German holz "wood" and kneht "servant, apprentice".
HOLZMANN German
Derived from Old High German holz "wood" and man "man", a name for someone who lived close to a wood or worked with wood.
HOOPER English
Occupational name for someone who put the metal hoops around wooden barrels.
HOOVER German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of HUBER.
HOPPER English
Occupational name for an acrobat or a nickname for someone who was nervous or restless. A famous bearer was the American actor Dennis Hopper (1936-2010).
HORN English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Germanic word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
HORNE English
Variant of HORN.
HORNÍK Czech, Slovak
Occupational name meaning "miner" in Czech and Slovak.
HOU Chinese
From Chinese (hóu) meaning "lord, nobleman".
HOUTKOOPER Dutch
Means "buyer of wood" in Dutch.
HOUTMAN Dutch
Dutch cognate of HOLZMANN.
HOWARD (2) English
Occupational name meaning "ewe herder", from Old English eowu "ewe" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
HRABĚ Czech
Means "count" in Czech, perhaps used to denote someone who worked for a count or acted like a count.
HRUŠKA Czech
Means "pear" in Czech, most likely used to denote a person who grew or sold pears.
HU Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "beard, whiskers, recklessly, wildly, barbarian".
HÜBER German
Variant of HUBER.
HUBER German
Occupational name for a farmer, derived from Old High German huoba "plot of land, farm".
HUNT English
Variant of HUNTER.
HUNTER English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
HUTMACHER German
German cognate of HOEDEMAKER.
JACKMAN English
Means "servant of JACK".
JAEGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JÄGER German
Means "hunter" in German, from Old High German jagon meaning "to hunt".
JAGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JAKEMAN English
Means "servant of JACK".
JARDINE English, Scottish
Means "garden", denoting someone who worked as a gardener.
JEHLIČKA Czech
From Czech jehla meaning "needle", most likely borne by tailors in reference to their occupation.
JOINER English
Occupational name for a carpenter (that is, a person who joins wood together to make furniture).
JONCKERS Dutch
Patronymic form of JONKER.
JONKER Dutch
From the Dutch title jonkheer meaning "young lord". It was originally a medieval noble designation (not an actual title) for a young nobleman.
JONKERS Dutch
Patronymic form of JONKER.
JONKHEER Dutch
Variant of JONKER.
JOSHI Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali
From Sanskrit ज्योतिश (jyotisha) meaning "astronomer".
JOYNER English
Variant of JOINER.
JUHÁSZ Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "shepherd" in Hungarian.
KÁDÁR Hungarian
Means "cooper, barrel maker" in Hungarian.
KADLEC Czech
From Czech tkadlec meaning "weaver".
KALB German
Occupational name meaning "calf (animal)" in German.
KALBFLEISCH German
Occupational name for a butcher who dealt in veal, from German kalb meaning "calf" and fleisch meaning "meat".
KALMÁR Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "merchant, shopkeeper" in Hungarian, of German origin.
KAMIŃSKI Polish
From Polish kamień meaning "stone", a name for a stonecutter or for one who lived at a place with this name.
KAPPEL German, Dutch
Name for a person who lived near or worked at a chapel, ultimately from Late Latin cappella, a diminutive of cappa "cape", arising from the holy relic of the torn cape of Saint Martin, which was kept in small churches.
KARDOS Hungarian
From Hungarian kard meaning "sword". It could have been applied to soldiers, sword makers, or one with a pugnacious nature.
KASABIAN Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Ղասաբյան (see GHASABYAN).
KÄSTNER German
Means "cabinet maker", derived from Middle High German kaste "box".
KATIRCI Turkish
Derived from Turkish katır meaning "mule", a name for a person who made transports by mule.
KATONA Hungarian
Means "soldier" in Hungarian.
KÄUFER German
Variant of KAUFER.
KAUFER German
Means "trader" in German.
KAUFMANN German, Jewish
Means "trader, merchant" in German.
KAY (2) English
Derived from Old French kay meaning "wharf, quay", indicating one who lived near or worked on a wharf.
KELLER German
Means "cellar" in German, an occupational name for one in charge of the food and drink.
KELLOGG English
Occupational name for a pig butcher, from Middle English killen "to kill" and hog "pig, swine, hog".
KEO Khmer
Means "glass" in Khmer.
KEREKES Hungarian
Occupational name for a maker of wheels, from Hungarian kerék meaning "wheel".
KERNER German
Derived from Old High German kerno "seed", an occupational name for one who sold or planted seeds.
KERPER German
Variant of GERBER.
KERTÉSZ Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "gardener" in Hungarian.
KIEFER (2) German
Occupational name for a barrel maker, derived from Old High German kuofa meaning "barrel".
KING English
From Old English cyning "king", originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king.
KIRCHNER German
Derived from Middle High German kirchenaere meaning "sexton".
KISTLER German
Occupational name meaning "chest maker, cabinetmaker" from Middle High German kiste.
KITCHEN English
Occupational name for a person who worked in a kitchen (of a monastery for example), derived from Old English cycene, ultimately from Latin coquina.
KLADIVO Czech
Means "hammer" in Czech, a nickname for a blacksmith.
KLEID Jewish
Occupational name for a tailor, from Old High German kleid meaning "garment, clothing".
KLERK Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERKS Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERKX Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERX Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KNEF German
Occupational name for a shoemaker, derived from Low German knif meaning "shoemaker's knife".
KNEIB German
Variant of KNEF.
KNEPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KNIGHT English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
KNOCHENMUS German
From German Knochen "bone" and Mus "sauce". It probably referred to someone who worked in the butcher trade.
KNOPF German
Means "button" in German, originally belonging to a button maker or button seller.
KNOPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KOCH German
German cognate of COOK.
KOCK Low German
Low German cognate of COOK.
