Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
PHOENIXEnglish
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years... [more]
PICKETTEnglish
of Norman origin, from the personal name "Pic", here with the diminutive suffixes "et" or "ot", and recorded as "Picot, Pigot" and Piket". The name is ultimately of Germanic derivation, from "pic", meaning "sharp", or "pointed", which was a common element in names meaning for instance, residence near a "pointed hill", use of a particular sharp or pointed tool or weapon, or a nickname for a tall, thin person.
PICKFORDEnglish
This surnames origins lie with the Anglo-Saxons. It is a product of their having lived in the parish of Pitchford in Shropshire. ... [more]
PICOTEnglish
Norman-French
PIERPONTEnglish
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Aisne and Calvados, so called from Old French pierre ‘stone’ + pont ‘bridge’.
PIKEEnglish, Irish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point, from Old English pic ‘point’, ‘hill’, which was a relatively common place name element.... [more]
PILCHEnglish
From Middle English pilch, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches or a nickname for a habitual wearer of these. A pilch (from Late Latin pellicia, a derivative of pellis "skin, hide") was a kind of coarse leather garment with the hair or fur still on it.
PILCHEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches, from an agent derivative of Pilch. In early 17th-century English, pilcher was a popular term of abuse, being confused or punningly associated with the unrelated verb pilch "to steal" and with the unrelated noun pilchard, a kind of fish.
PILGRIMEnglish, German
From Middle English pilegrim, pelgrim or Middle High German bilgerin, pilgerin (from Latin pelegrinus "traveler"; see Pellegrino). This originated as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to some seat of devotion nearer home, such as Santiago de Compostella, Rome, or Canterbury... [more]
PILKINGTONEnglish (British), Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, England.
PINCHEnglish
Nickname for a chirpy person, from Middle English pinch, pink ‘(chaf)finch’. Compare Finch. possibly a metonymic occupational name from Middle English pinche ‘pleated fabric’, from Middle English pinche(n) ‘to pinch (pastry)’, ‘to pleat (fabric)’, ‘to crimp (hair, etc.)’, also ‘to cavil’, ‘to be niggardly’.
PINCHESEnglish (British, Rare)
This is one of the very earliest of surnames. This is an English name. First recorded in the 12th century it was a nickname of endearment for a bright, chirpy, person, thought by his peer group to be active like a finch... [more]
PINCKNEYEnglish
The surname Pinckney originally denoted someone from Picquigny, France, which derives from a Germanic personal name, Pincino (of obscure derivation) and the Latin locative suffix -acum... [more]
PINESEnglish (American)
Surname of the characters, Dipper, Mabel and Stan from Gravity Falls.
PINKEnglish, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
PINKHAMEnglish
habitational name from a lost or unidentified place in or bordering on Devon
PINKNEYEnglish
Variant spelling of Pinckney.
PINNEREnglish (Rare)
Parish in Middlesex.
PITTEnglish
English from Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit or hollow, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pitt in Hampshire.
PITTMANEnglish
Described someone who lived in a hollow or pitt (see Pitt).
PLANTEnglish
An occupational surname for a gardener.
PLATTENEnglish
Diminutive of Platt.
PLAYFAIREnglish
From a medieval nickname for an enthusiastic competitor in sports and games (from Middle English pleyfere "companion in play, playmate"), or else a different form of Playford (from a Suffolk place-name meaning "ford where sports are held")... [more]
PLEASANCEEnglish
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Plaisance, literally "pleasantness"; or (ii) "person from Piacenza", Italy (from Latin Placentia, literally "pleasing things").
PLEASANTAmerican
Means being a very bright man in the near future. Also can be used as a alias.
PLUMEnglish, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
PLUMERGerman, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
PLUMMEREnglish
1. Occupational name for a worker in lead, especially a maker of lead pipes and conduits, from Anglo-Norman French plom(m)er, plum(m)er ‘plumber’, from plom(b), plum(b) ‘lead’ (Latin plumbum)... [more]
POBJOYEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
POEEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a vain or flamboyantly dressed person (from Old Norse "peacock"). American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was a famous bearer.
POGUEIrish, American
An Irish surname meaning "kiss"
POLANDEnglish, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
POLINGEnglish, Welsh
Altered form of Bolling, possibly also of Bollinger or Pollinger.
POLLOCKScottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Glasgow, apparently so named from a diminutive of a British cognate of Gaelic poll ‘pool’, ‘pit’. The surname is also common in northeastern Ulster.... [more]
POLTIMOREEnglish (Rare)
Rare English surname derived from a Devon place name of Celtic origin, allegedly meaning “pool by the large house”.
POMEROYEnglish
From an English surname meaning "dweller by the apple orchard".
POMPEYFrench, English
Variant of Italian POMPEI.
PONCESpanish, English
The Ponce name was carried into England after the migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066.'Ponce' is derived from 'Ponsoby',a place in Cumberland, where the family settled. The Ponce motto is 'Pro rege, lege grege' meaning "For the King, law, and people"
POOKEnglish
Pooke was the original version... [more]
POOLEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pool or pond, Middle English pole (Old English pōl), or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Poole in Dorset, South Pool in Devon, and Poole Keynes in Gloucestershire.
POPPGerman, English
From a Germanic personal name Poppo, Boppo, of uncertain origin and meaning, perhaps originally a nursery word or a short form of for example Bodobert, a Germanic personal name meaning ‘famous leader’... [more]
PORTUGALSpanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
POSEYEnglish, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
POSYEnglish
Variant of Posey
POTEETEnglish, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
POTHIEREnglish
One of the Many spellings of Pottier
POULTONEnglish
English surname that means "settlement by a pool".
POWALSKIEnglish (American)
Surname of Leon Powalski from the Star Fox 64 series.
POWISEnglish
The English of Welsh Surname Powys, which derives from the place "Powys" in Wales.
POWYESEnglish
Unknown source. Surname of many early American pilgrims.
PRATEnglish
Variant of Pratt.
PREECEWelsh (Anglicized), English
Variant of PRICE. From Welsh ap Rhys meaning "son of RHYS". ... [more]
PRENTICEEnglish
Derived from apprentice.
PRESHAWEnglish (British, Rare)
This surname is a habitational name from a locality near Upham on the slopes of the South Downs. It is entirely within a private estate and has its own chapel.
PRESSEnglish, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
PREVOSTFrench, English
Derived from Old French prevost meaning "provost" (ultimately from Latin praepositus, the past participle of praeponere meaning "to place in charge") which is a status name for any of the various officials in a position of responsibility.
PREWITTEnglish
English surname meaning brave, valor.
PRIDMOREEnglish
unexplained; perhaps a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name.
PRIESTEnglish
Derived from the occupation priest, which is a minister of a church. It could also be a nickname for a person who is / was a priest.
PRINCEEnglish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
PRIOREnglish, Scottish, Dutch, German
Derived from Latin prior meaning "superior". It was used as an occupational surname for a prior, which is a head of a religious house, below an abbot.
PRIVETTFrench, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see PRIVATUS). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
PROCTOREnglish
proctor was originally used for the test examiner but later had been adopted as a suraname
PROCTOREnglish
Occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour "steward" (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator "agent", from procurare "to manage"). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.
PROPHETEnglish, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
PROVOSTEnglish, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
PRUDHOMMEFrench, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
PRUEEnglish, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
PRUITTEnglish, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
PUCHOLEnglish, English (American)
Puchol is name prominently used in the English culture. "Puchol" means "Little Bitch" and is generally associated with weakness. Studies show that the name and those who have it give cancer to others... [more]
PUCKETTEnglish
Of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Pocket(t), from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French poque "small pouch", hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of purses and pouches or a nickname... [more]
PUDDEPHATEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone with a roly-poly physique (from Middle English puddy fat "round-bellied vat").
PUETTEnglish (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
PULSIFEREnglish
Probably a variant of Percival.
PULVERLow German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
PURDEYEnglish
Variant of Purdie (see Purdie on the given name site)
PURDIEEnglish
The first name Purdie is transferred usage of this surname, which means "by God" in Norman French.
PURDOMEnglish
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
PURDUMEnglish
Variant spelling of English Purdom.
