Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
FLOWER     English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
FLOWER     English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
FLOWER     English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
FOOT     English
Variant of Foote.
FOOTE     English
Nickname for someone with a peculiarity or deformity of the foot, from Middle English fot (Old English fot), or in some cases from the cognate Old Norse byname Fótr.
FORDE     English, Irish, Norwegian
English and Irish: variant spelling of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.... [more]
FORDHAM     English
Habitational name from any of the places in Cambridgeshire, Essex, and Norfolk named Fordham, from Old English ford ‘ford’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’.
FORSTER     English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
FOSSOYEUR     American
A surname meaning "Gravedigger" in French.
FOULKES     English (Anglicized, ?)
English variant spelling of Foulks.
FOULKS     English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also Volk.
FOXWORTH     English
"dweller at the homestead infested by foxes." or "house of Fox" aka Foxworthy... [more]
FOXX     English
Variant of Fox.
FRALEY     English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
FRAMPTON     English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
FRANCK     English, French
From the given name Franck.
FRANKLAND     English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
FRANKS     English
This surname is derived from the given name Frank.
FRANKSON     English
This surname means "son of Frank."
FRAY     English, French, Norwegian
Meaning "peace" or "brother," descended from the French term "Frere" in turn descended from the name of ancient Norse deity Frey, the deity of peace and prosperity.
FREDERICK     English
Derived from the given name Frederick.
FREDERICKS     English
Patronymic from Frederick.
Means "son of Frederick".
FREE     English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
FREELING     English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
FRENCH     English, Anglo-Saxon
Ethnic name for someone from France, Middle English frensche, or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who adopted French airs. Variant of Anglo-Norman French Frain.
FRETT     English
English from Middle English frette, Old French frete ‘interlaced work (in metal and precious stones)’ such as was used for hair ornaments and the like, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such pieces.
FREWIN     English
From the Middle English personal name Frewine, literally "noble or generous friend".
FRIEND     English
Nickname for a companionable person, from Middle English frend "friend" (Old English freond). In the Middle Ages the term was also used to denote a relative or kinsman, and the surname may also have been acquired by someone who belonged to the family of someone who was a more important figure in the community
FRISBY     English
Means "person from Frisby", Leicestershire ("farmstead of the Frisians"). A frisbee is a plastic disc thrown from person to person as a game; the trademarked name, registered in 1959 by Fred Morrison, was inspired by the Frisbie bakery of Bridgeport, Connecticut, whose pie tins were the original models for the plastic discs.
FRIZZELL     English (Rare)
Either (i) from Friseal, the Scottish Gaelic form of Fraser; or (ii) from a medieval nickname applied to someone who dressed in a showy or gaudy style (from Old French frisel "decoration, ribbon").
FROGGATT     English
Topographical name from the village of Froggatt in Derbyshire.
FROUD     English
From the Old English personal name Frōda or Old Norse Fróthi, both meaning literally "wise" or "prudent". A variant spelling was borne by British historian James Anthony Froude (1818-1894).
FULBRIGHT     English (American)
Surname of the character, Fanny Fulbright (Also known as Numbuh 82) from the Cartoon Network original series, Codename: Kids Next Door.
FULCHER     English
English (chiefly East Anglia): from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + hari, heri ‘army’, which was introduced into England from France by the Normans; isolated examples may derive from the cognate Old English Folchere or Old Norse Folkar, but these names were far less common.
FULLERTON     English
Habitational name from a place in Scotland. Derived from Old English fugol "bird" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
FURLONG     English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
FURMAN     Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
FURNESS     English (British)
It originated from the river in England.
FYFE     English
From the place 'Fyfe'
FYLER     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Feiler.
GABBETT     English
From the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name GABRIEL.
GABLE     English
Northern English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a habitational name from a minor place named with Old Norse gafl ‘gable’, which was applied to a triangular-shaped hill. The mountain called Great Gable in Cumbria is named in this way.... [more]
GADBERRY     English
Variant of Gadbury.
GADBURY     English
Habitational name from Cadborough, alias Gateborough, in Rye, Sussex, probably so named from Old English gāt meaning "goat" + beorg meaning "hill".
GADSBY     English
Habitational name from Gaddesby in Leicestershire, recorded in Domesday Book as Gadesbi and so named from the Old Norse personal name Gaddr (or from Old Norse gaddr "spur (of land)") and býr "settlement".
