Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is TanorFaux.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABOUT     French
It is a french surname that comes from the french word 'about', meaning "an extremity of a metallic or wooden element or piece." This surname is notably born by the French novelist Edmond François Valentin About... [more]
AFIF     Arabic
Arabic: from the personal name Afif. It means 'chaste'.
AIMAR     Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon, Spanish
1. From the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Aethelmaer", meaning "famous noble." ... [more]
ALT     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from alt ‘old’, typically applied as a distinguishing epithet to the older of two bearers of the same personal name.
ANDERS     German, Scottish, Czech
Derived from the given name Anders.
ANNE     Indian
Indian (Andhra Pradesh); pronounced as two syllables: Hindu name of unknown meaning.
APPEL     German, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
ARTIS     English
English: regional name for someone from the French province of Artois, from Anglo-Norman French Arteis (from Latin Atrebates, the name of the local Gaulish tribe). This surname is popular in North Carolina and Virginia, of the US.
BARHAM     English
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, are named with Old English beorg ‘hill’ + ham ‘homestead’. The one in Kent, however, is from an unattested Old English byname Biora, Beora (a derivative of bera ‘bear’) + ham.
BARRINGTON     English, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
BARTLEY     English, American
1. English: habitational name from Bartley in Hampshire, or from Bartley Green in the West Midlands, both of which are named with Old English be(o)rc ‘birch’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’; compare Barclay... [more]
BIERBAUM     German
German: topographic name for someone who lived by a pear tree, Middle Low German berbom. Compare Birnbaum.
BLUTH     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name from Middle High German bluot, German Blüte ‘bloom’, ‘flower head’. ... [more]
BOORMAN     Anglo-Saxon, English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived in a particularly noteworthy or conspicuous cottage, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bur", bower, cottage, inner room, with "mann", man, or a locational name from any of the various places called Bower(s) in Somerset and Essex, which appear variously as "Bur, Bure" and "Bura" in the Domesday Book of 1086... [more]
BOREMAN     Dutch
Dutch: variant of Borneman. ... [more]
BORMAN     Dutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNE     English, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BORNEMAN     Dutch
1. Respelling of German Bornemann. ... [more]
BORNEMANN     Low German
North German: topographic name denoting someone who lived by a well or spring, from Middle Low German born ‘spring’, ‘well’ + man ‘man’.
BOWE     Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWER     English, Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a bow maker, Older Scots bowar, equivalent to English Bowyer. ... [more]
BOWERMAN     English, American
1. English: occupational name for a house servant who attended his master in his private quarters (see Bower). ... [more]
BOWYER     English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of bows (see Bow), as opposed to an archer. Compare Bowman.
BRAS     Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German: from Old French and Middle Dutch bras ‘arm’. This was probably a descriptive nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the arm, but the word was also used as a measure of length, and may also have denoted a surveyor.
BREVARD     French
French: nickname from Old French bref ‘small’ + the derogatory suffix -ard.... [more]
BRIGGS     English, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BROOKMAN     English, American
English: variant of Brook. ... [more]
BROWNING     English
English: from the Middle English and Old English personal name Bruning, originally a patronymic from the byname Brun (see Brown).
BRUCKMAN     German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUECKNER     German, German (Silesian)
German (Brückner): from Middle Low German brugge, Middle High German brugge, brücke, brügge ‘bridge’ + the agent suffix -ner, hence a topographic name for someone living by a bridge, an occupational name for a bridge toll collector, or in the southeast (Silesia for example) a bridge keeper or repairer... [more]
BRUEGGEMAN     German
Variant of German Brueggemann.
BRUEGGEMANN     Low German, German
North German (Brüggemann): topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper or street paver, Middle Low German brüggeman (see Bruckman, Brueckner).
BRUEGGER     Low German
North German (Brügger): occupational name for a bridge keeper, paver, or road builder, Middle Low German brügger. Compare Brueggemann.
