Surnames with Relationship "from word"

This is a list of surnames in which the relationship is from word.
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D'CRUZE Indian (Christian)
Variant of CRUZ more common among Christians from India.
DE CAMPO Italian
Locative surname derived from place names called Campo (meaning "field").
DE CLOET Dutch
Variant of KLOET.
DEFOREST French
Means "from the forest" in French.
DE GROOT Dutch
From Dutch groot meaning "big, great".
DE KLERK Dutch
From Dutch klerk meaning "clerk", making this a cognate of CLARK.
DE KLOET Dutch
Variant of KLOET.
DELACROIX French
Means "of the cross" in French. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
DE LA CRUZ Spanish
Spanish cognate of DELACROIX.
DE LA FUENTE Spanish
Means "of the fountain" in Spanish.
DELANEY (1) English
Derived from Norman French de l'aunaie meaning "from the alder grove".
DE LANG Dutch
Dutch cognate of LONG.
DE LANGE Dutch
Dutch cognate of LONG.
DEL BOSQUE Spanish
Means "of the forest" in Spanish.
DELGADO Spanish, Portuguese
Means "thin" in Spanish and Portuguese, ultimately from Latin delicatus meaning "delicate, tender, charming".
DEL OLMO Spanish
Variant of OLMO.
DEMİR Turkish
Means "iron" in Turkish, originally referring to an ironworker.
DE PALMA Italian
Means "from the palm tree" in Italian.
DE REGE Italian (Rare)
Italian variant of REY (1).
DESCHAMPS French
Means "from the fields", from French champ "field".
DESCOTEAUX French
Means "from the hillside", from French coteau "hillside".
DESJARDINS French
Means "from the gardens", from French jardin "garden".
DE SMET Flemish
Flemish variant of SMIT.
DESROCHES French
Means "from the rocks", from French roche "rock".
DESROSIERS French
Means "from the rose bushes", from French rosier "rose bush". It probably referred to a person who lived close to, or cared for a rose garden.
DEVIN (2) English
Nickname for a person who acted divinely, from Old French devin "divine", ultimately from Latin.
DE VROOME Dutch
Variant of VROOM.
DE WIT Dutch
Variant of DE WITTE.
DE WITTE Dutch
Means "the white" in Dutch, a nickname for a person with white hair.
DI PASQUA Italian
Means "of Easter" in Italian.
DONNE Scottish, Irish
From Gaelic donn meaning "brown", a nickname for a person with brown hair.
DOUBEK Czech
Means "small oak" in Czech, derived from dub "oak".
DOWNER English
Name for someone who lived on or near a down, which an English word meaning "hill".
DRAKE English
Derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent".
DU Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "stop, prevent".
DUBOIS French
Means "from the forest", from French bois "forest".
DUERR German
Variant of DÜRR.
DUFF Scottish
Derived from Gaelic dubh meaning "dark".
DUFORT French
Means "from the fort", from French fort "stronghold".
DUFOUR French
Occupational name for a baker, from French four "oven".
DUKE English
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was a nickname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
DUMONT French
Means "from the mountain", from French mont "mountain".
DUNN English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old English dunn "dark" or Gaelic donn "brown", referring to hair colour or complexion.
DUPONT French
Means "from the bridge", from French pont "bridge".
DURAND French, English
From Old French durant meaning "enduring", ultimately from Latin durans. This was a nickname for a stubborn person.
DURANT English, French
Variation of DURAND.
DURANTE Italian
Italian cognate of DURAND.
DÜRR German
Means "thin" in German.
DUVAL French
Means "from the valley" in French.
DYKSTRA Frisian
From Frisian dyk meaning "dike, ditch". The name was given to a person living near a dyke or embankment.
EARL English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
EICHEL German
Means "acorn" in German, indicating a person who lived near an oak tree.
EK Swedish
Means "oak" in Swedish.
