Surnames via Locations

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POTENZA Italian
From the name of the southern Italian city of Potenza, called Potentia in Latin, meaning "power, force".
POWER (1) English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.
POZZI Italian
From Italian pozzo meaning "well, pit", derived from Latin puteus.
PRAŽAK Czech
Means "from PRAGUE" in Czech.
PRESCOTT English
From the name of various English places meaning "priest's cottage" in Old English.
PRESLEY English
Variant of PRIESTLEY. This name was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRESTON English
Originally derived from various place names meaning "priest town" in Old English.
PRIESTLEY English
From a place name meaning "priest clearing", from Old English preost and leah.
PROVENZA Italian
From the name of the Provence region of southern France (in Italian Provenza). It is derived from Latin provincia "province", a territorial division.
PROVENZANO Italian
Variant of PROVENZA typical of southern Italy, namely Sicily and Calabria.
PUERTA Spanish
Means "door, gate", a topographic name for a person who lived near the gates of the town.
PUGLIESE Italian
From an adjectival derivative of Puglia, from Latin Apulia, a region of southeast Italy containing the boot heel and some of the coastline of the Adriatic Sea. It is a regional name for someone from that region.
PUIG Catalan
Catalan cognate of POGGIO.
PUSZTAI Hungarian
From Hungarian puszta meaning "plain, steppe". The name was given to someone living on a plain.
PUTNAM English
From Puttenham, the name of towns in Hertfordshire and Surrey in England, which mean "Putta's homestead".
QUINCY English
Originally from various place names in Normandy that were derived from the given name QUINTUS.
QUIÑONES Spanish
From various Spanish place names derived from quiñóon meaning "shared piece of land", derived from Latin quinque "five".
QUINTANA Spanish, Catalan
Originally indicated someone who lived on a piece of land where the rent was a fifth of its produce, from Spanish and Catalan quintana "fifth", from Latin quintus.
QUIRÓS Spanish
Denoted a person from one of the various places of this name in Spain, which may derive from Galician queiroa meaning "heather".
RADCLIFF English
From various place names in England that mean "red cliff" in Old English.
RAINES English
Originally denoted a person from Rayne, Essex, England (possibly from an Old English word meaning "shelter") or from Rennes, Brittany, France (from the name of the Gaulish tribe of the Redones).
RAINS English
Variant of RAINES.
RAKE English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat".
RAKES English
Variant of RAKE.
RALSTON Scottish
Originally denoted a person from Ralston, Scotland, which was derived from the given name RALPH combined with Old English tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
RAMOS Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, from Latin ramus meaning "branch".
RAMSEY Scottish, English
Means "garlic island", derived from Old English hramsa "garlic" and eg "island". The surname was brought to Scotland by the Norman baron Simundus de Ramsay.
RANDRUP Danish
From the name of homesteads in Denmark (in Viborg or Rebild municipalities).
RANTA Finnish
Originally indicated a person who lived near the shore, from Finnish ranta meaning "shore, beach".
RAPALLINO Italian
From the name of the town of Rapallo near Genoa.
RASPUTIN Russian
From Russian распутье (rasputye) meaning "crossroads". A famous bearer was the Russian mystic Grigoriy Rasputin (1869-1916).
RATTRAY Scottish
From a Scottish place name meaning "fortress town", from Gaelic ráth meaning "fortress" and a Pictish word meaning "town".
RAVENNA Italian
From the name of the city of Ravenna in northern Italy, which is of uncertain origin, possibly Etruscan.
RAY English
Variant of REY (1), REY (2), RYE or WRAY.
READ (2) English
From Old English ryd, an unattested form of rod meaning "cleared land". It is also derived from various English place names with various meanings, including "roe headland", "reeds" and "brushwood".
READY (2) Scottish
Originally denoted a person from Reedie farm in Angus, Scotland.
REENBERG Danish
Meaning unknown. The second element is probably from Old Norse berg "mountain" (modern Danish bjerg).
REIS German, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning "twig, branch, bush", denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
REMINGTON English
From the name of the town of Rimington in Lancashire, derived from the name of the stream Riming combined with Old English tun meaning "enclosure, town".
RESNIK Slovene
Possibly from Slovene resa meaning "heather".
REUTER (1) German
Fom Middle High German riute meaning "cleared land".
