Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is LMS.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AACKERGerman
Variant spelling of the surname Acker.
ABBRUZZESEItalian
From an Italian surname coming from the place name Abruzzi in eastern Italy (the modern name is Abruzzo). This place name may derive from the Praetutii, an ancient tribe inhabiting the region.
ABELSONEnglish
This name derives from the surname Abelson, meaning "son of Abel." Patronymic.
ABERCROMBIEScottish
Derived from a surname. It is the name of a parish in Fife, Scotland, on the northern shore of the Frith of Forth, whence the possessor took his surname; from Aber, marshy ground, a place where two or more streams meet; and cruime or crombie, a bend or crook... [more]
ÅBERGSwedish
Combination of Swedish å "small river" and berg "mountain".
ABERNATHYScottish
A different form of Abernethy, which originally meant "person from Abernethy", Perth and Kinross ("confluence of the (river) Nethy"). This was one of the surnames of the Scots who settled in northern Ireland during the ‘plantation’ in the 17th century, and it was brought to the U.S. as the name of a Southern plantation owner.
ABIDAOUDArabic
Arabic surname meaning "son of Dawud".
ABIDAOUDAncient Aramaic
Ancient last name of Aramaic-Phoenician Origin. Abidaoud, Abi is used in the Phoenician Kings names of Tyre Abibaal and Abimilki. Abidaoud in English is Abidavid or my father David and the son of David (Davidson).
ACHAMPONGWestern African
Variant of the Ashanti surname Acheamphong, meaning "destined for greatness".
ACHIOSpanish (Latin American)
Possibly derived from the town, Achio, near Guadalajara in Mexico. The name itself is probably from the Nahuatl achio meaning "frequent".
ACKERLEYEnglish
Old English surname which came from a place name which meant "Oak meadow." See Ackley.
ACORNGerman
Origin uncertain; most probably an Americanized form of German Eichhorn.
ADORNOItalian
Southern Italian: from the personal name Adorno, meaning ‘adorned’.... [more]
AGASSIArmenian, Persian, Italian
The surname Agassi most likely evolved from a nickname for someone resembling a mappie, perhaps jokingly referred to as chattering or nagging person. ... [more]
AHEARNAIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
AHLBORNSwedish (Rare)
Ornamental name composed of the elements al "alder" and -born, a Swedish surname suffix derived from German geboren "born".
AHLQUISTSwedish
Combination of Swedish al "alder" and quist an old or ornamental spelling of kvist "twig".
AHOFinnish
As a Finnish surname, it is derived from Finnish aho "glade", "forest clearing". It was also formerly a popular ornamental name in Northern Finland, especially among Swedes living there. It is now a 'protected' surname in Finland, which means someone may only bear it via birthright or marriage.... [more]
AIZENPopular Culture
This Japanese surname is used as 藍染 with 藍 (ran, ai) meaning "indigo" and 染 (sen, shi.mi, shi.miru, -shi.meru, -ji.miru, so.maru, so.meru, -zo.me, -zome) meaning "colour, dye, paint, print, stain." Normally, this would be romanticised as Aizome.... [more]
AKHMATOVATatar, Russian
Feminine form of Akhmatov, meaning "son of Äxmät".
ALABASTEREnglish
From the name of a whitish kind of gypsum used for vases, ornaments and busts, ultimately deriving from Greek alabastros, itself perhaps from Egyptian 'a-labaste "vessel of the goddess Bast"... [more]
ALARIEFrench, French (Quebec)
French: reflex of the Visigothic personal name Alaric, which is composed of Germanic elements meaning ‘all power’. This form was established in Quebec from 1681.
ALBAZJewish, Northern African
Ashkenazic Jewish name meaning, "falconer" found mainly amongst Jewish peoples emigrating from Algeria and Morocco.
ALCOTTEnglish
English: ostensibly a topographic name containing Middle English cott, cote ‘cottage’ (see Coates). In fact, however, it is generally if not always an alteration of Alcock, in part at least for euphemistic reasons.
ALDERSONEnglish (Modern)
Patronymic from the Middle English forename Alder, derived from two Old English names, Ealdhere ‘ancient army’ and Æ{dh}elhere ‘noble army’. Means "son of Aldert".
