Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SHERWIN     English
English: nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English schere(n) ‘to shear’ + wind ‘wind’.
SHERWOOD     English
Means bright wood.... [more]
SHIELD     English
Metonymic occupational name for an armorer, from Middle English scheld "shield" (Old English scild, sceld).
SHINGLER     English
An occupational name for someone who laid wooden tiles, or shingles on roofs, an agent derivative Middle English schingle ‘shingle’. ... [more]
SHINN     English
Metonymic occupational name for a Skinner, from Old English scinn, Middle English shin ‘hide’, ‘pelt’. In Middle English this word was replaced by the Norse equivalent, skinn.
SHIPLEY     English (Rare)
English: habitational name from any of the various places, for example in Derbyshire, County Durham, Northumberland, Shropshire, Sussex, and West Yorkshire, so called from Old English sceap, scip ‘sheep’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
SHOAF     American
Origin is unknown but it is the surname of American Rachel Shoaf who is a convicted murderer.
SHOCKLEY     English
(i) perhaps "person from Shocklach", Cheshire ("boggy stream infested with evil spirits"); (ii) perhaps an anglicization of Swiss German Schoechli, literally "person who lives by the little barn"
SHRADER     English
Variant of SCHRADER.
SHRAPNEL     English
A different form of Carbonell. Shrapnel (i.e. metal balls or fragments that are scattered when a bomb, shell or bullet explodes) is named after General Henry Shrapnel (1761-1842), a British artillery officer who during the Peninsular War invented a shell that produced that effect.
SHROPSHIRE     English
Regional name from the county of Shropshire, on the western border of England with Wales.
SHUCK     English
Origin uncertain; perhaps a nickname from Middle English schucke "devil, fiend".
Meaning: "From a sheep valley"
SHURGOT     Polish, English (American)
Americanized spelling of Szurgot.
SIDDLE     English
Variant of Siddall.
SIGSWORTH     English
Originally denoting someone from Sigsworth Moor in North Yorkshire, England.
SILK     English, Irish
English: metonymic occupational name for a silk merchant, from Middle English selk(e), silk(e) ‘silk’. ... [more]
SILL     English
English: from a medieval personal name, a short form of Silvester (see Silvester) or Silvanus (see Silvano).
SILLITOE     English
A different form of Shillito (which is 'a name of unknown derivation and meaning, probably originating in Yorkshire'), borne by British novelist, short-story writer and poet Alan Sillitoe (1928-2010).
SILVER     English
From Middle English silver "silver", hence a nickname for a rich man or for someone with silvery gray hair, or a metonymic occupational name for a silversmith.
SILVER     English
Topographic name from any of the various streams in different parts of England named with this word, probably from the silvery appearance of the water.
Obviously means "silver stone." In addition to people, this is the name of a racetrack in the village of the same name in England.
SIMKIN     English
Means "little Sim", Sim being a medieval short form of Simon (cf. Simpkin).
SIMMERS     English
English patronymic from Summer.
SIMPLETON     English
A name for someone who is simple, derived from old English.
SINEATH     English, Irish
Variant of Sinnott. Not to be confused with the Irish first name Sinéad.
SINGLETON     English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Sussex.
SINNETT     English
Variant of Sinnott.
SINNOTT     English, Irish
From the medieval personal name Sinod (from Old English Sigenōth, literally "victory-brave").... [more]
SISNETT     English (Rare)
Found in Barbados.
SISSON     English
metronymic from the medieval female personal name Siss, Ciss, short for Sisley, Cecilie, or possibly from a pet form of Sisley (with the old French diminutive suffix -on). variant of Sessions.
SIVERTSON     American
Americanized form of Sivertsen or Sivertsson.
SKELTON     English, German, Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from places in Cumbria and Yorkshire, England, originally named with the same elements as Shelton, but with a later change of ‘s’ to ‘sk’ under Scandinavian influence.
SKYE     English (Anglicized, Rare)
Originates from the Isle of Skye in Scotland.
SKYRING     English
originated around London home counties,... [more]
SLACK     English, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
SLATE     English
Occupational name for a slater, from Middle English slate, "slate".
SLEDGE     English
Sledge. Refers to a sledge as a sled.
SLIM     English
A characteristic name for someone noted for being thin.