BRUGGER     German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
BRUGMAN     Dutch, Swiss
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper, from Dutch brugge ‘bridge’ (see Bridge); in some cases, it is a habitational name for someone from the Flemish city of Bruges (or Brugge), meaning ‘bridges’... [more]
BUNCH     English
English: nickname for a hunchback, from Middle English bunche ‘hump’, ‘swelling’ (of unknown origin).
BUR     Swiss, Low German, Czech, French
Swiss and North German variant of Bauer. ... [more]
BURBAGE     English
English: habitational name from places in Wiltshire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire, so named with Old English burh ‘fort’ + bæc ‘hill’, ‘ridge’ (dative bece).
BURBIDGE     Anglo-Saxon
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a dialectal variant of the locational surname, deriving from any of the places called "Burbage", in the counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Wiltshire... [more]
BURBRIDGE     English
English: perhaps a variant of Burbage, altered by folk etymology, or possibly a habitational name from a lost place so named.
BURKETT     English
English: from an Old English personal name, Burgheard, composed of the elements burh, burg ‘fort’ (see Burke) + heard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. ... [more]
BURNLEY     English
English (Lancashire and Yorkshire): habitational name from Burnley in Lancashire, so named with the Old English river name Brun (from brun ‘brown’ or burna ‘stream’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
BUTTER     English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
CARD     English
English: metonymic occupational name for someone who carded wool (i.e. disentangled it), preparatory to spinning, from Middle English, Old French card(e) ‘carder’, an implement used for this purpose... [more]
CARREL     French
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
CARRELL     English
English: from Old French carrel, ‘pillow’, ‘bolster’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of these. In some cases perhaps an altered spelling of Irish Carroll. In other cases perhaps an altered spelling of French Carrel.
CATTRALL     English
This surname is of Old Scandinavian origin, is an English locational name from Catterall, near Garstang in Lancashire, which appeared as "Catrehala" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and "Caterhale" in the Book of Fees of 1212... [more]
CHANG     Chinese, Korean
This is the pinyin romanization of 常, Cháng ... [more]
COLO     Italian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
CONTE     Italian
Italian: from the title of rank conte ‘count’ (from Latin comes, genitive comitis ‘companion’). Probably in this sense (and the Late Latin sense of ‘traveling companion’), it was a medieval personal name; as a title it was no doubt applied ironically as a nickname for someone with airs and graces or simply for someone who worked in the service of a count.
COURTIER     French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
COWAN     Scottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized)
This surname, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin. The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus the personal name Eoghan from the old Celtic "Oue(i)n", well-born, but believed to derive ultimately from the Greek "Eugenious", "born lucky" or "well-born"... [more]
COWEN     Scottish, English (British)
Scottish and northern English: variant spelling of Cowan.
CRAN     Anglo-Saxon
This picturesque name is of Anglo Saxon origin and is a nickname surname given to a tall thin man, or someone with long legs, or some other fancied resemblance to the bird. The derivation is from the old English "cran(uc)", "cron(uc)", "cren(uc)", which means a crane and until the introduction of a separate word in the 14th Century also a heron... [more]
CRANE     English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
CRANSTON     Scottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
CRAWLEY     English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley. ... [more]
CROWLEY     Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
DAN     Romanian, Vietnamese, English, Danish
Ethnic name in various European languages (including Danish and English) meaning ‘Dane’. ... [more]
DEE     Welsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Chinese (Latinized)
Welsh: nickname for a swarthy person, from Welsh du ‘dark’, ‘black’. ... [more]
DEVANEY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibheannaigh ‘descendant of Duibheannach’, a personal name of uncertain origin; the first element is dubh ‘black’, the second may be eanach ‘marshy place’... [more]
DEVANNEY     Irish
Irish: variant of Devaney.
DIES     Roman Mythology
From the given name: Dies. ... [more]
DOLE     English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
DONAGHY     Irish
Irish: variant of Donahue.
