Surnames of Length 6

This is a list of surnames in which the length is 6.
usage
length
Siegel 2 German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
Sieger German
From the given name Sieghard.
Siemon German
Variant of Simon.
Sierra Spanish
Originally indicated a dweller on a hill range or ridge, from Spanish sierra "mountain range", derived from Latin serra "saw".
Sikora Polish
Means "tit (bird)" in Polish.
Silver English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
Simmon German
From the given name Simon 1.
Simões Portuguese
Means "son of Simão" in Portuguese.
Simons English, German
Derived from the given name Simon 1.
Siskin Jewish
Variant of Ziskind.
Śląski Polish
Polish cognate of Slezák.
Slater English
Occupational name indicating that an early member worked covering roofs with slate, from Old French esclat "shard", of Germanic origin.
Slávik Slovak
Slovak cognate of Slavík.
Slavík Czech
Means "nightingale" in Czech.
Ślązak Polish
Polish cognate of Slezák.
Slezák Czech
Originally a name for a person from Silesia, a historical region that is nowadays split between Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic.
Sloane Irish
Variant of Sloan.
Slovák Czech, Slovak
Originally described one who was from Slovakia.
Smalls English
Variant of Small.
Smeets Dutch
Variant of Smit.
Smolak Polish, Czech
Occupational name for a distiller of pitch, derived from the Slavic word smola meaning "pitch, resin".
Smythe English
Variant of Smith.
Snider English
Variant of Snyder.
Snyder English
Means "tailor", derived from Middle English snithen "to cut", an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.
Soares Portuguese
Means "son of Suero".
Sokoll Jewish
Variant of Sokol.
Sólyom Hungarian
Means "hawk, falcon" in Hungarian.
Sommer 1 German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
Sommer 2 German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
Sonnen German
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
Souček Czech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topographic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
Sovány Hungarian
Means "thin, lean" in Hungarian.
Sparks English
From an Old Norse nickname or byname derived from sparkr meaning "sprightly".
Spears English
Patronymic form of Spear.
Specht German
Means "woodpecker" in German.
Spiker Dutch
Americanized form of Spijker 1 or Spijker 2.
Spiros Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Σπύρος (see Spyros).
Spyros Greek
From the given name Spyros.
Stacey English
Variant of Stacy.
Stacks English
Variant of Stack.
Stanek 1 Polish
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name Stanisław.
Stanek 2 Czech
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name Stanislav.
Stanev Bulgarian
Means "son of Stane", Stane being a diminutive of Stanislav.
Stárek Czech
Czech cognate of Starek.
Starek Polish
From a nickname derived from Polish stary "old".
Stauss German
Means "buttocks" from Middle High German stuz.
Steele English
Occupational name for a steelworker, from Old English stele meaning "steel".
Steube German
Variant of Steuben.
St John English
From a place named for Saint John.
Stoica Romanian
From Romanian stoic meaning "stoic, impassive".
Strand Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
Straub German
From Old High German strub meaning "rough, unkempt".
Street English
Habitational name for a person who lived in a place called Street, for example in Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt meaning "Roman road", from Latin strata.
Strnad Czech, Slovene
Means "bunting" in Czech and Slovene.
Strong English
Nickname derived from Middle English strong or strang meaning "strong".
Stroud English
From Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
Struna Slovene, Czech
From Slavic struna meaning "string, cord", possibly denoting a maker of rope.
Stuber German
Occupational name for the owner of an inn, derived from Old High German stuba "room".
Stumpf German
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
Styles English
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "stile, set of steps".
Suárez Spanish
Means "son of Suero".
Sugita Japanese
From Japanese (sugi) meaning "cedar" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Sultan Arabic
From a nickname meaning "sultan, ruler" in Arabic.
Sumner English
Occupational name for a summoner, an official who was responsible for ensuring the appearance of witnesses in court, from Middle English sumner, ultimately from Latin submonere "to advise".
Sundén Swedish
From Swedish sund meaning "sound, strait".
Sutton English
From various English place names meaning "south town".
Suzuki Japanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
Swango German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Schwangau.
Sydney English
Variant of Sidney.
Sýkora Czech, Slovak
Means "tit (bird)" in Czech and Slovak.
Symons English
Derived from the given name Simon 1.
Szántó Hungarian
Occupational name for a ploughman or tiller, derived from Hungarian szánt meaning "to plow".
Szarka Hungarian
From Hungarian szarka meaning "magpie", often used as a euphemistic term for a thief.
Szwarc Polish
Polish phonetic spelling of German Schwarz.