RHODES English
Topographic name derived from Old English rod meaning "cleared land", or a locational name from any of the locations named with this word.
RIBEIRO Portuguese
Means "little river, stream" in Portuguese, ultimately from Latin riparius meaning "riverbank".
RIBER Danish
Originally indicated a person from the county or town of Ribe in southwestern Denmark.
RICHELIEU French
From the name of the town of Richelieu, derived from French riche "wealthy" and lieu "place". The historic figure Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642), born Armand du Plessis, was so-called because he became the first Duke of Richelieu. He appears in Alexander Dumas' novel 'The Three Musketeers' (1844).
RIDLEY English
Denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places of this name in England. The places are derived from Old English geryd "channel" or hreod "reed" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
RIETVELD Dutch
Means "reed field", from Dutch riet "reed" and veld "field". It is found mostly in the western part of the Netherlands (the Holland area).
RIGBY English
Originally derived from a the name of a town in Lancashire, itself from Old Norse hryggr "ridge" and býr "farm".
RIGGI Italian
From the name of the Italian city of Reggio Calabria, from Latin Rhegium, of Greek origin.
RILEY (1) English
From the name of the town of Ryley in Lancashire, derived from Old English ryge "rye" and leah "clearing".
RINNE (2) Finnish
Means "hillside" in Finnish.
RÍOS Spanish
Spanish cognate of RIOS.
RIOS Portuguese
Originally denoted a person who lived near a river, from Portuguese rios "river", ultimately from Latin rivus.
RIVA Italian
Means "bank, shore" in Italian, from Latin ripa, denoting one who lived by a river or a lake.
RIVERA Spanish
From Spanish ribera meaning "bank, shore", from Latin riparius.
RIVERO Spanish
Variant of RIVERA.
RIVERS English
Denoted a person who lived near a river, from Middle English, from Old French riviere meaning "river", from Latin riparius meaning "riverbank".
ROACH English
From Middle English and Old French roche meaning "rock", from Late Latin rocca, a word that may be of Celtic origin. It indicated a person who lived near a prominent rock, or who came from a town by this name (such as Les Roches in Normandy).
ROBLEDO Spanish
Means "oak wood" from Spanish roble "oak", ultimately from Latin robur.
ROBLES Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived near an oak tree or forest, from Spanish roble "oak", from Latin robur.
ROCCA Italian
Italian cognate of ROACH.
ROCHA Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician cognate of ROACH.
ROCHE French
French cognate of ROACH.
ROGGEVEEN Dutch
Means "rye field" in Dutch. A famous bearer was Jacob Roggeveen (1659-1729), the first European explorer to Easter Island.
ROMÀ Catalan
Catalan form of ROMANO (1) or ROMANO (2).
ROMAGNA Italian
From the region of Romagna, on the Adriatic coast of Italy. It is derived from Latin Romania meaning "land of the Romans".
ROMANO (2) Italian
Denoted a person from the city of ROME, either a resident or someone who visited as a pilgrim. In Calabria it was also used to designate a person from New Rome, a name for Constantinople.
ROMÃO Portuguese
Portuguese form of ROMANO (1) or ROMANO (2).
ROME French, English
English and French form of ROMANO (2).
ROMEIJNDERS Dutch
From Dutch Romein meaning "Roman, person from ROME".
ROMERO Spanish
Derived from Spanish romero meaning "pilgrim to ROME".
ROMILLY English, French
Originally denoted a person who came from any of the various places in northern France called ROMILLY or from ROMILEY in England.
ROMPA Dutch
Variant of VAN ROMPA.
RONCALLI Italian
From the names of places like Ronco or Ronchi, quite common in northern Italy, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It was the surname of Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (1881-1963), the pope John XXIII.
RONCHI Italian
From Italian places named Ronchi, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It is most common in northern and central Italy.
ROOIJAKKERS Dutch
Means "red field", from Dutch rood "red" and akker "field".
ROOSA Dutch
From Dutch roos meaning "rose".
ROOSEVELT Dutch
Means "rose field" from Dutch roos "rose" and veld "field". This was the surname of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) and Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
ROSA Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of ROSE (1).
ROSALES Spanish
Means "rose bushes" in Spanish.