DOSSETT     English
Recorded in several forms including Dowsett, Dosset, and Dossit, this is an English surname. ... [more]
DWIVEDI     Indian
This surname has multiple meanings, the most commonly accepted etymology is that Dwivedi means a person who has the knowledge of two Vedas, but there exists a conflicting view since Dwivedis are given higher status than Chaturvedis or Chaubeys... [more]
EAMER     French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
EMER     Jewish, Anglo-Saxon
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name from Yiddish emer ‘pail’, ‘bucket’. ... [more]
EMMER     German
A topographic name for someone who lived by land where grain was grown, a status name for someone who owned such land, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or dealt in grain.
EMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
ESPINAL     Spanish
Spanish: from any of numerous fields named Espinal or Espinar, from a collective of espina ‘thorn’.
ESS     Low German, German (Swiss)
North German: topographic name for someone living on or owning land that was waterlogged or partly surrounded by water, from Middle Low German es ‘swamp’, ‘water’. ... [more]
EYMER     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
FARRAR     English (British)
Northern English: occupational name for a smith or worker in iron, from Middle English and Old French farrour, ferour, from medieval Latin ferrator, an agent derivative of ferrare ‘to shoe horses’, from ferrum ‘iron’, in medieval Latin ‘horseshoe’... [more]
FARROW     English
Northern English: hyper-corrected form of FARRAR, occupational name for a smith or worker in iron. The original -ar or -er ending of this name came to be regarded as an error, and was changed to -ow.
FELLOWS     English
English: patronymic from Fellow, from Middle English felagh, felaw late Old English feolaga ‘partner’, ‘shareholder’ (Old Norse félagi, from fé ‘fee’, ‘money’ + legja to lay down)... [more]
FERRIER     Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a smith, one who shoed horses, Middle English and Old French ferrier, from medieval Latin ferrarius, from ferrus ‘horseshoe’, from Latin ferrum ‘iron’. Compare FARRAR.
FILOSA     Italian
Southern Italian: Probably an occupational nickname for a fisherman, from Sicilian filuòsa ‘fishing net’. Also from the subphylum: Filosa. These are known as euglyphids, filose (which means stringy or thread-like), amoebae with shells of siliceous scales or plates, which are commonly found in soils, nutrient-rich waters, and on aquatic plants.
FISK     English (British)
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone supposedly resembling a fish in some way, from Old Norse fiskr ‘fish’ (cognate with Old English fisc).
FORSTER     English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
FRAMPTON     English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
FUKUMOTO     Japanese
Japanese: ‘blessed origin’; found in western Japan and the Ryūkyū Islands.
FULCHER     English
English (chiefly East Anglia): from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + hari, heri ‘army’, which was introduced into England from France by the Normans; isolated examples may derive from the cognate Old English Folchere or Old Norse Folkar, but these names were far less common.
FUNKE     German
German: variant of Funk.
GALPIN     English
English: occupational name for a messenger or scullion (in a monastery), from Old French galopin ‘page’, ‘turnspit’, from galoper ‘to gallop’.
GEE     Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GEESON     Irish
This unusual name is the patronymic form of the surname Gee, and means "son of Gee", from the male given name which was a short form of male personal names such as "Geoffrey", "George" and "Gerard"... [more]
GILPIN     English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
GIMPEL     German, Jewish
German: from a pet form of the personal name Gumprecht (see Gombert). ... [more]
GOMBERT     French, German
French and German: from Gundbert, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements gund ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The name was relatively popular in both France and Germany during the Middle Ages, and was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews... [more]
GREENWALD     American
Partly Americanized form of German and Jewish Grün(e)wald (see Grunwald). ... [more]
GRIBBEN     Irish
This surname is of Old Gaelic origin, and is a variant of "Cribben", which itself is the Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacRoibin", meaning "son of (mac) Robin", a patronymic from the Anglo-Norman French given name "Robin"... [more]
GRODSKY     Polish, Jewish
Altered spelling of Polish Grodzki, a habitational name from Grodziec or Grodzie, places named with gród ‘castle’, ‘fortification’ (cognate with Russian grad). ... [more]
GRUNWALD     German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German (Grünwald): habitational name from any of various places named Grün(e)wald, from Middle High German gruene ‘green’ + walt ‘wood’, ‘forest’. ... [more]
GUAJARDO     Spanish
Spanish: unexplained. Perhaps a habitational name from a place so named in Estremadura. This name is common in Argentina, Chile, and Mexico. ... [more]
GULOTTA     Italian
Italian: from the female personal name, a pet form of Gulla.
