Surnames with Relationship "from word"

This is a list of surnames in which the relationship is from word.
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JOKINEN Finnish
Derived from Finnish joki "river".
JONKER Dutch
From the Dutch title jonkheer meaning "young lord". It was originally a medieval noble designation (not an actual title) for a young nobleman.
JONKHEER Dutch
Variant of JONKER.
JOÓ Hungarian
Variant of .
JOSHI Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali
From Sanskrit ज्योतिश (jyotisha) meaning "astronomer".
JUNG German
Means "young" in German, from Middle High German junc.
JUNGE German
Variant of JUNG.
KADEŘ Czech
Variant of KUDRNA.
KAFKA Czech
Derived from Czech kavka "jackdaw".
KAISER German
From Middle High German keiser meaning "emperor", originally a nickname applied to someone who acted kingly. The title ultimately derives from the Roman name CAESAR.
KALMÁR Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "merchant, shopkeeper" in Hungarian, of German origin.
KAŁUŻA Polish
Means "puddle" in Polish.
KALUŽA Slovene, Czech
Czech and Slovene form of KAŁUŻA.
KANG Korean
Korean form of JIANG (2), from Sino-Korean (gang).
KAPPEL German, Dutch
Name for a person who lived near or worked at a chapel, ultimately from Late Latin cappella, a diminutive of cappa "cape", arising from the holy relic of the torn cape of Saint Martin, which was kept in small churches.
KÄUFER German
Variant of KAUFER.
KAUFER German
Means "trader" in German.
KAUR Indian (Sikh)
Means "princess", ultimately from Sanskrit कुमारी (kumari) meaning "girl". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his Sikh female followers the surname Kaur and all males Singh. In many instances, it is also used as a middle name with the family name serving as the surname.
KAWA Polish
Derived from Polish kawka "jackdaw".
KAY (2) English
Derived from Old French kay meaning "wharf, quay", indicating one who lived near or worked on a wharf.
KĘDZIERSKI Polish
From a nickname meaning "curly", describing a person with curly hair.
KEIR Scottish
Variant of KERR.
KEMP English
Derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, warrior".
KEMPF German
German cognate of KEMP.
KERPER German
Variant of GERBER.
KERR Scottish
From Scots kerr meaning "rough wet ground", ultimately from Old Norse kjarr.
KIM Korean
Korean form of JIN, from Sino-Korean (gim) meaning "gold". This is the most popular surname in Korea.
KING English
From Old English cyning "king", originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king.
KIRÁLY Hungarian
Means "king" in Hungarian, of Slavic origin (a cognate of KRÓL).
KIRCH German
German cognate of CHURCH.
KIRK English
From northern Middle English kirk "church", from Old Norse kirkja (cognate of CHURCH).
KIS Hungarian
Nickname meaning "small" in Hungarian.
KISS Hungarian
Variant of KIS.
KITA Japanese
From Japanese (kita) meaning "north".
KITCHEN English
Occupational name for a person who worked in a kitchen (of a monastery for example), derived from Old English cycene, ultimately from Latin coquina.
KLEIN German, Dutch, Jewish
Means "small, little" from German klein or Yiddish kleyn. A famous bearer of this name is clothes designer Calvin Klein (1942-).
KLERK Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERKS Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERKX Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLERX Dutch
Variant of DE KLERK.
KLOET Dutch
Possibly from Middle Dutch cloet meaning "lump, ball". In some cases this was a nickname for an oafish person. In other cases it may have been a name for someone who lived near a sign that had a globe on it.
KLOETEN Dutch
Variant of KLOET.
KNEF German
Occupational name for a shoemaker, derived from Low German knif meaning "shoemaker's knife".
KNEIB German
Variant of KNEF.
KNEPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KNIGHT English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
KNOPF German
Means "button" in German, originally belonging to a button maker or button seller.
KNOPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KOCH German
German cognate of COOK.
KOCK Low German
Low German cognate of COOK.
KOENIG German
German cognate of KING.
KÖHL German
Variant of KOHL.
