Surnames with Relationship "from word"

This is a list of surnames in which the relationship is from word.
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OZOLIŅŠ Latvian
From Latvian ozols meaning "oak tree".
OZOLS Latvian
Means "oak tree" in Latvian.
PABST German
From German Papst, a cognate of POPE.
PAGANI Italian
Italian cognate of PAYNE.
PAGANO Italian
Italian cognate of PAYNE.
PAGE English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAHLKE German
Low German cognate of PEEL.
PAIGE English
Variant of PAGE.
PAIN English
Variant of PAYNE.
PALMEIRO Portuguese
Portuguese form of PALMER.
PALMER English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PALOMO Spanish
Means "pigeon, dove", from Latin palumbes.
PALUMBO Italian
From Italian palombo meaning "pigeon" (also "dogfish"). This form is typical of southern Italy.
PAN (2) Chinese
From Chinese (pān) meaning "water in which rice has been rinsed", and also referring to a river that flows into the Han River.
PAPE French
French cognate of POPE.
PAPKE Low German
Low German diminutive form of papa (see POPE).
PAPP (1) Hungarian
From a nickname meaning "priest, cleric" in Hungarian.
PAREDES Portuguese, Spanish
Denoted a person who lived near a wall, from Portuguese parede and Spanish pared meaning "wall", both derived from Latin paries.
PARENT English, French
Derived from Old French parent meaning either "notable" (from Latin pārēre meaning "to be apparent") or "parent" (from Latin parere meaning "to produce, to give birth").
PARK (1) Korean
From Sino-Korean 樸, 朴 (bak) meaning "plain, unadorned, simple".
PARK (2) English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Germanic origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
PASTERNAK Polish, Ukrainian, Russian, Yiddish
Means "parsnip" in various Slavic languages, ultimately from Latin pastinaca. A famous bearer was Boris Pasternak (1890-1960), author of 'Doctor Zhivago'.
PASTORE Italian
Means "shepherd" in Italian.
PÁSZTOR Hungarian
Means "shepherd" in Hungarian.
PATERNOSTER English, Italian
Occupational name for a maker of rosaries, also called paternosters. They are derived from the Latin phrase pater noster "our Father", the opening words of the Lord's Prayer.
PAVONE Italian
Means "peacock" in Italian. It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
PAVONI Italian
Variant of PAVONE.
PAYNE English
From a medieval given name or nickname derived from Latin paganus meaning "heathen, pagan" (from an earlier sense "rural, rustic"), which was given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults who were not overly religious.
PEACOCK English
From Middle English pecok meaning "peacock". It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
PEAK English
Originally indicated a dweller by a pointed hill, from Old English peac "peak". It could also denote a person from the Peak District in Derbyshire, England.
PECK (1) English
Variant of PEAK.
PEEL English
Nickname for a thin person, derived from Old French pel, Latin palus meaning "stake, post" (related to English pole).
PELLEGRINO Italian
Means "pilgrim, traveller" in Italian, ultimately from Latin peregrinus.
PENN (2) English
Occupational name for a person who kept penned animals, from Old English penn.
PENNY English
Nickname meaning "penny, coin" from Old English penning.
PEREIRA Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician pereira meaning "pear tree", ultimately from Latin pirum meaning "pear".
PERRY (1) English
From Old English pirige meaning "pear tree", a derivative of peru meaning "pear", itself from Latin pirum. A famous bearer was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PETIT French, Catalan, English
Means "small, little" derived from Old French and Catalan petit. It was perhaps used for a short, small person or to denote the younger of two individuals.
PFAFF German
From a nickname meaning "priest, cleric" from Old High German pfaffo, from Latin papa.
PFENNING German
From Old High German pfenning meaning "penny, coin". It was used in reference to feudal tax obligations.
PHẠM Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of FAN, from Sino-Vietnamese (phạm).
PHAN Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of PAN (2), from Sino-Vietnamese (phan).
PILGRIM English
Nickname for a person who was a pilgrim, ultimately from Latin peregrinus.
