French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Delorey French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Deslauriers, a topographic name for someone living among laurels, a combination of the fused preposition and plural definite article des ‘from the’ + the plural of Old French lorier ‘laurel’.
Demar French, English
Combination of the French word de, meaning "from" and the Old French word maresc, meaning "marsh".
Demaree French (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of French Desmarais.
Demerchant French (Acadian)
A name meaning "the merchant", though the spelling indicates dutch origins.
Demers French
From French meaning "of the seas". A famous bearer of this surname was Modeste Demers, a bishop in 18th century Vancouver.
Demestre French
It's an occupational word coming from Latin. It means "master". It is of French origin.
De Michele Italian, French
An Italian and French patronymic surname, meaning "son of Michele 1".
DeMille French (Belgian)
Denoted a person from Hamme-Mille, a section of the municipality of Beauvechain, in the province of Walloon Brabant in Wallonia, Belgium. This surname was borne by the American filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille (1881-1959).
Denaut French (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of Denault.
Denoncourt French (Quebec)
Possibly a habitational name.
Déodat French
From the given name Déodat.
Depaul French
Son of Paul
Dernier French
Means Last in French
De Robespierre French
From the combined given name Robert and Pierre.
Deroboam French
unknown possibly french, family has french origins
Deruelle French
Habitational name for someone who lived near a place called (la) Ruelle, for example Ruelle-sur-Touvre.
Desanges French (Rare)
Means "from the angels", possibly connected to the French title of the Virgin Mary Notre Dame des Anges, meaning "Our Lady of the Angels". Bearers of this surname include Louis William Desanges (1822-1905), an English artist of French descent, and French historian Jehan Desanges (1929-).
Desaulniers French (Quebec)
Topographic name denoting a property distinguished by a grove of alder trees, derived from Old French au(l)ne meaning "alder".
Descatoire French
Alexandre Descatoire was a French sculptor (1874-1949)... [more]
Deschain French, Literature
Of French origin. This is the last name of the character of the Gunslinger Roland in Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series.
Deschanel French
Derived from eschamel meaning "stepladder", or des chanels meaning "from the channels, from the little jugs". An occupational nickname for a trader, it supposedly originated in the Ain department, in Lyon, France.
Deschenes French
"Chenes" is French for "oak tree". In French, "Des" means more than one. "Des"+ "Chenes"= Deschenes meaning "Many oak trees."
Deslauriers French (Quebec)
A topographic name for someone living among laurels, a combination of the fused preposition and plural definite article des ‘from the’ + the plural of Old French lorier ‘laurel’.
Desmarais French
Habitational name for someone from any of various places named with Old French mareis, maresc ‘marsh’, as for example Les Marets, in Seine-et-Marne, Centre, Nord, and Picardy.
Desnoyers French (Quebec)
Means "of the walnut trees", from French word "noyer", meaning walnut. "Des noyers" literally translates to "the walnuts".
De Soye French
Meaning "From Soye" in French.
Des Roches French
Either a topographic name for someone living among rocks or a habitational name from any of several places named with this word, meaning "from the rocks" in French.
Desrouleaux French, Haitian Creole
Means "of the scrolls" in French. It is a occupational name for a scribe, a person who serves as a professional copyist, especially one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of automatic printing... [more]
Desruisseaux French, French (Quebec)
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area characterized by streams, from the fused preposition and plural definite article des meaning "from the" and ruisseaux (plural of ruisseau) meaning "stream".
d'Estaing French
Derived from Estaing, a commune in the Aveyron department in southern France. A famous bearer was former French president Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (1926-2020).
d'Estienne French
From the given name Estienne, a Medieval French form of Stephen.
De Talleyrand French
A French noble surname. A cadet branch of the family of sovereign counts of Périgord, they took their name from the estate of Périgord owned by these counts, and date back to Boso I, count of la Marche... [more]
De Thomas French
Derived from the given name Thomas.
