All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Watney English
Probably means "person from Watney", an unidentified place in England (the second syllable means "island, area of dry land in a marsh"; cf. Rodney, Whitney)... [more]
Watterson Scottish, Northern Irish
From an altered form of the given name Walter.
Waud English
From Old English weald meaning "forest".
Waverly English
Meaning, "from Waverley (Surrey)" or "from the brushwood meadow." From either waever meaning "brushwood" or waefre meaning "flickering, unstable, restless, wandering" combined with leah meaning "meadow, clearing."
Wawrzyniak Polish
from the personal name Wawrzyniec
Wawrzyszewski Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Masovian village of Wawrzyszew.
Waycaster English
The surname Waycaster is German in origin. It means "roll-eater," and was likely derived from a derisive nickname on a baker.
Waynewright English
Variant spelling of Wainwright.
Waziri Muslim
"Prime minister, Advisor, leader of passion."
Weakly English
Variant spelling of Weekley.
Weale Welsh
A Welsh name, quite rare.
Weaponsworth English
Means maker of weapons
Weare English (British)
Derived from the Old English wer, meaning a "weir, dam, fishing-trap". This was used as an occupational surname for fishermen. Originated in Devon, England.... [more]
Weatherford English
Topographic name or a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Webbe English (Rare)
Variant of "Webb", meaning weaver.
Wechter German
Variant spelling of German Wächter
Weddell Scottish
Derived from Wedale, the original name of the parish of Stow in Scotland. A famous bearer is James Weddell, a Scottish navigator and seal hunter who sailed a record 7.69 degrees south of the Antarctic Circle... [more]
Wedderburn Scottish
From the name of a location in Berwickshire, Scotland, which is derived from wedder “wether” and Old English burn “stream”.
Wedmore English (British)
Habitational name from Wedmore in Somerset, recorded in the 9th century as Wethmor, possibly meaning ‘marsh (Old English mor) used for hunting (w?the)’.
Wedon English
Variant of Weedon
Wędrogowski Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Masovian village of Wędrogów.
Weedon English
From places called Weedon
Weekley English
Originally meant "person from Weekley", Northamptonshire ("wood or clearing by a Romano-British settlement"). British philologist Ernest Weekley (1865-1954) bore this surname.
Weerasekara Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit वीर (vira) meaning "hero, man, brave" and शेखर (shekhara) meaning "crest, peak, top".
Weerasinghe Sinhalese
From Sanskrit वीर (vira) meaning "hero, man, brave" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Weerasuriya Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit वीर (vira) meaning "hero, man, brave" and सूर्य (surya) meaning "sun".
Weg Dutch
Proper non: Way/road/path
Węgrzyn Polish
Means "Hungarian" in Polish.
Wei Chinese
From Chinese 魏 (wèi) referring to the ancient state of Wei, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC in what is now the Henan, Hebei, Shanxi, and Shandong provinces.
Weichselbraun German (Austrian)
From Weichsel, "sour cherry" in German and Braun, "brown" in German
Weidemann Medieval German, German (Austrian), Norwegian
Weidemann is a German family name and comes from the Middle High German terms for hunter or woad farmer.... [more]
Weidmann German
Name meaning, "hunter".
Weigel German
Derived from the given name Wigand.
Weiher German
Meaning:... [more]
Weil German, Jewish
South German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places so named in Baden, Bavaria, and Württemberg, from Latin villa ‘country house’, ‘estate’ (later used of a group of houses forming a settlement).
Weiler German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places so named in southern Germany. Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Weil.
Weimar German
Habitational name from any of several places called Weimar in Hesse and Thuringia.... [more]
Weinbach German, Jewish
From the name of a commune in Hesse, Germany.
Weinberg German, Jewish
Weinberg means "Vineyard" in german.
Weinbrenner German
Occupational name for a distiller of brandy, literally 'wine burner'.
Weingartner German
Derived from German weingärtner meaning "wine maker, vintner", which itself is derived from German weingarten meaning "vineyard". The latter is a composite word consisting of German wein "wine" combined with German garten "garden"... [more]
Weinheimer German
German: habitational name for someone from any of the places named Weinheim, for example in Baden and Hessen.
