Surnames of Length 6

This is a list of surnames in which the length is 6.
usage
length
Cullen 1 English
From the name of the German city of Cologne, which was derived from Latin colonia "colony".
Cullen 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Coileáin or Ó Cuilinn.
Cuocco Italian
Italian cognate of Cook.
Curran Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of Corraidhín".
Curtis English
Nickname for a courteous person, derived from Old French curteis meaning "refined, courtly".
Cuyler Dutch
Variant of Kuijlaars or Koole.
Cuyper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper.
Czajka Polish
Means "lapwing (bird)" in Polish.
Dallas 1 English
From Old English dæl meaning "valley" and hus meaning "house".
Dallas 2 Scottish
From the name of a place in Moray, Scotland possibly meaning "meadow dwelling" in Gaelic.
Dalton English
Derived from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the English chemist and physicist John Dalton (1766-1844).
D'Amore Italian
From the given name Amore.
Danell English
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Daniau French
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Daniel English, French, German, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Romanian
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Dannel English
Variant of Daniel.
Darrow Scottish
Habitational name from Darroch near Falkirk, in Stirlingshire, said to be named from Gaelic darach meaning "oak tree".
Darwin English
From the given name Deorwine.
Daviau French
From a diminutive form of David.
Davids English
Means "son of David".
Dawson English
Means "son of Daw".
D'Cruze Indian (Christian)
Variant of Cruz more common among Christians from India.
Deacon English
Means "deacon", ultimately from Greek διάκονος (diakonos) meaning "servant".
De Jong Dutch
Means "young" in Dutch, from Middle Dutch jonc. This is the most common surname in the Netherlands.
De Lang Dutch
Dutch cognate of Long.
De León Spanish
Referred to someone from the Leon region of Spain.
Del Río Spanish
Means "of the river" in Spanish.
De Luca Italian
Means "son of Luca 1".
Deniau French
Variant of Daniel.
Deniel French
Variant of Daniel.
Denman English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
Dennel French
Variant of Daniel.
Dennis English
From the given name Dennis.
Denzel German
Variant of Tanzer.
Denzil English
From the place name Denzell, a manor in Cornwall, which is of unknown meaning.
De Rege Italian (Rare)
Italian variant of Rey 1.
De Smet Flemish
Flemish variant of Smit.
De Vito Italian
Means "son of Vito".
Devlin Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Doibhilin meaning "descendant of Doibhilin", a given name that may be derived from the Gaelic term dobhail meaning "unlucky".
Dexter English
Occupational name meaning "dyer" in Old English (originally this was a feminine word, but it was later applied to men as well).
Dieter German
Derived from the given name Dieter.
Dirchs Dutch (Rare)
Means "son of Dirk".
Dircks Dutch
Means "son of Dirk".
Dirckx Flemish, Dutch
Means "son of Dirk".
Dirkse Dutch
Means "son of Dirk".
Disney English
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy. This surname was borne by the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
Dobrev Bulgarian
Means "son of Dobri".
Dobson English
Means "son of Dobbe", a medieval diminutive of Robert.
Doctor English
Originally denoted someone who was a doctor, ultimately from Latin doctor meaning "teacher".
Dohman German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Thomas.
Donati Italian
From the given name Donato.
Dorsey English
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
Doubek Czech
Means "small oak" in Czech, derived from dub "oak".
Downer English
Name for someone who lived on or near a down, which is an English word meaning "hill".
Dragić Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Patronymic from any of the Slavic given names starting with Drag (see Drago).
Dragov Bulgarian
Means "son of Drago".
Draper English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
Dreher German
Means "turner" from Middle High German drehen "to turn". A turner was a person who used a lathe to create small objects from wood or bone.
Dreier German
Variant of Dreher.
Dreyer German
Variant of Dreher.
Duarte Portuguese, Spanish
From the given name Duarte.
Dubois French
Means "from the forest", from French bois "forest".
Dudley English
From a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
Dufort French
Means "from the fort", from French fort "stronghold".
Dufour French
Occupational name for a baker, from French four "oven".
Duguay French
Means "from the ford", from French gué "ford".
Dumont French
Means "from the mountain", from French mont "mountain".
Dunbar Scottish
From the name of a town in East Lothian, Scotland, derived from Gaelic dùn meaning "fort" and barr meaning "summit", so called from its situation on a rock that projects into the sea.
Duncan Scottish
From the given name Duncan.
Dunkel German
Means "dark" in German.
Dupond French
Variant of Dupont.
Dupont French
Means "from the bridge", from French pont "bridge".
Dupuis French
Means "from the well", from Old French puts, Latin puteus "well".
