Surnames of Length 6

This is a list of surnames in which the length is 6.
usage
length
Hyland 1 English
Topographic name meaning "high land", from Old English heah and land.
Hyland 2 Irish
Variant of Whelan.
Ibáñez Spanish
Means "son of Ibán".
Ibarra Basque, Spanish
From Basque place names derived from ibar meaning "meadow".
Ibbott English
Matronymic surname derived from the medieval name Ibota, a diminutive of Isabel.
Ignácz Hungarian
Derived from the given name Ignác.
Ilbert English
Derived from a Norman French form of the Germanic given name Hildiberht.
Ingham English
From the name of an English town, of Old English origin meaning "Inga's homestead".
Ingram English
Derived from the Norman French given name Enguerrand.
Irvine 1 Scottish
Originally derived from the name of a Scottish (North Ayrshire) town, which was named for the River Irvine, derived from Brythonic elements meaning "green water".
Ishida Japanese
From Japanese (ishi) meaning "stone" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Ivanoŭ Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Belarusian Іваноў (see Ivanow).
Ivanov Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Macedonian
Means "son of Ivan". It is among the most common surnames in Bulgaria and Russia.
Ivanow Belarusian
Means "son of Ivan".
Jacobs English, Dutch
Derived from the given name Jacob.
Jaeger German
Variant of Jäger.
Jagoda Polish
Means "berry" in Polish.
Jahoda Czech
Czech cognate of Jagoda.
Jansen Dutch, Norwegian
Means "son of Jan 1". This is the second most common Dutch surname.
Janzen Dutch
Means "son of Jan 1".
Jarvis English
Derived from the given name Gervais.
Jeanes 1 English
Derived from the given name Jan, a medieval English form of John.
Jeanes 2 English
Originally denoted a person who came from Genoa, Italy.
Jekyll English
Derived from the Breton given name Judicaël. This name was used by Robert Louis Stevenson for the character of Dr Henry Jekyll in the book Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886).
Jensen Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of Jens". This is the most common surname in Denmark.
Jenson Danish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Jensen.
Jepson English
Means "son of Jep".
Jérôme French
Derived from the given name Jérôme.
Jerome English
Derived from the given name Jerome. A famous bearer of this surname was the American-born Jennie Jerome (1854-1921), Lady Randolph Churchill, mother of Sir Winston Churchill.
Jervis English
Variant of Jarvis.
Jewell English
Derived from the Breton given name Judicaël.
Joiner English
Occupational name for a carpenter (that is, a person who joins wood together to make furniture).
Jokela Finnish
Derived from Finnish joki "river".
Jonker Dutch
From the Dutch title jonkheer meaning "young lord". It was originally a medieval noble designation (not an actual title) for a young nobleman.
Jordan 1 English, French, German
Derived from the given name Jordan.
Jordan 2 Jewish
Derived from the name of the Jordan river, which is from Hebrew יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down".
Joseph English, French
Derived from the given name Joseph.
Joyner English
Variant of Joiner.
Juhász Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "shepherd" in Hungarian.
Julien French
From the given name Julien.
Juriša Croatian
Derived from a diminutive form of Jure.
Kaczka Polish
Means "duck" in Polish.
Kadlec Czech
From Czech tkadlec meaning "weaver".
Kahler German
From a nickname derived from German kahl meaning "bald".
Kaiser German
From Middle High German keiser meaning "emperor", originally a nickname applied to someone who acted kingly. The title ultimately derives from the Roman name Caesar.
Kalmár Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "merchant, shopkeeper" in Hungarian, of German origin.
Kałuża Polish
Means "puddle" in Polish.
Kaluža Slovene, Czech
Czech and Slovene form of Kałuża.
Kamiya Japanese
From Japanese (kami) meaning "god" and (ya) meaning "valley".
Kaneko Japanese
From Japanese (kane) meaning "gold, metal, money" and (ko) meaning "child".