SLOUGH     English
A very rare surname, possibly of German origins.
SMALLEY     English, Cornish (?)
Locational surname from places in Derbyshire and Lancashire, so called from Old English smæl ‘narrow’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’. This may also be a Cornish name with an entirely separate meaning.
SMART     English
From Old English (smeart) meaning "quick". This surname was used to refer to person who worked as a handyman.
SMEATON     English
From Old English Smiðatun meaning "settlement of the smiths".
SMILEY     Scots, English
From elements small and lea meaning "a small clearing" or as a nickname may refer to a person of happy disposition known for smiling.
SMITHE     English (Rare)
Rare spelling of Smith.
SMITHER     English
Occupational surname SMITH with the suffix -er.
SMITHERS     English
Patronymic from SMITHER.
SMOCK     English
From Middle English smoc, smok meaning "smock", "shift", hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold such garments, or a nickname for someone who habitually wore a smock (the usual everyday working garment of a peasant).
SMOKE     English, German, German (Austrian)
Possibly a variant of English Smock or an altered form of German Schmuck.
SMYTH     English
Creative spelling of the surname Smith.
SNAPE     English (British), Scottish
An old, now rare surname, with various origins in Suffolk and Yorkshire in England and Lanarkshire in Scotland. This is also the name of Severus Snape, a character from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series.
SNARK     English
History largely unknown. The word's original meaning, in the mid-nineteenth century, was to snort / snore, or to find fault. ... [more]
SNELSON     English
Means "son of Snell", Snell being a nickname for a brisk or active person, from Middle English snell "quick, lively" (cf. the Dutch cognate Snell), but "in part also representing a survival of the Old English personal name Snell or the Old Norse cognate Snjallr."
SNOW     English, Jewish (Anglicized)
Nickname denoting someone with very white hair or an exceptionally pale complexion, from Old English snaw "snow".... [more]
SNOWDEN     English
Habitational name from Snowden, a place in West Yorkshire named from Old English snāw ‘snow’ + dūn ‘hill’, i.e. a hill where snow lies long.
SNOWDON     English
Variant spelling of Snowden, a surname initially used by the Border Reivers. Comes from the mountain in Wales.
SNOWE     English
Variation of Snow.
SNYDER     Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
SOAP     American
a guy in call of duty modern warfare
SODERBERG     English (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Swedish Söderberg
SOLIDAY     American
Reportedly German and Dutch background? Never have really known. The history that has been told my siblings and I is that three brothers came from Germany to the US in late 1800 and went into business in Phila - they eventually argued and split up and two of them changed the spelling of their last name and scattered throughout PA - When I left home in 1963 - mY Father James Edward Soliday, son of John Soliday and Martha Freidline Soliday and us children were the only ones in our area... [more]
SOMERSET     English
Regional name from the county of this name, so called from Old English sumer(tun)saete meaning "dwellers at the summer settlement".
SONLEY     English
Possibly derived from the Old Norse name SUNNULFR.
SORA     English (Canadian)
Sora is a Kingdom Hearts character developed by Square Enix and Disney
SORRELL     English
From a medieval nickname meaning literally "little red-haired one", from a derivative of Anglo-Norman sorel "chestnut".
SOULE     English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
SOUTH     English
From Middle English south, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the south of a settlement or a regional name for someone who had migrated from the south.
SOUTHARD     English, Dutch
Possibly derived from the English surname SOUTHWORTH.
SOUTHERN     English
Topographic name, from an adjectival derivative of South.
SOUTHWORTH     English
Means "southern enclosure".
SOVEREIGN     English
Occupational surname for a leader or supervisor, derived from the English word sovereign meaning "possessing supreme or ultimate power".
SOWERBY     English
Habitational name from any places so-called in Northern England. Named from Old Norse saurr, 'mud, filth' and by, 'farm, estate'.
SPACKMAN     English
English variant of Speakman.
SPALDING     English, Scottish
This surname originates as a locational surname (someone coming from Spalding in Lincolnshire) is derived from Old English Spaldingas, which may be a tribal name for members of the Spaldas tribe... [more]
SPARK     English, German
Northern English: from the Old Norse byname or personal name Sparkr ‘sprightly’, ‘vivacious’.... [more]
SPARROW     English
English: nickname from Middle English sparewe ‘sparrow’, perhaps for a small, chirpy person, or else for someone bearing some fancied physical resemblance to a sparrow.
