Scandinavian Submitted Surnames

Scandinavian names are used in the Scandinavia region of northern Europe. For more specific lists, see Swedish names, Danish names and Norwegian names. See also about Scandinavian names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Hedin Swedish
Combination of Swedish hed "heath, moor" and the common surname suffix -in.
Hedström Swedish
Combination of Swedish hed "heath, moor" and ström "stream, river".
Hee Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
A Danish habitational name from any of several places named from a word meaning ‘shining’ or ‘clear’, referencing a river.... [more]
Heide German, Jewish, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Variant of German Heid, and Dutch Vanderheide. Danish and Norwegian surname from various places called Heide all from the German elements heida, heidr, haith all meaning "heath"... [more]
Heijkenskjöld Swedish (Rare)
Combination of an either German or Dutch first element (possibly Heike) and Swedish sköld "shield".
Heimisdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Heimir" in Icelandic.
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Helander Swedish
The first element is Hel-, which is probably derived from place names ultimately derived from Swedish helig "holy, sacred, blessed" or the male given name Helge... [more]
Helgeson English (American), Swedish (Rare)
Variant or anglicized form of Helgesson or Helgesen.
Helgesson Swedish
Means "son of Helge" in Swedish.
Helland Norwegian
The Old Norse name element -land meaning "country, land" combined with either Old Norse hella "flat rock" or hellir "cave". ... [more]
Hellbom Swedish
From Swedish häll, a type of flat rock, and bom "barrier, boom".
Hellgren Swedish
Combination of Swedish häll "flat rock" and gren "branch".
Helmeier German, Dutch, Danish
Variant spelling of Helmeyer.
Helmeyer German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
Helsing Swedish
Denoted a person who came from the Swedish province Hälsingland.
Helstrom Scandinavian
From a place called Helstrom, meaning a house (or shelter) by a river, from the pre 7th century Olde Norse "hiamlr- straumr".
Henningsdóttir Icelandic (Rare)
Means "daughter of Henning" in Icelandic.
Hentze German, Faroese
Derived from the given names Heinrich or Hans.
Herlev Danish
Derived from the suburb of Herlev in Denmark.
Hermannsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Hermann". Only used by women.
Hermansdotter Swedish (Rare)
Means "daughter of Herman". This surname is only used by females.
Heyerdahl Norwegian
Combination of Heyer from heiðr, "heath, moor" in Old Norse and Dahl from dalr, "valley" in Old Norse... [more]
Hilmarsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Hilmar".
Hinriksdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Hinrik" in Icelandic.
Hinriksson Icelandic
Means "son of Hinrik" in Icelandic.
Hinz German, Danish (Rare)
Derived from the given name Hinz, a diminutive of Heinrich.
Hjälm Swedish
Variant of Hjelm.
Hjalmarsson Swedish
Means "son of Hjalmar".
Hjaltalín Icelandic
From the given name Hjaltalín.
Hjelm Swedish, Danish
From Swedish hjälm or Danish hjelm, both derived from Old Norse hjalmr "helmet".
Hjelte Swedish
From Swedish hjälte "hero".
Hjermstad Norwegian (Rare)
Hjerm means royal swords, stad means place. So Hjermstad means "place for the King's swords".
Hjornevik Norwegian
Named after the town of Hjørnevik, Norway
Hlöðversdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Hlöðver". Used exclusively by women.
Hlöðversson Icelandic
Means "son of Hlöðver". Used exclusively by men; Hlöðversdóttir is the female form].
Hogan Norwegian
Anglicized form of the Norwegian surname Haugen (or Haugan), meaning "hill."
Högberg Swedish
Means "high mountain" in Swedish.
Højgaard Danish, Faroese
Combination of Danish høj "high" and gård "farm, garden".
Hollander German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
Holmbeck Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish holm "islet" and bäck "stream".
Holmqvist Swedish
Combination of Swedish holm "islet, small island" and kvist "twig".
Holmsten Swedish
Combination of Swedish holm "islet" and sten "stone".
Holmstrøm Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish form of Holmström.
Holter English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
Höök Swedish
Derived from Swedish hök "hawk".
Hopperstad Norwegian
Probably a habitational name from a farm name in Norway.