Kappel German, Dutch
Name for a person who lived near or worked at a chapel, ultimately from Late Latin cappella, a diminutive of cappa "cape", arising from the holy relic of the torn cape of Saint Martin, which was kept in small churches.
Kardos Hungarian
From Hungarian kard meaning "sword". It could have been applied to soldiers, sword makers, or one with a pugnacious nature.
Karimi Arabic, Persian
Derived from the given name Karim.
Kartal Turkish
From a nickname meaning "eagle" in Turkish.
Kašpar Czech
Derived from the given name Kašpar.
Kaspar German
Derived from the given name Kaspar.
Katona Hungarian
Means "soldier" in Hungarian.
Käufer German
Variant of Kaufer.
Kaufer German
Means "trader" in German.
Kayode Western African, Yoruba
From the given name Kayode.
Kazama Japanese
From Japanese (kaza) meaning "wind, style" and (ma) meaning "among, between".
Kazloŭ Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Belarusian Казлоў (see Kazlow).
Kazlow Belarusian
Patronymic from Belarusian казёл (kaziol) meaning "male goat", probably used to denote a goatherd.
Kedves Hungarian
Means "nice, kind" in Hungarian.
Keegan Irish
From Irish Mac Aodhagáin meaning "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of Aodh.
Keeley Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe", a given name derived from caol "slender".
Keller German
Means "cellar" in German, an occupational name for one in charge of the food and drink.
Kelley Irish
Variant of Kelly 1.
Kelsey English
From an English place name meaning "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
Kemény Hungarian
Means "firm, hard, tough" in Hungarian.
Kermit Manx
Anglicized form of Mac Diarmada (see McDermott).
Kerner German
Derived from Old High German kerno "seed", an occupational name for one who sold or planted seeds.
Kerper German
Variant of Gerber.
Kersey English
From an English place name meaning derived from Old English cærse "watercress" and eg "island".
Kiefer 1 German
Means "pine tree" in German.
Kiefer 2 German
Occupational name for a barrel maker, derived from Old High German kuofa meaning "barrel".
Killam English
Denoted one who hailed from the English town of Kilham, meaning "kiln homestead".
Kimura Japanese
From Japanese (ki) meaning "tree, wood" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
Kinley Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Kinsey English
Derived from the given name Cynesige.
Király Hungarian
Means "king" in Hungarian, of Slavic origin (a cognate of Król).
Klerks Dutch
Variant of De Klerk.
Klerkx Dutch
Variant of De Klerk.
Klímek Czech
Derived from a diminutive of Kliment.
Klimek Polish
Derived from a diminutive of Klemens.
Knaggs English
From Middle English knagg meaning "small mound, projection". It is found most commonly in the north of England, in particular Yorkshire.
Knight English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
Kocsis Hungarian
Means "coachman" in Hungarian.
Koeman Dutch
Variant of Koopman.
Koenig German
German cognate of King.
Köhler German
Variant of Kohler.
Kohler German
From Middle High German koler meaning "charcoal burner" or "charcoal seller".
Kohout Czech
Czech cognate of Kohut.
Kolijn Dutch
From the given name Nicolaas.
Kollen Dutch
From the given name Nicolaas.
Koning Dutch
Dutch cognate of King.
Kontos Greek
Means "short" in Greek.
Koolen Dutch
Derived from the given name Nicolaas.
Koppel Estonian, Danish
From Low German koppel meaning "paddock, pasture" (a word borrowed into Estonian).
Kovács Hungarian
Hungarian form of Kovač.
Kozioł Polish
Means "male goat" in Polish, probably used to denote a goatherd.
Kozlov Russian
Patronymic from Russian козёл (kozyol) meaning "male goat", probably used to denote a goatherd.
Krajnc Slovene
Originally denoted a person from Carniola (Slovene Kranjska), a region that makes up a large part of central Slovenia.
Kramář Czech
Czech form of Krämer.
Krämer German
Means "shopkeeper, merchant" in German, derived from Old High German kram meaning "tent, trading post".