GUMP     German
Occupational name or nickname from Middle High German gumpen, gumpeln ‘to clown’. from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with gund ‘battle’, ‘war’. Compare Gombert.
GUTTENBERG     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Bavaria, called Guttenberg, from the weak dative case (originally used after a preposition and article) of Old High German guot ‘good’ + berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’... [more]
HAGEMAN     Dutch, Swedish
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, from Middle Dutch haghe ‘hedge’, ‘enclosure’ + man ‘man’. Respelling of German Hagemann. ... [more]
HAGEMANN     German, Danish
1. German: topographic name for someone who lived by a hedge or enclosure, from Middle High German hac ‘enclosure’, ‘hedge’, Middle Low German hage + mann ‘man’. ... [more]
HAMDAN     Muslim
Muslim: from an Arabic personal name, Ḥamdān ‘much praise’, a derivative of Hamid. Ḥamdān was the name of a tribe in Arabia. The Hamdani dynasty ruled al-Jazira and Syria from 905 to 1004.... [more]
HARGREAVES     English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HARGROVE     English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HAYWORTH     English
English: habitational name from Haywards Heath in Sussex, which was named in Old English as ‘enclosure with a hedge’, from hege ‘hedge’ + worð ‘enclosure’. The modern form, with its affix, arose much later on (Mills gives an example from 1544).
HEALY     Irish
Southern Irish: reduced form of O’Healy, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÉilidhe ‘descendant of the claimant’, from éilidhe ‘claimant’, or of Gaelic Ó hÉalaighthe ‘descendant of Éaladhach’, a personal name probably from ealadhach ‘ingenious’.
HEFNER     German, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including Hafner, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
HIBBARD     English
English: variant of Hilbert.
HIGASHIDA     Japanese
Written as: 東田 meaning ‘eastern rice paddy’, is usually found in western Japan.... [more]
HILBERT     English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HRDINA     Czech, Slovak
Hrdina is a Czech and Slovak surname meaning "hero". Two notable bearers are Jan Hrdina, and Jiří Hrdina, both are ice hockey players.
HUMPHERY     English, Irish
English and Irish: variant of Humphrey.
ILES     English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
IMMER     German, Anglo-Saxon
German: habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. ... [more]
IMMERS     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IMORE     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IRONS     English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from Airaines in Somme, so named from Latin harenas (accusative case) ‘sands’. The form of the name has been altered as a result of folk etymology, an association of the name with the metal... [more]
JAGGER     English
English (West Yorkshire): occupational name from Middle English jagger ‘carter’, ‘peddler’, an agent derivative of Middle English jag ‘pack’, ‘load’ (of unknown origin). ... [more]
JAGR     Czech
Jágr is a Czech-language surname. It is related to the German surname Jäger which means "hunter" in German. It is used by the Ice Hockey player Jaromír Jágr.
JIMERSON     English (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English Jameson, based on a pet form of the personal name.
JOB     English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
KATZIN     Jewish
Jewish: nickname from Hebrew katsin ‘rich man’. ... [more]
KEELER     English
English: occupational name for a boatman or boatbuilder, from an agent derivative of Middle English kele ‘ship’, ‘barge’ (from Middle Dutch kiel). Americanized spelling of German Kühler, from a variant of an old personal name (see Keeling) or a variant of Kuhl.
KEELING     Irish, English
Irish: see Keeley. ... [more]
KIDDER     English
English: possibly an occupational name from early modern English kidd(i)er ‘badger’, a licensed middleman who bought provisions from farmers and took them to market for resale at a profit, or alternatively a variant of Kidman... [more]
KIDMAN     English
English: occupational name, probably for a goatherd (from Middle English kid(e) ‘young goat’ + man ‘man’), but possibly also for a cutter of wood used for fuel. (from Middle English kidde ‘faggot’ (an archaic English unit for a bundle of sticks)).