Hörberg Swedish
The first element is probably derived from a place name starting with hör. The meaning of this element differs depending on which place name it was derived from, examples include harg "sanctuary, altar" (from Höör, Hörby), "hay" (from Hörröd), and hörn "corner" (from Hörnefors)... [more]
Hornæus Swedish (Archaic)
Probably a latinization of Härnösand, a city in Västernorrland County, Sweden. A notable bearer was Swedish priest Laurentius (Lars) Christophori Hornæus (born as Lars Christoffersson in 1645 in Härnösand)... [more]
Hovda Norwegian
Habitational name from the many farmsteads in Norway named Hovda. Derived from Old Norse hófði "rounded peak", itself derived from Old Norse hofuð "head".
Hovde Norwegian
Variant of Hovda.
Høyer Danish
A surname relatively common in Denmark, derived from the Old Norse word haugr, meaning "mound, cairn, hill". Alternatively, meaning can be traced back to the old Germanic personal name Hucger, a compound consisting of hug- "heart, mind, spirit" and geirr "spear".
Hoyland English, Norwegian
English (South Yorkshire): habitational name from any of various places in South Yorkshire named with Old English hoh ‘hill spur’ + land ‘(cultivated) land’. ... [more]
Huldudóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Hulda". Used exclusively by women.
Hulduson Icelandic
Means "son of Hulda". Used exclusively by men.
Hultberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish Hult and berg "mountain, hill".
Hultgren Swedish
Combination of Swedish hult "grove, copse" and gren "branch".
Hultqvist Swedish
Combination of Swedish Hult and kvist "branch, twig".
Hurtig Swedish
Nickname for someone full of energy and endurance, from Swedish hurtig "quick, fast, rapid, brisk".
Husse Scandinavian (Archaic)
Variant of Hussey.
Hviid Danish
derived from hvid, meaning "white".
Ibrahimson Swedish
Means "son of Ibrahim" in Swedish.
Ingalls English, Scandinavian (Anglicized)
Patronymic from the Anglo-Scandinavian personal name Ingell, Old Norse Ingjaldr.... [more]
Ingebretsen Norwegian
Means "son of Ingebret". The given name Ingebret is a Norwegian alteration of Engelbert (see also Engebret).
Ingebretson Norwegian
Patronymic from the German personal name Engelbrecht.
Ingebritson Norwegian
Patronymic from the German personal name Engelbrecht.
Ingemarsdotter Swedish (Rare)
Means "daughter of Ingemar". This name is only given to females. A notable bearer is Swedish cross-country skier Ida Ingemarsdotter (b... [more]
Ingemarsson Swedish
Means "son of Ingemar".
Ingólfsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Ingólfr" in Icelandic.
Isachsen Norwegian
Means "son of Isach".
Ísaksdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Ísak" in Icelandic.
Ísaksson Icelandic
Means "son of Ísak" in Icelandic.
Island Norwegian
Habitational name from any of four farmsteads so named. The origin of their name is not certain; it may be a compound of is "ice" and land "land" or from Island "Iceland" (the name of the country).
Israelsson Swedish
Means "son of Israel".
Jacobsson Swedish
Means "son of Jacob".
Jakobsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jakob" in Icelandic.
Jendre German (Anglicized, Rare), Czech (Anglicized, Rare), Slovak (Anglicized, Rare), Danish (Anglicized, Rare)
Jendre is an anglicized version of many surnames throughout Europe that start with 'Jendre'.... [more]
Jensdatter Norwegian, Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Jens.
Jeppsson Swedish
Probably means "son of Jesper".
Jernberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish järn "iron" and berg "mountain".
Joansen Faroese, Danish
Means "son of Joen".
Joensen Faroese, Danish
Means "son of Joen".
Johannesdotter Swedish (Rare)
Means "daughter of Johannes". This surname is only used by females.
Jóhannessdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jóhannes" in Icelandic.
Jóhannesson Icelandic
Means "son of Jóhannes" in Icelandic.
Jóhannsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jóhann" in Icelandic.
Johansdotter Swedish (Rare)
Means "daughter of Johan". This surname is only used by females.
Jonas Danish, German, Dutch, Norwegian
From the given name Jonas
Jonsdotter Swedish (Rare)
Means "daughter of Jon 1" in Swedish. It can be seen as a truncated form of Johansdotter and/or Jonasdotter, especially if the bearer of this name lived pre 20th century.
Jónsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jón" in Icelandic.
Jonsen Norwegian
Means 'Son of Jon 1'.
Jónsson Icelandic
Means "son of Jón" in Icelandic.
Jósefsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jósef" in Icelandic.
Josefsen Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of Josef" in Danish and Norwegian.
Jósefsson Icelandic
Means "son of Jósef" in Icelandic.