ELD Swedish
From Old Norse eldr, modern Swedish eld, meaning "fire".
ENGLISH English
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
ENNIS Irish
Variant of INNES (1).
EPISCOPO Italian
Means "bishop" in Italian, ultimately from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos).
ESPINA Spanish
Means "thorn" in Spanish, a name for someone who lived near a thorn bush.
ESPINO Spanish
Variant of ESPINA.
ESPINOSA Spanish
From Spanish espinoso meaning "thorny", ultimately from Latin spinosus, a derivative of spina meaning "thorn, spine".
ESTRADA Spanish
Spanish form of STREET.
EVANGELISTA Italian
Means "evangelist" in Italian.
FABBRI Italian
From Italian fabbro meaning "blacksmith", ultimately from Latin faber.
FABBRO Italian
Variant of FABBRI.
FABRE French
Derived from Latin faber "blacksmith".
FABRON French
Diminutive form of FABRE.
FALCO Italian
Derived from Italian falco "falcon". The name was used to denote a falconer or a person who resembled a falcon in some way.
FALK Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
From Old Norse falkr or Middle High German valke "falcon".
FAN Chinese
From Chinese (fàn) meaning "bee".
FARINA Italian
Occupational name for a miller, derived from Italian farina "flour".
FAUCHER French
Occupational name meaning "mower" in French, ultimately from Latin falx meaning "sickle, scythe".
FAULKNER English, Scottish
Occupational name for a keeper of falcons, from Middle English and Scots faulcon, from Late Latin falco, of Germanic origin.
FAURE French
Southern French variant of FÈVRE.
FAVERO Italian
Variant of FABBRI.
FAVRE French
Southern French variant of FÈVRE.
FAVREAU French
Diminutive of FAVRE.
FAY French, English
Referred to a person who came from various places named Fay or Faye in northern France, derived from Old French fau "beech tree", from Latin fagus.
FELD German, Jewish
Means "field" in German. The name was originally given to someone who lived on land cleared of forest.
FELDT German, Danish, Swedish
North German, Danish and Swedish variant of FELD.
FENN English
From a name for someone who dwelt near a marsh, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, swamp, bog".
FERRARA Italian
Italian form of FERREIRA.
FERRARI Italian
Occupational name for a metalworker or smith, derived from Latin ferrarius, a derivative of ferrum meaning "iron".
FERREIRA Portuguese, Galician
Denoted one from a town named because it was near an iron mine, from Latin ferrum meaning "iron".
FERREIRO Galician
Galician cognate of FERRARI.
FERRER Catalan
Catalan cognate of FERRARI.
FERRERO Italian
Regional variant of FERRARI. It is typical of the area around Turin.
FERRO Italian, Portuguese
Means "iron", ultimately from Latin ferrum. This was an occupational name for one who worked with iron.
FÈVRE French
Occupational name meaning "blacksmith" in Old French, derived from Latin faber.
FIDDLER English
English form of FIEDLER.
FIEDLER German
Means "fiddler" in German.
FIELDS English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
FISCHER German
Occupational name meaning "fisherman" in German.
FISKER Danish
Means "fisherman" in Danish.
FLEMING English
Given to a person who was a Fleming, that is a person who was from FLANDERS in the Netherlands.
FLOROS Greek
From Greek φλωρος (phloros) meaning "greenfinch", derived from classical Greek χλωρος (chloros) meaning "green".
FLOYD Welsh
Variant of LLOYD.
FONTAINE French
Derived from Old French fontane meaning "well, fountain", a derivative of Latin fons.
FONTANA Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of FONTAINE.
FORD English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
FOREST English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTER English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORESTIER French
French cognate of FORESTER.
FORNEY German
Name for someone who lived near ferns, from Old High German farn "fern".
FORST German
Derived from Old High German forst "forest". Probably unrelated to the Old French word forest, which was derived from Latin, Old High German forst was derived from foraha meaning "fir tree".
