Ancient Submitted Surnames

These names were used in various ancient regions.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Aca Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl acatl meaning "cane".
Acar Ancient Aramaic
The origins of Acar in Lebanon is ACHAR (עָכָר), Anglicized form of Hebrew Akar or Akan, meaning “one who troubles or roils”.
Ackles Anglo-Saxon
The ancient history of the Ackles name begins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the family resided in Eccles which was in both Norfolk and a parish near Manchester.
Adelmund Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Meaning "Noble Protection", Adel, being a variation of germanic adal, meaning "noble" and mund, meaning "protection".
Aimar Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon, Spanish
1. From the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Aethelmaer", meaning "famous noble." ... [more]
Aldane Anglo-Saxon
Derived from "dweller at the old enclosure".
Andishmand Ancient Persian
ANDISHMAND (pronounced: AEN-DEESH-MAND, in the West D is silent), Origin Middle-Persian, means one who thinks (i.e. an intellectual). Given to people of Persian and non-Persian descent of diverse Persian or Central Asian ethnic and religious backgrounds (including Jews, Christians, Zoroastrians) based on a person's profession that requires thinking (technocrat, writer, poet, intellectual).
Antonius Ancient Celtic
It means invaluable. In the Gaelic languaje is amhrisiadwy.
Antunes Ancient Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
It comes from the Greek anthos whose meaning is flower. Alludes to St. Anthony of Padua. It's a surname of the Christian inspiration. Variants and derivatives: Antonius, Antonios, Antunes, Antuñez, Antuña, Antuño, Toni, Tony, Tonino, Tonini, Tonio, Toño, Toñín.
Aradhya Indian, Sanskrit
Means "one who worships god". Commonly seen in India, Karnataka and other parts of India like kashi. They wear holy thread (yagnopaveetha).
Ardehi Persian, Kurdish, Ancient Persian
House Ardehis of Zagors or Ardahvans (Persian: اردهیان) were one of the Persian Sassanid royal families, who occupied the Mounts of Zagros before the Islamic conquest of Persia in 650 CE. Ardahvans in Shahnameh and Persian mythology are mentioned to be the first settlers of Zagros mountains, and the constructors of Forts Of Zagros.
Ashman English, Anglo-Saxon
From Middle English Asheman, a byname meaning "pirate, seaman". It can also be made up of English ash referring to the "ash tree", and man. In that case, it could refer to someone who lived by ash trees... [more]
Averne Anglo-Saxon
Possibly deriving from the Olde English "fearn", meaning fern.
Babbit Anglo-Saxon
Babbitt is part of the ancient legacy of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is a product of when the family lived in Suffolk. The surname refers to a person who came from Babe, which may refer to an area known as the Hundred of Babegh in the county of Suffolk... [more]
Balfager Ancient Germanic (Gothic), Medieval Portuguese
Name of a Visigoth noble family (around the 10th century) from the Iberian Peninsula (current northern Portugal), meaning "bold spear"; they descent from the Balti dynasty.
Bargy Anglo-Saxon
The surname Bargy was first found in Gloucestershire, where they held a family seat from ancient times.
Barno Italian, Ukrainian, French, Ancient Aramaic, Russian
The surname Barno was first found in the north of Italy, especially in Tuscany. The name occasionally appears in the south, usually in forms which end in "o," but the northern forms ending in "i" are much more common... [more]
Baygents Anglo-Saxon
The earliest recorded spelling of the surname was "Besant", "Bezant", or "Beasant", which comes from an old French word "besant", which, in turn, was derived from the Latin term "byzantius aureus". The "byzantius" or "bezant" was a gold coin named after the city of Byzantium (ancient name in BC, later named 'Constantinople' in 330 AD)... [more]
Beekman German, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
Benningfield English, Anglo-Saxon
Benningfield is believed to be either ... [more]
Bhakta Sanskrit
From Sanskrit meaning 'devotee'.