Devalcourt French (Cajun)
Habitational name from places in France named Valcourt.
Devall French, English
Devall (also DeVall) is a surname of Norman origin with both English and French ties.Its meaning is derived from French the town of Deville, Ardennes. It was first recorded in England in the Domesday Book.In France, the surname is derived from 'de Val' meaning 'of the valley.'
Deveaux French, Bahamian Creole
Means "of the valleys", derived from French val "valley".
Deveraux English, French
Variant spelling of Devereux.
De Vignerot French, French (Belgian)
The surname Vignerot was first found in Belgium, where the name became noted for its many branches in the region, each house acquiring a status and influence which was envied by the princes of the region... [more]
Devil French
Variant of De Ville, De Vill,etc.
Deville French
French surname meaning, 'The Village', from French De- 'the' and Ville- 'Village'.
Devore French
French: variant of De Var, a habitational name for someone from a place named Var, for example in Charente. Respelling of French Devors, a habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from Vors in Aveyron.
Dieudonné French
From the given name Dieudonné.
Dieulafoy French
From Old French Dieu la foy meaning "God the faith". Famous bearers were the married couple of French archeologists Marcel Dieulafoy (1844-1920) and Jane Dieulafoy (1951-1916). A medical condition of the stomach causing gastric bleeding called "Dieulafoy's lesion" was named after Dr... [more]
Diggins Norman
Diggins came to England in the 11th century wave of migration that was set off by the Norman Conquest of 1066; from the Norman baptismal name which means the son of Diccon, a diminution of the parent name, Richard.
Digne French
From French digne "dignified, worthy" perhaps a nickname for a hardworking person.
Dion French
Meaning uncertain. It may be a habitational name from any of various locations called Dion or Dionne, derived from the Gaulish element divon- meaning "(sacred) spring" or Celtic dēwos meaning "god, deity"... [more]
Disharoon French (Americanized)
Americanized form of an unidentified French name, possibly de Charente. This name was established in MD by the end of the 17th century.
Dominique French
From the given name Dominique
Donadieu French
Meaning “given to God”, surname given to a child because they were given to a priest or monastery or either an orpan.
Donatien French
From the given name Donatien.
D'orevalle French (Archaic)
Variant form of D'aurevalle. A known bearer of this surname was the medieval bishop Hugh d'Orevalle (d. 1084 or 1085).
D'orival French
Variant form of D'oreval. This is also one of the very few forms (of what is ultimately the D'aurevalle surname) that is still in use nowadays.
Dorsay French
French form of Dorsey.
d'Orves French
Denoted someone from Orve, a commune in the Doubs department in eastern France.
Douillard French
Nickname for a softie, possibly derived from Old French do(u)ille meaning "soft, tender".
Doux French
From French meaning "sweet". Probably a nickname for someone who's gentle and kind-hearted.
Dozier French
Meaning "lives near willow trees" or possibly someone who made goods, such as baskets, from willow wood.
Dragon French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
Dragoo American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
Dreik French
Derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".
Dreyfus French, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of Dreyfuss, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
Drouillard French
Probably a derogatory nickname, from a derivative of the regional term drouiller "to defecate", which also has various figurative senses.
Drury English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
Du Aimé French
The Duaime surname comes from an Old French word "hamel," which meant "homestead." It was likely first used as a name to describe someone who lived at a farm on the outskirts of a main town, or for someone that lived in a small village.
Duboi French
Variant of Dubois.
Dubosque French
DuBosque means 'of the forest' in french and was a surname given typically to someone from a rural treed area.
Dubreuil French
Topographic name derived from Old French breuil meaning "marshy woodland" (also derived from Late Latin brogilum, of Gaulish origin). In French the term later came to mean "enclosed woodland" and then "cleared woodland", and both these senses may also be reflected in the surname.
Dubuisson French
A topographic name for someone who lived in an area of scrub land or by a prominent clump of bushes, derived from Old French buisson meaning "small tree, bush, scrub".