PURPLEEnglish
Nickname for someone wore purple clothing or has a purple complexion
PUSEYEnglish
Habitational name from Pusey in Oxfordshire (formerly in Berkshire), so called from Old English peose, piosu ‘pea(s)’ + ēg ‘island’, ‘low-lying land’, or from Pewsey in Wiltshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Pevesie, apparently from the genitive case of an Old English personal name Pefe, not independently attested + Old English ēg ‘island’.
PUTTICKEnglish (British)
A variant spelling of the Sussex surname Puttock from the Village of Puttock, which itself derives from the Old English "Puttocke" a bird of prey, the kite. ... [more]
PYBURNEnglish (?)
Apparently from some lost or minor place so named. 1881 British census has 109; KH.
PYGALLEnglish (Hellenized, Rare)
From ancient Greek for rump, associations with prostitution across Europe, commonly given to illegitimate children of prostitutes, found especially in North East England and Nottinghamshire.
PYKEEnglish
Most likely originates from the words pike (the weapon or the fish), having to do with fishermen or soldiers, or pick, having to do with miners or somebody who tills the ground.
QUANTRELLEnglish
From a medieval nickname for an elegantly or flamboyantly dressed person (from Middle English quointerel "dandy, fop", from quointe "known, knowledgeable, crafty, elegant").
QUARRYEnglish
From Middle English quarey "quarry", a topographic name for someone who lived near a stone quarry, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in one. ... [more]
QUARTERMAINEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a very dextrous person, or for someone who habitually wore gloves (from Old French quatremains, literally "four hands"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Allan Quartermain, the hero of 'King Solomon's Mines' (1886) and other adventure novels by H. Rider Haggard... [more]
QUARTERMAINEEnglish
Variant of Quartermain. This surname was borne by British actor Leon Quartermaine (1876-1967).
QUAYLEEnglish, Irish, Scottish, Manx
Meaning, "son of Paul." When the name originates from Ireland, the Isle of Man and Scotland it is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Phàil (Scottish) Mac Phóil (Irish) Mac Phaayl (Manx) meaning "son of Pàil / Póil / Paayl"... [more]
QUENBYEnglish
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Quarmby, a habitational name from a place so called in West Yorkshire.
QUENNELLEnglish
From the medieval female personal name Quenilla, from Old English Cwēnhild, literally "woman-battle". This was borne by Peter Quennell (1905-1993), a British poet, critic and historian.
QUESTEDEnglish (British)
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly derived from the lost village of Questers.
QUINEnglish
Variant of Quinn.
QUINLEYEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Apparently an altered form of Scottish McKinley or a reduced form of Irish McQuinnelly, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
RACHELEnglish, German
From the English female given name RACHEL or derived from German rau "rough".
RACKHAMEnglish
Means "person from Rackham", Sussex ("homestead or enclosure with ricks"). This surname was borne by British watercolourist and book illustrator Arthur Rackham (1867-1939).
RADFORDEnglish
Habitational name from any of the various places so named, for example in Devon, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire, and Hereford and Worcester. Most are named from Old English read "red" + ford "ford", but it is possible that in some cases the first element may be a derivative of Old English ridan "to ride", with the meaning "ford that can be crossed on horseback".
RAGSDALEEnglish
Apparently an English habitational name from Ragdale in Leicestershire, which is probably named from Old English hraca "gully", "narrow pass" + dæl "valley", "dale".
RAINBIRDEnglish
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-bright" (cf. Raginbert). The modern form of the name has been influenced by English rainbird "plover".
RAINBOWEnglish
From the Old French male personal name Rainbaut, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-brave" (cf. Raginbald). The modern form of the name has been influenced by English rainbow.
RAINWATEREnglish (American)
Americanized form of the German family name Reinwasser, possibly a topographic name for someone who lived by a source of fresh water, from Middle High German reine ‘pure’ + wazzer ‘water’.
RAISBECKEnglish
Raisbeck is a hamlet in the civil parish of Orton, in the Eden district, in the county of Cumbria, England. The surname Raisbeck originates from the hamlet. The name of the hamlet derives from Hrridarr, a personal name and beck, a stream or river.
RAISHEnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Raisch.
RAISONEnglish, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
RALEIGHEnglish
English habitation name in Devon meaning "red woodland clearing".