KIRCH     German
German: from Middle High German kirche ‘church’, hence a topographic name for someone living by a church or a occupational nickname from someone employed by the church. ... [more]
KRAHN     German
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
KRANE     Dutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
KRANICH     German
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
KUN     Hungarian, Jewish
Hungarian: ethnic name for a member of a Turkic people known in English as the Cumanians (Hungarian kún). ... [more]
LAGASSE     French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
LAGRANGE     French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
LAIRD     Scottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish: status name for a landlord, from northern Middle English laverd ‘lord’.
LAMARCHE     French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
LASALLE     French
1. French: local name or occupational name for someone who lived or worked at a manor house, from Old French sal(e) ‘hall’ (modern French salle; see also Sale), with the definite article la. ... [more]
LASKI     Polish, Hungarian, Jewish
Polish (Laski) and Jewish (from Poland): habitational name from Lasko (now Lask) in Sieradz voivodeship, named with laz, lazy ‘clearing in a forest’. ... [more]
LAWFORD     Anglo-Saxon
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the various places called Lawford which have as their component elements the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Lealla", cognate with the Old High German "Lallo", and the Olde English "ford", a ford... [more]
LAWFORD     Anglo-Saxon
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the various places called Lawford which have as their component elements the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Lealla", cognate with the Old High German "Lallo", and the Olde English "ford", a ford... [more]
LEVENSTEIN     Jewish, Yiddish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name, or perhaps an ornamental elaboration associated with the name Leyb; from Middle High German lewe ‘lion’, translating the Yiddish male personal name Leyb (see Low) + German stein ‘stone’, ‘rock’... [more]
LEVY     English, French, Jewish
There are three possible sources of this surname. ... [more]
LORAH     American
Americanized form of French Loreaux, from a variant of the personal name Lorel, a pet form of Laurent. This is a frequent name in Pennsylvania.
LORD     English
A surname derived from someone of a lordly manner, or perhaps one who had earned the title in some contest of skill or had played the part of the ‘Lord of Misrule’ in the Yuletide festivities.... [more]
LURIE     Jewish
It is one of the oldest family trees in the world, tracing back at least to King David born c. 1037 BCE, as documented by Neil Rosenstein in his book The Lurie Legacy. It contains many famous members such as Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Felix Mendelssohn, Martin Buber, Rashi, and Hezekiah.
MAGGIORI     Italian
Recorded in many spelling forms including the 'base' form of Maggi, and the diminutives and double diminutives Maggiore, Maggiori, Di Maggio, Maggorini, and many others, this is an Italian surname of Roman (Latin) origins... [more]
MANDIA     Italian
Southern Italian (Campania): unexplained.
MATSUZAKI     Japanese
Japanese: ‘pine tree cape’. This name is found mostly in both the Tōkyō area and on the island of Kyūshū, where it is pronounced Matsusaki.
MCCARD     Scottish, Irish
Scottish or Irish: variant of McCart.
MCCART     Northern Irish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Airt, ‘son of Art’, a personal name meaning ‘bear’.
MCCLUNG     Scottish (Anglicized)
Scottish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Luinge ‘son of Lunge’, a personal name probably meaning ‘seafarer’, although the literal meaning is ‘ship’, from Latin navis longa.
MCELHANEY     Irish
Irish: variant of McElhinney
MCELHINNEY     Northern Irish (Anglicized)
Irish (mainly Ulster): Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Choinnigh ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Coinneach’ (see Kenny).
MCKINNON     Scottish (Anglicized)
Scottish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Fhionghuin, a patronymic from a Gaelic personal name meaning ‘fair born’ or ‘fair son’. ... [more]
MCLAREN     Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Labhrainn meaning "son of Labhrann", Gaelic form of the personal name Lawrence.... [more]
MCNEESE     Irish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois, a patronymic from a shortened form of the personal name Aonghus (see Angus).
MEJIA     Spanish
Spanish (Mejía): probably from a religious byname (possibly under Jewish influence), from a vernacular form of Latin, Greek Messias ‘Messiah’, from Hebrew māšīaḥ ‘anointed’.