Ducasse French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by an oak tree, from Old French casse ‘oak (tree)’ (Late Latin cassanos, a word of Celtic origin), with the fused preposition and article du ‘from the’... [more]
Duchêne French
Means "from the oak (tree)" in French, used to denote a person who lived near an oak tree or an oak forest.
Dufau French
The name DUFAU come from two French words DU which means « of the » and FAU which is old French for a beech tree. Surnames in France were given later so the person with this name meant he/she had a beech tree in his property... [more]
Dufault French
Alternate spelling of Dufau, meaning "of the beech tree."
Dufresne French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
Duhamel French
Topographic name for someone who lived in a hamlet, from Old French hamel, a diminutive of ham "homestead", with fused preposition and definite article du.
Dujardin French
Means "from the garden" in French.
Dulin French
The surname Dulin is most common in France and is an occupational name meaning "from flax". Pronounced "du LIN" in English; however, in French it is pronounced "du LON". Anglicized in some cases as Duling, Dowling, or Dulong (a more common French surname brought to England, Ireland and Scotland from French Normans and later Huguenots).
Dupain French
Means "of the bread" in French, probably used as an occupational name for a baker.
DuPaul French
From the given name Paul.
Dupin French
Means "of the pine tree" in French, referring to a person who lived near a pine tree or was from any of various locations named Le Pin.
du Plessis Afrikaans, French Creole, French (Cajun), French (Huguenot)
French topographic name for someone who lived by a quickset fence, Old French pleis (from Latin plexum past participle of plectere ‘plait’, ‘weave’), with fused preposition and definite article du ‘from the’... [more]
Dupouy French
Variant of Dupuy.
Dupré French
Means "of the meadow" in French.
Durbin French
Derived from the place called D'urban or D'urbin in Languedoc
Duret French
Derived from French dur meaning "hard, tough".
Durieux French
Derived from Old French riu meaning "river, stream", originally used to indicate someone who lived by a stream.
Dutertre French
Means "of the hillock, of the mound" in French.
Dutroux French, Belgian
Last name of Marc Dutroux, Belgian serial killer and child molester.
Duvall French
Variant spelling of Duval.
Duvernay French
Means "from the alder grove," from Gaulish vern meaning "alder" combined with Latin -etum, whence Modern French -aie, forming names of orchards or places where trees/plants are grown)... [more]
Duvillard French
French surname, pronounced /dyvilaʁ/, whose bearers mainly live in Haute-Savoie. It means "from Le Villard", a village in the Rhône-Alpes region, whose name comes from the Latin 'villare' which means 'hamlet'... [more]
Eamer French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
Ecru French (?)
It means "unbleached" in French, but is used in English to mean brown.
Eleanor French
Derives from the given name Eleanor. Not popular as a last name.
Élias French
From the given name Élias.
Emery English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’... [more]
Émilien French
From the given name Émilien.
Emperaire French
Means "Emperor".
Engelbert German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
Érable French (Rare)
From érable meaning "maple."
Erasmus French, Dutch
it means beloved one or king
Erman German (Modern), French (Modern)
Erman is a shortened French adaption of the Swiss-German surname Ermendinger, itself derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence during the early or middle 18th century when Jean-Georges Ermendinger (1710-1767), a Swiss fur trader from Geneva, married into a French speaking Huguenotte family... [more]
Esprit French
From the given name Esprit.
Estimé Haitian Creole, French
Means "valued, esteemed" in French.
Eustache French
From the given name Eustache.
Évariste French
From the given name Évariste.
Évrard French
From the given name Évrard.
Fabergé French (Huguenot, Russified, ?), Popular Culture
From Russian Фаберже (Faberzhe), which is ultimately of Huguenot French origin, having evolved (since c. 17th century) from Favri; compare Favre... [more]
Fafard French
Possibly derived from the french 'fard' meaning 'made-up' or 'make-up'. This is in a theatrical sense and does not imply lying. Very possibly a derivation form a theatrical occupation
Falba Occitan (Archaic), French (Rare)
Possibly from French fauve "wildcat".