Blagden Anglo-Saxon
Blagden is a locational surname deriving from any one of the places called Blackden or Blagdon, or Blagden farm in Hempstead, Essex. Blackden in Cheshire, Blagden in Essex and Blagdon in Northumberland share the same meaning and derivation, which is "the dark or black valley", derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "blaec", black, with "denu", valley, while the places called Blagdon in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, recorded as Blakedone in 1242, Blakeson in 1234, and Blachedone in the Domesday Book of 1086 respectively mean "the black hill", derived from the Old English "blaec", black, and "dun", down, hill, mountain... [more]
Bodily Anglo-Saxon
A habitational name from the parish of Budleigh, near Exeter in Devon or Baddeley Green in Staffordshire. From the Old English budda, meaning "beetle" and leah, meaning "wood" or "clearing", also known as a glade... [more]
Brumbaugh Ancient Germanic
Brumbaugh is derived from towns of the same name, located in various regions of Germany: from "in der Brumbach" a farm near Müsen, Germany, or in the town of Brombach, Swabia and or Switzerland.
Bryer Anglo-Saxon
This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and was originally given either as a topographical name to someone who lived by a briar patch, deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "braer, brer", Middle English "brer", prickly thorn-bush, or as a nickname to a prickly individual, "sharp as brere" (Chaucer), from the same word applied in a transferred sense.
Burbidge Anglo-Saxon
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a dialectal variant of the locational surname, deriving from any of the places called "Burbage", in the counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Wiltshire... [more]
Burnell Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
A name for a person with a brown complexion or dark brown hair. From the Old English burnel via the French brunel a diminutive of the French brun, which means "brown". The suffix el-- a short form of "little" was added to brun to make Brunel... [more]
Bux Anglo-Saxon
From boc, meaning a beach, or beech. Sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Buxton, in Derbyshire, Buxhall, in Suffolk, or Buxted in Sussex; variant of "Buck", a deer.
Caesar Ancient Roman, English
An Ancient Roman political title that indicated a military leader. A famous bearer was Julius Caesar, Roman general, dictator, and politician. In modern times, the surname is used to refer to an individual with a tyrannical attitude, which references the connotative meaning of the word "caesar", meaning "a dictator".
Calfee Anglo-Saxon
This surname is a variant of the name Calf, which is a variant of the Old Norse Kalfr, however it is possible that it is a nickname for someone who had characteristics like a calf, or baby cow.
Cambon Ancient Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
It means zigzagging river or warped (bent) river. It have a second meaning that is leg.
Cattell Anglo-Saxon, French, Ancient Scandinavian
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Olde Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
Chapulin Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning grasshopper.
Childress Anglo-Saxon
The surname Childress may have been a nickname for an orphan, or an occupational name applied to someone who ran an orphanage. Further research showed the name was derived from the Old English word cildra-hus, which means "children's house" or "orphanage".
Citlalpopoca Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "smoking star" or "comet".
Claxon Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Derived from the Old English elements clǽg, which denoted places with a clayey soil and tūn, usually meaning "dwellings" or an "enclosed space", but was used in relation to any kind of human habitation... [more]
Clebsch Ancient Germanic
Means "baker" in Old Prussian.
Clevenger English, Anglo-Saxon
The surname is derived from the Old English word cleofan which means to cleave or split.
Coish Anglo-Saxon, English, English (Australian), English (American)
Derived from Old English cosche and cosshe (c.1490), meaning "small cottage" or "hut". The medieval Coish family held a seat in Cambridgeshire.
Commander Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
Conant Ancient Celtic, Pictish
A patronym from the ancient Celtic personal name Conan, which derives from the Celtic kunovals meaning "high" and "mighty".... [more]
Cope Anglo-Saxon
Earliest origins of the Cope surname date from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain, for a person who habitually wore a long cloak or cape. The surname Cope is derived from the Old English word cope, which emerged about 1225 and comes from the Old English word cape, which refers to a cloak or cape.