Kramer Low German, Jewish
Low German and Jewish form of Krämer.
Krause German
Variant of Kraus.
Krauss German
Variant of Kraus.
Krauß German
Variant of Kraus.
Krejči Czech
Means "tailor" in Czech.
Krüger 1 German
In northern Germany an occupational name for a tavern keeper, derived from Middle Low German kroch meaning "tavern".
Krüger 2 German
In southern Germany an occupational name for a potter, derived from Middle High German kruoc meaning "jug, pot".
Krupin Russian
Derived from Russian крупа (krupa) meaning "grain".
Krusen Dutch
Anglicized form of Cruyssen.
Kučera Czech
Means "curl" in Czech, a nickname for a person with curly locks of hair.
Kudrna Czech
Means "curl" in Czech, a nickname for someone with curly hair.
Kuiper Dutch
Means "cooper, barrel maker" in Dutch.
Kunkel German
Occupational name for a maker of distaffs, from Middle High German kunkel "distaff, spindle", of Latin origin.
Kunkle German
Variant of Kunkel.
Kurata Japanese
From Japanese (kura) or (kura) both meaning "granary, storehouse" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Kuroda Japanese
From Japanese (kuro) meaning "black" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Kuroki Japanese
From Japanese (kuro) meaning "black" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
Kurucz Hungarian
Derived from the Hungarian word kuruc, referring to rebels who fought against the Habsburgs in the late 17th to early 18th century.
Kyselý Czech
Means "sour" in Czech. It was most likely used to denote a person known for having a bad mood.
Làconi Sardinian
From the name of the town of Làconi on Sardinia, Italy.
Laganà Italian
Occupational name for a greengrocer, meaning "vegetables" in southern Italian dialects, ultimately from Greek λάχανον (lachanon).
Lamont Scottish
From the medieval Gaelic given name Lagmann, derived from Old Norse lǫgmaðr meaning "law man".
Landau German, Jewish
Derived from the town of Landau in the Palatinate region of Germany, of Old High German origin meaning "land valley".
Langer German, Jewish
German cognate of Long.
Lannon Irish
Variant of Lennon.
Lantos Hungarian
Means "minstrel, bard, lutist" in Hungarian, from lant meaning "lute".
Larsen Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of Lars".
László Hungarian
Derived from the given name László.
Lavoie French
Means "the road, the lane" in French, a name for someone who lived close to a road.
Lawson English
Means "son of Laurence 1".
Layton English
Derived from the name of English towns, meaning "town with a leek garden" in Old English.
Lebeau French
Nickname for a handsome person, from French le "the" and beau "beautiful, handsome".
Lebrun French
From a nickname meaning "the brown", from French brun "brown".
Lehrer Jewish
Means "teacher" in German (Yiddish לערער (lerer)).
Lennon Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The byname Leannán means "lover". The name was borne by the musician John Lennon (1940-1980).
Lennox Scottish
From the name of a district in Scotland, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly meaning "place of elms".
Leroux French
Means "the red", from Old French ros "red". This was a nickname for a person with red hair.
Leslie Scottish
From a Scottish clan name, earlier Lesselyn, derived from a place name in Aberdeenshire, itself probably from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly".
Levine Jewish
Patronymic from the given name Levi.
Leyton English
Variant of Layton.
Linden German
Derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
Lindon English
Variant of Lyndon.
Linton English
Originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
Lister Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac an Fleisdeir meaning "son of the arrow maker".
Little English
Meaning simply "little", it was originally a nickname given to a short person.
Lončar Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "potter", from Serbo-Croatian lonac, Slovene lonec meaning "pot".
London English
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain.
Lorenz German
Derived from the given name Lorenz.
Loritz German
Derived from the given name Lorenz.
Lovász Hungarian
Means "groom, stableman, ostler" in Hungarian.
Lovell English
Variant of Lowell.
Lovrić Croatian
Means "son of Lovro".