Josefsson Swedish
Means "son of Josef" in Swedish.
Jósepsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Jósep" in Icelandic.
Jósepsson Icelandic
Means "son of Jósepr" in Icelandic.
Juel Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Alternate form of Juhl. This variant of the name can be traced back to the 14th century and is the name of a Danish noble family sometimes referred to as "Juel med stjernen" meaning "Juel with the star" in reference to their coat-of-arms, as a way to distinguish them from another Danish noble family - the Juul-family - who in turn are known as "Juul with the fleur-de-lis"... [more]
Juhl Danish, Norwegian (Rare), Low German
Likely originating as a nickname for people born around Christmas or who had a connection with that time of year, from the Old Norse jól, which was the name of the Nordic pagan midwinter festival, or modern Danish jul meaning "Christmas" (cf... [more]
Juliusson Swedish
Means "son of Julius".
Juncker German, Danish, French
Meaning "young nobleman" in German and Danish.
Junel Swedish (Rare)
Perhaps a variant of Junell.
Junelius Finland Swedish (Archaic, ?)
Variant of Junnelius, a latinized form of the Finnish surname Junna.
Juul Danish, Norwegian
Alternate form of Juhl. This variant of the name can be traced back to the 13th century as the name of a Danish noble family still alive today. The family is sometimes referred to as "Juul med liljen" meaning "Juul with the fleur-de-lis" in reference to their coat-of-arms, as a way to distinguish them from another Danish noble family - the Juel-family - who in turn are known as "Juel with the star"... [more]
Käll Swedish
From Swedish källa "source (of a stream of water)", ultimately derived from Old Norse kelda.
Källberg Swedish
Swedish variant of Kjellberg.
Kamban Faroese, Old Norse, Old Celtic, Old Irish
Likely from Old Irish cambán "crooked one". This was the surname of Grímur Kamban, the legendary first settler in the Faroe Islands according to the Færeyinga saga. This name is still borne by a handful of people in the Faroe Islands today.
Kamp German, Dutch, Danish
From the German element kamp (from Latin campus) "field".
Kämpe Swedish
From Swedish kämpe "fighter".
Kamprad Swedish (Rare)
Rare Swedish surname of German origin. A notable bearer is Ingvar Kamprad (1926-2018), a Swedish business magnate and the founder of IKEA... [more]
Kane Irish, Norwegian
From the anglicized Irish surname Cathan, meaning "warlike." In Norway, it's used as a noble name.
Känngård Swedish (Rare)
Derived from a place named Kännavallen (now known as Tjännavallen) outside Enånger, Hälsingland, Sweden.
Kárason Icelandic
Means "son of Kári" in Icelandic.
Karlgren Swedish
Combination of the given name Karl and Swedish gren "branch".
Karlin Swedish (Rare)
Variant spelling of Carlin 3.
Karlström Swedish
Literally means "Carl's stream" in Swedish.
Kempe Swedish
Variant of Kämpe.
Kevinsen Scandinavian
Scandinavian variant of Kevinson.
Keyn Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from the Norwegian word for "strong pillar".
Kielland Norwegian
Alexander Kielland was a Norwegian writer (1849–1906).
Kierkegaard Danish
Means "farm near the church" from elements kirke meaning "church" and gaard meaning "farm." A famous bearer is Søren Aabye Kierkegaard, a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher.
Kihlberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish kil "wedge" and berg "mountain".
Kile Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of thirteen farmsteads named Kile from, ultimately derived from Old Norse kíll "wedge" and, by extension, "narrow bay inlet".
Kjartansdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Kjartan". Used exclusively by women.
Kjartansson Icelandic
Means "son of Kjartan". Used exclusively by men.
Kjella Norwegian (?)
Meaning unknown, but it might be related to the given name Kjell.
Kjellberg Swedish, Norwegian (Rare)
Combination of Old Norse kelda or Swedish källa both meaning "spring, source (of water)", and berg "mountain".
Kjellsen Norwegian
Means "son of Kjell"
Klintsen Norwegian, Danish
Means "son of Klint".
Knös Swedish (Rare)
Derived from the name of a farm named Knorren or Knörren in Sweden whose name is unexplained but possibly taken from Swedish knusa "to crush, to crumble". Knös coincides with the Swedish word knös meaning "rich person", but the surname existed before the vocabulary word appeared in the Swedish language.
Koefoed Danish
Probably a Danish form of Dutch Koevoets. The name arrived on the Danish island Bornholm via Lübeck, Germany.