Corpus Anglo-Saxon
It was a name given to a dark-haired person. In Yorkshire and Suffolk, the surname Corpus is derived from the Old Norse word korpr, which means raven; in Oxfordshire, the surname is derived from the Old French word corp, which has the same meaning.
Cran Anglo-Saxon
This picturesque name is of Anglo Saxon origin and is a nickname surname given to a tall thin man, or someone with long legs, or some other fancied resemblance to the bird. The derivation is from the old English "cran(uc)", "cron(uc)", "cren(uc)", which means a crane and until the introduction of a separate word in the 14th Century also a heron... [more]
Cuautli Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl quauhtli meaning "eagle".
Culbert Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
Cumba Gaulish
A topographic name from Gaulish cumba meaning "narrow valley" or a habitational name for a village associated with this name (see Coombe).
Dani Gujarati, Sanskrit
Indian (Gujarat): Hindu Vania name, from the Sanskrit epithet dani ‘liberal in giving’.
Dewalt Anglo-Saxon
It is derived from the baptismal name Theobald,which was an ancient personal name.
Docilus Ancient Roman
Don't know the source, which is why I put other.
Downing Anglo-Saxon
from 'Dunning', a patronymic meaning 'Son of Dunn', 'Dunn' being a nickname for someone with brown coloring
Dutcher Anglo-Saxon
The name Dutcher is Anglo-Saxon in origin. It was a name given to a worker who was a dike or ditch maker. The surname Dutcher was first found in East Sussex and either Upper Dicker or Lower Dicker, villages that date back to 1229 where they were listed as Diker... [more]
Eamer French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
Earlbaum Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic eorl, meaning "earl('s)" and baum, meaning "tree".
Ehecatl Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "wind".
Eiris Ancient Irish (Latinized)
Its meaning That is fruitfulness or fertility. It comes from the Irish name Eire Or Eriu (Erin, Eirinn). Another ancient name is Ivernia (Hibernia or Iverni) and its meaning is the green and fertile lands.
Emer Jewish, Anglo-Saxon
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name from Yiddish emer ‘pail’, ‘bucket’. ... [more]
Emor Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
Engelby Anglo-Saxon
The name Engelby has a long Anglo-Saxon heritage, from people of the village of Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire, or from Ingleby, found in Derbyshire, or at Ingleby-Berwick, North Yorkshire.
Eymer Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
Eymor Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
Ferrers Ancient Roman
It derives from Latin, "ferrum", which means "iron". As a surname, it derives from two French villages named "Ferrieres" where iron was mined.
Fising Anglo-Saxon (Rare), Romanian
This surname specifically comes from a village in Transylvania, Romania named Gergeschdorf, currently named Ungurei in Transylvania, Romania. The surname is a Siebenburgen Saxon or Transylvanian Saxon specific surname... [more]
Flavinius Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman family name, probably deriving from FLAVIUS.
Fogg Ancient Germanic
This surname appeared in Denmark during the time of the Vikings. It is believed to have Jute origin. It spread to Italy during the Roman Empire and to England as early as the 1080s, being listed in the Doomsday Book compiled by William the Conqueror... [more]
Foland Anglo-Saxon (Archaic)
Originally an English name, Foland is actually a variant of the name Fowler (as in bird-catcher). Most migrating to Ireland, other Fowlers/Folands first came to the Americas in 1622; John Fowler.... [more]
French English, Anglo-Saxon
Ethnic name for someone from France, Middle English frensche, or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who adopted French airs. Variant of Anglo-Norman French Frain.
Frink Anglo-Saxon, Norman
It was a name given to a person who was referred to as being free or generous. The surname was originally derived from the Old French franc, which meant "liberal, generous." ... The surname also has origins from the Norman official title, the frank which also means free.
Gast German, Ancient Germanic
From the Ancient Germanic name element Gast.
