Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HYATTEnglish
English (mainly London and Surrey): possibly a topographic name from Middle English hegh, hie ‘high’ + yate ‘gate’. ... [more]
HYDEEnglish
Topographic name for someone living on (and farming) a hide of land, Old English hī(gi)d. This was a variable measure of land, differing from place to place and time to time, and seems from the etymology to have been originally fixed as the amount necessary to support one (extended) family (Old English hīgan, hīwan "household")... [more]
HYLANScottish, English
Variation of the surname Hyland.
HYMELAmerican
Possibly an altered form of HUMMEL.
HYNDESTANAnglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTANEAnglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTONAnglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
ICKESGerman, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
IDDENDENEnglish (Rare)
Iden as a village name is to be found in both the counties of Kent and Sussex, and describes a pasture, or strictly speaking an area within a marsh suitable for pasture. The origination is the pre 6th century phrase ig-denn with ig meaning an island... [more]
IDDONEnglish
From the Old Norse female personal name Idunn, literally probably "perform love" (cf. Idony).
IDENEnglish
Habitational name from a place called Iden Green in Benenden, Kent, or Iden Manor in Staplehurst, Kent, or from Iden in East Sussex. All these places are named in Old English as meaning "pasture by the yew trees", from ig meaning "yew" + denn meaning "pasture".
ILESEnglish (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
IMPEYEnglish
From Impey, the name of various places in England, derived from Old English *imphaga, *imphæg "sapling enclosure". Alternatively it could have indicated a person who lived near an enclosure of young trees.
INCHBALDEnglish
From the medieval male personal name Ingebald, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin and meaning literally "brave Ingel" (Ingel was a different form of Engel - a shortened form of various Germanic compound personal names (e.g. Engelbert and Engelhard) that begin with Engel-; the two main sources of that were Angel "Angle" (the name of the Germanic people) and Ingal, an extended form of Ing (the name of a Germanic god)).
INDEnglish (?)
Meaning deweller at the end of a villiage (Gypsy)
INGALLSEnglish, Scandinavian (Anglicized)
Patronymic from the Anglo-Scandinavian personal name Ingell, Old Norse Ingjaldr.... [more]
INGLEEnglish
Derived from the Old Norse given names INGIALDR or INGÓLF.
INGOLDEnglish
Derived from the given names Ingell (see INGLE), INGJALDR or INGWALD.
INGOLDSBYEnglish
Habitational name from Ingoldsby in Lincolnshire, named from the Old Norse personal name Ingjaldr + bý meaning "farmstead", "settlement".
INMANEnglish (British)
Anglo-Saxon in Origin. Occupational surname given to a person who "tended a lodge or an inn". Surname first found in Lancashire, England.
IOANEEnglish (New Zealand), English (Australian), American, Samoan, Polynesian, Romanian
May come from the given name John or variants of this name, such as Ion.
IRELANDEnglish, Scottish
Ethnic name for someone from Ireland, Old English Iraland. The country gets its name from the genitive case of Old English Iras "Irishmen" and land "land". The stem Ir- is taken from the Celtic name for Ireland, Èriu, earlier Everiu... [more]
IRETONEnglish
Habitational name from either of two places in Derbyshire called Ireton, or one in North Yorkshire called Irton. All of these are named from the genitive case of Old Norse Íri ‘Irishmen’ (see Ireland) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.... [more]
IRISHEnglish
Derived from Ireland
IRONSEnglish
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from Airaines in Somme, so named from Latin harenas (accusative case) ‘sands’. The form of the name has been altered as a result of folk etymology, an association of the name with the metal... [more]
ISAACJewish, English, Welsh, French
Derived from the given name Isaac.
ISHAMEnglish
The name of a village in Northamptonshire, England from the Celtic name of a local river Ise and the Anglo-Saxon term for a small settlement or homestead -ham.
ISLEYEnglish
Of Old English origin, derived from a place named Hesli, meaning "a hazel wood or grove".
ISOMEnglish
Variant of Isham.
ISSACEnglish, Spanish
From the given name Issac.
IVANSEnglish
Meaning "son of Ivan
IVESEnglish
Means "son of Ive", a medieval male personal name, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin, a shortened form of any of a range of compound names beginning with īv "yew" (cf... [more]
IVEYAnglo-Saxon, English
Anglo-Saxon: Ivey is a variant of the Anglo-Saxon baptismal name Ive. It is the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of "Son of Ive".... [more]
IVORYEnglish
Habitational name from Ivry-la-Bataille in Eure, northern France.