Szweda Polish
Derived from Polish Szwed meaning "Swede, person from Sweden".
Tafani Italian
From the nickname tafano meaning "gadfly", indicating an annoying person.
Tailor English
Variant of Taylor.
Takács Hungarian
Means "weaver" in Hungarian.
Takala Finnish
Means "(dweller in the) back", probably denoting someone who lived in a remote area, from Finnish taka.
Takeda Japanese
From Japanese (take) meaning "military, martial" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Tamaro Italian
Possibly from the Germanic given name Thietmar. It is typical of the area around Trieste in northern Italy.
Tamura Japanese
From Japanese (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
Tanaka Japanese
Means "dweller in the rice fields", from Japanese (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy" and (naka) meaning "middle".
Tanner English
Occupational name for a person who tanned animal hides, from Old English tannian "to tan", itself from Late Latin and possibly ultimately of Celtic origin.
Tanzer German
Means "dancer" in German, derived from Middle High German tanzen "to dance".
Tasker English
From Middle English taske meaning "task, assignment". A tasker was a person who had a fixed job to do, particularly a person who threshed grain with a flail.
Tatham English
From the name of the town of Tatham in Lancashire, itself from the Old English given name Tata combined with ham meaning "home, settlement".
Tatton English
Originally indicated a person from a town by this name, derived from the Old English given name Tata combined with tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
Tawfiq Arabic
From the given name Tawfiq.
Taylor English
Derived from Old French tailleur meaning "tailor", ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut".
Teagan Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán".
Teague 1 Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Taidhg meaning "descendant of Tadhg".
Teague 2 Cornish
From Cornish tek meaning "fair, beautiful".
Teahan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Téacháin meaning "descendant of Téachán". The given name Téachán possibly means "fugitive".
Terzić Bosnian
From Bosnian terzija meaning "tailor", ultimately of Persian origin.
Teufel German
From a nickname meaning "devil" in German, given to a mischievous person or one who was devil-like.
Thayer French (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Tailler.
Thomas English, Welsh, French, German
Derived from the given name Thomas.
Thorne English
Variant of Thorn.
Thorpe English
From Old Norse þorp meaning "village".
Tinker English
Occupational name for a mender of kettles, pots and pans. The name could derive from the tinking sound made by light hammering on metal. It is possible that the word comes from the word tin, the material with which the tinker worked.
Tipton English
Originally given to one who came from the town of Tipton, derived from the Old English given name Tippa combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Tivoli Italian
Derived from the resort town of Tivoli, near Rome, originally called Tibur in Latin, of uncertain origin.
Tjäder Swedish
Means "wood grouse" in Swedish.
Tobias English, German, Jewish
From the given name Tobias.
Todaro Italian
From a regional form of a given name Todaro, a variant of Teodoro. It is quite common in Sicily.
Toller English
Occupational name meaning "tax gatherer", derived from Old English toln "toll, fee, tax".
Toloni Italian
Derived from the given name Bartolomeo.
Tolvaj Hungarian
Means "thief" in Hungarian.
Tomčić Serbian, Croatian
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Toma 2.
Tordai Hungarian
From Torda, the Hungarian name of the city of Turda in Romania (formerly within the Kingdom of Hungary).
Torres Spanish, Portuguese
Name for a person who lived in or near a tower, ultimately from Latin turris.
Tosell Catalan
Catalan form of Tosi.
Towner English
Variant of Toller.
Toyoda Japanese
From Japanese (toyo) meaning "bountiful, luxuriant" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy". A famous bearer was Kiichiro Toyoda (1894-1952), founder of Toyota Motor Corporation.
Tracey 1 English
From the village of Tracy-sur-mer on the Normandy coast in France. It was brought to England with William the Conqueror.
Tracey 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Treasaigh meaning "descendant of Treasach".
Traver French
French variant of Travers.
Traves English
English variant of Travers.
Travis English
English variant of Travers.
Treacy Irish
Variant of Tracey 2.
Trevis English
English variant of Travers.
Trevor Welsh
Originally from the name of various Welsh towns meaning "big village", derived from Middle Welsh tref "village" and maur "large".
Triggs English
From a byname derived from Old Norse tryggr meaning "true, loyal".
Trucco Italian
Denoted a person coming from a place of this name in northern Italy.
Truman English
Means "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972).
Tucker English
Occupational name for a fuller of cloth, derived from Old English tucian meaning "offend, torment". A fuller was a person who cleaned and thickened raw cloth by pounding it.
Tupper English
Occupational name for a herdsman, derived from Middle English toupe "ram".