Geiselhart German (Silesian, Rare), Ancient Germanic (Lombardic, Rare), Old High German (Rare)
Possibly after the Geisel, a river in Saxony-Anhalt, which likely received its name from either the Lombardic patronym Giso, meaning "noble, precious promise" or from the Old High German gewi, from the Gothic gavi, or gaujis, a which is a medieval term for a "region within a country", often a former or actual province combined with the suffix Hart, which means "stag", and comes from the Middle English hert and the Old English heort.... [more]
Gevaudan Ancient Irish (Rare)
Gévaudan (French pronunciation: ​ʒevodɑ̃; Occitan: Gavaudan, Gevaudan) is a historical area of France in Lozère département. It took its name from the Gabali, a Gallic tribe subordinate to the Arverni.
Gleason Ancient Irish (Anglicized)
Irish (Munster): reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Glasáin, from a diminutive of glas ‘green’, ‘blue’, ‘gray’.
Goodchild Anglo-Saxon
A name used from the middle ages around the Anglo-Saxon period. It is also the surname of basketball player Miela Goodchild (DOB Unknown).
Haag Ancient Germanic (Archaic)
’’The German surname Haag, like many surnames, was taken from some geographical feature near the dwelling place of its first bearer. Coming from the Old Norse "haga," or some local variation of the word, the name means "one who lives near a hedged or fenced enclosure."... [more]
Ham English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
Heenan Ancient Irish
Thought to be a nickname or metonymic, and to owe its derivation from the early Gaelic word ean meaning a "bird". The derivation is from the ancient name O'hEeanchain, which loosely translates as The descendant of the son of the Bird.
Helthon Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
"Unique" in Norse Mythology, German variant of Hilton
Hendeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hengeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hengsteton Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Henkeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hingeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hingestone Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hinxstone Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hiott Anglo-Saxon
From the Anglo-Saxon town of Ayott, which means “at the high gate”.
Höek Ancient Germanic (?)
Surname of Ren Höek from Ren & Stimpy.
Holloway Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
Huaranga Incan
Possibly refers to the Inca administrative "unit of a thousand households"
Huitzil Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl uitsitsillin meaning "hummingbird".
Hungerford Anglo-Saxon
Hungerford is a Saxon name, meaning "Hanging Wood Ford".... [more]
Hyndestan Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hyndestane Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hyndeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Iams Ancient Irish
iNNES, may have came from the irish clan whose name was Innes
Iiams Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-saxon name meaning "Son of Emma."
Immer German, Anglo-Saxon
German: habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. ... [more]
Immers Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
Imore Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
Ivey Anglo-Saxon, English
Anglo-Saxon: Ivey is a variant of the Anglo-Saxon baptismal name Ive. It is the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of "Son of Ive".... [more]
Ivy Anglo-Saxon
The surname Ivy comes from the baptismal name Ive and it is of Anglo-Saxon origin.
Kalos Ancient Greek
Means beautiful in Greek
Kamban Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian, Ancient Celtic, Ancient Irish
Likely from Old Irish cambán "crooked one". This was the surname of Grímur Kamban, the legendary first settler in the Faroe Islands according to the Færeyinga saga. This name is still borne by a handful of people in the Faroe Islands today.
Koyle Ancient Irish
The surname Koyle was first found in Donegal (Irish: Dún na nGall), northwest Ireland in the province of Ulster, sometimes referred to as County Tyrconnel, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.
Lawford Anglo-Saxon
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the various places called Lawford which have as their component elements the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Lealla", cognate with the Old High German "Lallo", and the Olde English "ford", a ford... [more]
Leverock Anglo-Saxon, English
It goes back those Anglo-Saxon tribes that once ruled over Britain. Such a name was given to a person who was given the nickname Laverock, which was the Old English word that described a person who was a good singer or someone who had a cheery personality.