GAINES     English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
From the city of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, England. A famous bearer of this surname includes English painter Thomas Gainsborough.
GAISFORD     English
Habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
GALL     Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
GALLANT     English
Nickname for a cheerful or high-spirited person, from Old French, Middle English galant "bold, dashing, lively". The meanings "gallant" and "attentive to women" are further developments, which may lie behind some examples of the surname.
GALPIN     English
English: occupational name for a messenger or scullion (in a monastery), from Old French galopin ‘page’, ‘turnspit’, from galoper ‘to gallop’.
GAMBLE     English
from the Old Norse byname Gamall meaning "old", which was occasionally used in North England during the Middle Ages as a personal name. ... [more]
GAMMON     English
From a medieval nickname applied to a merry or sportive person (from Middle English gamen "game"), or to someone who walked in a strange way or had some peculiarity of the legs (from Anglo-Norman gambon "ham").
GARINGTON     English
Possibly from the given name Gareth.
GARLICK     English
(i) "grower or seller of garlic"; (ii) perhaps from a medieval personal name descended from Old English Gārlāc, literally "spear-play"; (iii) an anglicization of the Belorussian Jewish name Garelick, literally "distiller"
GARNETT     English
United kingdom
GASKILL     English
Meaning "Goat Shelter". English (Lancashire) habitual name from Gatesgill in Cumbria, so named from Old Norse geit ‘goat’ + skáli ‘shelter’. The surname is first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century.
GATES     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by the gates of a medieval walled town. The Middle English singular gate is from the Old English plural, gatu, of geat "gate" (see Yates)... [more]
GATLIN     English
English of uncertain origin; probably a variant of Catlin or Gadling, a nickname from Old English gœdeling ‘kinsman’, ‘companion’, but also ‘low fellow’.
GATLING     English, German (Anglicized)
English variant of Gatlin. Possibly a respelling of German Gättling (see also Gatlin).
GATSBY     English
A different form of Gadsby ("person from Gaddesby", Leicestershire ("Gaddr's farmstead")). A fictional bearer is Jay Gatsby, the central character of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel 'The Great Gatsby' (1925).
GAVETT     English
Variant of GAVITT
GAVIN     Scottish, English
From the given name Gavin.
GAVITT     English
Perhaps an altered spelling of the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name GABRIEL.
GAWKRODGER     English
From a medieval nickname meaning "clumsy Roger".
GAY     English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
GAY     English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
GAYDOS     Hungarian, English
Anglicized spelling of Hungarian GAJDOS.
GAYLORD     English
Derived from Old French gaillard meaning "high-spirited, boistrous".
GEARHART     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Gierhard, a variant of Gerhardt.
GEARING     English
probably an Americanized spelling of Gehring
GEE     Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GEORGE     English, French, German
Derived from the given name George.
GEORGIA     English
From the given name Georgia.
GERALD     English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
GERALDSON     English
Means "son of Gerald".
GERE     English
Variant of Geer, Gehr or Geary, all related to the Old High German element gēr (Old English gār, Old Norse geirr) meaning "spear, arrow". A famous bearer is American actor Richard Gere (b... [more]
GERMAN     English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERRARD     English
From the given name Gerrard.
GERSHON     English, Hebrew
Hebrew One of the tribes of Israel ... [more]
GERVAIS     English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
GIBBON     English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
GIERC     English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
GIFFORD     English
Gifford is an English name for someone who comes from Giffords Hall in Suffolk. In Old English, it was Gyddingford, or "ford associated with Gydda." Alternatively, it could come from the Middle English nickname, "Giffard," from Old French meaning "chubby-cheeked."
GILBERTSON     English
Means "son of Gilbert".
GILBY     English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
GILFORD     English
English or Welsh.
GILKESON     English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
GILL     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a ravine or deep glen, Middle English gil(l), Old Norse gil "ravine"
GILLARD     English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
GILLARD     English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
GILLETTE     English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
GILLIARD     English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
GILLIBRAND     English
From the Norman personal name Gillebrand, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "hostage-sword".
GILLMORE     English
Variant of Gilmore.