ROSCOE English
From the name of a town in Lancashire, derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
ROSE (1) English, French, German, Jewish
Means "rose" from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German rose, all from Latin rosa. All denote a person of a rosy complexion or a person who lived in an area abundant with roses. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental, from Yiddish רויז (roiz).
ROSENBERG German, Swedish, Jewish
Means "rose mountain" in German and Swedish. As a Swedish and Jewish name it is ornamental.
ROSENFELD German, Jewish
Means "field of roses" in German. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
ROSS English, Scottish
From various place names (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), which are derived from Scottish Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland".
ROTHENBERG German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning "red" and berg meaning "mountain". As a Jewish name it may be ornamental.
ROTHSCHILD Jewish
From Middle High German rot "red" and schilt "shield", or Yiddish רויט (roit) and שילד (shild). The famous Rothschild family of bankers took their name from a house with a red shield on it.
ROVIGATTI Italian
From the name of the city of Rovigo in northeastern Italy near Venice. It was called Rodigium in Latin, and is of unknown meaning.
ROWBOTTOM English
Originally indicated a person who lived in an overgrown valley, from Old English ruh "rough, overgrown" and boðm "valley".
ROWE (1) English
Means "row" in Middle English, indicating a dweller by a row of hedges or houses.
ROWNTREE English
Originally given to a person who lived near a rowan tree or mountain ash.
ROYDON English
Originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
ROYSTON English
Originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "Royse's town". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
RUDAWSKI Polish
Indicated a person who lived near the Rudawa, a river in Poland.
RUOHO Finnish
Means "grass" in Finnish.
RUSH English
Indicated a person who lived near rushes, the grasslike plant that grows in a marsh, from Old English rysc.
RUSNAK Polish
Means "Russian" in Polish.
RUTHERFORD Scottish
From the name of places in southern Scotland and northern England, derived from Old English hryðer meaning "cattle, ox" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
RUTKOWSKI Polish
Originally a name for a person from Rutki, Poland.
RUUD Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse ruð meaning "clearing".
RYE English
Topographic name. It could be a misdivision of the Middle English phrases atter ye meaning "at the island" or atter eye meaning "at the river". In some cases it merely indicated a person who lived where rye was grown or worked with rye (from Old English ryge).
RYSKAMP Dutch
Meaning unknown, probably ending with Dutch kamp meaning "camp".
SAARI Finnish
From Finnish saari meaning "island".
SACHS German
Originally indicated a person from Saxony (German Sachsen). The region was named for the Germanic tribe of the Saxons, ultimately derived from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SACKVILLE English
From the name of the Norman French town of Saqueneville.
SADOWSKI Polish
Denoted someone who lived in Sadowo, Sadowice or other places beginning with Polish sad "garden, orchard".
SALAMANCA Spanish
Originally indicated a person from Salamanca, a city in western Spain that is of unknown meaning.
SALAZAR Basque
From Spanish sala meaning "hall" and Basque zahar meaning "old". It can also refer to the town of Salazar in Burgos, Spain, which is of the same origin.
SALCEDO Spanish
Derived from Latin salix meaning "willow tree". The name was originally given to one who lived near a willow tree.
SALINAS Spanish
Occupational name for a salt worker or someone who lived bear a salt works, from Spanish salina "salt works, salt mine", ultimately from Latin sal "salt".
SALLER (1) German
Originally denoted a person from the town of Sallern in Bavaria, possibly from a Celtic element meaning "stream".
SALLER (2) German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe "sallow tree".
SALZWEDEL German
Originally denoted a person from Salzwedel, Germany, which is of Old Saxon origin meaning "salt ford".
SANDFORD English
Indicated a person from Sandford, England, which means simply "sand ford".
SANDOVAL Spanish
Derived from the name of a town in Spain, ultimately from Latin saltus "forest, glade" and novalis "unploughed land".
SANDS English
From Old English, indicated the original nearer lived on sandy ground.
SAN NICOLÁS Spanish
Indicated the original bearer was from a place named after Saint NICHOLAS.
SANTANA Spanish, Portuguese
From any of the numerous places named after Saint ANNA.
SANTIAGO Spanish, Portuguese
From various Spanish and Portuguese places called SANTIAGO.
SAPPINGTON English
Possibly from the city of Sapperton, England, derived from Old English sapere meaning "soap maker" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
SÁRKÖZI Hungarian
Originally indicated someone from Sárköz, a region in Hungary, derived from sár "mud" and köz "margin, lane".