PINHEIRO Portuguese
Means "pine tree" in Portuguese.
PINHO Portuguese
Habitational name meaning "pine" in Portuguese.
PINI Italian
Name for a person who lived near a pine tree, from Italian pino, Latin pinus.
PLANCHE French
French form of PLANK.
PLANCK German
German variant of PLANK.
PLANK German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
PLANQUE French
French form of PLANK.
PLATT English
From Old French plat meaning "flat, thin", from Late Latin plattus, from Greek πλατυς (platys) meaning "wide, broad, flat". This may have been a nickname or a topographic name for someone who lived near a flat feature.
PLEŠKO Slovene
Nickname for a bald person, from Slovene pleša meaning "bald patch".
POGGI Italian
Variant of POGGIO.
POGGIO Italian
Means "hillock, small hill" in Italian, a derivative of Latin podium meaning "balcony, platform".
POIRIER French
Means "pear tree" in French, originally a nickname for someone who lived close to such a tree.
POKORNI Hungarian
Hungarian variant of POKORNY.
POKORNY Polish
Polish form of POKORNÝ.
POKORNÝ Czech, Slovak
Means "humble" in Czech and Slovak.
POLÁK Czech
Means "Pole, person from Poland" in Czech.
POPE English
From a nickname that originally designated a person who played the part of the pope in a play or pageant. Otherwise the name could be used as a nickname for a man with a solemn, austere, or pious appearance. It is derived from Latin papa, ultimately from Greek παππας (pappas) meaning "father".
POPESCU Romanian
From Romanian popă "priest", from Slavic pop.
PORRA Catalan
Variant of PORRAS.
PORRAS Spanish, Catalan
From a nickname meaning "club" in Spanish and Catalan, ultimately from Latin porrum meaning "leek".
PORTER English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PORTNER Low German
Low German cognate of PORTER.
POWER (2) English
From Middle English povre meaning "poor", via Old French from Latin pauper. It could have been a nickname for someone who had no money or a miser.
PRINZ German, Jewish
Means "prince", used as an ornamental name by Jews or as a nickname for someone who acted in a princely manner.
PROTZ German
From a nickname meaning "showy, pompous", derived from an old southern German word meaning "toad".
PUERTA Spanish
Means "door, gate", a topographic name for a person who lived near the gates of the town.
PUIG Catalan
Catalan cognate of POGGIO.
PURCELL English
From Old French pourcel "piglet", from Latin porcellus, a derivative of porcus "pig". This was a nickname or an occupational name for a swineherd.
QUICK English
Nickname for a quick or agile person, ultimately from Old English cwic meaning "alive".
QUIÑONES Spanish
From various Spanish place names derived from quiñóon meaning "shared piece of land", derived from Latin quinque "five".
QUINTANA Spanish, Catalan
Originally indicated someone who lived on a piece of land where the rent was a fifth of its produce, from Spanish and Catalan quintana "fifth", from Latin quintus.
RAKE English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat".
RAKES English
Variant of RAKE.
RANA Italian, Spanish
Means "frog" in Italian and Spanish.
RAO (1) Indian, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit राज (raja) meaning "king".
RASCH German
German form of RASK.
RASK Danish, Swedish
Means "energetic, quick, healthy" in Danish and Swedish.
RAY English
Variant of REY (1), REY (2), RYE or WRAY.
Italian
Italian form of REY (1).
READ (1) English
Means "red" from Middle English read, probably denoting a person with red hair or complexion.
READY (1) English
From Middle English redi meaning "prepared, prompt".
REED English
Variant of READ (1).
REEVE English
Occupational name derived from Middle English reeve, Old English (ge)refa meaning "sheriff, prefect, local official".
REGENBOGEN German, Jewish
From a German nickname meaning "rainbow".
REID Scottish
Scots variant of READ (1).
REIER German
Variant of REIHER.
REIHER German
Means "heron" in German, a nickname for a person with long legs.
REIS German, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning "twig, branch, bush", denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
REUTER (1) German
Fom Middle High German riute meaning "cleared land".