GILMORE     English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
GILPIN     English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
GILSTRAP     English (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
GINGELL     English
Either (i) from a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gangulf, literally "walking wolf"; or (ii) a different form of Gingold.
GIRLING     English
From a medieval nickname applied to a brave man (or, with heavy irony, to a cowardly one), from Old French cuer de lion "lion heart".
GLAD     English
From a short form of the various Old English personal names with a first element glæd "shining, joyful". Compare Gladwin.
GLAD     English, Scandinavian
Nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English, Scandinavian glad "merry, jolly".
GLADNEY     English
Probably means "bright island", from the Old English element glæd "bright" (cf. Glædwine) and the English element ney "island" (cf.... [more]
GLEAVE     English
Means either "sword-maker" or "sword-seller", or else from a nickname applied to a skilled swordsman (in either case from Middle English gleyve "sword").
GLISSEN     English, Irish
Possible British version of the Irish surname Glasson from the the Gaelic word O’Glasain. Meaning green from the counties of Tipperary.
GOBER     English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GODIN     English
Comes from the Germanic personal name Godin-, a pet form of any of various compound names beginning with god, got ‘god’. Compare Godbold, Goddard, and Godfrey.
GODWIN     English
Derived from the first name Godwine.
GOLD     English, German
From Old English, Old High German gold "gold", applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in gold, i.e. a refiner, jeweler, or gilder, or as a nickname for someone who either had many gold possessions or bright yellow hair.
GOLD     English
From an Old English personal name Golda (or the feminine Golde), which persisted into the Middle Ages as a personal name. The name was in part a byname from gold "gold", and in part a short form of the various compound names with this first element.
GOLDSMITH     English
Occupational name for a worker in gold, a compound of Old English gold "gold" and smið "smith". In North America it is very often an English translation of German or Jewish Goldschmidt.
GOODALL     English
Habitational name from Gowdall in East Yorkshire, named from Old English golde "marigold" and Old English halh "nook, recess".
GOODALL     English
From Middle English gode "good" and ale "ale, malt liquor", hence a metonymic occupational name for a brewer or an innkeeper.
GOODENOUGH     English
From a medieval nickname probably applied either to someone of average abilities or to an easily satisfied person; also, perhaps from a medieval nickname meaning "good servant".
GOODFELLOW     English
Generally explained as a nickname meaning 'good fellow' or 'good companion'.
GOODING     English
The name Gooding comes from the baptismal name for "the son of Godwin"
GOODKIND     English (Rare)
From the English words "good kind".
GOODMAN     English
A combination of the words "good" and "man". A nickname given to a kind man.
GOODSON     English
Nickname for a dutiful son, from Middle English gode ‘good’ + sone ‘son’.
GORHAM     English
A name originating from Kent, England believed to come from the elements gara and ham meaning "from a triangular shaped homestead." Compare Gore.
GOSLING     English
1. variant of Joslin - see Jocelyn, Jocelyn. ... [more]
GOTHAM     English
English: habitational name from Gotham in Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English gat ‘goat’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘water meadow’.
GOULDING     English, Anglo-Saxon
From the late Old English personal name Golding.
GRACE     English
From the given name Grace
GRAFF     English
Metonymic occupational name for a clerk or scribe, from Anglo-Norman French grafe "quill, pen" (a derivative of grafer "to write", Late Latin grafare, from Greek graphein).
GRANGE     English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
GRANT     English, Scottish
From a medieval personal name, probably a survival into Middle English of the Old English byname Granta (see Grantham).
GRANTHAM     English
Habitational name from Grantham in Lincolnshire, of uncertain origin. The final element is Old English hām "homestead"; the first may be Old English grand "gravel" or perhaps a personal name Granta, which probably originated as a byname meaning "snarler"... [more]
GRASS     English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
GRATL     English
GRAVE     English
Occupational name from Middle English greyve "steward", from Old Norse greifi or Low German greve
GRAVE     English
Topographic name, a variant of Grove.
GRAVES     English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
GRAVES     French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
GRAVES     English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
GRAYLING     English (British)
Uncommon surname of unclear origin; possible medieval locational name, or a derivative of the French surname Grail or the diminutive Graillon.... [more]
GREELEY     English, Norman
English (of Norman origin): nickname for someone with a pock-marked face, from Old Northern French greslé ‘pitted’, ‘scarred’ (from gresle ‘hailstone’, of Germanic origin).