IVSENEnglish (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of IBSEN or IVERSEN.
IYKOFOSAmerican
A surname means "Twilight" in Greek.
JACEEnglish (Rare)
Derived from the given name Jace
JACEYAmerican
Derrived from the given name Jacey
JACKSEnglish
Possibly derived as a diminutive of the given name Jack. A famous bearer is Canadian singer-songwriter Terry Jacks, best known for his 1974 single 'Seasons in the Sun.'
JACOBIJewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOWAYEnglish (American)
Altered form of the personal name Jacques.
JAGGEREnglish
English (West Yorkshire): occupational name from Middle English jagger ‘carter’, ‘peddler’, an agent derivative of Middle English jag ‘pack’, ‘load’ (of unknown origin). ... [more]
JAKESONEnglish
It means "son of Jake"
JANISONAmerican (Modern, Rare)
Means son of Jane. Extremely rare surname.
JASMINEEnglish, Japanese
means a fragrant shrub or flower used as perfume
JASONEnglish
Probably a patronymic from James or any of various other personal names beginning with J-.
JAYEnglish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
JAYEEnglish
Variant of Jay.
JEFFREYEnglish
From a Norman personal name that appears in Middle English as Geffrey and in Old French as Je(u)froi. Some authorities regard this as no more than a palatalized form of Godfrey, but early forms such as Galfridus and Gaufridus point to a first element from Germanic gala "to sing" or gawi "region, territory"... [more]
JEFSONEnglish
"Son of Jef".
JENCKESEnglish
"Back-formation" of Jenkin, a medieval diminutive of John.
JENNEREnglish
Occupational name for an engineer.
JENNESSEnglish
English surname, a patronymic from the Middle English personal name Jan.
JEREMYEnglish
From the given name Jeremy.
JESSELEnglish
From a pet-form of Jessop (a medieval male personal name - a different form of Joseph). A literary bearer is Miss Jessel, the governess who has charge of the two troubled and enigmatic children in Henry James's ghost story 'The Turn of the Screw' (1898).
JESSIEEnglish
Possibly a variant of Jessey, an occupational name for someone making jesses (a short strap fastened around the leg of a bird used in falconry).
JESSUPEnglish
From the given name Joseph.
JETSONEnglish
A patronymic from the personal name Jutt, a pet form of Jordan. Compare Judson.
JEWEnglish
Ethnic name for a Jew, from Middle English jeu meaning "Jew" from Old French giu.
JIMERSONEnglish (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English Jameson, based on a pet form of the personal name.
JOBEnglish, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JOCELYNEnglish
Another of the names brought to England in the eleventh century by the Normans, and mentioned in the Domesday Book. Originally a masculine name only.
JOELSONEnglish
Means "son of Joel".
JOHNEnglish
From the given name John. A famous bearer is Elton John.
JOLIEEnglish
From the given name Jolie meaning pretty.
JONSONEnglish
Variant of Johnson and English form of Johnsson
JORDISONEnglish
Possibly meaning son of Jordan. This name is surname of American drummer Joey Jordison.
JORGENSONGerman, English
Respelling of Jørgensen or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOSEPHHebrew, English, Dutch, Yiddish
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament, Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died... [more]
JOURDINEFrench, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JOWETTEnglish
From the medieval male personal name Jowet or the female personal name Jowette, both literally "little Jowe", a pet-form of Julian. This was borne was British theologian and classical scholar Benjamin Jowett (1817-1893).
JUDKINSEnglish
Means "decsendent of JUD".
JULESEnglish
Patronymic or metronymic from a short form of Julian.
JUSTICEEnglish
Simply form the abstract noun "Justice"
JUSTINFrench, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin Justinus, a derivative of Justus.
KAFKAAmerican (Rare)
Czech and Jewish (Bohemia): from kavka 'jackdaw', which is a type of bird; traditionally a nickname or surname.
KAIGLEREnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of Kegler.
KAINEEnglish
Variant of Caine.
KAPITYEnglish
Meaning unknown.
KARPEnglish
From the given name Karp.
KAYEEnglish
From the first name Kaye.
KEATEEnglish
Variant of KEAT.