REVIE English
Variant of REEVE.
REY (1) English, Spanish, French, Catalan
Means "king" in Old French, Spanish and Catalan, ultimately from Latin rex (genitive regis), perhaps originally denoting someone who acted like a king.
REY (2) English
Means "female roe deer" from Old English ræge, probably denoting someone of a nervous temperament.
REYER German
Variant of REIHER.
REYES Spanish
Spanish variant of REY (1).
ŘEZNÍČEK Czech
Diminutive of ŘEZNÍK.
ŘEZNÍK Czech, Slovak
Means "butcher" in Czech and Slovak.
RHEE Korean
North Korean form of LEE (2).
RHODES English
Topographic name derived from Old English rod meaning "cleared land", or a locational name from any of the locations named with this word.
RIBEIRO Portuguese
Means "little river, stream" in Portuguese, ultimately from Latin riparius meaning "riverbank".
RICCHETTI Italian
Diminutive form of RICCI.
RICCI Italian
From Italian riccio meaning "curly", a nickname for someone with curly hair. It is ultimately from Latin ericius meaning "hedgehog".
RIDER English
Variant of RYDER.
RIESE German, Jewish
Means "giant" in German.
RÍOS Spanish
Spanish cognate of RIOS.
RIOS Portuguese
Originally denoted a person who lived near a river, from Portuguese rios "river", ultimately from Latin rivus.
RITTER German
From Middle High German riter meaning "rider, knight", a cognate of RYDER.
RIVA Italian
Means "bank, shore" in Italian, from Latin ripa, denoting one who lived by a river or a lake.
RIVERA Spanish
From Spanish ribera meaning "bank, shore", from Latin riparius.
RIVERO Spanish
Variant of RIVERA.
RIVERS English
Denoted a person who lived near a river, from Middle English, from Old French riviere meaning "river", from Latin riparius meaning "riverbank".
RIZZO Italian
Variant of RICCI.
ROACH English
From Middle English and Old French roche meaning "rock", from Late Latin rocca, a word that may be of Celtic origin. It indicated a person who lived near a prominent rock, or who came from a town by this name (such as Les Roches in Normandy).
ROBLEDO Spanish
Means "oak wood" from Spanish roble "oak", ultimately from Latin robur.
ROBLES Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived near an oak tree or forest, from Spanish roble "oak", from Latin robur.
ROCCA Italian
Italian cognate of ROACH.
ROCHA Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician cognate of ROACH.
ROCHE French
French cognate of ROACH.
ROIG Catalan
Means "red" in Catalan, from Latin rubeus, originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a red complexion.
ROJAS Spanish
Variant of ROJO.
ROJO Spanish
Means "red" in Spanish, referring to the colour of the hair or complexion.
RONCALLI Italian
From the names of places like Ronco or Ronchi, quite common in northern Italy, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It was the surname of Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (1881-1963), the pope John XXIII.
RONCHI Italian
From Italian places named Ronchi, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It is most common in northern and central Italy.
ROOSA Dutch
From Dutch roos meaning "rose".
ROSA Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of ROSE (1).
ROSALES Spanish
Means "rose bushes" in Spanish.
ROSÁRIO Portuguese
Means "rosary" in Portuguese. This name was often given to people born on the day of the festival of Our Lady of the Rosary.
ROSARIO Spanish
Spanish form of ROSÁRIO.
ROSE (1) English, French, German, Jewish
Means "rose" from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German rose, all from Latin rosa. All denote a person of a rosy complexion or a person who lived in an area abundant with roses. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental, from Yiddish רויז (roiz).
ROSSI Italian
Derived from a nickname for a red-haired person, from Italian rosso, Latin russus meaning "red".
ROSSINI Italian
Diminutive form of ROSSI. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).
ROT German, Jewish
Variant of ROTH.
ROTH German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning "red". It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
ROUNDS English
Patronymic derived from Middle English rond meaning "round, plump", ultimately from Latin rotundus.
ROUSSEAU French
Diminutive of ROUX. A famous bearer was the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) whose ideas influenced the French Revolution.