Lowell English
From a nickname derived from a Norman French lou meaning "wolf" and a diminutive suffix.
Loyola Spanish, Basque
From the name of a place name near the town of Azpeitia in the Basque Country of Spain, derived from Basque loi meaning "mud". This was the birthplace of Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), the founder of Jesuits.
Lozano Spanish
Means "healthy, exuberant, lively" in Spanish, originally used as a nickname for an elegant or haughty person.
Ludwig German
From the given name Ludwig.
Lukács Hungarian
From the given name Lukács.
Lundin Swedish
Variant of Lund.
Luther German
From the old given name Leuthar.
Lyndon English
Originally from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English.
Lynton English
Variant of Linton.
Macháň Czech
Derived from the given name Mach, a Czech diminutive of Matěj and other given names beginning with Ma.
Macías Spanish
Derived from the given name Mateo.
MacKay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacAoidh.
Mac Óda Irish
Means "son of Odo" in Irish.
MacRae Scottish
Variant of McRae.
Madden Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Madaidhín.
Maddox Welsh
Derived from the given name Madoc.
Madsen Danish
Means "son of Mads".
Magyar Hungarian
Means "Hungarian" in Hungarian.
Mäkelä Finnish
Means "the place of the hill" in Finnish.
Malley Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Máille.
Mallon Irish
Variant of Malone.
Malone Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Mandel German, Yiddish
Means "almond" in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Marchi Italian
Derived from the given name Marco.
Marini Italian
Derived from the given name Marino.
Marino Italian, Spanish
Derived from the given name Marino.
Marion French
Derived from the given name Marion 1.
Markey Irish
From the Irish Ó Marcaigh meaning "descendant of Marcach", a given name meaning "horse rider".
Markov Bulgarian, Russian
Means "son of Marko or Mark".
Marley English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1843) bears this surname.
Marlow English
Originally a name for a person from Marlow in Buckinghamshire, England. The place name means "remnants of a lake" from Old English mere "lake" and lafe "remnants, remains". A notable bearer was the English playwright and poet Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
Martel 1 English, French
Derived from the given name Martel, a medieval diminutive of Martin.
Martel 2 French, English
Nickname for a smith, derived from Old French martel "hammer", ultimately from Late Latin martellus.
Martín Spanish
Derived from the given name Martín.
Martin English, French, German, Swedish
Derived from the given name Martin. This is the most common surname in France.
Márton Hungarian
Derived from the given name Márton.
Marvin English
Derived from the Welsh given name Merfyn or the Old English name Mærwine.
Massey English
Derived from Massy, the name of several towns in France. The name of the town is perhaps derived from a personal name that was Latinized as Maccius.
Masson 2 French
From a short form of the given name Thomasson, itself a diminutive of Thomas.
Mateev Bulgarian
Means "son of Matey".
Mateus Portuguese
From the given name Mateus.
Maurer German
Occupational name meaning "wall builder" in German.
McAfee Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of MacDhubhshìth.
McCabe Irish, Scottish
Means "son of Cába", where Cába is a byname meaning "cape, cloak" (from Latin cappa).
McCaig Scottish
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic MacThaoig meaning "son of Tadhg".
McCrae Scottish
Variant of McRae.
McCrum Scottish
Anglicized form of MacChruim.
McCune Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Eoghain.
McEwan Scottish
Anglicized form of MacEòghainn.
McGill Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Ghoill meaning "son of the foreigner", derived from gall "foreigner".
McIver Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic MacIomhair meaning "son of Íomhar".
McLean Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic MacGillEathain or MacGillEain meaning "son of the servant of Eòin".
McLeod Scottish
From Gaelic MacLeòid meaning "son of Leod", a given name derived from Old Norse ljótr "ugly".
McNeil Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic MacNèill meaning "son of Niall".
McPhee Scottish
Anglicized form of MacDhubhshìth.
Meaney Irish
Variant of O'Mooney.
Medina Spanish
Means "(Arab) city" in Spanish, derived from Arabic مدينة (madinah).