Weininger German (Swiss), Jewish
Denoted a person from Weiningen, a municipality in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. It is also a Jewish ornamental name derived from German wein meaning "wine" and the suffix -inger.
Weinkauf German
From "wein kaufen" meaning "buy wine" or "wine-buyer"
Weinmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational name for a viticulturalist or wine merchant, Middle High German winman, German Weinmann.
Weinreich German
from the name "Winrich"... [more]
Weinstein Jewish
Means "wine stone" from German wein meaning "wine" and stein meaning "stone". It originally referred to the potassium bitartrate crystals produced from the process of fermenting grape juice.
Weinstock English, German, Hebrew
This surname of WEINSTOCK is the English variant of the German surname WENSTOCK, an occupational name for a producer or seller of wine, derived originally from the Old German WEIN. The name was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews, largely recollecting the prominence of wine in the Jewish Scriptures and its used in Jewish ceremonies... [more]
Weintraub German, Jewish
This surname translates into English as “grape”.
Weir Scottish, English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dam or weir on a river.
Weir Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Mhaoir "son of the steward or keeper".
Weir Irish
Anglicized form, based on an erroneous translation (as if from Gaelic cora "weir", "stepping stones"), of various Gaelic names such as Ó Corra (see Corr) and Ó Comhraidhe (see Curry).
Weis German
Variant of Weiss.
Weisenburger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of numerous places named Weissenburg "white fortress".
Weishuhn German
Derived from Middle High German wiz meaning "white" and huon meaning "hen, fowl", hence a metonymic occupational name for a poultry farmer or dealer, or perhaps in some instances a nickname.
Weisman German, German (Austrian), Jewish
A German surname meaning "white man"
Weissmuller German
Translates to "White Miller".
Weisz Jewish
Hungarian spelling of Weiss.
Weixel German
German: variant spelling of Weichsel, a topographic name for someone who lived near a sour cherry tree (St. Luce cherry), from Middle High German wīhsel (modern German Weichsel(n), pronounced ‘Weiksel’.
Welborn English
Habitational name from Welborne in Norfolk, Welbourn in Lincolnshire, or Welburn in North Yorkshire, all named with Old English wella ‘spring’ + burna ‘stream’.
Welburn English
English surname meaning "From the Spring brook"
Welby English (British, Rare)
Lincolnshire family name
Weld English
Meant "one who lives in or near a forest (or in a deforested upland area)", from Middle English wold "forest" or "cleared upland". A famous bearer is American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-).
Weldin English
Variant of Weldon.
Weldon English
Weldon is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Weldon family lived in Northamptonshire, at Weldon.... [more]
Welfing German
Name given to our family by our relative, a German king.
Welford English
English surname meaning "Lives by the spring by the ford"
Welk German (East Prussian)
Nickname from Middle High German welc, meaning "soft and mild". The name was first recorded in South Holland, however many of the bearers of the name trace its roots back to East Germany. A famous bearer of this name was Lawrence Welk, an American musician and host of the Lawrence Welk Show.
Welker German
Variant of Walker.
Well English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a spring or stream, Middle English well(e) (Old English well(a)).
Welland English (British, Rare)
From the name of the place, derived from Old English wig - war and landa - territory, land.
Wellborn English
Related to Wellburn
Wellborne English
Related to Wellborn
Welle German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or stream, Middle Low German welle.
Weller English, German
Either from the Olde English term for a person who extracted salt from seawater, or from the English and German "well(e)," meaning "someone who lived by a spring or stream."... [more]
Welles English
Variant of Wells.
Wellington English
Habitational name from any of the three places named Wellington, in Herefordshire, Shropshire, and Somerset. All are most probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Weola + -ing- (implying association with) + tun ‘settlement’.
Wellman English
From German Welle meaning "wave" and man, meaning "man", referring to someone who lived by a stream.
Wellspeak French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Beauparlant.
Welsch German
From Middle High German welsch, walsch "person from a Romance country (especially Italy), foreigner", hence an ethnic name or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who had trading or other connections with the Romance countries.