SPARROW     English
Nickname from Middle English sparewe "sparrow", perhaps for a small, chirpy person, or else for someone bearing some fancied physical resemblance to a sparrow.
SPAULDING     English (British)
Variant spelling of Spalding.
SPEAKMAN     English
English (chiefly Lancashire) nickname or occupational name for someone who acted as a spokesman, from Middle English spekeman ‘advocate’, ‘spokesman’ (from Old English specan to speak + mann ‘man’).
SPENCE     English, Scottish
Metonymic occupational name for a servant employed in the pantry of a great house or monastery, from Middle English spense "larder", "storeroom" (a reduced form of Old French despense, from a Late Latin derivative of dispendere, past participle dispensus, "to weigh out or dispense").
SPENDLOVE     English
From a medieval nickname for someone who spread their amorous affections around freely. A different form of the surname was borne by Dora Spenlow, the eponymous hero's "child-wife" in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849-50).... [more]
SPICER     English, Jewish, Polish
English: occupational name for a seller of spices, Middle English spic(i)er (a reduced form of Old French espicier, Late Latin speciarius, an agent derivative of species ‘spice’, ‘groceries’, ‘merchandise’).... [more]
SPILLMAN     English
From the medieval male personal name Spileman, literally "acrobat" or "jester" (from a derivative of Middle English spillen "to play, cavort").
SPINA     American
Means "Thorn" in Latin.
SPINDLER     English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spindle maker, from an agent derivative of Middle English spindle, Middle High German spindel, German Spindel, Yiddish shpindl "spindle, distaff".
SPINSTER     American (Rare)
A presumably extinct English occupational name, derived from the occupation of spinning.
SPOON     English
Apparently a metonymic occupational name either for a maker of roofing shingles or spoons, from Old English spon "chip, splinter" (see also Spooner).
SPRADLIN     English (British)
Originally Spradling, mean one who spreads seed
SPRAGUE     English
English from northern Middle English Spragge, either a personal name or a byname meaning "lively", a metathesized and voiced form of "spark."
SPRINGALL     English
Means (i) "operator of a springald (a type of medieval siege engine)" (from Anglo-Norman springalde); or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a youthful person (from Middle English springal "youth").
SPRINGER     German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
SPURGEON     English
Unexplained meaning.
SPURRELL     English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SPURRILL     English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SQUIRE     English
Surname comes from the occupation of a Squire. A young man who tends to a knight.
SQUIRES     English
Surname is plural of Squire. A young person that tends to his knight, also someone that is a member of a landowner class that ranks below a knight.
STALEY     English
Byname from Middle English staley "resolute, reliable", a reduced form of Stallard.
STALLARD     English
Byname for a valiant or resolute person, from a reduced pronunciation of Middle English stalward, stalworth "stalwart" (an Old English compound of stǣl "place" and wierðe "worthy").
STALTON     English
can not find a meaning to my name anywhere.
STANCIL     English
English habitational name from a place so named in South Yorkshire.
STANFORD     English
Olde English pre 7th Century "stan", stone, and "ford", ford; hence, "stony ford".
STANNARD     English
From the medieval personal name Stanhard, literally "stone-strong" or "stone-brave".
STANSFIELD     English (British)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, probably named with the genitive case of the Old English personal name Stan "stone" and Old English feld "pasture, open country". It may also be a topographic name from Middle English stanesfeld "open country of the (standing) stone"... [more]
STAPLEFORD     English
Habitational name from any of a number of places, in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English stapol meaning "post" + ford meaning "ford".
STAPLETON     English
Habitational surname from any of various places in England.
STAR     German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STARBUCK     English
After Starbeck village in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. A famous bearer of this name was the fictional character, Starbuck, the first mate of the Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick.
STARLING     English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a starling, especially in constantly chattering.
START     English
Habitational name from any of the various minor places named from Old English steort "tail".
STAY     English, American
Possibly related to the word Stay, or a nickname for Stanley.
ST CLAIR     French, English
From the place name St CLAIR
STEACY     English
Variant of Stacy.
STEEL     English
Variant of Steele.