MENEAR     Cornish, English (British)
English (Devon; of Cornish origin): topographic name for someone who lived by a menhir, i.e. a tall standing stone erected in prehistoric times (Cornish men ‘stone’ + hir ‘long’). In the United States, it is a common surname in Pennsylvania & West Virginia.
MICHELS     German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
MONCRIEF     Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from Moncreiff Hill near Perth, so called from Gaelic monadh ‘hill’ + craoibhe, genitive of craobh ‘tree’.
MOSS     English, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish
English and Welsh: from the personal name Moss, a Middle English vernacular form of the Biblical name Moses. ... [more]
MOU     Chinese, Lao
Chinese : from the name of a state of Mou that existed during the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc). Descendants of the ruling class of this state adopted its name as their surname. ... [more]
MU     Chinese
Chinese : in the state of Song during the Spring and Autumn period (722–481 bc) there existed a leader who was posthumously given the name of the duke of Mu. His descendants adopted Mu as their surname... [more]
MULL     Scottish
Scottish, Irish, or English: Probably comes from the Scots language, as the Scots word for "headland" or comes from the geographical term, which is an Anglicization of the Gaelic Maol, a term for a rounded hill, summit, or mountain bare of trees... [more]
NAKAI     Japanese
Japanese: ‘central well’; it originated in Mikawa (now part of Aichi prefecture), and is also found in the island of Okinawa.
NAKAI     Punjabi
This surname originates from the Punjab. It is a sub-cast of Sandhu Jats and are descendants of Nakai Misl, a principality of the Sikh Empire from 1748 to 1810.
NEAD     English
1. English: possibly a metonymic nickname for a needy person, from Middle English ne(e)d ‘need’. ... [more]
NEESON     Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as McNeese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen. Surname made famous by the actor Liam Neeson
NIED     Upper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
NIES     German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
NIESEN     Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis). ... [more]
NORA     Italian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
OKUBO     Japanese
From a place name meaning ‘large hollow’, which is common in Japan and the Ryūkyū Islands. This is a frequent surname in Japan and was taken by several samurai families, most notably the Ōkubo clan between 16th and 19th century Japan, and bearers today.
OLIVERAS     Catalan
Catalan: variant spelling of the topographic name Oliveres, from the plural of olivera ‘olive tree’, or a habitational name from Las Oliveras in Murcia province.
PALMA     Spanish, Catalan, Galician, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Catalan, Galician, Portuguese, and southern Italian: habitational name from any of various places named or named with Palma, from Latin palma ‘palm’. ... [more]
PAXTON     Scottish, English
From a place in England named with the Old English given name Pæcc and Old English name element -tun "settlement". A famous bearer was the actor Bill Paxton, (1955-2017).
PELT     Dutch
Dutch: shortened form of Van Pelt.
PINCH     English
Nickname for a chirpy person, from Middle English pinch, pink ‘(chaf)finch’. Compare Finch. possibly a metonymic occupational name from Middle English pinche ‘pleated fabric’, from Middle English pinche(n) ‘to pinch (pastry)’, ‘to pleat (fabric)’, ‘to crimp (hair, etc.)’, also ‘to cavil’, ‘to be niggardly’.
PLUM     English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
PLUMER     German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
PLUMMER     English
1. Occupational name for a worker in lead, especially a maker of lead pipes and conduits, from Anglo-Norman French plom(m)er, plum(m)er ‘plumber’, from plom(b), plum(b) ‘lead’ (Latin plumbum)... [more]
PRESHAW     English (British, Rare)
This surname is a habitational name from a locality near Upham on the slopes of the South Downs. It is entirely within a private estate and has its own chapel.
PRUDHOMME     French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
PULASKI     Polish
Polish (Pułaski): habitational name for someone from the Pulazie in Łomża Voivodeship.
PURDOM     English
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
PURDUM     English
Variant spelling of English Purdom.
RATHER     German, Jewish
1. Occupational name for a counsellor or nickname for a wise person, from Middle High German rater ‘adviser’. ... [more]
REDMER     Frisian
North German: from the Frisian personal name, composed of the Germanic elements rad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’ + mari, meri ‘fame’.