KOHL German
Derived from Middle High German kol "cabbage".
KOHOUT Czech
Czech cognate of KOHUT.
KOHUT Ukrainian
Means "rooster" in Ukrainian, a nickname for a proud person.
KOKOT Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian cognate of KOHUT.
KÖNIG German
German cognate of KING.
KONING Dutch
Dutch cognate of KING.
KOVÁČ Slovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech cognate of KOVAČ.
KOVAČ Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Slovene
Means "blacksmith", a derivative of Slavic kovati meaning "to forge".
KOVÁCS Hungarian
Hungarian form of KOVAČ.
KOVÁŘ Czech
Czech cognate of KOVAČ.
KOWALSKI Polish
From Polish kowal meaning "blacksmith".
KOZEL Czech
Czech cognate of KOZIOŁ.
KOZIOŁ Polish
Means "male goat" in Polish, probably used to denote a goatherd.
KOZLOV Russian
Patronymic from Russian козёл (kozyol) "male goat", probably used to denote a goatherd.
KRÁL Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of KRÓL.
KRAMÁŘ Czech
Czech form of KRÄMER.
KRANZ German, Jewish
Derived from Old High German kranz meaning "wreath", an occupational name for a maker of wreaths or an ornamental Jewish name.
KRAUS German
From Middle High German krus meaning "curly", originally a nickname for a person with curly hair.
KRAUSE German
Variant of KRAUS.
KRAUSS German
Variant of KRAUS.
KRAUß German
Variant of KRAUS.
KŘÍŽ Czech
Means "cross" in Czech, ultimately from Latin crux.
KRIŽMAN Slovene
From Slovene križ meaning "cross".
KRÓL Polish
Means "king" in Polish. The name referred to one who acted like a king or was connected in some way with a king's household.
KRON German, Swedish
From German Krone and Swedish krona meaning "crown" (from Latin corona), perhaps a nickname for one who worked in a royal household.
KRÜGER (1) German
In northern Germany an occupational name for a tavern keeper, derived from Middle Low German kroch meaning "tavern".
KRÜGER (2) German
In southern Germany an occupational name for a potter, derived from Middle High German kruoc meaning "jug, pot".
KRUSE German
Variant of KRAUS.
KUANG Chinese
From Chinese (kuàng), which refers to the clan of the same name.
KUDRNA Czech
Means "curl" in Czech, a nickname for someone with curly hair.
KUNKEL German
Occupational name for a maker of distaffs, from Middle High German kunkel "distaff, spindle", of Latin origin.
KUNKLE German
Variant of KUNKEL.
KURZ German
Means "short" in German, ultimately from Latin curtus.
LABELLE French
Means "fair, beautiful" in French.
LACHAPELLE French
Means "the chapel" in French, most likely used to denote a person who lived by a church or a chapel.
LAGUARDIA Italian
Occupational name meaning "sentry, sentinel" in Italian, also a locative name referring to a person who lived near a watchtower. Fiorello Laguardia (1882-1947) was the first mayor of New York of Italian origin.
LÅNG Swedish
Swedish cognate of LONG.
LANG German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of LONG.
LANGE German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of LONG.
LANGER German, Jewish
German cognate of LONG.
LANGLAIS French
Means "the Englishman" in French.
ŁASKA Polish
Means "grace, mercy" in Polish.
LÁSKA Czech, Slovak
Means "love" in Czech and Slovak.
LAW English
Derived from Old English hlaw "hill".
Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of LI (2), from Sino-Vietnamese ().
LEBEAU French
Nickname for a handsome person, from French le "the" and beau "beautiful, handsome".
LEBLANC French
Means "the white", from French blanc "white". The name referred to a person who was pale or whose hair was blond.
LECLAIR French
Either a variant of LECLERC or from French clair meaning "bright".
LECLERC French
Means "the clerk" in French.
LEE (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
LEE (2) Korean, Chinese
Korean form of LI (1), from Sino-Korean (i). It is also a variant Chinese romanization of LI (1).
LEFÈVRE French
Occupational name meaning "blacksmith" in Old French, derived from Latin faber.