KOCSIS Hungarian
Means "coachman" in Hungarian.
KOEMAN Dutch
Variant of KOOPMAN.
KOEMANS Dutch
Variant of KOOPMAN.
KÖHLER German
Variant of KOHLER.
KOHLER German
From Middle High German koler meaning "charcoal burner" or "charcoal seller".
KOLÁŘ Czech
Means "wheelwright", a derivative of Czech kolo "wheel".
KOLAR Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene cognate of KOLÁŘ.
KOLBE German
From Middle High German kolbe meaning "club".
KOOPMAN Dutch
Occupational name meaning "merchant" in Dutch.
KOPITAR Slovene
From Slovene kopito meaning "hoof", an occupational name for a shoer.
KOŠAR Croatian
From Croatian koš meaning "basket", originally indicating a person who made or sold baskets.
KOSZORÚS Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian koszorú meaning "garland, wreath, girdle", a name for someone who made garlands.
KOUMANS Dutch
Variant of KOOPMAN.
KOVÁČ Slovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech cognate of KOVAČ.
KOVAC Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Czech
Simplified spelling of KOVÁČ or KOVAČ.
KOVAČ Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Slovene
Means "blacksmith", a derivative of Slavic kovati meaning "to forge".
KOVACHEV Bulgarian
Patronymic derived from Bulgarian ковач (kovach) meaning "blacksmith".
KOVAČIĆ Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian
Patronymic derived from South Slavic kovač meaning "blacksmith".
KOVAČIČ Slovene
Slovene form of KOVAČIĆ.
KOVÁCS Hungarian
Hungarian form of KOVAČ.
KOVÁŘ Czech
Czech cognate of KOVAČ.
KOWALCZYK Polish
Patronymic derived from Polish kowal "blacksmith".
KOWALSKI Polish
From Polish kowal meaning "blacksmith".
KOZEL Czech
Czech cognate of KOZIOŁ.
KOZIOŁ Polish
Means "male goat" in Polish, probably used to denote a goatherd.
KOZLOV Russian
Patronymic from Russian козёл (kozyol) "male goat", probably used to denote a goatherd.
KRÁL Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of KRÓL.
KRAMÁŘ Czech
Czech form of KRÄMER.
KRÄMER German
Means "shopkeeper, merchant" in German, derived from Old High German kram meaning "tent, trading post".
KRAMER Low German, Jewish
Low German and Jewish form of KRÄMER.
KRANZ German, Jewish
Derived from Old High German kranz meaning "wreath", an occupational name for a maker of wreaths or an ornamental Jewish name.
KRAVITZ Jewish
Occupational name derived from Polish krawiec meaning "tailor".
KREJČI Czech
Means "tailor" in Czech.
KRÓL Polish
Means "king" in Polish. The name referred to one who acted like a king or was connected in some way with a king's household.
KRÜGER (1) German
In northern Germany an occupational name for a tavern keeper, derived from Middle Low German kroch meaning "tavern".
KRÜGER (2) German
In southern Germany an occupational name for a potter, derived from Middle High German kruoc meaning "jug, pot".
KRUPIN Russian
Derived from Russian крупа (krupa) meaning "grain".
KÜCHLER German
Occupational surname for a baker who made small cakes or cookies, derived from Middle High German kuoche "cake, pastry".
KUIJPERS Dutch
Variant of KUIPER.
KUIPER Dutch
Means "cooper, barrel maker" in Dutch.
KUIPERS Dutch
Variant of KUIPER.
KULKARNI Indian, Marathi
Means "village clerk, revenue collector" in Marathi.
KUMIĘGA Polish
Possibly from Polish kum "godfather, friend" or komięga "raft, barge".
KUNDAKÇI Turkish
From Turkish kundak meaning "stock, wooden part of a rifle".
KUNKEL German
Occupational name for a maker of distaffs, from Middle High German kunkel "distaff, spindle", of Latin origin.
KUNKLE German
Variant of KUNKEL.
KURUCZ Hungarian
Derived from the Hungarian word kuruc, referring to rebels who fought against the Habsburgs in the late 17th to early 18th century.
KUZNETSOV Russian
Patronymic form of Russian кузнец (kuznets) meaning "blacksmith".
LAGANÀ Italian
Occupational name for a greengrocer, meaning "vegetables" in southern Italian dialects, ultimately from Greek λαχανον (lachanon).
LAGOUNOV Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Лагунов (see LAGUNOV).
LAGUARDIA Italian
Occupational name meaning "sentry, sentinel" in Italian, also a locative name referring to a person who lived near a watchtower. Fiorello Laguardia (1882-1947) was the first mayor of New York of Italian origin.
LAGUNOV Russian
Patronymic name derived from Russian лагун (lagun) meaning "water barrel". It was used to denote the descendants of a person who made water barrels.
LAKATOS Hungarian
Means "locksmith" in Hungarian, a word of Romance origin.
LANE (2) French
Derived from a French word meaning "wool", designating one who worked in the wool trade.
LÁNÍK Czech
Derived from Czech lán, a measure of land equal to approximately 18 hectares. The name loosely translates as "farmer" and is considered a Moravian equivalent of Sedlák.
LANTOS Hungarian
Means "minstrel, bard, lutist" in Hungarian, from lant meaning "lute".
LAPOINTE French
Means "point (of a lance)" in French, possibly a nickname for a soldier.
ŁAWNICZAK Polish
From Polish ławnik meaning "alderman".
LEACH English
Originally indicated a person who was a physician, from the medieval practice of using leeches to bleed people of ills.
LECLAIR French
Either a variant of LECLERC or from French clair meaning "bright".
LECLERC French
Means "the clerk" in French.
LÉCUYER French
From French écuyer meaning "squire, shield-bearer".