Turati Italian
From the name of the town of Turate near Como in Lombardy.
Turchi Italian
Means "Turkish" in Italian.
Turner English
Occupational name for one who worked with a lathe, derived from Old English turnian "to turn", of Latin origin. A famous bearer is the American musician Tina Turner (1939-), born Anna Mae Bullock.
Uberti Italian
Derived from the given name Uberto.
Uehara Japanese
From Japanese (ue) meaning "above, top, upper" and (hara) meaning "field, plain".
Uesugi Japanese
From Japanese (ue) meaning "above, top, upper" and (sugi) meaning "cedar".
Uggeri Italian
Derived from the given name Edgardo.
Ungaro Italian
Means "Hungarian" in Italian.
Urbina Basque
Derived from Basque ur "water" and bi "two", indicating a place where two waterways met.
Văduva Romanian
From Romanian văduvă meaning "widow".
Valdez Spanish
Means "son of Baldo".
Van Can Dutch
Variant of Van Kan.
Van Kan Dutch
Means "from Kanne", a town in the province of Limburg in Belgium. The meaning of the town's name is unknown.
Vankov Bulgarian
Means "son of Ivan" in Bulgarian.
Van Pey Dutch (Rare)
Means "from Pey", a town in the province of Limburg in the Netherlands.
Varano Italian
Derived from one of the many towns of this name in Italy.
Varela Spanish
Derived from Spanish vara "stick". It may have originally been given to one who used a stick in his line of work, for example an animal herder.
Vargas Spanish, Portuguese
Means "slope, flooded field, pastureland" or "hut", from the Spanish and Portuguese dialectal word varga.
Varley English
Originally denoted a person from Verly, France, itself derived from the Roman name Virilius.
Vasile Romanian
Derived from the given name Vasile.
Vastag Hungarian
From a nickname meaning "stout, thick" in Hungarian.
Vaughn Welsh
Variant of Vaughan.
Vencel Hungarian
Derived from the given name Vencel.
Verity English
From a nickname meaning "truth", perhaps given originally to a truthful person.
Vernon English
Locational name in the Eure region of Normandy, from the Gaulish element vern "alder (tree)" with the genitive case maker onis.
Verona Italian
From the name of the city of Verona, one of the most important historical cities of northern Italy. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain.
Vesela Czech
Moravian Czech variant of Veselý.
Veselý Czech
From a nickname meaning "cheerful" in Czech.
Vestri Italian
From the given name Silvestro.
Victor French, English
Derived from the male given name Victor.
Vilaró Catalan
Catalan variant of Vilar.
Villar Spanish
Spanish cognate of Vilar.
Vincze Hungarian
From the given name Vince.
Vinter Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Scandinavian variant of Winter.
Vipond English
From Vieux-Pont, the name of various places in Normandy, derived from French vieux "old" and pont "bridge".
Visser Dutch
Occupational name meaning "fisherman" in Dutch.
Vitale Italian
From the given name Vitale.
Vitali Italian
From the given name Vitale.
Viteri Spanish, Basque
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a Basque place name.
Vlasák Czech
Derived from Czech vlas "hair", probably referring to a barber or a person who bought and sold hair.
Vlašić Croatian
Patronymic from the nickname Vlah meaning "Romanian".
Vlašič Slovene
Patronymic from the nickname Vlah meaning "Romanian".
Vogels Dutch
Variant of Vogel.
Voigts German
Patronymic variant of Vogt.
Volkov Russian
Patronymic derived from Russian волк (volk) meaning "wolf".
Vossen Dutch
From the given name Vos, which comes from the Frisian name Fos, which is from Old Germanic given names beginning with the element folk meaning "people".
Vrubel Czech
From a nickname derived from Czech vrabec meaning "sparrow".
Vukoja Croatian
Derived from the given name Vuk.
Wägner German
Variant of Wagner.
Wagner German
From Middle High German wagener meaning "wagon maker, cartwright". This name was borne by the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883).
Wähner German
Variant of Wagner.
Wahner German
Variant of Wagner.
Walker English
Occupational name for a person who walked on damp raw cloth in order to thicken it. It is derived from Middle English walkere, Old English wealcan meaning "to move".
Waller 1 English
Derived from Old French gallier meaning "person with a pleasant temper".
Waller 2 English
Derived from Old English weall meaning "wall", denoting a builder of walls or someone who lived near a prominent wall.
Waller 3 English
From Old English wille meaning "well, spring, water hole".
Walter English, German
Derived from the given name Walter.