LEGRAND French
Means "the tall, the large" in French.
LEIGH English
Variant of LEE (1).
LEMAIRE French
Means "the mayor" in French. It was a title given to a town official, or else a nickname for someone who was pompous and officious.
LEROY French
Variant of REY (1), using the definite article.
LESAUVAGE French
French form of SAVAGE.
LESTRANGE French
From Old French estrange, a cognate of STRANGE.
LÉVESQUE French
Derived from French évêque, a cognate of BISHOP.
LI (1) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "plum, plum tree". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Tang dynasty.
LI (2) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "black".
LIAO Chinese
From Chinese (liào) referring to the ancient state of Liao, which was located in present-day Henan province.
LIN Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
LINDEN German
Derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LIU Chinese
From Chinese (liú) meaning "kill, destroy". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Han dynasty.
LJUNG Swedish
Means "heather" in Swedish.
LLOYD Welsh
Originally a nickname from the Welsh word llwyd meaning "grey".
LOBO Spanish, Portuguese
Originally a nickname meaning "wolf" in Spanish and Portuguese.
LOEWE German
Variant of LÖWE.
LONČAR Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "potter", from Serbo-Croatian lonac, Slovene lonec meaning "pot".
LONG English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long limbs or who was tall.
LONGO Italian
Italian cognate of LONG.
LOVEL English
Variant of LOWELL.
LOVELL English
Variant of LOWELL.
LOW English
Variant of LAW.
LÖWE German, Jewish
Means "lion" in German.
LOWE (2) English
Variant of LAW.
LOWELL English
From a nickname derived from a Norman French lou meaning "wolf" and a diminutive suffix.
LU Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "musical note" and also referring to the former state of Lu, which was situated in what is now Henan province.
LUND Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English
Indicated a person who lived near a grove of trees, from Old Norse lundr meaning "grove". There are towns in Sweden and Britain called Lund.
LUNGU Romanian
Romanian cognate of LONG.
LUPEI Romanian
Variant of LUPU.
LUPO Italian
From an Italian nickname meaning "wolf".
LUPU Romanian
From Romanian lup meaning "wolf".
LYON (2) English, French
From a nickname derived from Old French and Middle English lion meaning "lion".
MA Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "horse".
MAC CLÉIRICH Irish
Means "son of the clerk" in Irish.
MACHADO Portuguese, Spanish
Denoted a person who made or used hatchets, derived from Spanish and Portuguese machado "hatchet", both from Latin marculus "little hammer".
MAÇON French
French cognate of MASON.
MAGRO Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "thin, lean", ultimately from Latin macer.
MAGYAR Hungarian
Means "Hungarian" in Hungarian.
MAJEWSKI Polish
Derived from Polish maj meaning "May". It may have been given in reference to the month the bearer was baptized.
MÄKELÄ Finnish
Means "the place of the hill" in Finnish.
MAKI (1) Japanese
From Japanese (maki) meaning "shepherd, tend cattle".
MÄKINEN Finnish
Derived from Finnish mäki meaning "hill".
MALINOWSKI Polish
From Polish malina meaning "raspberry", originally indicating a person who lived near a raspberry patch.
MAŁY Polish
Polish cognate of MALÝ.
MALÝ Czech
Means "small" in Czech.
MANCINI Italian
Diminutive of MANCO.
MANCO Italian
Means "left-handed" in Italian, derived from Latin mancus meaning "maimed".
MANCUSO Sicilian
Sicilian variant of MANCO.
MANDEL German, Yiddish
Means "almond" in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
MANN German, English
From a nickname meaning "man". This may have originally been given in order to distinguish the bearer from a younger person with the same name.
MARCHAND English, French
Occupational name meaning "merchant", ultimately from Latin mercari "to trade".
MARCHESI Italian
From the Italian title marchese meaning "marquis". It was probably a nickname for a person who behaved like a marquis or worked in the household of a marquis.
MARSHALL English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "marshal", ultimately from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant". It originally referred to someone who took care of horses.
MARSZAŁEK Polish
Polish cognate of MARSHALL.