REDNER     German
German: possibly a variant of Redmer, or an occupational name for a spokesman, Middle High German rednære.
REX     English, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
RICHE     English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RIECK     German
South German: from a pet form of the personal name Ru(o)diger, a compound of Old High German hrod ‘renown’ + ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’ (see Roger). ... [more]
RIEK     German
German: variant spelling of RIECK.
RITCH     English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGS     French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
ROHRBACH     German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: habitational name from any of numerous places called Rohrbach (‘reed brook’ or ‘channel brook’) in many parts of Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. It is a common surname in Pennsylvania.
ROOP     Dutch
Dutch: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Robrecht.
ROOT     English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
ROPER     English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of rope, from an agent derivative of Old English rāp ‘rope’. See also ROOP.
ROTHMAN     German, Jewish
German (Rothmann) and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a person with red hair, from an elaborated form of Roth 1. ... [more]
ROTHMANN     German
German: see Rothman.
RUDNER     German
German: unexplained. Perhaps a variant of Redner.
RUTH     English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
RUTMAN     Jewish, German
1. Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): origin uncertain; perhaps a variant of Rothman. ... [more]
RUTMANN     German
German: see Rutman.
RUTT     English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
RYERSON     American
Americanized spelling of Swedish Reierson or of any of its cognates, for example Dutch Ryerse, Ryersen or Norwegian and Danish Reiersen.
SABA     French, Occitan
Nickname from a variant of Occitan sabe meaning "tasty, flavorsome". Compare Sabourin.
SALE     English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SCHWAB     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): regional name for someone from Swabia (German Schwaben), from Middle High German Swap, German Schwabe ‘Swabian’. The region takes its name from a Germanic tribe recorded from the 1st century BC in the Latin form Suebi or Suevi, of uncertain origin; it was an independent duchy from the 10th century until 1313, when the territory was broken up.
SEIDE     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from Middle High German side, German Seide ‘silk’ (from Late Latin seta, originally denoting animal hair), hence a metonymic occupational name for a manufacturer or seller of silk.
SEIM     Upper German
German: metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper, from Middle High German seim ‘honey’.
SEM     Norwegian
Norwegian: habitational name from any of about fifteen farms so named, a variant of Seim.
SENG     German
1. Topographic name for someone who lived by land cleared by fire, from Middle High German sengen ‘to singe or burn’. ... [more]
SENSABAUGH     American
Americanized form of German Sensenbach, a topographic name formed with an unexplained first element + Middle High German bach ‘creek’.
SENSENBACH     German
A topographic name formed with an unexplained first element + Middle High German bach ‘creek’. Pretty common in Iowa and Pennsylvania.
SHALIT     Hebrew
Hebrew: שַׁלִּיט‎ šallīt meaning "ruler"
SHINN     English
Metonymic occupational name for a Skinner, from Old English scinn, Middle English shin ‘hide’, ‘pelt’. In Middle English this word was replaced by the Norse equivalent, skinn.
SHISHIDO     Japanese
Japanese: habitational name taken from a district in Hitachi (now Ibaraki prefecture), written with a variant character for ‘flesh’ and ‘door’. It is found mostly in northeastern Japan.
SILK     English, Irish
English: metonymic occupational name for a silk merchant, from Middle English selk(e), silk(e) ‘silk’. ... [more]
SILL     English
English: from a medieval personal name, a short form of Silvester (see Silvester) or Silvanus (see Silvano).
SING     German, Chinese (Cantonese), Indian
German: probably a variant of Seng. ... [more]
SLACK     English, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
SMULLEN     Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Smolláin, according to Patrick Woulfe, a variant of Ó Spealáin (see Spillane).
SOLAR     Spanish (Rare), Catalan, Aragonese, Asturian
Spanish, Catalan, Aragonese, and Asturian-Leonese: topographic name from Latin solarius ‘ancestral home’ (a derivative of solum ‘ground’, ‘floor’), perhaps denoting someone who lived near or at the house of an important family.