Walton English
From the name of any of several villages in England, derived from Old English wealh "foreigner, Celt", weald "forest", weall "wall", or wille "well, spring, water hole" combined with tun "enclosure".
Warren 1 English
Denoted a person who lived near a warren, from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
Warren 2 English
Originally denoted a person from the town of La Varenne in Normandy, which may derive from a Gaulish word meaning "sandy soil".
Waters 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
Waters 2 English
Derived from the given name Walter.
Watson English, Scottish
Patronymic derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name Walter.
Weaver 1 English
Occupational name for a weaver, derived from Old English wefan "to weave".
Weaver 2 English
From the name of the River Weaver, derived from Old English wefer meaning "winding stream".
Weeber German
German cognate of Weaver 1.
Weekes English
Derived from Old English wīc meaning "village, town".
Wegner Low German
Low German variant of Wagner.
Wehner German
Variant of Wagner.
Wehunt German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Wiegand.
Weiner German
Variant of Wagner.
Welter German
Derived from the given name Walter.
Wendel German
Derived from the given name Wendel.
Werner German
From the given name Werner.
Weston English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English west "west" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Wetzel German
From the given name Wenzel.
Whalen Irish
Variant of Whelan.
Whelan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Faoláin meaning "descendant of Faolán".
Wiater Polish
Derived from Polish wiatr "wind", a nickname for a quick person.
Wibowo Indonesian
From Indonesian wibawa meaning "authority, power", ultimately from Sanskrit विभव (vibhava).
Wilbur English
From the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English.
Wilcox English
From a diminutive of the given name William.
Wilkie English
Double diminutive of the given name William.
Willey English
Variant of Wiley.
Willis English
Derived from the given name William. A famous bearer of this surname is actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
Wilmer English
Derived from the given name Wilmǣr.
Wilson English
Means "son of Will". A famous bearer was the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Wilton English
From any of the English towns named Wilton.
Winter English, German, Swedish
From Old English winter or Old High German wintar meaning "winter". This was a nickname for a person with a cold personality.
Winton English
Derived from the name of several English villages. Their names derive from Old English meaning "enclosure belonging to Wine".
Wirner German
From the given name Werner.
Wójcik Polish
From the Polish word wójt meaning "chief, mayor" (related to German Vogt).
Wolter German
From the given name Walter.
Womack English
Of uncertain origin. One theory suggests that it indicated a dweller by a hollow oak tree, derived from Old English womb "hollow" and ac "oak".
Wörner German
From the given name Werner.
Wragge English
Derived from the Old Danish given name Wraghi, a variant of Vragi.
Wright 1 English
From Old English wyrhta meaning "wright, maker", an occupational name for someone who was a craftsman. Famous bearers were Orville and Wilbur Wright, the inventors of the first successful airplane.
Wright 2 French (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Droit.
Wuopio Swedish
Meaning uncertain, possibly referred to a dweller in a narrow bay with steep shores.
Wyrick Polish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Wyrzyk.
Yamada Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Yankov Bulgarian
Means "son of Yanko".
Yasuda Japanese
From Japanese (yasu) meaning "peace, quiet" or (yasu) meaning "protect, maintain" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Yılmaz Turkish
From the given name Yılmaz.
Yokota Japanese
From Japanese (yoko) meaning "beside, next to" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Yonker Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Jonker.
Younge English
Variant of Young.
Yoxall English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Yoxall in Staffordshire, itself derived from Old English geoc "oxen yoke" and halh "nook, recess".
Zabala Basque
Originally denoted someone who lived in a place of this name in Biscay. It is derived from Basque zabal meaning "large, wide".
Zariņš Latvian
From Latvian zars meaning "branch".
Zavala Spanish
Variant of Zabala.
Zeelen Dutch
Derived from the given name Ceel.
Zegers Dutch
Means "son of Sieger".
Zentai Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from the city of Senta in Serbia (formerly a part of Hungary and called Zenta).
Ziętek Polish
Possibly from a diminutive of Polish zięć meaning "son-in-law".
Zimman Jewish
Possibly a variant of Zimmermann.
Zingel Jewish
From Middle High German zingel "defensive wall". This name was originally applied to a person who lived near the outermost wall of a castle.
Žitnik Slovene, Czech
From the Slavic root žito meaning "rye". This was an occupational name for a dealer in rye or a baker.
Zuñiga Basque
From the name of a Spanish town, formerly named Estuniga in Basque, possibly derived from Basque istuin "channel, strait".
Zunino Italian
Derived from the given name Giovanni.