Lumb English, Anglo-Saxon
Lumb valley system in Yorkshire, England.... [more]
Mac Naught Ancient Celtic
The origin is celtic / irish and the meaning is "Son of nobody"
Magner Irish, Ancient Germanic
Irish from a pet form of the Scandinavian name Magnus, in Ireland borne by both Vikings and Normans.... [more]
Mann Sanskrit (Anglicized)
Originally Sanskrit, now in Punjabi and Hindi - used by Jats predominantly in Punjab area of NW India. Well represented in Sikhs. Also spelled as {!Maan} when anglicized. Belonged to landholding nobility of warrior caste (knights) that at one time held a strong and established kingdom.... [more]
Marschall Ancient Germanic
Meanting Horse Servant
Marta Ancient Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
It is a small animal from the variety of mammals living in Spain and is prized for its skin has great finesse. Also known like Beech Marten (Stone Marten or White Breasted Marten).
Mihok Ancient Greek (Rare)
Mihok Families moved over time by selecting different census years, Mihok Family name was founded in the United States in 1920s there were 11 Mihok Families living in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania.... [more]
Millwood English, Anglo-Saxon
The name was originally given to a miller or the keeper of a mill. The surname Millwood is derived from the Old English word mylenweard.
Morgade Anglo-Saxon
It`s a derived from Anglo-Saxon Morgen Or Morgan. Its meaning is morning. It have a second meaning that is a variety or type of oil.
Nary Ancient Irish
An anglicized form of the Gaelic surname O Naraigh. This surname is derived from the personal name Narach which means modest.
Nute Anglo-Saxon, English
Derived from the given name Cnute. Alternatively, it may be of nickname origin, from the Old English word hnutu, which meant brown, and would have been given to someone with a brown complexion.
Ó Neachtain Ancient Irish
Meaning "(descendant) of Nechtan."
Pacieco Ancient Roman (Archaic)
A Roman surname meaning "little one." One of the first persons recorded with this surname is a general named Vivio Pacieco, General Pacieco was sent by Julius Caesar to fight in the Iberian peninsula... [more]
Papaqui Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl pakini meaning "happy".
Popoca Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "to smoke".
Rad Ancient Persian
Meanings: "Honest", "Bounteous"
Raigon Ancient Celtic
syll. rai-gon The baby boy name Raigon is derived from Celtic origins. It means “heir to the throne” or “little king”
Ramagi Ancient Roman
In Caesar's Gallic Wars, the Ramagi built catapults and other mechanical weapons.... [more]
Rambeau French (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, Rainbaut, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
Ravelino Ancient Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
It means manufacturing of fine and expensive fabrics. Also means the tailor or weaver. It comes from Asti and Piedmont (noth of Italy).
Rockhold Anglo-Saxon
Came from when the family lived in the village of Rock found in the various locations that existed in Worcestershire, Devon and also in Northumberland.The surname also has topographic origins in that it describes the area where the original bearers lived.
Rodé Ancient Greek
A man said it was a location.
Roith Ancient Irish
Roith, Ruith = "Wheel" / Mug Ruith/Mogh Roith = "Servant of the wheel"... [more]
Rothchilds Ancient Celtic
Scottish circa 1500-1600. See Neil Oliver's book 'The Vikings' for mention of Rothkilde
Rugeley Anglo-Saxon
A locational surname whose literal meaning is "woodland clearing on or near a ridge", derived from the Old English hrycg meaning "ridge" and leah, meaning "clearing". First recorded as a surname in Staffordshire, England, but refers to a village in Normandy called Rugles.
Runds Ancient Germanic (Rare)
The Runds surname most likely originated near the Rhine river. It comes from the Proto-Celtic word, rūnā, meaning mystery/mystic. The coat of arms dates back to the middle ages and consists of a black shield with three gold crescent moons... [more]
Salt Anglo-Saxon, English
Of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the town in Staffordshire.
Sanghera Sanskrit
The Sanghera (संघेडा) clan are descended from Chauhan Rajputs and are found chiefly amongst the Jatt Sikh tribes of Northwestern India.