SARNO Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sarno in Italy, named for the Sarno River (called Sarnus in Latin).
SASAKI Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "help, aid" (repeated, indicated by the iteration mark ) and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
SAULT French
French cognate of SOTO.
SAUVETERRE French
From the name of various towns in France, derived from French sauve "safe" and terre "land".
SAVONA Italian
From the name of the city of Savona in northern Italy, called Savo by the Romans, of uncertain meaning.
SCHOOL Dutch
From Dutch school, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school", indicating a person who worked at or lived near a school.
SCHOORL Dutch
Originally indicated a person from the town of Schoorl in the province of Noord-Holland in the Netherlands. It means "forest by the shore" in Dutch.
SCHOREL Dutch
Variant of SCHOORL.
SCHÖTTMER German
Originally indicated a person from Schötmar, Germany (now part of the city of Bad Salzuflen in North Rhine-Westphalia).
SCHWANGAU German
From the name of a town in southern Germany, possibly related to German Schwan meaning "swan".
SCHWARZENBERG German
Means "black mountain" in German.
SCHWARZENEGGER German
From a place name, derived from Old High German swarz meaning "black" and ecka meaning "edge, corner". A famous bearer of this name is actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947-).
SCHWEITZER German
Indicated a person from Switzerland (see SCHWEIZ).
SCIACCA Italian
Originally denoted someone from Sciacca, Sicily, Italy, which is of uncertain origin.
SCOTT English, Scottish
Originally given to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic.
SEABROOK English
Denoted a person from a town by this name in Buckinghamshire, England. It is derived from that of a river combined with Old English broc "stream".
SELBY English
From the name of a village that meant "willow farm" in Old English.
SEMPERS English
From the name of various towns named Saint Pierre in Normandy, all of which commemorate Saint PETER.
SEPÚLVEDA Spanish
Derived from the name of the Sepúlveda Valley in the mountains of Segovia, and was originally used to denote people from that region. It is possibly derived from Spanish sepultar "to bury".
SESSA Italian
Originally indicated a person from from Sessa or Sessa Cilento, Italy (from Latin Suessa, of uncertain meaning).
SESSIONS English
From the name of the city of Soissons in northern France, itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe of the Suessiones.
SEYMOUR (1) English
From Saint Maur, a French place name, which commemorates Saint MAURUS.
SEYMOUR (2) English
From an English place name, derived from Old English "sea" and mere "lake".
SHARROW English
Originally a name for someone from Sharrow, England, derived from Old English scearu "boundary" and hoh "point of land, heel".
SHAW (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
SHELBY English
Variant of SELBY.
SHELTON English
From the name of various English towns, meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHERAZI Urdu
Urdu form of SHIRAZI.
SHERBURN English
Denoted a person hailing from any of the various places called Sherborne or Sherburn in England, derived from Old English scir "bright" and burna "spring, fountain, stream".
SHIMIZU Japanese
From Japanese (shi) meaning "clear, pure, clean" and (mizu) meaning "water".
SHIRAZI Persian
Originally denoted someone who came from the city of Shiraz, located in southern Iran. The city's name is possibly of Elamite origin.
SIDDALL English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English sid "wide" and halh "nook, recess".
SIDNEY English
Originally derived from various place names in England meaning "wide island", from Old English sid "wide" and eg "island". Another theory holds that it comes from the name of a town in Normandy called "Saint DENIS", though evidence for this is lacking.
SIENA Italian
Indicated a person from Siena in Italy, which was named after the Gaulish tribe of the Senones.
SIERRA Spanish
Originally indicated a dweller on a hill range or ridge, from Spanish sierra "mountain range", derived from Latin serra "saw".
SILVA Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRA Portuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SINAGRA (1) Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sinagra on Sicily, possibly derived from Latin sinus "inlet" and ager "field".
SINCLAIR English
Derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR".
SKÁLA Czech
Means "rock" in Czech, indicating that the original bearer lived near a prominent rock.
SKAŁA Polish
Polish cognate of SKÁLA.
SKALICKÝ Czech, Slovak
Indicated the original bearer came from a place named Skalice, Skalica or Skalička in the Czech Republic or Slovakia, derived from the Slavic root skala meaning "rock".