Køhler Danish
Danish form of Kohler.
Kolden German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
Kris Danish
From the given name Kris.
Kristjánsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Kristján" in Icelandic.
Kristjánsson Icelandic
Means "son of Kristján" in Icelandic.
Kristófersdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Kristófer" in Icelandic.
Kristófersson Icelandic
Means "son of Kristófer" in Icelandic.
Krog Norwegian, Danish
Habitational name from places named with krog "corner, bend".
Kronberg German, Swedish
German habitational name from any of the places called Kronberg near Frankfurt in Hesse and in Bavaria from the elements krone "crown" and berg "mountain, hill". Swedish ornamental name from kron "crown" and berg "mountain hill".
Kullberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish kulle "hill" and berg "mountain".
Kurtsen Danish (Rare)
Means "son of Kurt".
Kvist Swedish
Swedish surname meaning "twig, branch".... [more]
Læstadius Swedish
From the name of the village Lästa in Ångermanland, Sweden, whose name possibly means "Leiðulfr's home". Lars Levi Læstadius (1800-1861) was a Swedish priest who founded a Lutheran revival movement known as Laestadianism.
Lagerlöf Swedish
A notable bearer was Swedish author Selma Lagerlöf (1858-1940), the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in literature (1909).
Lagerqvist Swedish
Combination of Swedish lager "laurel" and qvist, an archaic spelling of kvist, "twig".
Lamberg Finnish, Swedish
Perhaps combination of an unexplained first element (maybe taken from a place name) and Swedish berg "mountain". It could also be of German origin (see other submission).
Lande French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
Landin Swedish
A combination of Swedish land "land" and the common surname suffix -in, derived from Latin -inus, -inius "descendant of"
Långbacka Finland Swedish
From Swedish lång "long" and backe "slope, hillside".
Langeland Norwegian
Derived from the elements lang meaning "long" and land meaning "land" or "farmstead".
Langhorn English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
Lantz Swedish
Swedish soldier name meaning "lance". ... [more]
Lars Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), German
Patronymic from the given name Lars.
Larsdatter Norwegian, Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic for Lars.
Lassen Danish
Variant of Larsen.
Laudrup Danish
Possibly from the name of homesteads in Denmark, most likely derived from Old Norse laut meaning "barn", combined with the Danish suffix -drup (itself from Old Norse thorp) meaning "outlying farmstead, village, settlement"... [more]
Laxness Icelandic (Rare)
Derived from the name of a farm in Mosfellsbær parish in southwest Iceland. A notable bearer was author and Nobel Prize winner Halldór Laxness (1902-1998).
Leffler German, Swedish
Occupational name for a spoonmaker. Derived from German Löffel "spoon".
Leifsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Leif" in Icelandic.
Leijon Swedish
Variant of Lejon.
Lejon Swedish
Means "lion" in Swedish.
Lemming Danish
Derived from any of the places in Denmark called Lemming where the first element lem "lamb" is combined with the suffix -ing denoting a place.
Levísdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Leví" in Icelandic.
Levísson Icelandic
Means "son of Leví" in Icelandic.
Lidén Swedish
Combination of the Swedish place name element lid "slope, hillside" and the common surname siffix -én.
Lidholm Swedish
Combination of Swedish lid "slope" and holm "islet".
Lidman Swedish
Combination of Swedish place name element lid "slope, hillside" and man "man". A notable bearer was Swedish writer Sara Lidman (1923-2004).
Lidström Swedish
Combination of the Swedish place name element lid "slope, hillside" and ström "stream, flow". A notable bearer is Swedish ice hockey player Nicklas Lidström (b. 1970).
Lif Swedish
This is most likely a name adopted by soldiers in the 17th century. The actual meaning is unclear. It could be taken directly from the Swedish word liv meaning "life" or from a location named with this element.
Lilja Swedish, Finnish
Means "lily" in Swedish and Finnish. It is also used as a first name (see Lilja).
Liljedahl Swedish, Norwegian
Ornamental name derived from Swedish lilje, a genitive form of lilja "lily" used in compounds, and the archaic word dahl (Old Norse dalr) meaning "valley"... [more]
Liljegren Swedish
Combination of Swedish lilja "lily" and gren "branch".
Liljeman Swedish (Rare)
From the Swedish lilja meaning "lily" and the suffix man meaning "man."
Lindahl Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and dal "valley".