RALLSEnglish (Anglicized, Rare)
From old English or Saxon. Originally Rallf ( Raulf) which meant Wolf Council
RALPHEnglish
From a Middle English personal name composed of Germanic rad "counsel, advice" and wolf "wolf". This was first introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Ráðulfr, and was reinforced after the Conquest by the Norman form Ra(d)ulf... [more]
RAMBERTEnglish
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert (see Rainbird). It was borne by Dame Marie Rambert (original name Cyvia Rabbam, later Miriam Rambach; 1888-1982), a Polish-born British ballet dancer and choreographer.
RANDLEEnglish
English: variant spelling of Randall or Americanized spelling of Randel.
RANDOLPHEnglish, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
RANGEREnglish, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RANNELLSEnglish
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Rannulf, Ranel, of continental Germanic origin.
RAPSONEnglish
Means "son of Rab" or "son of Rap". Both Rab and Rap are diminutives of Robert.
RASBERRYEnglish
Possibly a habitational name from Ratsbury in Lynton, Devon.
RASPBERRYEnglish
Variant spelling of Rasberry.
RATCLIFFEnglish
Habitational name from any of the places, in various parts of England, called Ratcliff(e), Radcliffe, Redcliff, or Radclive, all of which derive their names from Old English rēad meaning "red" + clif meaning "cliff", "slope", "riverbank".
RATHBONEEnglish (Archaic), Medieval English (Rare)
Of unknown origin, but might denote a person with short legs. From Olde English rhath, meaning "short, and bon, "legs".
RAUEnglish
From a medieval personal name, a variant of RALPH.
RAVENELEnglish, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
RAVENHILLEnglish
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
RAVENSWOODEnglish (American)
Ravenswood is a gothic surname.
RAWLSEnglish
From the Olde German and Anglo-Saxon personal name Rolf. Originally derived from the Norse-Viking pre 7th Century 'Hrolfr' meaning "Fame-Wolf".
RAYMONDEnglish, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
READEEnglish
English variant spelling of Read.
READINGEnglish
Habitational name from the county seat of Berkshire, which gets its name from Old English Readingas ‘people of Read(a)’, a byname meaning ‘red’. Topographic name for someone who lived in a clearing, an unattested Old English ryding.
REASONEnglish
A different form of Raison.
REDEnglish
Variant of Read (1).
REDDENEnglish
Location name meaning "clearing or cleared woodland." Communities called Redden include one in Roxburghshire, Scotland and another in Somerset, England. A notable bearer is actor Billy Redden who played the dueling banjoist Lonnie in the 1972 film 'Deliverance.'
REDDICKEnglish
Habitational name from Redwick in Gloucestershire, named in Old English with hreod "reeds" and wic "outlying settlement".
REDDINGEnglish, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDDISHEnglish
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. 'of Reddish,' a village near Stockport, Cheshire.
REDHAGEEnglish
This surname originated in Germany
REDPATHScottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Berwickshire, probably so called from Old English read ‘red’ + pæð ‘path’. This name is also common in northeastern England.
REDWOODEnglish
Name possibly derived from the colour of the bark of trees or the name of the town Reedworth between Durham and Devon
REEVESEnglish
Patronymic form of Reeve. It is also a topographic surname for someone who lived on the margin of a wood, derived from Middle English atter eves meaning "at the edge" (from Old English æt þære efese).
RELPHEnglish
From the Old French male personal name Riulf, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "power-wolf" (cf. Riculf).
RENDALLScottish, English
Variant of Randall. Habitational name from Rendall in Orkney. Possibly also an Americanization of Swedish Rendahl.
RENSHAWEnglish, Scottish
A habitational surname from any of the so-called or like-sounding places in the United Kingdom. These include Renishaw in Derbyshire, Ramshaw in Durham, the lost Renshaw in Cheshire and Radshaw in Yorkshire... [more]
REVELLEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone who is full of noisy enthusiasm and energy (from Middle English revel "festivity, tumult").
REVELSAmerican
from the surname Revel, a variant of Revell, a Middle English and Old French name referring to festivity
REVEREEnglish, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
REXEnglish, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
RHINEGerman, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RHODEAmerican
Comes from the state 'Rhode Island' in America
RIALEnglish
Variant of Royle.
RIALEnglish
Variant of Ryle.