Durand French, English
From Old French durant meaning "enduring", ultimately from Latin durans. This was a nickname for a stubborn person.
Durant English, French
Variation of Durand.
Durnin Irish
From Irish Ó Doirnáin meaning "descendant of Doirnín", a given name meaning "little fist".
Dustin English
From the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn.
Dvořák Czech
Occupational name derived from Czech dvůr "manor", indicating a person who worked at such a place. This name was borne by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904).
Dwight English
From the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of Dionysius.
Easton English
From the name of various places meaning "east town" in Old English.
Edison English
Means "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
Eichel German
Means "acorn" in German, indicating a person who lived near an oak tree.
Eklund Swedish
From Swedish ek (Old Norse eik) meaning "oak" and lund (Old Norse lundr) meaning "grove".
El-Amin Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic الأمين (see Al-Amin).
Eldred English
From the given name Ealdræd.
Ellery English
From the medieval masculine name Hilary.
Emmett English
Derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Emmitt English
Variant of Emmett.
Engman Swedish
From Swedish äng (Old Norse eng) meaning "meadow" and man (Old Norse maðr) meaning "man", originally a name for a person who lived in a meadow.
Erkens Dutch
Derived from the given name Erk, a variant of Erik.
Espina Spanish
Means "thorn" in Spanish, a name for someone who lived near a thorn bush.
Espino Spanish
Variant of Espina.
Essert German
Variant of Esser.
Eustis English
Derived from the given name Eustace.
Evelyn English
Derived from the given name Aveline.
Evered English
From the given name Everard.
Everly English
From place names meaning derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Fabbri Italian
From Italian fabbro meaning "blacksmith", ultimately from Latin faber.
Fabbro Italian
Variant of Fabbri.
Fábián Hungarian
Derived from the given name Fábián.
Fabian German, English, Polish
Derived from the given name Fabian.
Fabien French
Derived from the given name Fabien.
Fabron French
Diminutive form of Fabre.
Fallon Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Fallamháin meaning "descendant of Fallamhán", a given name meaning "leader".
Fannon Irish
From the Irish Ó Fionnáin meaning "descendant of Fionn".
Faragó Hungarian
An occupational name meaning "woodcutter", from Hungarian farag meaning "carve, cut".
Färber German
Occupational name meaning "dyer", derived from German Farbe "colour".
Farina Italian
Occupational name for a miller, derived from Italian farina "flour".
Farkas Hungarian
Means "wolf" in Hungarian.
Farmer English
Occupational name for a tax collector, from Middle English ferme "rent, revenue, provision", from Medieval Latin firma, ultimately from Old English feorm. This word did not acquire its modern meaning until the 17th century.
Farran English
Derived from Old French ferrant meaning "iron grey".
Fausti Italian
From the given name Fausto.
Favero Italian
Variant of Fabbri.
Fekete Hungarian
Means "black" in Hungarian, originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or a dark complexion.
Ferber German
Variant of Färber.
Ferrer Catalan
Catalan cognate of Ferrari.
Fertig German
Means "ready, prepared" in German.
Fields English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
Finlay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Finley Scottish
Anglicized (typically American) form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Finnin Irish
Diminutive form of Finn.
Firmin English, French
From the given name Firmin.
Fisker Danish
Means "fisherman" in Danish.
Flater German
Means "reed bed" in German.
Flipse Dutch
Variant of Flipsen.
Flores Spanish
Means "son of Floro" in Spanish.
Floros Greek
From Greek φλώρος (floros) meaning "greenfinch", derived from classical Greek χλωρός (chloros) meaning "green".
Forest English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
Forney German
Name for someone who lived near ferns, from Old High German farn "fern".
Foster 2 English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
Foster 3 English
Occupational name for a maker of saddle trees, derived from Old French fustier.
Foster 4 English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster child or foster parent.
Fowler English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
Fraser Scottish
Meaning unknown, originally Norman French de Fresel, possibly from a lost place name in France.
Freund German
From Middle High German vriunt, modern German Freund meaning "friend".
Fujita Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Fuller English
Occupational name for a fuller, a person who thickened and cleaned coarse cloth by pounding it. It is derived via Middle English from Latin fullo.
Fulton English
From the name of the English town of Foulden, Norfolk, meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
Furlan Italian, Slovene
From the name of the Italian region of Friuli, in the northeast of Italy, which is derived from the name of the Roman town of Forum Iulii meaning "forum of Julius".
Gabler German
Occupational name for someone who made or sold forks, from Old High German gabala "fork".