ALFESJewish
Official website of the the City of Alfés (in the Province Lleida, Catalonia, Spain) says:... [more]
ALJAŽSlovene
Etymological origin unknown, possibly from the latin word alias, meaning "different".
ALLEYEnglish, French (Anglicized)
From a Middle English personal name, Alli, Alleye, as forms such as Johannes filius Alli (Norfolk, 1205) make clear. This is of Scandinavian origin, cognate with Old Danish Alli, Old Swedish Alle... [more]
AMBERGGerman, Jewish
German and possibly Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several settlements called Amberg (literally ‘by the mountain’), including a city in Bavaria. It could also be a topographic name of identical etymology... [more]
AMESEnglish, German
English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius.... [more]
AMIDALAPopular Culture
Queen Amidala is a character from the Star Wars universe. Amidala is her regnal name, having been born Padmé Naberrie.
AMORYEnglish, Norman
English from a Germanic personal name, Aimeri, composed of the elements haim ‘home’ + ric ‘power’. (The same elements constitute the etymology of Henry.) The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
AMSLERAmerican, German (Swiss)
As a Swiss German surname it is from the Swiss place name Amslen.
ANDERSDOTTERSwedish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Anders.
ANDRÁSSYHungarian
man, warrior... a surname that derives from the personal name "Andreas", meaning manly, and was held by the first of Christ's disciples.
ANDRULEWICZLithuanian (Modern, Rare), Polish (Modern, Rare), Jewish (Modern, Rare), Latvian
Originally Andrulevičus or Andrulevičius, it means "ben-Adam" or "ben-ish" ("ben" being "son" in Hebrew; Adam meaning "man"). The Andrulevičiuses were originally Sephardic kohanim whom immigrated to Lithuania, and then Poland, Latvia, and other countries.
ANGELOSGreek
Reduced form of any of various Greek surnames derived from the forename Angelos (from #angelos ‘messenger’, ‘angel’), as for example Angelopoulos.
ANSELMOItalian, Spanish
Comes from the personal name Anselmo, which is of Germanic origin (see Anselm). This was a distinctively Langobardic name, and was especially common in Lombardy in the Middle Ages.
ANTUNIEZSpanish, Galician, Asturian
Meaning "son of Antonius." It is a last name that appears in northern Spain.
AOChinese (?)
Chinese from the name of Da Ao, a teacher of the legendary emperor Zhuan Xu (26th century bc).
APPELGerman, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
ARAFAArabic (Egyptian)
Possibly from Arabic عَرَفَ (ʿarafa) meaning “to know”.
ARAGONSpanish, Catalan, French
A surname and an autonomous community of Spain.
ARISENEnglish (Modern)
From a Dutch surname that means "son of Aris". In The Netherlands, this name is never used as a first name, since Dutch law strictly prohibits the use of surnames as first names. Therefore, if this name is indeed sometimes used as a first name in the United States (where it *is* allowed to use surnames as first names), one should classify Arisen as an (American-)English first name.
ARMOURScottish, Northern Irish
From Middle English, Old French armure, blended with the agent noun armer (see Armer), hence an occupational name for a maker of arms and armor. The collective noun armure denoted offensive weapons as well as the more recently specialized sense of protective gear.
ARROYOSpanish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named with arroyo "watercourse", "irrigation channel."
ASHBYEnglish
English: habitational name from any of the numerous places in northern and eastern England called Ashby, from Old Norse askr ‘ash’ or the Old Norse personal name Aski + býr ‘farm’.
ASHCRAFTEnglish
Altered form of English Ashcroft.
ASHCROFTEnglish
English (chiefly Lancashire) topographic name from Middle English asche ‘ash tree’ + croft ‘enclosure’, or a habitational name from a minor place named with these elements.
ASSELBROUGHEnglish
pronouncec assel brudd the origin of the name id unknown but the family were first fiund in heworth .george asselbrough married sarah keatlie in heworth.they had george b1752-1833 alston,srag 17154c nicholas 1757 - 1813 felling pit disaster.peter 1760 james 1762,... [more]
ÅSTRÖMSwedish
Swedish ornamental name meaning "small river stream". A combination of å "small river" and ström "stream".
ATLEEEnglish
English: topographic name for someone whose dwelling was ‘by the clearing or meadow’, Middle English atte lee. The word lea or lee (Old English leah) originally meant ‘wood’, thence ‘clearing in a wood’, and, by the Middle English period, ‘grassy meadow’.