Lindbergh Swedish (Rare), English (Rare)
Rare variant spelling of Lindberg. A famous bearer was American aviator Charles Lindbergh (1902-1974) who was the first person to fly non-stop from America to mainland Europe in 1927.
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Middle Hugh German, Dutch linde or Scandinavian lind "lime tree". Almost exclusively ornamental in Swedish, otherwise probably habitational. There are also a number of feminine names containing the element lind, for example Linda, Dietlinde and Gerlinde, and it's possible that the surname is derived from any of those names.
Lindell Swedish
Derived from Swedish lind "lime tree".
Lindelöf Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and löf (an archaic spelling of löv) "leaf".
Lindén Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "linden tree" and the common surname suffix -én.
Lindfors Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree, linden" and fors "rapid, waterfall".
Lindh Swedish
Variant spelling of Lind.
Lindhagen Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and hage "enclosed pasture". Carl Lindhagen was the Chief Magistrate of Stockholm in the early 1900s.
Lindman Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "linden tree" and man "man".
Lindskog Swedish
Derived from Swedish lind meaning "linden tree" and skog meaning "forest".
Lindstedt Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and stad "town, city" (spelling possibly influenced by German Stadt, also meaning "town, city").
Lindstrøm Norwegian
Norwegian form of Lindström.
Lindvall Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and vall "pasture, grassy field".
Linnaeus Swedish (Rare)
Latinized form of Lind. A famous bearer was Swedish botanist Carl Linneaus (b. 1707 - d. 1778). His father adopted the name Linnaeus after a big lime tree (lind in Swedish) that grew on the family homestead in Vittaryd parish, Småland.
Linné Swedish
Swedish form of Linnaeus.
Ljungberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish ljung "heather" and berg "mountain".
Ljungqvist Swedish
Composed of the elements ljung "heather" and quist, an old spelling of kvist "twig".
Ljungström Swedish
Combination of Swedish ljung "heather" and ström "stream".
Löf Swedish
From an archaic Swedish spelling of löv "leaf".
Löfdahl Swedish
Combination of Swedish löv "leaf" and dal "valley".
Löfholm Swedish (Rare)
From Swedish elements löv "leaf" and holme "islet".
Löfquist Swedish
Combination of Swedish löv "leaf" and kvist "twig".
Löfström Swedish
Combination of Swedish löv "leaf" and ström "stream".
Löfvén Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish löv "leaf" and the common surname suffix -én, a derivative of Latin -enius "descendant of". Stefan Löfven (b. 1957) is a Swedish politician and the prime minister of Sweden since 2014.
Løkken Norwegian
Habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads so called. Derived from Old Norse lykkja "enclosure".
Lomholt Danish
From the name of a farm/estate in Vejlby Parish, Denmark.
Lönn Swedish
Means "maple" in Swedish.
Lööf Swedish
Variant of Löf.
Lööv Swedish
Variant of Löf.
Lööw Swedish
Variant of Löf.
Løvaas Norwegian
Ultimately derived from Old Norse lauf "leaf, foliage" and áss "hill, ridge". Taken from any of the many farms in Norway named Løvaas,
Løvdahl Norwegian (Rare)
From the name of any of the numerous homes or places named Old Norse lauf "leaf foliage" and dalr "valley".
Loven Norwegian (Rare), American (Rare)
From a farm (later renamed to Låvi) in Aurland municipality in Sogn og Fjordane fylke.... [more]
Løvgren Norwegian
Norwegian form of Löfgren.
Löwenthal Jewish, Swedish
Ornamental name composed of German Löwe "lion" and T(h)al "valley". In some cases the Jewish name would have been an ornamental elaboration associated with the personal name Levi (or other names meaning "lion").
Lugn Swedish (Rare)
Means "calm" in Swedish.
Lundell Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and the common surname suffix -ell.
Lundholm Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and holm "islet".
Lundmark Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and mark "ground, field, land".
Lundstedt Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and stad "town, city" (spelling possibly influenced by German Stadt, also meaning "town, city").
Lundsten Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and sten "stone".
Lundvall Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "groove" and vall "pasture".
Lundvik Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and vik "bay".
Lunn Norwegian, English
Derived from Lund, which in turn comes from the Old Norse lundr, meaning "grove of trees".
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lúðvíksdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Lúðvík" in Icelandic.
Lúðvíksson Icelandic
Means "son of Lúðvík" in Icelandic.
Lyng Danish, Norwegian
Means "heather" in Norwegian and Danish.
Lynge Danish
From a town in Denmark named "Lynge".