SKJEGGESTAD Norwegian
From a place name, derived from Norwegian skjegg "beard" and stad "town, place".
SKOVGAARD Danish
From a place name, derived from Danish skov "wood, forest" and gård "farm, yard".
SLANE Irish
Originally indicated a person from Slane, County Meath, Ireland, which is derived from the given name SLÁINE.
ŚLĄSKI Polish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
ŚLĄZAK Polish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
SLEZÁK Czech
Originally a name for a person from SILESIA, a historical region that is nowadays split between Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic.
SLOVÁK Czech, Slovak
Originally described one who was from Slovakia.
SMEDLEY English
From an unidentified place name probably meaning "smooth clearing" in Old English.
ŚNIEGOWSKI Polish
Habitational name for a person from Sniegow, Sniegowo or other places with a name derived from Polish śnieg "snow".
SOKOŁOWSKI Polish
Usually refers to the city of Sokołów Podlaski in Poland. It may sometimes be derived from Polish sokół meaning "falcon".
SOLBERG Norwegian, Swedish
From a place name, derived from Old Norse sól "sun" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it may be ornamental.
SOLER Occitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOLO Basque
Means "rural estate" in Basque.
SOLOS Basque
Possibly a variant of SOLO.
SOMMA Italian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SOMOGYI Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SONG Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
SORIANO Italian
From place names such as Soriano Calabro and Soriano nel Cimino. It is typical of southern Italy.
SORRENTINO Italian
Derived from the town of Sorrento near Naples, called Surrentum in Latin, of unknown meaning.
SOSA Spanish
Spanish form of SOUSA.
SOTO Spanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEK Czech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topographic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SOUCY French
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOUN Khmer
Means "garden" in Khmer.
SOUSA Portuguese
Originally indicated someone who lived near the River Sousa in Portugal, possibly derived from Latin salsus "salty" or saxa "rocks".
SOUTHGATE English
Name for a person who lived near the southern gate of a town or in a town named Southgate, from Old English suþ and gæt.
SPALDING English
From the name of the town of Spalding in Lincolnshire, derived from the Anglo-Saxon tribe of the Spaldingas.
SPIJKER (1) Dutch
Denoted a dweller by or worker at a granary, from Dutch spijker "granary".
SPIKER Dutch
Americanized form of SPIJKER (1) or SPIJKER (2).
SPILLUM Norwegian
Originally denoted a person from Spillum, Norway.
SPINI Italian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPITZ German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
STABLUM Italian
Northern Italian name derived from Latin stabulum meaning "stable".
STAFFORD English
From the name of the English city of Stafford, Staffordshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
STAINTHORPE English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
STAMP English
Originally denoted a person from Étampes near Paris. It was called Stampae in Latin, but the ultimate origin is uncertain.
STANFORD English
Derived from various English place names meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY English
From various place names meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904).
STANTON English
From one of the many places named Stanton or Staunton in England, derived from Old English stan meaning "stone" and tun meaning "enclosure, town".
STARRETT Scottish
Originally indicated a person from Stairaird, an estate in Scotland.
STATHAM English
From the name of a village in the English county of Cheshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ham "home, settlement".
STAWSKI Polish
Derived from Polish staw meaning "pond".
STEEN Low German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEIN German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STEINMANN German
Means "stone man" in German, used as a habitational name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or an occupational name for a stone worker.
STENBERG Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Scandinavian sten "stone" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it is ornamental.
STERLING Scottish
Derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning.
STEUBE German
Variant of STEUBEN.
STEUBEN German
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STILO Italian
Derived from the name of the town of Stilo in southern Italy. It is possibly derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "column, pillar".
ST JOHN English
From a place named for Saint JOHN.
ST MARTIN French
From a place named for Saint MARTIN.
STONE English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
STORSTRAND Norwegian
Originally denoted someone from Storstrand farm in Norway, derived from stor meaning "big" and strand meaning "beach".
ST PIERRE French
From a French place named for Saint PETER.
STRAND Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
STREET English
Habitational name for a person who lived in a place called Street, for example in Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt meaning "Roman road", from Latin strata.
STRICKLAND English
From the name of a town in Cumbria, derived from Old English stirc "calf, young bullock" and land "cultivated land".
STROHKIRCH German
Means "straw church" in German.