AUUpper German, Swiss, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
South German, Swiss, and Austrian topographic name from dialect Au ‘water meadow’, ‘stream’ (see Aue).
AUChinese
Chinese variant of Ou.
AUDENEnglish
This surname is derived from the Germanic given name Aldwin, of which the Old English equivalent is Ealdwine. Also compare Alden, which is a surname that has the same etymological origins. The surname Auden was probably formed during the time of the Norman French occupation of England, as Germanic names containing -al- usually became -au- in Norman French... [more]
AUGELLOItalian
Italian (Campania) dialect variant of Uccello ‘bird’, hence either a nickname for a diminutive, birdlike person or an occupational name for a fowler. Compare Auciello.
AUKERMANDutch
Americanized form of Dutch Ackerman. This was a frequent name in New Netherland in the 17th century.
AVARAItalian
Italian feminine form of Avaro.
AVELINOSpanish, Polynesian, Filipino
Spanish form of Avellino, the surname of the 17th-century Italian saint Andrew Avellino.
AYDENEnglish, Scottish, Turkish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
BAArabic
Arabic from a shortened form of Aba, accusative case of Abu ‘father’.
BAChinese
Chinese from the name of the kingdom of Ba, which existed in Sichuan during the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc). Descendants of some of the ruling class adopted the name of the kingdom as their surname... [more]
BACHARACHASJewish
Bacharachas is a derivate of the Bacharach that is a town in Germany.
BACLANCeltic (Rare)
Form of the surname Backlund
BADRINETTEEnglish
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
BAINEBRIDGEEnglish, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BALLARDEnglish
English and Scottish: derogatory nickname from a derivative of bald ‘bald-headed’ (see also Bald).
BANKSYEnglish, Popular Culture
This is pseudonyms Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter. Banksy's real name might be Robin Gunningham. How Banksy got his pseudonym is unknown... [more]
BARBEROSpanish
Spanish occupational name for a barber-surgeon (see Barber), Spanish barbero, from Late Latin barbarius, a derivative of barba ‘beard’ (Latin barba).
BARDENEnglish
English: habitational name from places in North and West Yorkshire named Barden, from Old English bere ‘barley’ (or the derived adjective beren) + denu ‘valley’.
BARKEREnglish
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
BARNERLow German
North German derivative of the old Germanic personal name Barnher or Bernher (see Berner).
BARNEREnglish
Southern English habitational name for someone who lived by a barn.
BARRICKEnglish
Variation of Barwick.
BARTLETTEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Bartelot, a pet form of Bartholomew.
BARWICKEnglish, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
BAUMFREEDutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
BAYEnglish
From the Middle English given name BAYE.
BAYERSGerman
Variant of Bayer.
BEACOMIrish
Northern Irish variant of Beauchamp.
BEAMANEnglish
A beekeeper.
BEAUVOIREnglish
From the surname of Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
BECKETTEnglish
An Old English name simply meaning "beehive". Famous Irish playwrite Samuel Beckett bears this name.
BEHRGerman, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
BELGRAVEEnglish
Aristocratic surname from French, meaning "beautiful grove"; comes from a place name in Leicestershire. A famous namesake is British polar explorer Belgrave Ninnis, who perished in Antarctica on a 1912 expedition.
BELLETFrench
Comes from a derivative of bel ‘handsome’.
BELLUMUSLate Roman
Means "beautiful man" derived from the elements bellus "beautiful" and homo "man"
BENDTSDATTERDanish (Archaic), Norwegian (Archaic)
Strictly feminine patronymic for Bendt.
BERESFORDEnglish
English: habitational name from a place in the parish of Alstonfield, Staffordshire named Beresford, from Old English beofor ‘beaver’ (or possibly from a byname from this word) + Old English ford ‘ford’... [more]
BERKELEYEnglish
It is English and it is also a surname.
BERNEREnglish, Norman
From the Norman personal name Bernier from Old English beornan ‘to burn’, hence an occupational name for a burner of lime (compare German Kalkbrenner) or charcoal. It may also have denoted someone who baked bricks or distilled spirits, or who carried out any other manufacturing process involving burning... [more]
BERNERGerman, Low German
German habitational name, in Silesia denoting someone from a place called Berna (of which there are two examples); in southern Germany and Switzerland denoting someone from the Swiss city of Berne. ... [more]
BERNETTScottish, English
Altered spelling of Scottish and English Burnett or French Bernet.