FÖRSTNER German
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest (see FORST).
FORTIER French
Derived from Old French fort "stronghold", indicating a person who lived near or worked at such a place.
FORTUIN Dutch
Dutch cognate of FORTUNE.
FORTUNE English
From Middle English, ultimately from Latin fortuna meaning "fortune, luck, chance". This was possibly a nickname for a gambler.
FORTUYN Dutch
Dutch cognate of FORTUNE.
FOSS English
Variant of FOSSE.
FOSSE English, French
Derived from Old French fosse "ditch".
FOURNIER French
Occupational name for a baker, from French fourneau meaning "oven".
FOX English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
FRANK (2) English
From Old English franc meaning "free".
FRANKLIN English
Derived from Middle English frankelin meaning "freeman". It denoted a landowner of free but not noble birth, from Old French franc meaning "free".
FREI German
Means "free" in German, probably referring to someone outside the feudal system.
FREUD German, Jewish
Means "joy" in German, a nickname for a cheerful person. A famous bearer was the psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).
FROMM German
From a nickname derived from Middle High German vrom meaning "noble, honourable".
FROST English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
FRY English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
FRYE English
Variant of FRY.
FUCHS German
From Old High German fuhs meaning "fox". It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
FUENTES Spanish
Means "spring, well" in Spanish, derived from Latin fons.
FUX German
Variant of FUCHS.
GAGE French, English
Occupational name derived either from Old French jauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge, payment" (a name for a moneylender). Both words were ultimately of Frankish origin.
GAGNE French
Variant of GAGNEUX.
GAGNEUX French
Derived from Old French gagnier meaning "to farm, to cultivate".
GALLO Italian, Spanish
Means "rooster", ultimately from Latin gallus. This was a nickname for a proud person.
GARB German
Variant of GARBER.
GARBER German
Variant of GERBER.
GARNER (1) English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a granary or lived near one.
GARNETT (1) English
Occupational name referring to a person who made hinges, from Old French carne "hinge".
GARVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GATTI Italian
Means "cat" in Italian, originally a nickname for an agile person.
GERBER German
Means "tanner, leather dresser" in German, derived from Old High German garawen meaning "to prepare".
GERST German
Occupational name for a barley farmer, derived from Old High German gersta "barley".
GERSTLE German
Variant of GERST.
GERVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GLAS German, Dutch
German and Dutch cognate of GLASS.
GLASS English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLEN Scottish
Variant of GLENN.
GLENN Scottish
Derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
GOOD English
From a nickname meaning "good", referring to a kindly person.
GOODE English
Variant of GOOD.
GÓRSKI Polish
From the Polish word góra meaning "mountain".
GRAF German
From the German noble title Graf meaning "count", ultimately from Greek γραφευς (grapheus) meaning "scribe".
GRANT English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
GRAVES English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
GRAY English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
GRBIĆ Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "hunchback", derived from Serbian, Croatian and Slovene grba "hump".
GREEN English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
GREENE English
Variant of GREEN.
GREY English
Variant of GRAY.
GRIEVE Scottish
Occupational name meaning "steward, farm manager" in Middle English, related to the German title Graf.
GRIFFIN (2) English
Nickname from the mythological beast with body of a lion with head and wings of an eagle. It is ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GROOS German
Variant of GROß.
GROS French
Means "thick, fat, big" in French, from Late Latin grossus, possibly of Germanic origin.
GROSS German
Variant of GROß.
GROß German
From Old High German groz meaning "tall, big".
GROßE German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSE German
Variant of GROß.
GRÖßEL German
Variant of GROß, used in southern Germany.
GROßEL German
Variant of GROß, used in southern Germany.
GROßER German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSER German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSI Italian
Italian cognate of GROS.
GROSSO Italian
Italian cognate of GROS.
GROVES English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GUAN Chinese
From Chinese (guān) meaning "frontier pass".