MARTEL (2) French, English
Nickname for a smith, derived from Old French martel "hammer", ultimately from Late Latin martellus.
MARTELLI Italian
Italian form of MARTEL (2).
MÁSELNÍK Czech
Referred to one who churned or sold butter or buttermilk, derived from Czech máslo "butter".
MAŚLANKA Polish
Polish cognate of MÁSELNÍK.
MASON English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, ultimately of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MATA Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan
From Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan mata meaning "trees, shrubs", possibly from Late Latin matta meaning "reed mat".
MAURER German
Occupational name meaning "wall builder" in German.
MAUS German
From a nickname meaning "mouse", from Old High German mus.
MAYER (3) English
Occupational name for a mayor, from Middle English mair, derived via Old French from Latin maior.
MEDINA Spanish
Means "(Arab) city" in Spanish, derived from Arabic مدينة (madinah).
MEDVED Slovene, Slovak, Croatian, Russian
Means "bear" in several Slavic languages.
MEIR Jewish
Variant of MEYER (2).
MELO Portuguese
Portuguese form of MERLO.
MERCER English
Occupational name for a trader in textiles, from Old French mercier, derived from Latin merx meaning "merchandise".
MERCIER French
French form of MERCER.
MERLE French
French form of MERLO.
MERLO Italian, Spanish
Means "blackbird", ultimately from Latin merula. The blackbird is a symbol of a naive person.
MESSER German
Occupational name for a person who made knives, from Middle High German messer "knife".
MESSERLI German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive form of MESSER.
METZ (1) German
Occupational name for maker of knives, from Middle High German metze "knife".
MEYER (1) German
From Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater". Later it also denoted a tenant farmer. The spellings Meier and Meyer are more common in northern Germany while Maier and Mayer are more common in southern Germany.
MEYER (2) Jewish
From Hebrew מֵאִיר (meir) meaning "enlightened".
MILLS English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
MILNE Scottish
From Scots and Middle English milne (a variant of mille) meaning "mill".
MINAMI Japanese
From Japanese (minami) meaning "south".
MISHRA Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "mixed, mingled, honourable" in Sanskrit.
MLAKAR Slovene, Croatian
Referred to someone who lived near a pool, derived from South Slavic mlaka meaning "pool, puddle".
MLYNÁŘ Czech
Means "miller" in Czech.
MOLINA Spanish
Means "mill" in Spanish.
MOLNÁR Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "miller" in Hungarian.
MONDAY (2) English
Denoted a person for whom this was a significant day, often the day they would pay their feudal fees.
MONTAGNA Italian
Means "mountain" in Italian, indicating a person who lived on or near one.
MONTAGNE French
French cognate of MONTAGNA.
MONTAÑA Spanish
Spanish cognate of MONTAGNA.
MONTANARI Italian
Means "from the mountain" in Italian.
MONTE Italian
Variant of MONTI.
MONTERO Spanish
Derived from Spanish monte "mountain".
MONTI Italian
Means "mountain, hill" in Italian.
MOON (1) Korean
Korean form of WEN, from Sino-Korean (mun).
MOORE (1) English
Originally indicated a person who lived on a moor, from Middle English mor meaning "open land, bog".
MOORE (3) English
Nickname for a person of dark complexion, from Old French more, Latin maurus, meaning "Moorish".
MORALES Spanish
Derived from Spanish moral meaning "mulberry tree", of Latin origin.
MORENO Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "dark" in Spanish and Portuguese.
MORI Japanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest".
MOSCHELLA Italian
From a diminutive of Italian mosca meaning "housefly", perhaps originally a nickname for an annoying person.
MOTO Japanese
From Japanese (moto) meaning "base, root, origin". More commonly it is the final character in Japanese surnames.
MOULIN French
Means "mill" in French.
MULLINS (1) English
Derived from Norman French molin "mill".
MURARO Italian
Occupational name for a wall builder, from Italian murare meaning "to wall up".
MUSIAŁ Polish
Polish cognate of MUSIL.