ROUSSEL French
French form of RUSSELL.
ROUX French
Derived from Old French ros meaning "red", from Latin russus, a nickname for a red-haired person.
ROYER French
From French roue meaning "wheel", ultimately from Latin rota, an occupational name for a wheelwright.
RUAN Chinese
From Chinese (ruǎn), which refers to a type of musical instrument, similar to a lute.
RUBIO Spanish
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Latin rubeus "red".
RUSSELL English
From a Norman French nickname that meant "little red one", perhaps originally describing a person with red hair.
RUSSO Italian
Variant of ROSSI.
RŮŽIČKA Czech
Means "little rose" in Czech.
RYBA Czech, Polish
Means "fish" in Czech and Slovak, an occupational name for a fisher.
RYDER English
Occupational name for a mounted warrior, from Old English ridere meaning "rider".
RYE English
Topographic name. It could be a misdivision of the Middle English phrases atter ye meaning "at the island" or atter eye meaning "at the river". In some cases it merely indicated a person who lived where rye was grown or worked with rye (from Old English ryge).
SALA Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Romanian
Occupational name for a worker at a manor house, from the Romance word sala meaning "hall, large room", of Germanic origin.
SALCEDO Spanish
Derived from Latin salix meaning "willow tree". The name was originally given to one who lived near a willow tree.
SALINAS Spanish
Occupational name for a salt worker or someone who lived bear a salt works, from Spanish salina "salt works, salt mine", ultimately from Latin sal "salt".
SALUCCI Italian
From Italian sale meaning "salt".
SALVAGGI Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SALVATICI Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SANDS English
From Old English, indicated the original nearer lived on sandy ground.
SANTINI Italian
Diminutive form of SANTO.
SANTO Italian
Italian form of SANTOS.
SANTORO Italian
Means "all saint's day" in Italian, a nickname for one born on that day.
SANTOS Portuguese, Spanish
Means "saint" in Portuguese and Spanish, ultimately from Latin sanctus. This was a nickname for a pious person.
SARTINI Italian
Diminutive form of SARTO.
SARTO Italian
Occupational name meaning "tailor" in Italian, from Latin sartor, from sarcire meaning "to mend".
SARTOR Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTORE Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTRE French
French cognate of SARTO.
SAS Hungarian
Means "eagle" in Hungarian.
SASS Hungarian
Variant of SAS.
SASTRE Spanish
Spanish cognate of SARTO.
SAULT French
French cognate of SOTO.
SAUTER German
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SAUVAGE French
French form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEAU French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEON French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEOT French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAVAGE English
English nickname meaning "wild, uncouth", derived from Old French salvage or sauvage meaning "untamed", ultimately from Latin silvaticus meaning "wild, from the woods".
SCHMID German
Variant of SCHMIDT.
SCHMIDT German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit "smith, metalworker", a cognate of SMITH.
SCHMITZ German
Variant of SCHMIDT, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
SCHNELL German
German cognate of SNELL.
SCHNOOR German
Variant of SCHNUR.
SCHNUR German, Jewish
From Old High German snuor meaning "rope, cord", an occupational name for a maker of rope.
SCHOOL Dutch
From Dutch school, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school", indicating a person who worked at or lived near a school.
SCHREIBER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SCHRÖDER (1) Low German
Occupational name for a tailor, from Middle Low German schroden meaning "to cut".
SCHRÖTER German
Means "beer-porter, wine-porter" in German, an occupational name for a carrier of wine or beer barrels.
SCHULER German
Means "scholar, student" in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school".
SCHULT Low German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTE Low German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEIß German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German schultheiße meaning "mayor, judge".
SCHUYLER Dutch
Dutch form of SCHULER.
SCHWARZ German, Jewish
Means "black" in German, from Old High German swarz. It originally described a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
SCOLA Italian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
SCOTT English, Scottish
Originally given to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic.
SCRIVEN English
Occupational name meaning "writer, clerk, scribe" in Old French, derived from Latin scriba.
SEDLÁČEK Czech
Diminutive form of SEDLÁK.