Medved Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Ukrainian
Means "bear" in several Slavic languages.
Medveď Slovak
Slovak cognate of Medved.
Meijer Dutch
Dutch form of Meyer 1.
Meindl German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Meino.
Melnik Russian
Means "miller" in Russian.
Melnyk Ukrainian
Means "miller" in Ukrainian. This is the most common Ukrainian surname.
Mendel 1 Jewish
Derived from the given name Mendel.
Mendel 2 German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Meino. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
Mendes Portuguese
Portuguese form of Menéndez.
Mercer English
Occupational name for a trader in textiles, from Old French mercier, derived from Latin merx meaning "merchandise".
Merckx Dutch, Flemish
From the given name Mark.
Merkel German
From a diminutive of the given name Markus. A notable bearer is the German chancellor Angela Merkel (1954-).
Messer German
Occupational name for a person who made knives, from Middle High German messer "knife".
Miazga Polish
Derived from Polish miazga "pulp, crush".
Michel French, German, Dutch, Basque
Derived from the given name Michel, Michiel or Mitxel.
Milani Italian
Variant of Milano.
Milano Italian
Originally indicated someone who came from Milan.
Miller English
Occupational surname referring to a person who owned or worked in a grain mill, from Middle English mille "mill".
Milton English
Derived from an English place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote "Paradise Lost".
Minami Japanese
From Japanese (minami) meaning "south".
Minett English
From the medieval given name Minna.
Minkov Bulgarian
Means "son of Minko", a Bulgarian diminutive of Mihail.
Mishra Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "mixed, mingled, honourable" in Sanskrit.
Miyake Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "three" and (yake) meaning "house, home".
Miyata Japanese
From Japanese (miya) meaning "temple, shrine, palace" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Mizuno Japanese
From Japanese (mizu) meaning "water" and (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Mlakar Slovene, Croatian
Referred to someone who lived near a pool, derived from South Slavic mlaka meaning "pool, puddle".
Mlynář Czech
Means "miller" in Czech.
Mohren German
Derived from the given name Maurus.
Molina Spanish
Means "mill" in Spanish.
Möller Low German, Swedish
Low German and Swedish form of Müller.
Møller Danish
Danish form of Müller.
Molnár Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "miller" in Hungarian.
Monday 1 English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Mundi.
Monday 2 English
Denoted a person for whom this was a significant day, often the day they would pay their feudal fees.
Monday 3 Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Giolla Eoin. The last part of the surname was mistakenly taken as the Gaelic word for "Monday", Luain.
Monroe Scottish
Anglicized (typically American) form of Munro.
Mooney Irish
Variant of O'Mooney.
Mooren Dutch
Derived from the given name Maurus.
Moreau French
Derived from a diminutive of Maurus.
Moreno Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "dark" in Spanish and Portuguese.
Morgan Welsh
Derived from the given name Morgan 1.
Morita Japanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Morris English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Derived from the given name Maurice.
Morton English
Derived from a place name meaning "moor town" in Old English.
Moulin French
Means "mill" in French.
Mounce German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of German Manz.
Muggia Italian
From the town of Muggia in northeastern Italy near the Slovenian border. It was called Muglae in Latin.
Mulder Dutch
Dutch equivalent of Miller.
Mullen Irish
From the Irish Ó Maoláin meaning "descendant of Maolán". The given name Maolán meant "devotee".
Müller German
German equivalent of Miller, derived from Middle High German mülnære or müller.
Muller German
Variant of Müller.
Mulloy Irish
Variant of Molloy.
Munroe Scottish
Anglicized (typically Canadian and American) form of Munro.
Munson English
Patronymic formed from the Norman French nickname moun meaning "monk".
Muraro Italian
Occupational name for a wall builder, from Italian murare meaning "to wall up".
Murgia Sardinian
Means "brine" in Sardinian, perhaps a nickname for someone who pickled foods.
Murphy Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of Murchadh". This is the most common Irish surname.