STEELWORKER     English (Rare)
Modern version of Smith, meaning "someone who works with steel". Comes from the occupation Steel Worker .
STEMLE     English
STENT     English (Archaic)
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone". Recorded in several forms including Stein, Steen, Stone and Ston, this surname is english. It is perhaps not surprisingly one of the first recorded surnames anywhere in the world.... [more]
STERKEN     Dutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
STETSON     English
Of unknown origin and meaning, though likely English.
STEVEN     Scottish, English, Dutch, North German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
STICKMAN     English (Canadian)
The Origin for the surname Stickman comes from the YouTube series Iron Hand character "Tim Stickman" and his wife (season 3) his kids (season 4) and parents (all seasons) made in 2016 and premiering in 2017.
STIFF     English (American)
Used sometimes as a derogatory term, stiff means uptight. It is used in a surname in American culture as well as in the media, such as novels, movies or tv shows.
STINCHCOMB     English
Habitational name from Stinchcombe in Gloucestershire, recorded in the 12th century as Stintescombe, from the dialect term stint meaning "sandpiper" + cumb meaning "narrow valley".
STINSON     English, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
STIRRUP     English (British)
Originated in Merseyside, England.
ST LEGER     Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
STOCKDALE     English
Habitational name from a place in Cumbria and North Yorkshire, England. Derived from Old English stocc "tree trunk" and dæl "valley".
STOCKE     English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English Stocke (Old English Stocc). In some cases the reference may be to a primitive foot-bridge over a stream consisting of a felled tree trunk... [more]
STOCKLEY     English
Derived from Old english stocc (tree bark) and leah (clearing), indicating that the original bearer of this name lived in a wooded clearing.
STOCKTON     English
Habitational surname for a person from any of the places (e.g. Cheshire, County Durham, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and North and West Yorkshire) so called from Old English stocc "tree trunk" or stoc "dependent settlement" + tun "enclosure", "settlement".
STOGDILL     English
Possibly a variant of STOCKDALE.
STOKE     English
Derived from Old English stoc "place".
STOKELY     English
Variation of Stockley.
STOLLER     German, Jewish, English
Habitational surname for someone from a place called Stolle, near Zurich (now called Stollen).... [more]
Topographic name for someone who lived by a paved road, in most cases a Roman road, from Middle English stane, stone, "stone" and street "paved highway", "Roman road".
STOREY     English
From the Old Norse nickname Stóri, literally "large man". A literary bearer is British novelist and playwright David Storey (1933-).
STORM     English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr meaning "storm".
STOUT     Scottish, English
Probably a nickname for a brave or powerfully built man, from Middle English stout ‘steadfast’. A contrary origin derives from the Old Norse byname Stútr ‘gnat’, denoting a small and insignificant person.
STOWELL     English
A locational name from various places in England called Stowell
ST PETER     English
Originally from French Canadian immigrants. It was the closest translation to Saint Pierre.... [more]
STRAIGHT     English
Nickname from Middle English streʒt "straight, upright", presumably applied in either a literal or a figurative sense.
STRAIT     English
Variant of Straight.
STRANG     English
Originally given as a nickname to one who possessed great physical strength.
Means "person from Strangeways", Greater Manchester ("strong current").
STRATTON     English
English: habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Surrey, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English str?t ‘paved highway’, ‘Roman road’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
STRAUGHAN     English
Northern English (Northumbria and the Northeast) variant of Scottish Strachan.
STRAWBERRY     English (American, Rare)
Possibly from the name of the fruit, or from any of the various places named Strawberry in the US.
STRAWBRIDGE     English (American)
Someone who built bridges as a living.
STREAM     English
English topographic name for someone who lived beside a stream, Middle English streme. Americanized form of Swedish Ström or Danish Strøm (see Strom).
STREETER     English
English (Sussex) topographic name for someone living by a highway, in particular a Roman road (see Street).
STRETE     English
Strete is derived from Old English "Straet" which, in turn is derived from the latin "strata". This surname has spelling variants including, Streeter, Street, Straight, and Streeten. The first occurrences of this surname include Modbert de Strete of Devon (1100), AEluric de Streitun and his heir Roger (at the time of Henry de Ferrers) and Eadric Streona, Ealdorman of Mercia.