MUSIL Czech
Possibly from a nickname meaning "the one who had to", from the past participle of the verb muset meaning "must" (of Germanic origin).
MUYSKENS Dutch
Means "little mouse" in Dutch.
NACAR Turkish
Turkish form of NAJJAR.
NÆSS Norwegian
Variant of NESS.
NAESS Norwegian
Variant of NESS.
NAGEL German, Dutch
Means "nail" in German and Dutch, an occupational name for a carpenter or nailsmith.
NAJJAR Arabic
Means "carpenter" in Arabic.
NASH English
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015).
NASS Norwegian
Variant of NESS.
NEDVĚD Czech
Variant of MEDVED, derived from the dialectal nedvěd.
NEGRESCU Romanian
Patronymic derived from Romanian negru "black".
NEGRI Italian
Nickname derived from Italian negro "black", used to refer to someone with dark hair or dark skin.
NEGRINI Italian
Variant of NEGRI.
NĚMEC Czech
Means "German" in Czech.
NĚMEČEK Czech
Diminutive form of NĚMEC.
NÉMET Hungarian
Means "German" in Hungarian.
NERI Italian
From Italian nero "black", indicating a person with a dark complexion or dark hair.
NERONI Italian
Variant of NERI.
NESPOLI Italian
From the name of towns such as Nespoli and Nespoledo, derived from Italian nespola meaning "medlar (tree)".
NESS English, Scottish, Norwegian
From English ness and Norwegian nes meaning "headland, promontory", of Old Norse origin, originally referring to a person who lived there.
NGÔ Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of WU, from Sino-Vietnamese (ngô).
NGUYỄN Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of RUAN, from Sino-Vietnamese (nguyễn). This is the most common Vietnamese surname, accounting for over a third of the population.
NIEDDU Italian
From Sardinian nieddu meaning "black", derived from Latin niger.
NIEMEC Polish
Means "German" in Polish.
NIERI Italian
Either a variant of NERI, or from the Italian name RANIERO.
NIGRO Italian
Variant of NEGRI.
NOGUEIRA Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician nogueira meaning "walnut tree", from the Late Latin nucarius, ultimately from Latin nux meaning "nut".
NOGUERA Spanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan form of NOGUEIRA.
NORRIS (1) English, Scottish
Means "from the north" from Old French norreis. It either denoted someone who originated in the north or someone who lived in the northern part of a settlement.
NORTH English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
NOSEK Czech, Polish
Means "small nose" in Czech and Polish.
NOTARO Italian
Occupational name for a clerk, derived from Latin notarius.
NOVÁČEK Czech
Diminutive of NOVAK.
NOVÁK Czech, Slovak, Hungarian
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of NOVAK.
NOVAK Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Slavic novy "new", originally a name for someone who was new to a village.
NOVOTNÝ Czech
Czech variant of NOVAK.
NOWAK Polish
Polish form of NOVAK.
NOYER French
French form of NOGUEIRA.
Ó BRAOIN Irish
Irish Gaelic form of BREEN.
Ó BRAONÁIN Irish
Irish Gaelic form of BRENNAN.
OCHOA Spanish
Spanish form of OTXOA.
Ó CLÉIRIGH Irish
Means "descendant of the clerk" in Irish.
OHME German
From Middle High German oem meaning "maternal uncle".
OLÁH Hungarian
Means "Romanian" in Hungarian, from old Slavic volhu "Romance-speaker" (of Germanic origin).
OLASZ Hungarian
Means "Italian" in Hungarian, from old Slavic volhu "Romance-speaker" (of Germanic origin).
OLMO Spanish
Means "elm tree" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin ulmus. The name originally indicated a person who lived near such a tree.
OLMOS Spanish
Variant of OLMO.
ORIOL Catalan
From Catalan or meaning "gold", originally a nickname for a person with blond hair.
ORSINI Italian
From a nickname meaning "little bear" in Italian, from Latin ursus "bear".
ØSTER Danish
From Danish øst meaning "east", originally denoting a dweller on the eastern side of a place.
OTXOA Basque
From Basque otso meaning "wolf".