GUERRA Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "war", given to a belligerent person or one engaged in warfare.
GULLY English
Nickname for a big person, from Middle English golias meaning "giant" (ultimately from GOLIATH, the Philistine warrior who was slain by David in the Old Testament).
GUO Chinese
From Chinese (guō) meaning "outer city".
GUPTA Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu
Means "protected" in Sanskrit.
HAAS Dutch, German
Variant of HASE.
HAASE German
Variant of HASE.
HABER German, Jewish
Occupational name for one who grew or sold oats, derived from Old High German habaro "oat". As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
HABICH German
German cognate of HAWK.
HABICHT German
German cognate of HAWK.
HAFNER German
Occupational name for a potter, derived from Old High German havan "pot, vessel".
HAGEN Norwegian, Dutch
From Old Norse hagi or Old Dutch hago meaning "enclosure, pasture".
HAIG English, Scottish
From Old English haga or Old Norse hagi meaning "enclosure, pasture".
HALE English
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
HALL English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means simply "hall", given to one who either lived in or worked in a hall (the house of a medieval noble).
HALLE German
German variant of HALL.
HAMM English
Means "river meadow" in Old English.
HAN Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (hán) referring to the ancient state of Han, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC in what is now Shanxi and Henan provinces.
HARDIE Scottish
Scots variant of HARDY.
HARDY English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring", of Germanic origin.
HART English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
HASE German
From Middle High German and Middle Low German hase meaning "hare, rabbit". This was a nickname for a person who was quick or timid.
HAUPT German
German cognate of HEAD.
HÄUSLER German
Name for someone who lived in a house with no land, derived rom Old High German word hus meaning "house".
HAVENER German
Variant of HAFNER.
HAWK English
Originally a nickname for a person who had a hawk-like appearance or who acted in a fierce manner, derived from Old English heafoc "hawk".
HAWKING English
From a diminutive of HAWK. A famous bearer was the British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).
HAYASHI Japanese
From Japanese (hayashi) meaning "forest".
HAYES (1) English
From various English place names that were derived from Old English hæg meaning "enclosure, fence". A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
HAYTER English
Name for a person who lived on a hill, from Middle English heyt meaning "height".
HEAD English
From Middle English hed meaning "head", from Old English heafod. It may have referred to a person who had a peculiar head, who lived near the head of a river or valley, or who served as the village headman.
HEATH English
Originally belonged to a person who was a dweller on the heath or open land.
HEEREN Dutch
From Dutch heer "lord, master", a nickname for a person who acted like a lord or who worked for a lord.
HERCEG Croatian
Croatian form of HERZOG.
HERCZEG Hungarian
Hungarian form of HERZOG.
HERCZOG Hungarian
Hungarian form of HERZOG.
HERREMA Frisian
Frisian variant of HEEREN.
HERRERA Spanish
Spanish form of FERREIRA.
HERRERO Spanish
Spanish cognate of FERRARI.
HERSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2). A famous bearer was the British-German astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822), as well as his sister Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) and son John Herschel (1792-1871), also noted scientists.
HERZOG German
From a German title meaning "duke", a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke's household.
HIERRO Spanish
Spanish form of FERRO.
HILL English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a hill, derived from Old English hyll.
HILLAM English
From English places by this name, derived from Old English hyll meaning "hill".
HIRSCH (1) German
Means "deer, hart" in German. This was a nickname for a person who resembled a deer in some way, or who raised or hunted deer.
HIRSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2).
HJORT Danish, Swedish
Danish and Swedish cognate of HART.
HLAVÁČ Czech
From a nickname for a person with an oddly-shaped head, derived from Czech hlava "head".
HLAVÁČEK Czech
Diminutive form of HLAVÁČ.
HOÀNG Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of HUANG, from Sino-Vietnamese (hoàng).
HOCH German
Means "tall" in German.