Welsh Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Welsh Scottish, English
Ethnic name for someone from Wales or a speaker of the Welsh language. Compare Walsh and Wallace.
Welton English
Habitational name from any of various places named Welton, for example in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, and East Yorkshire, from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Weltraum German
A German surname meaning "outer space".
Welty German (Swiss)
From a Swiss German diminutive of the German given name Walther. A literary bearer was the American writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001).
Wemyss Scottish
From the lands of Wemyss in Fife, which is derived from Gaelic uaimheis "cave place".
Wen Chinese
From Chinese 温 (wēn) meaning "warm", also referring to any of several territories that were called Wen, namely an ancient state that existed during the Zhou dynasty.
Wences Slavic
Based on Wenceslaus or Wenceslas, latinized forms of name of Slavic rulers in various forms such as Václav, Wacław, Więcesław, Vyacheslav, Vjenceslav, etc. Derived from the Slavic words veli/vyache/więce/više ("great(er), large(r)"), and slava ("glory, fame")... [more]
Wend German
Variant of Wendt.
Wendelin German
From the given name Wendelin.
Wendler Medieval German
derived from a German word meaning to wander or wanderer
Wendt German, Danish
Ethnic name for a Wend, Middle High German wind(e). The Wends (also known as Sorbians) once occupied a large area of northeastern Germany (extending as far west as Lüneburg, with an area called Wendland), and many German place names and surnames are of Wendish origin... [more]
Wenig German
From the German word “wenig”, meaning little.
Wenn English
Surname from Norfolk, England
Wennerström Swedish
Combination of the place name element wenner, which is probably derived from the name of Lake Vänern, and Swedish ström "stream".
Wensley English
Habitational name from Wensleydale in North Yorkshire.
Wentworth English
Habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire and South Yorkshire called Wentworth, probably from the Old English byname Wintra meaning ‘winter’ + Old English worð ‘enclosure’... [more]
Wentz German (Rare)
Originally a pet form of the given names Werner and Wenceslaw. Meaning "guard" or "army".
Wentzel German
Variant spelling of Wetzel.
Wenz German
Variant of Wentz
Wenzel German
Variant of Wentzel or from the given name Wenzel
Wepener South African, German
South African, German decent/history
Werdum German
Werdum is a municipality in the district of Wittmund, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
Wernersson Swedish
Means "son of Werner".
Wero Spanish (Latin American), Maori
Maori: Means "to cast a spear"... [more]
Wertheimer German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Wertheim.
Wertz German
From a short form of the personal name Werner.
Weseloh German
German habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Wesner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Wessen.
Wesolowski Polish
Meaning Happy men
Wessel Frisian, Dutch
From the given name Wessel.
Wessels Dutch
Derived from the given name Wessel.
Wesson English
Variant of Weston.
Westbay English (Rare)
It literally means "West Bay".
Westbroek Dutch
Dutch form of Westbrook.
Westbury English
English British surname originating as a place name. There are several Westbury villages, parishes and even Manors across England that have given the name Westbury to people who take up residence in or come from those places... [more]
Westdyke English
Name given to someone who lived on the west side of a dyke.
Westen English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Weston, from Old English west 'west' + tun 'enclosure', 'settlement'. English: variant of Whetstone.
Wester German
From Middle High German wëster ‘westerly’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the west of a settlement, or a regional name for one who had migrated from further west.
Westergaard Danish
Danish variant of Westergård.
Westergård Swedish, Finnish
From Swedish väster meaning "west, western" combined with gård meaning "farm, yard, estate".
Westerly English
The name is originated from a term meaning 'winds from the West'. The name could be given to someone who is born in the west.
Westerman English
Topographical surname for someone who lived west of a settlement or someone who had moved to the west, from Old English westerne meaning "western" and mann meaning "man, person".
Westermann Low German
From Middle Low German wester meaning "westerly" and man meaning "man", making it a topographic surname for someone who lived west of a settlement or a regional surname for someone who had moved to the west... [more]
Westernmeir German
Of German decent.