RIBCHESTEREnglish
This name originates from the small village in Lancashire that shares the same name. Interestingly, most people with the name 'Ribchester' are in Lancashire, but a lot are also found in Newcastle Upon Tyne.
RICHEEnglish, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RICHERSEnglish, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
RICHMONDEnglish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places so named, in northern France as well as in England. These are named with the Old French elements riche "rich, splendid" and mont "hill"... [more]
RIDDELLScottish, English
From a Norman personal name, Ridel. Reaney explains this as a nickname from Old French ridel ‘small hill’ (a diminutive of ride ‘fold’, of Germanic origin), but a more probable source is a Germanic personal name derived from the element rīd ‘ride’.
RIDEOUTEnglish
Means "outrider (a municipal or monastic official in the Middle Ages whose job was to ride around the country collecting dues and supervising manors)".
RIDGEEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived on or by a ridge, Middle English rigge, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Ridge in Hertfordshire. The surname is also fairly common in Ireland, in County Galway, having been taken to Connacht in the early 17th century... [more]
RIDGEWAYEnglish
Comes from Middle English 'riggewey', hence a topographic name for someone who lived by such a route or a habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Cheshire, Derbyshire, Dorset, and Staffordshire.
RIDGWAYEnglish
Variant spelling of Ridgeway.
RIDOUTEnglish
A variant of the other surname Rideout.
RINGEREnglish
Derived from the occupation of "ringer" as in a bell ringer or a person who makes rings.
RIPPEREnglish
Means "maker, seller or carrier of baskets" (from a derivative of Middle English rip "basket").
RITCHEnglish, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGSFrench, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RITTMANGerman, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
RIVERSEnglish, Norman
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from any of various places in northern France called Rivières, from the plural form of Old French rivière ‘river’ (originally meaning ‘riverbank’, from Latin riparia)... [more]
RIVETFrench, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
RIVETTEnglish, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
ROEnglish
Possibly a variant of Rowe.
ROBBSEnglish
This possibly means "Son of Rob(ert)".
ROBERTSSENEnglish
English variant of Robertsson.
ROBESONEnglish
This is possibly a variant of Robson.
ROBEYEnglish
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
ROBINScottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROBINSEnglish
Southern English patronymic from the personal name Robin.
ROBYEnglish
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
ROCHESTEREnglish
Means "person from Rochester", Kent (probably "Roman town or fort called Rovi"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mr Rochester, the Byronic hero of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
ROCKEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a notable crag or outcrop, from Middle English rokke "rock" (see Roach), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Rock in Northumberland.
ROCKWELLEnglish
Means "person from Rockwell", Buckinghamshire and Somerset (respectively "wood frequented by rooks" and "well frequented by rooks"). Famous bearers include American illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) and Utah pioneer Porter Rockwell (1813-1878).
RODHAMEnglish
From Roddam in Northumberland. The name is thought to have derived from Germanic *rodum, meaning 'forest clearing'.
RODMANEnglish
It is of Old German origin, and the meaning of Rodman is "renowned man". The most famous bearer of the surname is the basketball player Dennis Rodman
RODMANEnglish
The surname Rodman is an ancient English surname, derived from a trade name, "men who were by the tenure or customs of their lands to ride with or for the lord of the manor about his business". The most famous bearer of this name is the basketball player Dennis Rodman.
ROEEnglish
Nickname for a timid person, derived from the Middle English ro meaning "roe"; also a midland and southern form of Ray.
ROELEnglish, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
ROGERScottish, English, North German, French, Catalan
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hrōd "renown" and gār, gēr "spear, lance", which was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Rog(i)er... [more]
ROHRLACHGerman (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
ROLFEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Rolf, composed of the Germanic elements hrōd "renown" and wulf "wolf". This name was especially popular among Nordic peoples in the contracted form Hrólfr, and seems to have reached England by two separate channels; partly through its use among pre-Conquest Scandinavian settlers, partly through its popularity among the Normans, who, however, generally used the form Rou(l) (see Rollo).
ROLFEEnglish
Variant of Rolf.
ROLLUpper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
ROLLEEnglish
Variant of Roll.