GREENALL     English
From Lincolnshire in England, meaning "green hill".
GREENGRASS     English
Notable bearers include film director Paul Greengrass and baseball player Jim Greengrass.
GREENLAW     English
From one of two placenames, located near the Anglo-Scottish border. Named with Old English grēne, 'green' and halw, 'hill, mound'.
GREENLEAF     English
From Old English grēne "green" and lēaf "leaf", presumably applied as a nickname, the significance of which is now lost.
GREENLEE     English
habitational name from any of various minor places, for example in Staffordshire, so named from Old English grene ‘green’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
GREENWALD     American
Partly Americanized form of German and Jewish Grün(e)wald (see Grunwald). ... [more]
GREENWAY     English
Originally given to a person who lived near a grassy path, from Middle English grene "green" and weye "road, path" (cf. Way).... [more]
GREENWOOD     English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a dense forest, from Middle English grene "green" and wode "wood", or a habitational name from a minor place so named, as for example Greenwood in Heathfield, East Sussex.
GREGERSON     English
Means "son of Gregory/Greg"
GREGSON     English
Means "son of GREG"
GREYSON     English
Variant of GRAYSON
GRIDLEY     English
Variant of Greeley.
GRIFFAN     English
Variant of Griffin.
GRIFFEN     English
Variant of Griffin.
GRIGGS     English
Means "son of Grigg", Grigg being a short form of Gregory.
GRIMES     English, Irish
The surname Grimes means 'son of Grimme'. It is also an anglicized version of the Irish surnames 'O Gormghaile', and 'O Goirmleadhaigh' from Ulster.... [more]
GRIMKÉ     English (American)
Meaning unknown. This was the surname of Sarah (1792-1873) and Angelina (1805-1879) Grimké, sisters who opposed slavery and supported women's rights.
GRIMM     Anglo-Saxon, English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name GRÍMR derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
GRISWOLD     English
meaning: from the gray forest.
GROVE     English, American
Americanized spelling of the French surname Le Grou(x)or Le Greux (see Groulx)
GROVE     English
Name for someone who lived by a grove or thicket, Middle English grove, Old English graf.
GRUNDY     English
Probably a Middle English metathesized form of the Old French personal name Gondri, Gundric (see Gundry).
GRUVER     American
GRYLLS     English (Rare)
There was an old and distinguished family of Grylls of Tavistock (Devon) and Lanreath (Cornwall) in the 17th century; two high sheriffs of the county then bore the name. The manor of Gryils (commonly mispronounced Garles), near the rocks called the Gryils or Garles, from which they probably derive their name, is in the parish of Lesneweth in that county.
GUDGEON     English
from Middle English gojon, gogen, Old French gougon ‘gudgeon’ (the fish) (Latin gobio, genitive gobionis), applied as a nickname or perhaps as a metonymic occupational name for a seller of these fish... [more]
GUEST     English
Nickname for a stranger or newcomer to a community, from Middle English g(h)est meaning "guest", "visitor" (from Old Norse gestr, absorbing the cognate Old English giest).
GULLICK     English
From the Middle English personal name Gullake, a descendant of Old English Gūthlāc, literally "battle-sport".
GULLIVER     English
From a medieval nickname for a greedy person (from Old French goulafre "glutton"). Jonathan Swift used it in his satire 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726), about the shipwrecked ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, whose adventures "offer opportunities for a wide-ranging and often savage lampooning of human stupidity and vice."
GUMM     English
From a nickname or byname from Middle English gome, Old English guma "man".
GUNDRY     English
From Gondri, Gundric, an Old French personal name introduced to Britain by the Normans, composed of the Germanic elements gund "battle" and rīc "power(ful)".
GUNNISON     American (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Gunnarsson.
GUPPY     English
English habitational name from a place in Wootton Fitzpaine, Dorset, Gupehegh in Middle English. This is named with the Old English personal name Guppa (a short form of Guðbeorht "battle bright") + (ge)hæg "enclosure"... [more]
GUY     English
Occupational name for a guide, Old French gui (a derivative of gui(d)er "to guide", of Germanic origin).
GUY     English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
HADDAWAY     English
Variant of Hathaway.
HADDLEY     English
Variant of Hadley.