KEELEnglish (Anglicized), English, Irish, German (Swiss), German (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Keele in Staffordshire, named from Old English cy ‘cows’ + hyll ‘hill’, or from East and West Keal in Lincolnshire, which are named from Old Norse kjolr ‘ridge’... [more]
KEELEREnglish
English: occupational name for a boatman or boatbuilder, from an agent derivative of Middle English kele ‘ship’, ‘barge’ (from Middle Dutch kiel). Americanized spelling of German Kühler, from a variant of an old personal name (see Keeling) or a variant of Kuhl.
KEENEREnglish
Anglicized form of Kiener or Kühner.
KEETONEnglish
Habitational name from a place called Ketton in Durham or one in Rutland or from Keaton in Ermington, Devon. The first is named from the Old English personal name Catta or the Old Norse personal name Káti and Old English tūn "settlement"; the second is probably from an old river name or tribal name Cētan (possibly a derivative of Celtic cēd "wood") and Old English ēa "river"; and the last possibly from Cornish kee "hedge, bank" and Old English tūn.
KELHAMEnglish
Derived from the village of Kelham, near Newark-upon-Trent, Nottingham.
KELSHAWEnglish
Derived from the villages of North or South Kelsey in Lincolnshire.
KEMPTONEnglish
From the name of a place in Shropshire meaning "Cempa's town" or "warrior town", from a combination of either the Old English word cempa "warrior" or the byname derived from it and tun "farmstead, settlement".
KENNAWAYEnglish
From the medieval personal name Kenewi, from Old English Cynewīg, literally "royal war", or Cēnwīg, literally "bold war".
KENNYEnglish, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinnigh "descendant of Coinneach" or Ó Cionaodha "descendant of Cionaodh".
KENSINGTONEnglish
English surname meaning "Cynesige's town", from the Old English personal name Cynesige and ton 'town'.
KENSLEYEnglish
This surname might derive from the surname Kinsley or from the locational surname Kelsey (denoting someone who is from either North or South Kelsey in Lincolnshire).
KENTEnglish (?)
Region in England
KENTIEScottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
KENYONEnglish, Welsh
Kenyon is a surname from Wales meaning "a person from Ennion's Mound"
KETCHAMEnglish
Reduced form of KITCHENHAM
KETLEYEnglish
Means "person from Ketley", Shropshire ("glade frequented by cats").
KICKLIGHTERAmerican
Americanized spelling of German Kückleiter, literally ‘chicken ladder’, probably a nickname for a chicken farmer.
KIDDEREnglish
English: possibly an occupational name from early modern English kidd(i)er ‘badger’, a licensed middleman who bought provisions from farmers and took them to market for resale at a profit, or alternatively a variant of Kidman... [more]
KIDMANEnglish
English: occupational name, probably for a goatherd (from Middle English kid(e) ‘young goat’ + man ‘man’), but possibly also for a cutter of wood used for fuel. (from Middle English kidde ‘faggot’ (an archaic English unit for a bundle of sticks)).
KIDWELLWelsh, English
The origins of this surname are uncertain, but it may be derived from Middle English kidel "fish weir", denoting a person who lived by a fish weir or made his living from it, or from an English place called Kiddal, probably meaning "Cydda's corner of land" from the Old English given name Cydda and halh "nook or corner of land".
KIFFEnglish
the origin of the name KIFF could have come from a variation of KITH as in "kith and kin". The O.E.D. definition of the word KITH is that of a native land, familiar place or home so "kith and kin" meant your home and your relations... [more]
KILVERTEnglish
Probably from an Old Norse personal name Ketilfrith, literally "cauldron peace". The surname was borne by British clergyman and diarist Francis Kilvert (1840-1879).
KINDEnglish, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
KINDNESSEnglish (Puritan)
Simply from the English abstract noun
KINGSFORDEnglish
English habitational name from any of various places named Kingsford, for example in Essex, Devon, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire. The name ostensibly means ‘the king’s ford’, but the one in Worcestershire is named as Ceningaford ‘ford of Cena’s people’.
KINGSLEIGHEnglish
It is a variant of KINGSLEY.
KINGSOLVEREnglish (American)
Altered form of English Consolver, which is unexplained. Compare Kinsolving.
KINSEYEnglish
Anglo-Saxon
KINSOLVINGEnglish
Altered form of English Consolver
KIRKEnglish, Northern English, Scottish, Danish
From northern Middle English, Danish kirk "church" (Old Norse kirkja), a topographic name for someone who lived near a church.
KIRKBYEnglish
Variant of Kirby.
KIRKLANDEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the Scottish 'kirk', meaning church, and land. This name denoted one who lived near or tended to the land belonging to or surrounding a church. A famous /fictional/ bearer is Arthur Kirkland, a main character in the highly popular anime/webmanga Axis Powers Hetalia... [more]
KIRKPATRICKEnglish, Scottish, Northern Irish
Habitational name from various places so called from the dedication of their church to St. Patrick. See KIRK.
KIRKSEYEnglish
English: probably a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. This surname is also common in the American South.
KIRSTENEnglish
English and modernized version of Kirstein
KITCHENHAMEnglish
Occupational surname for a person who was in charge of the kitchen in a royal or noble house, or a monastery. From the Anglo Saxon cycene (German: Küche Dutch: kjøkken Latin: cocina Italian: cucina)
KITLEYEnglish
Derived from a place name in Devonshire, England, and was first recorded in the form of Kitelhey in 1305.... [more]
KITSONScottish, English
Patronymic form of KIT.
KITTREDGEEnglish
Derived from the given name Keterych.
KIXEnglish (Rare)
Location name from one of two rivers in West Yorkshire called Kex.
KLARICHEnglish
English spelling of Klarić.
KLINEAmerican
Kline is one of the smaller groups of anglicized forms of the German surname Klein.... [more]
KLOSSEnglish (British)
Surname from the model, Karlie Kloss (1992-)
KNAPPEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hillock, Middle English "nappe, Old English cnæpp, or habitational name from any of the several minor places named with the word, in particular Knapp in Hampshire and Knepp in Sussex.
KNIGHTONEnglish
English surname which was derived from a place name composed of the Old English elements cnihta meaning "servant, retainer" (genitive plural of cniht) and tun "enclosure, settlement".
KNIPEEnglish
The lineage of the name Knipe begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It is a result of when they lived on the peak of a hill or highland. The surname Knipe is primarily familiar in the regions of Lancashire and Westmoreland.... [more]
KNOCKEnglish
Topographic name for someone living by a hill, from Middle English knocke "hill" (Old English cnoc).
KNOLLEnglish, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
KNOWLESEnglish, Irish
As an English surname it is derived from a genitive or plural form of Middle English knolle meaning "hilltop, hillock", denoting a person who either lived at the top of a hill or near a hillock, or hailed from one of the many places in England named with this word.... [more]
KNOWLTONEnglish
Habitational name from either of two places so named, one in Dorset and the other in Kent.
KNOXEnglish (Modern), Scottish, Northern Irish
Topographic name derived from Old English cnocc "round hill" referring to someone living on or near a hill top.
KOONAmerican
Americanized spelling of German Kuhn or Dutch Koen.
KOXEnglish
Variant of Cox
LADLEYEnglish
Probably a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
LADSONEnglish
Patronymic of Ladd.
LAGADUEnglish
Possible French origins
LAKEEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, Old English lacu, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example in Wiltshire and Devon. Modern English lake (Middle English lake) is only distantly related, if at all; it comes via Old French from Latin lacus... [more]
LAMBEnglish
A nickname for a gentle or malleable person or an occupational name for someone who raised or cared for young sheep. Can take the form Lum.
LAMBEEnglish
Variant of Lamb.
LAMPERTGerman, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
LAMSHEDEnglish
Surname common in Australia & the UK. A variation of Lambshead which was originally a mis-spelling of Lambside which was the area from which the family originated in Pommyland. Other variations include Lambshed, Lamshead, Lammyside and Lamesta... [more]
LANCASHIREEnglish
Shire of Lancaster; One who came from Lancashire, a county in the North of England.
LANCASTEREnglish
Habitational name from Lancaster in northwestern England, named in Old English as ‘Roman fort on the Lune’, from the Lune river, on which it stands, + Old English cæster ‘Roman fort or walled city’ (Latin castra ‘legionary camp’)... [more]
LANCEEnglish
From the Germanic personal name Lanzo, originally a short form of various compound names with the first element land ‘land’, ‘territory’ (for example, Lambert), but later used as an independent name... [more]
LANDEnglish, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
LANDRYFrench, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
LANEYEnglish, Irish
Possibly from the given name Laney or the Irish surname McElhinney.
LANGFIELDEnglish
Combination of Old English lang meaning "long" and feld meaning "stretch of open country". It could serve either as a topographic surname or a habitational surname for someone from one of the many locations named "Langfield" (ex... [more]
LANGFORDLiterature, English
An English habitational name from any of the numerous places named in Old English as ‘long ford’, from lang, long ‘long’ + ford ‘ford’, except for Langford in Nottinghamshire, which is named with an Old English personal name Landa or possibly land, here used in a specific sense such as ‘boundary’ or ‘district’, with the same second element.