HOEK Dutch
From Dutch hoek meaning "corner".
HOEKSTRA Frisian
From Frisian hoek meaning "corner".
HOLGUÍN Spanish
Possibly from Spanish holgar "to rest, to enjoy oneself".
HOLLINS English
Referred to someone living by a group of holly trees, from Old English holegn.
HOLME English, Scottish
Referred either to someone living by a small island (northern Middle English holm, from Old Norse holmr) or near a holly tree (Middle English holm, from Old English holegn).
HOLMES English, Scottish
Variant of HOLME. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
HOLT English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
HOLTZ German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLUB Czech, Ukrainian
Means "dove, pigeon" in Czech and Ukrainian.
HÖLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOOKER English
Originally applied to one who lived near a river bend or corner of some natural feature, from Old English hoc "angle, hook".
HORÁČEK Czech
Diminutive derived from Czech hora "mountain".
HORÁK Czech
Derived from Czech hora "mountain".
HORN English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Germanic word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
HORNE English
Variant of HORN.
HORVAT Croatian, Slovene
From Croatian and Slovene Hrvat meaning "Croat, person from Croatia".
HORVÁTH Hungarian
Hungarian form of HORVAT.
HOU Chinese
From Chinese (hóu) meaning "lord, nobleman".
HOUSE English
Referred to a person who lived or worked in a house, as opposed to a smaller hut.
HOWE English
Name for one who lived on a hill, from Middle English how "hill" (of Norse origin).
HOWSE English
Variant of HOWE.
HU Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "beard, whiskers, recklessly, wildly, barbarian".
HUANG Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "yellow".
HÜBER German
Variant of HUBER.
HUBER German
Occupational name for a farmer, derived from Old High German huoba "plot of land, farm".
HUFF English
Means "spur of a hill", from Old English hoh.
HULL English
Variant of HILL.
HULT Swedish
Swedish form of HOLT.
HUME Scottish, English
Variant of HOLME. A famous bearer was the philosopher David Hume (1711-1776).
HUMMEL (2) German, Dutch
Nickname for a busy person, from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch hommel, Middle High German hummel, all meaning "bee".
HUNT English
Variant of HUNTER.
HURST English
Originally a name for a person who lived near a thicket of trees, from Old English hyrst "thicket".
IGLESIAS Spanish
From Spanish iglesia meaning "church", from Latin ecclesia (of Greek origin).
INNES (1) Scottish
From a place name derived from Gaelic inis meaning "island".
JAEGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JÄGER German
Means "hunter" in German, from Old High German jagon meaning "to hunt".
JAGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JAGODA Polish
Means "berry" in Polish.
JAHODA Czech
Czech cognate of JAGODA.
JAIN Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Referred to a person who followed the principles of Jainism, a religion practiced in India. Jains are the followers of Lord Mahavira (599-527 BC).
JÄRVI Finnish
Means "lake" in Finnish.
JÄRVINEN Finnish
Derived from Finnish järvi meaning "lake". It is one of the most common surnames in Finland.
JASO Basque
Derived from Basque jats meaning "sorghum", a type of cereal grass.
JASSO Basque
Variant of JASO.
JELEN Czech
From a nickname meaning "stag" in Czech.
JELEŃ Polish
Polish form of JELEN.
JELÍNEK Czech
Diminutive of JELEN.
JEŽ Slovene, Czech
Cognate of JEŻ.
JEŻ Polish
Means "hedgehog" in Polish. It may have originally been given to a person who resembled a hedgehog in some way.
JEŽEK Czech
Diminutive form of JEŽ.
JIANG (1) Chinese
From Chinese (jiāng) meaning "river, Yangtze".
JIANG (2) Chinese
From Chinese (jiāng) meaning "ginger".
JIN Chinese
From Chinese (jīn) meaning "gold".
Hungarian
Means "good" in Hungarian.
JOKELA Finnish
Derived from Finnish joki "river".