BERRICKEnglish
Variation of Barwick.
BERRYANNMedieval English (Rare)
The name is pre 7th century Olde English and later Olde French. It derives from the word burri or berri, translating as a fortress or castle and means 'one who dwelt at the castle'. The suffix 'man' also indicates that it was job descriptive for a guard or keeper of the castle... [more]
BERTOCCHIItalian
Comes from a pet form of the personal name Berto.
BEXLEYEnglish
Habitational name from Bexley (now Bexleyheath in Greater London), which was named from Old English byxe ‘box tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
BEYFrench, German, Frisian
North German and Frisian: from the Old Frisian personal name Beyo or Boy/Boye (see Boye).... [more]
BIELERGerman, Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of the many places in eastern Europe whose name incorporates the Slavic element byel- ‘white’.... [more]
BILLARDEnglish, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
BILOTTIItalian
Variant of Bilotta and Bellotti, from a diminutive of Belli or Bello.
BINETTEFrench (Quebec)
Altered spelling of French Binet, a short form of Robinet, a pet form of Robert. The spelling reflects the French Canadian custom of pronouncing the final -t, which would be silent in metropolitan French.
BIRCHEnglish, German, Danish, Swedish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a birch tree or in a birch wood, from a Germanic word meaning ‘birch’ (Old English birce ‘birch’, Middle High German birche, Old Danish birk)... [more]
BIRCHARDEnglish
From the Old English personal name, Burgheard. See also Burkett.
BIRKSlovene
Of unknown origin.
BIRKELow German, Swedish
North German variant of Birk. Perhaps a shortened form of any of various Danish and Norwegian surnames beginning with Birke-, for example Birkeland and Birkelund (‘birch grove’). ... [more]
BIRKSEnglish
Northern English variant of Birch.
BISBEEEnglish
Named after the city of Bisbee which is in Arizona.... [more]
BJÖRKLUNDSwedish
Swedish ornamental name meaning "grove of birch trees". A combination of björk "birch" and lund "grove".
BLAUSTEINGerman, Jewish
Ornamental name from German blau "blue" and Stein "stone", i.e. lapis lazuli.
BLOMQUISTSwedish
Ornamental name composed of the elements blom "flower" + quist, an old or ornamental spelling of kvist "twig".
BLOOMEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
BLOOMSwedish
Variant of BLOM.
BLUFORDEnglish, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
BLUMENBERGJewish
Ornamental name composed of German Blume "flower" and Berg "mountain, hill".
BLUTHGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name from Middle High German bluot, German Blüte ‘bloom’, ‘flower head’. ... [more]
BOCKGerman, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BODÉNSwedish
Swedish ornamental name composed of Swedish bod "small hut" and the common surname suffix -én, a derivative of Latin -enius "descendant of".
BOHANNONIrish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadhachanáin, a double diminutive of buadhach ‘victorious’
BOLDTGerman
From the Germanic personal name Baldo, a short form of the various compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’.
BOLTEnglish
From Middle English bolt meaning "bolt", "bar" (Old English bolt meaning "arrow’). In part this may have originated as a nickname or byname for a short but powerfully built person, in part as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of bolts... [more]
BONDESwedish, Old Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse bóndi "farmer". Used as both a last name and a (rare) given name in Sweden (see BONDE for the given name and BONDESSON as an example of a patronymic derived from this name)... [more]
BONGIORNOItalian
Italian from the medieval personal name Bongiorno (composed of bono ‘good’ + giorno ‘day’), bestowed on a child as an expression of the parents’ satisfaction at the birth (‘it was a good day when you were born’).
BORÉNSwedish
Ornamental name composed of an unexplained first element and the common surname suffix -en, from Latin -enius "descendant of".... [more]
BORKOWSKIPolish, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Borki, Borkowice, or Borek, all named with Polish bór 'pine forest', or from Borków, which derives from the personal name Borek + the possessive suffix -ow.
BOUDREAUEnglish
English variant of French Beaudreau.