ROLLINEnglish, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
ROLSTONEnglish
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Rowlston in Lincolnshire, Rolleston in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, and Staffordshire, or Rowlstone in Herefordshire, near the Welsh border... [more]
ROMANCatalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belorussian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROMNEYEnglish
English: habitational name from a place in Kent, so called from an obscure first element, rumen, + Old English ea ‘river’ (see Rye).
ROMPEnglish, German
Likely a variant of Rump.
RONSONEnglish
Means "son of RON"
ROOKEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rook (e.g. in having black hair or a harsh voice).
ROOMEEnglish
Variant of Rome.
ROOTEnglish, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
ROPEREnglish
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of rope, from an agent derivative of Old English rāp ‘rope’. See also ROOP.
ROSELANDEnglish
Americanized form of Norwegian Røys(e)land; a habitational name from about 30 farmsteads, many in Agder, named from Old Norse reysi ‘heap of stones’ + land ‘land’, ‘farmstead’.
ROSEMANEnglish
From the Norman feminine name Rosamund.
ROSEVEARCornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
ROSEWOODEnglish
Denoting someone who came from a rose wood or grove.
ROSSEAUFrench, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
ROSSIEEnglish
Possibly a variant of Rossi.
ROUBICHOUEnglish
Diminutive of Robert.
ROUGHEnglish
A topographic name referring to a dwelling with uncultivated ground, ultimately deriving from Olde English ruh meaning "rough".
ROUSEEnglish
nickname for a person with red hair, from Middle English, Old French rous ‘red(-haired)’
ROVEREnglish, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
ROWETTEnglish
English from a medieval personal name composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wald ‘rule’, which was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the form Róaldr, and again later by the Normans in the form Rohald or Roald... [more]
ROWLEYEnglish
Anglo Saxon Name- locational, comes from several places in England such as in Devonshire, Yorkshire, County Durham and Staffordshire. It means ' rough wood or clearing', from the Old English 'run' meaning rough and 'leah', meaning clearing in a wood.
ROWSONEnglish (British, Anglicized)
The ancestors of the Rowson family first reached the shores of England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Their name is derived from the Norman given name Ralph. This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol.... [more]
ROYALEnglish
From the given name Royal.
RUDDEnglish
A famous bearer is political activist Mark Rudd.
RUFFEnglish
Variant of Rolf.
RUFFEnglish
Variant of Rolfe.
RUFFINEnglish
From the medieval French male personal name Ruffin, from Latin Rūfīnus, a derivative of Rūfus (literally "red-haired one"). A known bearer of the surname is US soul singer Jimmy Ruffin (1939-).
RUGBYEnglish
From Rugby, Warwickshire. Originally named *Rocheberie, from Old English *Hrocaburg, 'Hroca's fort', the name was altered due to influence fort Danish settlers, with the second element being replaced with Old Norse byr, 'farm'.... [more]
RULEScottish, English
Scottish name from the lands of Rule in the parish of Hobkirk, Roxburghshire. The derivation is from the River Rule which flows through the area, and is so called from the ancient Welsh word "rhull" meaning "hasty or rushing".... [more]
RUMBELOWEnglish
Means "person from Rumbelow", the name of various locations in England ("three mounds").
RUMPOLEEnglish
A different form of Rumbold (from the Norman personal name Rumbald, of Germanic origin and probably meaning literally "fame-bold"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Horace Rumpole, the eccentric QC created by John Mortimer (originally for a 1975 television play).
RUNCIEEnglish, Scottish
Derived from Latin runcinus, and related to the Old French "roncin", for a horse of little value. Middle English, Rouncy, as in Chaucer's Cantebury Tales.... [more]
RUSBYScottish, English
Alternative spelling of Busby, a parish in Renfrewshire. A name well represented in the Penistone, and Cawthorne districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire.
RUTHEnglish, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
RUTLEDGEEnglish, Scottish
Origin unknown
RUTTEnglish, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
RUTTEREnglish
Either (i) "player of the rote (a medieval stringed instrument played by plucking)"; or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a dishonest or untrustworthy person (from Old French routier "robber, mugger")... [more]
RYALLEnglish
From any of several places in England named from Old English ryge "rye" + hyll "hill".
RYALSEnglish
English occupational surname.
Previous Page      1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14      Next Page         3,902 results (this is page 10 of 14)