Gadsby English
Habitational name from the villsage of Gaddesby in Leicestershire, so named from Old Norse gaddr "spur, spike (of land)" and býr "farm, settlement".
Gagnon French
Derived from old French gagnon "guard dog". The name most likely originated as a nickname for an aggressive or cruel person.
Garber German
Variant of Gerber.
García Spanish
From a medieval given name of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Basque word hartz meaning "bear". This is the most common surname in Spain.
Garcia Portuguese, Spanish (Anglicized, Filipinized)
Portuguese form of García. It is also an unaccented form of the Spanish name used mainly in America and the Philippines.
Garçon French
Means "boy" in French, referring to a servant.
Garner 1 English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a granary or lived near one.
Garrod English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
Garver German
Variant of Gerber.
Gáspár Hungarian
Derived from the given name Gáspár.
Gaspar Portuguese, Spanish
Derived from the given name Gaspar.
Gašper Slovene
Derived from the given name Gašper.
Gatsby English (Rare), Literature
Rare variant of Gadsby. This name was used by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald for the central character in his novel The Great Gatsby (1925). In the book, James Gatz renames himself as Jay Gatsby at age 17 because he believes it sounds more sophisticated.
Gebara Basque
Habitational name for someone who lived in Gebara, a village in the province of Álava in Spain.
Geelen Dutch
Derived from the given name Geel, itself from Gillis or Gilbert.
Gehrig German
Variant of Gehring.
Geiger German
Means "fiddle player" in German, derived from Old High German giga "fiddle".
Gelens Dutch
Variant of Geelen.
Genkov Bulgarian
Means "son of Genko".
Gensch German
From the given name Gensch, a Sorbian form of John.
George English
Derived from the given name George.
Gérard French
From the given name Gérard.
Gerber German
Means "tanner, leather dresser" in German, derived from Old High German garawen meaning "to prepare".
Géroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Gerver German
Variant of Gerber.
Gibson English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Girard French
From the given name Gérard.
Giraud French
From the given name Gérald.
Giroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Giunta Italian
From the old Italian given name Bonagiunta or Bonaggiunta (derived from bono "good" and aggiunto "assistant").
Glover English
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
Goebel German
Variant of Göbel.
Gordon Scottish
From the name of a place in Berwickshire, Scotland, derived from Brythonic words meaning "spacious fort".
Gorman 1 German
From the Germanic given name Germund.
Gorman 2 Irish
From the Irish Ó Gormáin meaning "descendant of Gormán". The given name Gormán means "little blue one".
Górski Polish
From the Polish word góra meaning "mountain".
Graham Scottish
Derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by William de Graham.
Graner German
Originally denoted a person from Gran, the German name for Esztergom, a city in northern Hungary.
Graves English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
Greene English
Variant of Green.
Grieve Scottish
Occupational name meaning "steward, farm manager" in Middle English, related to the German title Graf.
Grillo Italian
From an Italian nickname meaning "cricket", perhaps given originally to a cheerful person (the cricket is associated with cheerfulness).
Große German
Variant of Groß.
Grosse German
Variant of Groß.
Grossi Italian
Italian cognate of Gros.
Grosso Italian
Italian cognate of Gros.
Grover English
From Old English graf meaning "grove of trees". A famous bearer was the American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908).
Groves English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
Gruber Upper German
From German Grube meaning "pit", indicating a person who lived or worked in a pit or depression. This is the most common surname in Austria.
Guérin French
From the Germanic given name Warin.
Guerra Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "war", given to a belligerent person or one engaged in warfare.
Gulyás Hungarian
Means "herdsman, tender of cows" in Hungarian.
Guzmán Spanish
From the name of the town of Guzmán in Burgos, Spain.
Habich German
German cognate of Hawk.
Hadžić Bosnian
From Bosnian hadž meaning "hajj, pilgrimage", ultimately derived from Arabic حَجّ (hajj). It originally denoted a person who had completed the hajj.
Hafner German
Occupational name for a potter, derived from Old High German havan "pot, vessel".
Haight English
Topographic name for someone who lived at the top of a hill, derived from Old English heahþu "height, summit".
Hailey English
Variant of Haley.
Haines English
Variant of Haynes.
Halász Hungarian
Means "fisherman" in Hungarian.
Hanley English
From various English place names meaning "high meadow" in Old English.
Hansen Norwegian, Danish
Means "son of Hans". This is the most common surname in Norway, and the third most common in Denmark.
Hanson English
Means "son of Hann".
Harden English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
Hardie Scottish
Scots variant of Hardy.
Harley English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Harlow English
Habitational name derived from a number of locations named Harlow, from Old English hær "rock, heap of stones" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
Harman English
From the given name Herman.