HADDON     English
Derived from the Old English word had meaning "heathland" and the Old English suffix -don meaning "hill"; hence, the "heathland hill" or the "heather-covered hill".... [more]
HAGSTROM     English
Anglicized form of Swedish HAGSTRÖM.
HAILES     Scottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
HAIRFIELD     English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
HAIZLIP     English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
HALDON     English (Rare)
From a place name in Devon, England.
HALLETT     English
Derived from the given name Hallet (see ADALHARD).
HALLEY     English
Location name combining the elements hall as in "large house" and lee meaning "field or clearing."
HALLIE     English
Spelling variant of Halley.
HALLIWELL     English
Northern English (Lancashire) habitational name from a place near Manchester called Halliwell, from Old English halig ‘holy’ + well(a) ‘well’, ‘spring’, or from any of the numerous other places named with these elements (see Hollowell).
HALLMARK     English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
HALLOW     English
English: topographic name from Middle English hal(l)owes ‘nooks’, ‘hollows’, from Old English halh (see Hale). In some cases the name may be genitive, rather than plural, in form, with the sense ‘relative or servant of the dweller in the nook’.
HALVERSON     English
Anglicized form of Norwegian or Danish Halvorsen.
HAMER     English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
HAMILL     English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
HAMMER     German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
HAMMERSLEY     English (Modern)
From southern England. From homersley meaning homestead, that later changed to hamersley
HAMMERSMITH     German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
HAMMON     English
Variant of Hammond.
HAMMOND     English
Derived from the Medieval English name HAMO or from the Old Norse name HÁMUNDR.
HAMMOND     English
From a personal name, Hamo(n), which is generally from a continental Germanic name Haimo, a short form of various compound names beginning with haim "home", although it could also be from the Old Norse personal name Hámundr, composed of the elements hár "high" and mund "protection"... [more]
HAMMONS     English
Variant of Hammon.
HAMP     English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HANCE     English
Allegedly a patronymic from the personal name Hann.
HANES     English, Welsh
variant spelling of Haynes.
HANKIN     English
From the given name Hankin
HANKS     English
Patronymic form of HANK.
HANLIN     Scottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish Hanlon.
HANNAM     English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
HANSLAY     English
Variant of HANSLEY.
HAPPYGOD     English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
HARBIN     English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins, and is derived from the personal names Rabin, Robin, and Robert. It has the English prefix 'har', which means gray.... [more]
HARBOR     English
English: variant spelling of Harbour.
HARBOUR     English
Variant of French Arbour or a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from Old English herebeorg "shelter, lodging".
HARGREAVES     English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HARGROVE     English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HARKAWAY     English
From a sporting phrase used to guide and incite hunting dogs.
HARKER     English (British)
English (mainly northeastern England and West Yorkshire): habitational name from either of two places in Cumbria, or from one in the parish of Halsall, near Ormskirk, Lancashire. The Cumbrian places are probably named from Middle English hart ‘male deer’ + kerr ‘marshland’... [more]
HARKNESS     Scottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name Hereca (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
HARLESS     English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
HARLIN     English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
HARMER     English (British)
Meaning, of the Army or man of Armor, from the battle at Normandy, France. It was formerly a French last name Haremere after the battle at Normandy it moved on to England where it was shortened to Harmer.
HAROLD     English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HARR     English
Short form of Harris
HARRINGTON     English
Comes from the three towns with this name in England.
HARROLD     Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of Harold.
HARROW     English
Means "person from Harrow", the district of northwest Greater London, or various places of the same name in Scotland ("heathen shrine").
HARRY     English
From first name Harry.
HARTFORD     English
Habitational name from Hertford, or from either of two places called Hartford, in Cheshire and Cumbria; all are named with Old English heorot ‘hart’ + ford ‘ford’.
HARTLEY     English, Scottish
Derived from the Old English words meaning heorot meaning "hart" and leah meaning "clearing". Also from Scottish Ó hArtghaile meaning "descendant of Artghal". Hartley is also an English given name.
HARTON     English
This surname is a habitational one, denoting someone who lived in a village in County Durham or in North Yorkshire.... [more]
HARTWELL     English
Habitational name from places in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Staffordshire called Hartwell, from Old English heorot ‘stag’, ‘hart’ + wella ‘spring’, ‘stream’... [more]
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