BOUJETTIFNorthern African (Archaic)
Meaning, "The family of the son of the Clever Head" or "One Whom Possess a Clever Head." Bou (normally used in the North African Regions of the Maghrib Countries) has 2 possible derivative meanings both originating from the Arabic language, "Son of..." or an Arabic word Tho meaning, "One Who Possess A Quality." Jettif is a variance of Jettef, Jeif or Ji'f which is derived from the ancient Tamazight or Imazighen (popularly known as Berber) and is pronounced "j-ixf" which means Clever, head, or brain."
BOUVIERFrench
Occupational name for a herdsman, from Old French bouvier, Late Latin boviarus, a derivative of bos, genetive bovis "ox."
BRANDISGerman, Jewish, Swiss
German & Swiss: Habitational name from a former Brandis castle in Emmental near Bern, Switzerland, or from any of the places so named in Saxony, Germany. A famous bearer of the name is Jonathan Brandis (1976-2003).... [more]
BRASEGerman
North German variation of Brass.
BRASHEARFrench (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of French Brasseur or Brassier "brewer."
BRASSEnglish, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRASSEURFrench
French and English (of both Norman and Huguenot origin): occupational name for a brewer, from Old French brasser ‘to brew’. See also Brasher.
BRATTÉNSwedish
Ornamental name composed of the personal name Bratt + the surname suffix -én, from Latin -enius ‘descendant of’.
BRESLINIrish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see Brazil).
BRETONFrench, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BRICKIrish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BROCKERGerman
North German topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp, from Middle Low German brook bog + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
BRODÉNSwedish
Ornamental name or topographic name, probably composed of the elements bro ‘bridge’ + the adjectival suffix -én, from Latin -enius.
BROLINSwedish, English (Anglicized)
Swedish ornamental name composed of bro "bridge" and the suffix -in (derived from Latin -inus, -inius) "descendant of".... [more]
BROUWERDutch
Dutch occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale, Middle Dutch brouwer.
BROWEREnglish (American)
English variant of Brewer. Respelling of Brauer or Brouwer.
BRUMBYAustralian (Rare), English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr ‘well’ + býr ‘farmstead’, ‘village’.
BRUNOPortuguese
From a Germanic personal name, Brun.
BRUNSWICKEnglish, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUERKGerman (Anglicized)
German from a short form of the personal name Burkhardt, a variant of Burkhart.
BUERMEISTERGerman
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BUFORDEnglish, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BURKENEnglish
English variant of Birkin (see Burkins).
BURKINSEnglish
English variant of Birkin, Burkin, a habitational name from the parish of Birkin in West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bircen ‘birch grove’, a derivative of birce (see Birch).
BURKSEnglish
English variant spelling of Birks.
BURMEISTERGerman
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BURNETTEFrench
Descriptive nickname from Old French burnete ‘brown’ (see Burnett). Possibly also a reduced form of Buronet, from a diminutive of Old French buron ‘hut’, ‘shack’.
BURRUCHAGASpanish, Basque
From "Pais Vasco" in Spain.
BUSSEGerman, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BYBERGSwedish
Swedish ornamental name. A combination of Swedish by "village" and berg "mountain".
BYERSScottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
BYERSGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
CABLEEnglish, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
CABUCOSEnglish
Decended from Old English meaning "leader."
CAHILLIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of Cathal’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
CAMPIONNorman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
CANELLAItalian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
CARLINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish, French, Swedish, Italian, Jewish (Anglicized), German
Irish (now also common in Scotland) anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin, an Ulster family name, also sometimes Anglicized as Carlton, meaning ‘descendant of Caireallán’, a diminutive of the personal name Caireall... [more]
CARLINGSwedish, German
Swedish: from the personal name Karl + the common suffix of surnames -ing ‘belonging to’.... [more]
CARNERGerman, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
CARRERASpanish, Italian
Spanish: topographic name for someone living by a main road, carrera ‘thoroughfare’, originally a road passable by vehicles as well as pedestrians (Late Latin carraria (via), a derivative of carrum ‘cart’), or a habitational name from any of various places named with this word.... [more]
CARRINGTONEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
CASANOVACatalan, Italian
Catalan and Italian: topographic name from Latin casa ‘house’ + nova ‘new’, or a habitational name from any of the many places named with these words.
CASSATTFrench
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
CASTELLIItalki (Italian Jew), Semitic, Italian, Spanish
Italian patronymic or plural form of Castello. ... [more]
CASTILLEFrench
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
CASTOLate Roman (Rare, ?)