Harmon English
From the given name Herman.
Harper English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
Harris English
Means "son of Harry".
Harvey English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see Harvey).
Haugen Norwegian
Means "hill" in Norwegian, referring to a person who lived on a hilltop.
Hayden 1 English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Hayden 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Ó hÉideáin or Ó hÉidín.
Hayley English
Variant of Haley.
Haynes English
Patronymic derived from the Norman name Hagano.
Hayter English
Name for a person who lived on a hill, from Middle English heyt meaning "height".
Hébert French
Derived from the given name Herbert.
Heeren Dutch
From Dutch heer "lord, master", a nickname for a person who acted like a lord or who worked for a lord.
Heikki Finnish
From the given name Heikki.
Heiman Jewish
From the given name Chayyim.
Hendry Scottish, English
Derived from the given name Henry.
Hennig German
From a diminutive of the given name Heinrich.
Henson English
Means "son of Henne", a medieval diminutive of Henry.
Herceg Croatian
Croatian form of Herzog.
Herman English, Dutch
From the given name Herman.
Herzog German
From a German title meaning "duke", a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke's household.
Hewitt English
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Hugh.
Heyman Jewish
From the given name Chayyim.
Hickey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hÍcidhe meaning "descendant of the healer".
Hidaka Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "sun, day" and (taka) meaning "tall, high".
Hierro Spanish
Spanish form of Ferro.
Hillam English
From English places by this name, derived from Old English hyll meaning "hill".
Hilton English
From various English place names derived from Old English hyll "hill" and tun "enclosure, town". Famous bearers of this name include the Hilton family of hotel heirs.
Himura Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "scarlet, dark red" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
Hirano Japanese
From Japanese (hira) meaning "level, even, peaceful" and (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Hirata Japanese
From Japanese (hira) meaning "level, even, peaceful" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Hirsch 1 German
Means "deer, hart" in German. This was a nickname for a person who resembled a deer in some way, or who raised or hunted deer.
Hirsch 2 Jewish
Derived from the given name Hirsh.
Hitler German
Variant of Hiedler. This was spelling used by Alois Hitler, the father of German dictator Adolph Hitler (1889-1945), when he adopted his stepfather Johann Georg Hiedler's surname.
Hlaváč Czech
From a nickname for a person with an oddly-shaped head, derived from Czech hlava "head".
Hobbes English
Derived from the medieval given name Hob. A famous bearer of this name was British political philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), the author of Leviathan.
Hobson English
Means "son of Hob".
Hodges English
Patronymic of Hodge, a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Hodson English
Means "son of Hodge", a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Hodžić Bosnian
From Bosnian hodža meaning "master, teacher, imam", a word of Persian origin.
Höfler German
Variant of Hofer.
Holmes English, Scottish
Variant of Holme. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
Hölzer German
German cognate of Holt.
Holzer German
German cognate of Holt.
Hooker English
Originally applied to one who lived near a river bend or corner of some natural feature, from Old English hoc "angle, hook".
Hooper English
Occupational name for someone who put the metal hoops around wooden barrels.
Hoover German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Huber.
Hopper English
Occupational name for an acrobat or a nickname for someone who was nervous or restless. A famous bearer was the American actor Dennis Hopper (1936-2010).
Hopson English
Variant of Hobson.
Horník Czech, Slovak
Occupational name meaning "miner" in Czech and Slovak.
Horton English
From the names of various places in England, which are derived from Old English horh "dirt, mud" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Horvat Croatian, Slovene
From Croatian and Slovene Hrvat meaning "Croat, person from Croatia".
Houben Dutch
Derived from the given name Hubert.
Howard 1 English
Derived from the given name Hughard or Hávarðr.
Howard 2 English
Occupational name meaning "ewe herder", from Old English eowu "ewe" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
Howell Welsh
From the Welsh given name Hywel.
Hruška Czech
Means "pear" in Czech, most likely used to denote a person who grew or sold pears.
Hubert French, German, English
Derived from the given name Hubert.
Hudson English
Means "son of Hudde".
Huerta Spanish
Means "garden, orchard" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin hortus.
Hughes 1 English
Patronymic of the given name Hugh.
Hughes 2 Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Mac Aodha.
Hummel 1 German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Humbert.
Hummel 2 German, Dutch
Nickname for a busy person, from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch hommel, Middle High German hummel, all meaning "bee".
Hunter English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
Hutson English
Variant of Hudson.
Huxley English
From the name of a town in Cheshire. The final element is Old English leah "woodland, clearing", while the first element might be hux "insult, scorn". A famous bearer was the British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963).