SEDLÁK Czech
Means "farmer" in Czech. A sedlák had more land than a Zahradník or a Chalupník, but less land than a Dvořák.
SELVAGGIO Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SEPPÄ Finnish
Means "smith" in Finnish.
SERGEANT English, French
Occupational name derived from Old French sergent meaning "servant", ultimately from Latin servire "to serve".
ŠEVČÍK Czech
Occupational name derived from Czech švec meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SHAIN Jewish
Means "beautiful, handsome" in Yiddish, from German schön.
SHARMA Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Gujarati, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Nepali
Means "joy, shelter, comfort" in Sanskrit.
SHEPARD English
Occupational name meaning "shepherd, sheep herder", from Old English sceaphyrde.
SHINE (1) English
Means "beautiful, attractive" from Old English sciene.
SHRIVER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SHVETS Ukrainian, Russian
Means "shoemaker" in Ukrainian and Russian.
SIERŻANT Polish
Polish cognate of SERGEANT.
SIKORA Polish
Means "tit (bird)" in Polish.
SILVA Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRA Portuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SILVER English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
SINGH Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his Sikh male followers the surname Singh and all females Kaur.
SKÁLA Czech
Means "rock" in Czech, indicating that the original bearer lived near a prominent rock.
SKAŁA Polish
Polish cognate of SKÁLA.
SKALICKÝ Czech, Slovak
Indicated the original bearer came from a place named Skalice, Skalica or Skalička in the Czech Republic or Slovakia, derived from the Slavic root skala meaning "rock".
SLÁVIK Slovak
Slovak cognate of SLAVÍK.
SLAVÍK Czech
Means "nightingale" in Czech.
SLOVÁK Czech, Slovak
Originally described one who was from Slovakia.
ŚLUSARCZYK Polish
Diminutive form of ŚLUSARSKI.
ŚLUSARSKI Polish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Polish ślusarz, of Germanic origin.
SMALL English
From a nickname for a small person, from Middle English smal.
SMALLS English
Variant of SMALL.
SMIT Dutch
From Middle Dutch smit "metalworker, blacksmith", a cognate of SMITH.
SMITH English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
SMOLA Czech
Variant of SMOLAK.
SMOLAK Polish, Czech
Occupational name for a distiller of pitch, derived from the Slavic word smola meaning "pitch, resin".
SMYTHE English
Variant of SMITH.
SNEL Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNELL.
SNELL English
From Old English snel meaning "fast, quick, nimble".
SOBEL Jewish
Variant of SOBOL.
SOBÓL Polish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOBOL Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Occupational name for a fur trader, from the Slavic word soboli meaning "sable, marten". As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKAL Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁ Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOL Czech, Jewish
From Czech sokol meaning "falcon", a nickname or an occupational name for a falconer. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKOLL Jewish
Variant of SOKOL.
SOLER Occitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOMMER (1) German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SONG Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
SORDI Italian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SORG German
Variant of SORGE.
SORGE German
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SÖRÖS Hungarian
From Hungarian sör meaning "beer". Originally the name was given to beer brewers.
SOTO Spanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOURD French
French cognate of SORDI.
SPEAR English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
SPECHT German
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPEIGHT English
English form of SPECHT, probably a loanword from German or Dutch.
STACK English
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
STACKS English
Variant of STACK.
STÁREK Czech
Czech cognate of STAREK.
STAREK Polish
From a nickname derived from Polish stary "old".
STARK English, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STARR English
From Middle English sterre meaning "star". This was usually a nickname, but it could also occasionally be a sign name from the name of an inn called the Star.
STEEN Low German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEIN German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STERN (2) German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STEUBE German
Variant of STEUBEN.
STEUBEN German
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STEWART Scottish
Occupational name for an administrative official of an estate or steward, from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". The Stewart family (sometimes spelled Stuart) held the Scottish crown for several centuries. One of the most famous members of the Stewart family was Mary, Queen of Scots.
STONE English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
STRAND Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
STRANGE English
Derived from Middle English strange meaning "foreign", ultimately from Latin extraneus.