Sante Ancient Celtic
It is a surname of Northern Italy (Cisalpine Gaul). It means sacred or holy.
Santiais Celtic (Latinized, Modern, Rare, Archaic), Ancient Celtic
Santiais is a surname of the Celtic origin (it's Cisalpine Gaul / Gallia Citerior, therefore, it's Italian-Celts, Italo-Celtic, Italo-Alpine). It meaning saint (sacred or holy)... [more]
Sather Anglo-Saxon
Sather is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from the family once having lived in the ancient chapelry of Satterthwaite found near Hawkeshead in Lancashire. This surname was originally derived from the Old English elements soetr meaning shield and pveit meaning pasture... [more]
Scullin Ancient Irish
The surname Scullin originates from the pre 10th century O' Sceallain, which itself derives from the word 'sceall' meaning the stone of a fruit or the kernel.
Shinmar Ancient Hebrew (Hellenized, Archaic, ?)
'Shin'; literally translated as 'god', 'crown'. 'Mar'; Hebrew translation for 'master'. Used by Ancient Hebrew descendants/Jews still existing in Middle East & India. Also a city that exists in West Punjab with majority Hebrew/Jews & synagogues.... [more]
Skipworth Anglo-Saxon
is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from Skipwith in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The placename was recorded as "Schipewic" in the Domesday Book of 1086; as "Scipewiz" in the 1166 Pipe Rolls of the county; and as "Skipwith" in the 1291 Pipe Rolls, and derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century "sceap, scip", sheep, and "wic", outlying settlement; hence, "settlement outside the village where sheep were kept"... [more]
Sologar Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Fijian
Sanskrit name of unknown origin, common in Fiji. May be related to Solgar.
Speier Ancient Germanic
Habitational name from Speyer.
Sriram Sanskrit
Meaning "The God 'Ram'" in Sanskrit.
Stogner Anglo-Saxon
The surname Stogner belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.
Suchwani Sanskrit
Suchwani means "decendent of Suchu", where the given name Suchu means "truthful".
Sur Indian, Bengali (Hindu), Sanskrit
From Sanskrit šūra "brave".
Tapachula Nahuatl, Aztec
Means "between the waters" in Nahuatl.
Tecuanhuehue Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "old tiger".
Tepetl Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "hill".
Tlatilpa Aztec
It means where fire is born.
Tochihuitl Aztec, Nahuatl
Means ‘Rabbit Feather Down’ - ‘down’ as in soft feathers. It’s a combination of tochitl meaning "rabbit" and ihuitl meaning "feather" particularly small ones.
Trafford Anglo-Saxon
A habitational surname that originates from villages in Cheshire and Northamptonshire. First recorded as a surname in 1086. ... [more]
Turkieh Ancient Hebrew, Arabic, Jewish
A Lebanese jewish surname that is often used among Lebanese jews in Israel.
Vindex Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "champion", "avenger", or "defender".... [more]
Windenburg German, Ancient Germanic
Means "Windy Castle" in German.
Woehrle Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Origin from Ohio Known for Farmers, less common occupation was Baker Farmer, Gardener and Bag Maker were the top 3 reported jobs.
Wollstonecraft Anglo-Saxon
Wollstonecraft derived originally from the Saxon name of Wulfstan which later developed into Wol(f)stan. The name means wolf stone and is one of a number of names based on Wolf.... [more]
Wykes Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English wic, roughly meaning "farm." The plural form is a patronymic of which is "son of Wic."... [more]
Xenos Ancient Greek
From Greek xenos ‘stranger’, ‘newcomer’ (equivalent to English Newman), or short for a composite name such as Xenocostas ‘Costas the newcomer’.
Yarbrough Anglo-Saxon
The ancient roots of the Yarbrough family name are in the Anglo-Saxon culture. The name Yarbrough comes from when the family lived in either the parish or the hamlet called Yarborough in the county of Lincolnshire... [more]