From the Latin personal name Castus ‘chaste’. Also a nickname from casto ‘chaste’, ‘pure’.
CATESEnglish
English patronymic from the Old Norse byname Káti (from káti ‘boy’).
CEBREIROJewish, Portuguese
Cebreiro is an olive tree.
CHALMERSScottish
Variant of Chambers. The -l- was originally an orthographic device to indicate the length of the vowel after assimilation of -mb- to -m(m)-.
CHOICEEnglish
Derived from the personal names Josse or Goce, which are derived from the Latin word "gaudere" and is a cognate in origin with the word "joy."
CHOUREYHindi
chourey surname basically belongs to kurmi caste
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
CLEVELANDOld English, English, Popular Culture
English regional name from the district around Middlesbrough named Cleveland ‘the land of the cliffs’, from the genitive plural (clifa) of Old English clif ‘bank’, ‘slope’ + land ‘land’... [more]
CLEVELANDNorwegian (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Norwegian Kleiveland or Kleveland, habitational names from any of five farmsteads in Agder and Vestlandet named with Old Norse kleif "rocky ascent" or klefi "closet" (an allusion to a hollow land formation) and land "land".
CLINKENBEARDLow German
Possibly an Americanized form of North German Klingebiel, a variant of Klingbeil.
COBAINScottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COEEnglish
English (Essex and Suffolk): nickname from the jackdaw, Middle English co, Old English ca (see Kay). The jackdaw is noted for its sleek black color, raucous voice, and thievish nature, and any of these attributes could readily have given rise to the nickname.
COILLIrish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COLDENEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLESEnglish, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
COLLARDEnglish, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLUMNorthern Irish
Reduced form of northern Irish McCollum.
COMBEFERRELiterature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COMEAUFrench, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUXFrench (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French Comeau.
CONAHANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham).
CONKLINIrish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
CORMIERFrench
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
CORRIGANEnglish
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
COTTONEnglish, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
COURFEYRACLiterature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
COVEYIrish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
COYLEIrish
Irish reduced variant of McCool.
CRABBEnglish, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRANSHAWEnglish
From Cranshaw in Lancashire, named from Old English cran(uc) ‘crane’ + sceaga ‘grove’, ‘thicket’.
CRETEFrench
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
CROANIrish
Variant of Croghan.
CROGHANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’. Croghan in county Roscommon was the ancient royal site of the province of Connacht.
CROOKSEnglish
Patrynomic for Crook.
CROSSANIrish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’. Sometimes translated as 'bard' or 'storyteller.'
CROZIEREnglish, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
CRUSOEEnglish (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
CULBERTSONEnglish, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
CUMBERLANDEnglish
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
CUNDALLEnglish
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
CURRIEScottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
CURRYScottish, English
Scottish and northern English: variant of Currie.
CURTINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see McCurtain). ... [more]
CWYNARPolish
Polonized form of the German surname Zwirner, an occupational name for a yarn or twine maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zwirn ‘twine’, ‘yarn’
CYPHERGerman (Anglicized, Rare)
Fanciful Americanized spelling of German Seifer.
DAHLKEGerman
Eastern German: from a pet form of the Slavic personal names Dalibor or Dalimir, which are both derived from dal- ‘present’, ‘gift’.
DALGLIESHScottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Selkirk, first recorded in 1383 in the form Dalglas, from Celtic dol- ‘field’ + glas ‘green.’
DANGALNepali (Modern)
The surname Dangal is supposed to be the shortened form of the demonym Dangali (pronounced DHAA-NGAA-LEE) for Dang (pronounced DHAA-NG), a district in Mid-Western Nepal. The surname is found to have been adopted by various communities, especially the Tiwaris (for the surname Tiwari), after they migrated to various regions of the countries and the locals in those regions referred to them as Dangalis (later shortened to Dangal) instead of their original surnames.
DARLINGLiterature, English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from Middle English derling, Old English deorling ‘darling’, ‘beloved one’, a derivative of deor ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ (see Dear). This was quite a common Old English byname, which remained current as a personal name into the 14th century... [more]
DAUGHTRYEnglish, Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) habitational name, with fused French preposition d(e), for someone from Hauterive in Orne, France, named from Old French haute rive ‘high bank’ (Latin alta ripa).