STRIBLING     English
From a medieval nickname for a youthful or inexperienced person (from Middle English stripling "youth").
STROH     English, German
Means "straw" when translated from German, indicating a thin man, a person with straw-colored hair, or a dealer of straw.
STRONG     English
From Middle English strong, strang "strong", generally a nickname for a strong man but perhaps sometimes applied ironically to a weakling.... [more]
STUCKEY     English
Stuckey was first found in Devonshire where they held family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence diminished after the battle of Hastings in 1066. For the next three centuries the Norman ambience prevailed... [more]
STUKELEY     English
From a surname meaning "woodland clearing with tree stumps" in Old English.
STUKELY     English
Possibly meaning "stucco" or "stuck".
STURGESS     English (British)
popular in 1680 in England.
STYLINSON     English (British)
Juxtaposed names Styles and Tomlinson, used to represent (relation)ship between Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles (Larry Stylinson).
SUCKLING     English
From a medieval nickname for someone of childlike appearance or childish character (from Middle English suckling "infant still feeding on its mother's milk"). Sir John Suckling (1609-1642) was an English poet and dramatist.
SUGG     English (British)
Surname of internet personalities Zoe and Joe Sugg. Zoe is known as Zoella on the website YouTube and has a book on sale called "Girl Online". Joe is also a YouTuber.
SUMMER     English, German
From Middle English sum(m)er, Middle High German sumer "summer", hence a nickname for someone of a warm or sunny disposition, or for someone associated with the season of summer in some other way.
SUMMERHAYS     English
Probably means "person living by a summer enclosure (where animals were grazed on upland pastures in the summer)" (from Middle English sumer "summer" + hay "enclosure").
SUMMERLEE     English (Rare)
This surname is originated from Old English sumer meaning "summer" and leah meaning "clearing, meadow."
SUMMERLIN     English, German, Scottish
An English surname.... [more]
SUMMERSET     English
Regional surname for someone from Somerset, an area in England. The name is derived from Old English sumer(tun)saete meaning "dwellers at the summer settlement".
SUMTER     English
This surname is derived from an official title. 'the sumpter.' Old French sommetier, a packhorseman, one who carried baggage on horseback
SUNDERLAND     English
Habitational name from any of the locations with the name 'Sunderland', most notably the port city County Durham. This, along with other examples in Lancashire, Cumbria and Northumberland derives from either Old English sundor 'seperate' and land 'land' or Old Norse suðr 'southern' and land 'land' (see Sutherland)... [more]
SURREY     English
Regional name for someone from the county of Surrey.
SURRIDGE     English
From the medieval personal name Seric, a descendant of both Old English Sǣrīc, literally "sea power", and Sigerīc, literally "victory power".
SURRIDGE     English
Originally meant "person from Surridge", Devon ("south ridge").
SURRIDGE     English
Meant "person from the south" (from Old French surreis "southerner").
SUSAN     English
Comes from the female personal name Susanna, Susanne (Middle English), Susanna (Dutch), from Hebrew Shushannah ‘lily’, ‘lily of the valley’. Southern French: from Occitan susan ‘above’, ‘higher’, hence a topographic name for someone living at the top end of a village or on the side of a valley... [more]
SUTCLIFFE     English
The name means ''south of the cliff/hill''.
SUTTER     German, English
English and South German occupational name for a shoemaker or cobbler (rarely a tailor), from Middle English suter, souter, Middle High German suter, sutære (from Latin sutor, an agent derivative of suere ‘to sew’).
Possibly derives from the Old English word ''sutere'', and the Latin word ''sutor'', meaning a shoemaker.
SUTTOR     English
English... [more]
SWAILE     English
Recorded in the spellings of Swaile, Swale and Swales, this is an English surname. It is locational, and according to the famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley, originates from either a hamlet called Swallow Hill, near Barnsley in Yorkshire, with Swale being the local dialectal pronunciation and spelling... [more]
SWAIN     Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
SWALLOW     English
From Middle English swal(e)we, swalu "swallow", hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the bird, perhaps in swiftness and grace.
SWAN     English, Scottish
Originally given as a nickname to a person who was noted for purity or excellence, which were taken to be attributes of the swan, or who resembled a swan in some other way. In some cases it may have been given to a person who lived at a house with the sign of a swan... [more]
SWANN     English
Variant of Swan.