Westgate English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a west gate in a city, or a habitual surname for someone from Westgate. It is derived from Middle English west meaning "west" and gate "gate" (or "street" in northern and eastern areas; from Old Norse gata).
Westhouse Dutch
West of the House, originating from the name VeistHuis
Westin Swedish
Variant spelling of Vestin.
Westlake English (Canadian)
Combined of West and Lake.
Westling Swedish
Combination of Swedish väst "west" and the common surname suffix -ling. A notable bearer is Prince Daniel (b. 1973), husband of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden.
Westmeir English
Not avaliable.
Weston Dutch
Diminutive of Westenberg
Westrop English (British)
Viking name local to Somerset and several counties in the North East of England. Approximate meaning "place to the west of the village with the church".
Westwood English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
Weton English
Variant of Weeton
Wettläufer German
Derived from Middle High German wetteloufer meaning "runner", probably a nickname for a fast runner or someone who rushed around.
Wettstein German (Rare)
North German: variant of Wetzstein, from Middle Low German wetsten "whetstone".
Wey English
Variant of Way.
Whaley English
From the name of the village of Whaley and the town of Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire, or the village of Whalley in Lancashire, England. It is derived from Old English wælla meaning "spring, stream" and leah meaning "woodland clearing".
Whalley English
Variant form of Whaley.
Wharton English
Derived from an Olde English pre 7th Century river name Woefer.
Whately English
Old English location or occupational surname meaning "from the wheat meadow".
Whatley English
From any of the various places in England named with Old English hwæte "wheat" and leah "woodland clearing".
Wheeldon English
Habitational name from a place in Derbyshire named Wheeldon, from Old English hweol ‘wheel’ (referring perhaps to a rounded shape) + dun ‘hill’, or from Whielden in Buckinghamshire, which is named with hweol + denu ‘valley’.
Wheelwright English (British)
Middle English "maker of wheels"
Whent English
Topographical for someone who lived by a cross road, or perhaps a very sharp bend in the road. The derivation being from the Olde English pre 7th century word "wendan," meaning to wander.
Whetzel American
Altered spelling of German Wetzel.
Whineray English
Means "person from Whinneray", Cumbria, or "person who lives in a nook of land growing with gorse" (in either case from Old Norse hvin "whin, gorse" + vrá "nook of land"). It was borne by New Zealand rugby player Sir Wilson Whineray (1935-2012).
Whippet English
Possibly used as a nickname from the early 17th century English word whippet, meaning "to move briskly". A type of sighthound bears this name.
Whipple English
English surname of uncertain meaning. It might be a shortened form of “whippletree”; an early name for the dogwood. It may also be a variation of Whipp – an early surname for someone who carried out judicial punishments.
Whisman English
Variation of Wisman or Wiseman.
Whistler English
An English occupational surname, meaning "one who whistles."
Whitby English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
Whitcomb English (British)
means wide valley
Whitehorn Scottish
A locational name from Whithorn near Wigtown, from Old English hwit "white" and ærn "house".
Whitehouse English
the origin of this surname started in England where people were called Whitehouse when they painted their houses white.
Whitelaw Scottish
Scottish and northern English: habitational name from any of various places in the Scottish Borders called Whitelaw, from Old English hwit ‘white’ + hlaw ‘hill’.
Whiteman English
From a nickname (see White).
Whiteplume Arapaho
Native Arapaho Wyoming Montana
Whitfield English
It is locational from any or all of the places called Whitfield in the counties of Derbyshire, Kent, Northamptonshire and Northumberland, or from the villages called Whitefield in Lancashire, the Isle of Wight and Gloucestershire.
Whitgift English
Means "person from Whitgift", Yorkshire ("Hvítr's dowry"). This surname was borne by Anglican churchman John Whitgift (?1530-1604), archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604 (in addition, Whitgift School is an independent day school for boys in South Croydon, founded in 1595 by John Whitgift; and Whitgift Centre is a complex of shops and offices in the middle of Croydon, Greater London, on a site previously occupied by Whitgift School).
Whiting English
Derived from a patronymic surname, created from the Old English personal name Hwit, meaning "the white one."