SOTTILE     Italian
Southern Italian: nickname from sottile ‘delicate’, ‘refined’, also ‘lean’, ‘thin’ (from Latin subtilis ‘small’, ‘slender’).
SPILLANE     Irish
Irish: reduced form O’Spillane, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Spealáin or ‘descendant of Spealán’, a personal name representing a diminutive of "speal" "‘scythe’". Compare Smullen... [more]
SPLAIN     Irish
Irish: reduced form of Spillane.
SPOHR     German
Occupational name for a maker of spurs, from Middle High German spor ‘spur’, or a topographic name, from Middle High German spor ‘spoor’, ‘animal tracks’.... [more]
SQUIRE     English
Surname comes from the occupation of a Squire. A young man who tends to a knight.
SQUIRES     English
Surname is plural of Squire. A young person that tends to his knight, also someone that is a member of a landowner class that ranks below a knight.
STEINER     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for someone who worked with stone: a quarry-man, stone-cutter, or stonemason; an agent derivative of Stein. Also can be a topographic name for someone who lived on stony ground or near a prominent outcrop of rock.
STRAKA     Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak: Nickname from straka ‘magpie’, probably for a thievish or insolent person.... [more]
SYLER     German
Altered spelling of German Seiler.
TEMPEST     English (British)
English (Yorkshire): nickname for someone with a blustery temperament, from Middle English, Old French tempest(e) ‘storm’ (Latin tempestas ‘weather’, ‘season’, a derivative of tempus ‘time’).
TEMPESTA     Italian
Italian: nickname for someone with a blustery temperament, from tempesta ‘storm’, ‘tempest’ (see Tempest). ... [more]
THAN     Vietnamese
Vietnamese: unexplained.
THOMA     German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: variant of Thomas. Greek: genitive patronymic from Thomas. Genitive patronymics are particularly associated with Cyprus.
TODA     Japanese
Japanese: there are multiple meanings with this surname depending on the kanji used. ... [more]
TRAIN     English (British), English (Devon)
English (Devon): 1. metonymic occupational name for a trapper or hunter, from Middle English trayne, Old French traine ‘guile’, ‘snare’, ‘trap’. ... [more]
TRUE     English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has three distinct possible sources, each with its own history and derivation. ... [more]
TRUMBO     French, German
French (Alsatian) form of German Trumbauer.
VECCHI     Italian
Italian: patronymic or plural form of Vecchio, meaning "old".
VECCHIO     Sicilian
Italian (mainly Sicily): from vecchio ‘old’, ‘aged’, applied as a status name for the older or oldest son, or as a nickname, possibly for someone who was prematurely gray, bent, or wrinkled.
VERRONE     Italian
Italian: probably a nickname from an augmentative form of verro ‘boar’.
WEIL     German, Jewish
South German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places so named in Baden, Bavaria, and Württemberg, from Latin villa ‘country house’, ‘estate’ (later used of a group of houses forming a settlement).
WEILER     German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places so named in southern Germany. Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Weil.
WICK     English, German
English: topographic name for someone who lived in an outlying settlement dependent on a larger village, Old English wic (Latin vicus), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, of which there are examples in Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Somerset, and Worcestershire... [more]
WIESNER     German
German: habitational name for someone from a place called Wiesen, or topographic name for someone who lived by a meadow, a derivative of Middle High German wise ‘meadow’.
WIN     Dutch, English, Burmese, Thai
Southeast Asian: unexplained. ... [more]
WINKEL     German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
WINKELMANN     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’. ... [more]
WINNE     Dutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
WITZ     German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’. Also a variant of Witzig. ... [more]
WITZIG     German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
WOLFRAM     English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
WORK     Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from the lands of Work in the parish of St. Ola, Orkney.
WOULFE     English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
WYLER     English
English: variant of Wheeler or a respelling of Jewish Weiler.
ZAMBONI     Italian
Italian: from the personal name Zamboni, a northeastern variant of Giambono, composed of a reduced form of Gianni (from Giovanni) + Bono or buono ‘good’.
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