STROUD English
From Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
STRUDWICK English
From an English place name derived from Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood" and wíc meaning "village, town".
STÜCK German, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STUMPF German
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
STYLES English
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "stile, set of steps".
SUDWORTH English
From an English place name composed of Old English suþ "south" and worþ "enclosure".
SULZBACH German
Toponymic name from German places named Sulzbach meaning "salty stream", derived from Old High German sulza "salty water" and bah "stream".
SUMMERFIELD English
Originally indicated the bearer was from a town of this name, derived from Old English sumor "summer" and feld "field".
SUNDÉN Swedish
From Swedish sund meaning "sound, strait".
SUNG Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see SONG).
SUTHERLAND Scottish
Regional name for a person who came from the former county by this name in Scotland. It is derived from Old Norse suðr "south" and land "land", because it was south of the Norse colony of Orkney.
SUTTON English
From various English place names meaning "south town".
SUZUKI Japanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
SVÉD Hungarian
Means "Swedish" in Hungarian.
SWANGO German
Americanized form of SCHWANGAU.
SWINDLEHURST English
From the place name Swinglehurst in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire, derived from Old English swin "swine, pig", hyll "hill" and hyrst "wood, grove".
SWITZER German
Americanized form of SCHWEITZER.
SYDNEY English
Variant of SIDNEY.
SZABOLCSI Hungarian
From the name of the Szabolcs region in Hungary, derived from the given name SZABOLCS.
SZILÁGYI Hungarian
Denoted one from the region of Szilágy in Hungary, derived from Hungarian szil meaning "elm" and ágy meaning "bed".
SZOMBATHY Hungarian
From Hungarian szombat meaning "Saturday".
SZWED Polish
Variant of SZWEDA.
SZWEDA Polish
Derived from Polish Szwed meaning "Swede, person from Sweden".
SZWEDKO Polish
Variant of SZWEDA.
TAFT English
Variant of TOFT.
TAKAHASHI Japanese
From Japanese (taka) meaning "tall, high" and (hashi) meaning "bridge".
TAKALA Finnish
Means "(dweller in the) back", probably denoting someone who lived in a remote area, from Finnish taka.
TAKENAKA Japanese
Means "dweller amongst bamboo", from Japanese (take) meaning "bamboo" and (naka) meaning "middle".
TAN Taiwanese
Min Nan romanization of CHEN.
TANAKA Japanese
Means "dweller in the rice fields", from Japanese (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy" and (naka) meaning "middle".
TANG Chinese
From Chinese (táng) referring to the Tang dynasty, which ruled China from 618 to 907.
TANGEMAN German
Originally indicated a person from a place named Tange in northern Germany.
TAPIA Spanish
Means "mud wall" in Spanish.
TARANTINO Italian
Locational name that originally designated a person who came from Taranto, a city in southeast Italy, which was originally called Ταρας (Taras) by Greek colonists. A famous bearer of this name is the American director Quentin Tarantino (1963-).
TASH English
From Middle English at asche meaning "at the ash tree".
TATHAM English
From the name of the town of Tatham in Lancashire, itself from the Old English given name TATA combined with ham meaning "home, settlement".
TATTON English
Originally indicated a person from a town by this name, derived from the Old English given name TATA combined with tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
TATUM English
Variant of TATHAM.
TAVERNA Italian
From the place name Taverna, common in different parts of Italy. It means "inn, tavern" in Italian.
TEHRANI Persian
Indicated a person from the Iranian city of Tehran, of unknown meaning.
TEKE (1) Turkish
Originally denoted someone from Teke, Turkey.
TENNFJORD Norwegian
Originally denoted a person from Tennfjord, Norway.
TER AVEST Dutch
Means "at the edge, eave" indicating a person who lived at the edge of a forest or under a covered shelter.
TERRANOVA Italian
Means "new land" in Italian.
TERRAZAS Spanish
Originally a name for a person from Terrazas in the Spanish city of Burgos, a place name meaning "terraces".
THORLEY English
From any of the various places in England called Thornley or Thorley, meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
THORN English, Danish
Originally applied to a person who lived in or near a thorn bush.
THORNE English
Variant of THORN.
THORNTON English
From any of the various places in England by this name, meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
THORPE English
From Old Norse þorp meaning "village".