LANGHORNEnglish, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
LANGSTONEnglish
Means "long stone"; derived from Old English lang meaning "long" and stan meaning "stone". It can also be used as a given name.
LANSDOWNEFrench, English
The first marquis lansdowne, land owners for there lords and farmers also know as tenants.
LANSINGEnglish
Derived from the name of Lancing, a place in West Sussex, which was composed of the Old English personal name Wlanc and -ingas meaning "family of" or "followers of".
LAPLANDEREnglish
A surname referring to someone who had immigrated from Lapland, northern Scandinavia.
LAPSLEYScottish, English, Medieval English
Combination of Old English læppa ”end of a parish” and leah ”woodland clearing”. Another meaning could be possible.
LARAMIEEnglish
From the French la ramée "the small wood, the arbour".
LARKEYAmerican (Modern, Rare, ?)
It is my grandmother's maiden name
LARTEREnglish
From the old Teutonic word 'lahtro' which is to do with a place that animals bear their young. This was modifed in several dialects to be 'lahtre', 'lattr', 'lauchter' and 'lawchter'. ... [more]
LATHAMEnglish (British)
Habitational name from any of the places in England named with the Old Norse word hlaða meaning "barn".
LATIMEREnglish
English occupational name for a Latinist, a clerk who wrote documents in Latin, from Anglo-Norman French latinier, latim(m)ier. Latin was more or less the universal language of official documents in the Middle Ages, displaced only gradually by the vernacular—in England, by Anglo-Norman French at first, and eventually by English.
LAUGHTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places in England so called. Most of them, as for example those in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (near Gainsborough), Sussex, and West Yorkshire, are named with Old English leac ‘leek’ + tun ‘enclosure’... [more]
LAURENCEEnglish, French
From the given name Laurence.
LAVERICKEnglish
Derived from Old English lāferce meaning "lark", making it a cognate of Lark.
LAVERSEnglish
English (chiefly Devon and Cornwall): Medieval English and occupational, from pre-10th century Old French "lavandier". Introduced by the Normans after 1066, originally described a worker in the wool industry, and was a metonymic or nickname for a person employed to wash raw wool or rinse the cloth after fulling... [more]
LAWLESSEnglish
Without reign of law.... [more]
LAWTONEnglish
Habitational name, common in Lancashire and Yorkshire, from Buglawton or Church Lawton in Cheshire, or Lawton in Herefordshire, named in Old English as ‘settlement on or near a hill’, or ‘settlement by a burial mound’, from hlaw ‘hill’, ‘burial mound’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
LAXTONEnglish
The lake town.
LAYCOCKEnglish
The name comes from a small village in England called "Laycock" and has something to do with "the place of the birds."... [more]
LAYMANEnglish
Habitational name for someone living near a meadow. Derived from Middle English leye. ... [more]
LAZENBYEnglish
From a place name which was derived from leysingi and byr, two Norse words meaning "freedman" and "settlement" respectively.
LEACHMANEnglish
Occupational name for a physician’s servant, from Leach 1 + Middle English man ‘manservant’.
LEADBEATEREnglish
Variant spelling of Ledbetter.
LEANNEEnglish, Irish
means "gracious plum" in english
LEAREnglish
Means (i) "person from Leire", Leicestershire ("place on the river Leire", a river-name that may also be the ancestor of Leicestershire); or (ii) "person from Lear", any of several variously spelled places in northern France with a name based on Germanic lār "clearing"... [more]
LECKEYScottish, English, Irish
Originally Scottish, but also found in England, Northern Ireland and Ireland. Possibly derives from the barony of Leckie (meaning "place of flagstones", from Gaelic leac, "flagstone") in Stirlingshire.
LEDGEREnglish, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’. The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEDGEREnglish
From a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut "people, tribe" and gār, gēr "spear". The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEDWICKEnglish
A variation of the given name Ludwig.
LEECHEnglish, Scottish
A physician.
LEEDSEnglish
From the city of Leeds in Yorkshire. The name was first attested in the form Loidis in AD 731. In the Domesday Book of 1086, it is recorded as 'Ledes'. This name is thought to have ultimately been derived from an earlier Celtic name... [more]
LEMONEnglish, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’. This came to be used as a nickname for a lover or sweetheart, from Middle English lem(m)an... [more]
LEOEnglish
From the Old French personal name Leon.
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