DAWEnglish, Scottish
English and Scottish from a pet form of David. ... [more]
DAWIrish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin. It may be composed of the elements deagh- ‘good’ + ádh ‘luck’, ‘fate’; some such association seems to lie behind its Anglicization as Goodwin.
DAWKINSEnglish, Popular Culture
English patronymic from a pet form of Daw. ... [more]
DAWLEYAnglo-French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
DAWSEnglish
"Son of David"
DEAIrish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
DEARYEnglish
Nickname for a noisy or troublesome person, from Anglo-French de(s)rei ‘noise’, ‘trouble’, ‘turbulence’ (from Old French desroi). topographic for someone who lived by a deer enclosure, from Old English deor ‘deer’ + (ge)hæg ‘enclosure’.
DEERYIrish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daighre ‘descendant of Daighre’, a byname meaning ‘fiery’.
DENEENIrish
Variant of Irish Dineen.
DEROSAItalian
Variation of de Rosa. Southern Italian metronymic from the female personal name Rosa, from rosa ‘rose’.
DERRYIrish, English
English variant of Deary, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree. ... [more]
DERUNGSSwiss, Romansh
Romansh from Roman occupiers of Switzerland.
DEVALSONEnglish
Meaning, "son of Deval."
DEVOREFrench
French: variant of De Var, a habitational name for someone from a place named Var, for example in Charente. Respelling of French Devors, a habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from Vors in Aveyron.
DIALLOWestern African
A common name throughout West Africa, it is the French transcription of a surname of Fula origin.
DIAMONDJewish
Americanized form of a Jewish surname, spelled in various ways, derived from modern German Diamant, Demant "diamond", or Yiddish dimet or diment, from the Middle High German diemant (via Latin from Greek adamas ‘unconquerable’, genitive adamantos, a reference to the hardness of the stone)... [more]
DIAMONDIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Diamáin "descendant of Diamán", earlier Díomá or Déamán, a diminutive of Díoma, itself a pet form of DIARMAID.
DIAMONDEnglish
English variant of Dayman (see Day). Forms with the excrescent d are not found before the 17th century; they are at least in part the result of folk etymology.
DIETZGerman
From a short form of the personal name Dietrich.
DILLIEGerman
Probably an altered spelling of Dilley or Dilly or possibly of German Dillier. A variant of Dilger.
DILLIONIrish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
DIMONDEnglish, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
DINEENIrish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duinnín ‘descendant of Duinnín’, a byname from a diminutive of donn ‘brown-haired man’ or ‘chieftain’.
DITTMANGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Dittmann.
DOANEIrish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dubháin ‘descendant of Dubhán’, meaning ‘the little black one’, a common name in the 16th century in southern Ireland, or Ó Damháin ‘descendant of Damhán’ meaning ‘fawn’, ‘little stag’, a rare Ulster name... [more]
DOCHERTYScottish
Scottish spelling of the Irish surname Doherty.
DODSONEnglish (British)
Means "son of Dodd" (see DUDDA).
DOHRMANNLow German
North German topographic name for someone who lived by the gates of a town or city (see Thor).
DOLLSouth German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
DOSSGerman, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
DOWScottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DRUMMONDSScottish
Variant of Scottish Drummond.
DUBHAGÁINNIrish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
DÜCKLow German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
DUCKEnglish, Irish, Dutch, Low German, German
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUCKDutch
Dutch variant of Duyck. In a German-speaking environment, this is also a variant of van Dyck and Dyck.
DUGGANScottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DUNDASScottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish (Counties Leitrim and Fermanagh): habitational name from Dundas, a place near Edinburgh, Scotland, which is named from Gaelic dùn ‘hill’ + deas ‘south’.
DU PLESSISAfrikaans, French Creole, French (Cajun), French (Huguenot)
French topographic name for someone who lived by a quickset fence, Old French pleis (from Latin plexum past participle of plectere ‘plait’, ‘weave’), with fused preposition and definite article du ‘from the’... [more]
DUYCKDutch
Dutch nickname from Middle Dutch duuc ‘duck’; in some cases the name may be a derivative of Middle Dutch duken ‘to dive’ and cognate with Ducker. Compare also Duck
DYCKDutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike, Dutch dijk. Compare Dyke.
DYEEnglish, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name Dennis. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
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