SWANNELL     English
From the Old Norse female personal name Svanhildr, literally "swan-battle".
SWANSON     American
Either an anglicized spelling of Svensson or Svendsen, or a patronymic meaning "son of Swan".
SWANWICK     English
Habitational name from Swanwick in Derbyshire, possibly also Swanwick in Hampshire. Both are named from Old English swan, "herdsman," and wic, "outlying dairy farm."
SWASEY     English
Unexplained. Possibly an Anglicized form of Dutch Swijse(n), variant of Wijs "wise" (see Wise).
SWIFT     English, Irish
As an English surname, it is originated as a nickname for a swift, fast runner (from Old English swift meaning "swift, fleet, quick.")... [more]
SWING     English
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Schwing or from Middle High German zwinc meaning "legal district", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a district administrator.
SWISS     English (American)
Americanized form of German Schweitz.
SWITSER     English
Either (i) from the medieval nickname Swetesire (literally "sweet sir, amiable master"), applied sarcastically either to someone who used the expression liberally as a form of address or to someone with a de-haut-en-bas manner; or (ii) an anglicization of Schweitzer (from Middle High German swīzer "Swiss person").
SYCAMORE     English
Probably comes from the tree Sycamore
SYKES     English
English Surname (mainly Yorkshire): topographic name for someone who lived by a stream in a marsh or in a hollow, from Middle English syke ‘marshy stream’, ‘damp gully’, or a habitational name from one of the places named with this word, in Lancashire and West Yorkshire.
SYLVESTER     English
From the given name Sylvester.
SYMERE     English (American, Rare)
Name of unknown origin, typically used in the United States. It is best known as the real first name of American rapper Lil Uzi Vert.
SYNGE     English (British)
First found in Shropshire where they had been anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Bridgenorth, from the time of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.
SYRETT     English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Syred (from Old English Sigerǣd, literally "victory-counsel"); or (ii) from the medieval female personal name Sigerith (from Old Norse Sigfrithr, literally "victory-lovely").
TABER     English, Polish
English: variant spelling of Tabor. ... [more]
TABOR     English, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
English: metonymic occupational name for a drummer, from Middle English, Old French tabo(u)r ‘drum’.... [more]
TALBERT     English, French
From a continental Germanic personal name composed of the elements tal "valley" and berth "bright".
TALBOT     English, Norman
Disputed origin, but likely from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message". In this form the name is also found in France, taken there apparently by English immigrants; the usual French form is Talbert.
TALBOTT     English
Variant of TALBOT.
TALCOTT     English, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
TALLANT     English (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLENT     English
Habitational name from Talland in Cornwall, which is thought to be named as ‘hill-brow church site’, from Cornish tal + lann.
TALLENTIRE     English (Rare)
From a small village in Cumbria, England, meaning 'head of the land' in Cumbric.
TALLON     English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
TANCOCK     English
From a shortened variant of the male personal name Andrew, with the suffix -cock (literally "cockerel", hence "jaunty or bumptious young man"), that was often added to create pet-forms of personal names in the Middle Ages.
TANDY     English
From a pet-form of the male personal name Andrew.
TANGERINE     English
Possibly means "from Tangier".
TANGUAY     French, English
From a personal name, a contraction of Tanneguy, from Breton tan meaning 'fire', and ki meaning 'dog', which was the name of a 6-th century Christian saint associated with Paul Aurelian.
TARBELL     English
Tarbell is an alteration of the English placename Turville in Buckinghamshire in England.
TARVER     English
Sodhut dweller, from old English
TATLOW     English (British, Rare)
I heard it was from a small village in England called Tallow.
TAUNTON     English
Habitational name from Taunton in Somerset, Taunton Farm in Coulsdon, Surrey, or Tanton in North Yorkshire. The Somerset place name was originally a combination of a Celtic river name (now the Tone, possibly meaning ‘roaring stream’) + Old English tūn ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
TEACH     English
This surname is derived from the Middle English phrase "at asche," meaning at,or near the ash tree.
TEBBS     English
Variant of Tibbs.
Previous Page      1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13      Next Page         3,748 results (this is page 11 of 13)