Farand English (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
Farge French
Reduced or Americanized form of La Farge/Lafarge.
Farragut Breton, French, Catalan, American
A Breton-French surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was American naval flag officer David Farragut (1801-1870), who is known for serving during the American Civil War. His father was of Catalan ancestry... [more]
Faucette French
From French fausette, meaning "falsehood." Variant of Fasset and Faucet.
Faustin French
From the given name Faustin.
Fayard French
Originally French topographic name for someone who lived by a beech tree or beech-wood.
Faye French, English
Refers to one who came from Fay or Faye (meaning "beech tree") in France.
Félicien French
From the given name Félicien
Ferrand French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
Ferrandin French (Rare)
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from the name of a profession (thus making it an occupational surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the masculine given name Ferrandin, which was a diminutive of the medieval French given name Ferrand... [more]
Ferron French
Variant of Feron.
Feuille French
This is actually a standard word in French, correctly pronounce like "furry" without the r's. It means "leaf", or "sheet" (i.e. feuille de papier).
Février French
Meaning, "February."
Fey German, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
Fils French
From fils "son", used to identify the younger of two bearers of the same personal name in a family.
Firman English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants Firman and Firmin... [more]
Flament French, Flemish
French and Flemish cognate of Fleming.
Flavigny French
French form of Flavinius. The Flavigny Abbey, in the French region of Burgundy, became famous because of the candies made by its Benedictine monks, called the anise of Flavigny... [more]
Florent French
From the given name Florent.
Florentin Romanian, French, German
From the given name Florentin.
Florine French
From the given name Florine.
Fontenot French (Cajun)
From the Old French word "fontaine", meaning "fountain."
Foret French, French Creole
From Old French forest ‘forest’, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a royal forest, or an occupational name for a keeper or worker in one. See also Forrest... [more]
Forrest French
French and English last name
Fortescue French
Means 'strong shield' from French elements fort meaning "strong" and escu meaning "shield#
Fortin French
Diminutive of Fort.
Foucault French
Derived from the Germanic given name Folcwald, which was composed of the elements fulc "people" and wald "power, leader, ruler"... [more]
Fouche French
"people army"
Fouquereau French (Quebec)
Jean Fouquereau was born on November 6, 1617, in Anjou, Isère, France, his father, Louis, was 23 and his mother, Catherine, was 20. He married Renee Bataille on December 31, 1639, in Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France... [more]
Foy French
From a medieval nickname based on Old French foi "faith", applied either to a notably pious person or to one who frequently used the word as an oath; also, from the medieval French female personal name Foy, from Old French foi "faith".
Frain French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
France French
Ethnic name for an inhabitant of France, a country in Europe.
Francisque French
From the given name Francisque.
Franck English, French
From the given name Franck.
Fray French, English
From the German surname Frey or the Old French given name FRAY.
Freer French
Dutch spelling of Frere (brother); another variant spelling is Frear.
Frémont French (Americanized), English (American)
Fremont is a French surname meaning Free Mountain. People include John Frémont a US Explorer and Politician who fought in the Mexican-American War to free California and many places named after him, Including Fremont, California, and Fremont Nebraska.
Frink Anglo-Saxon, Norman
It was a name given to a person who was referred to as being free or generous. The surname was originally derived from the Old French franc, which meant "liberal, generous." ... The surname also has origins from the Norman official title, the frank which also means free.
Fromager French
Occupational name for someone who makes or sells cheese.
Furneaux French (Anglicized), English
Locational surname from any of several places in France called Fourneaux, or from fourneau "furnace".
Gabin French
From the given name Gabin.
Gagneau French
Variation of Gagne.
Gaines English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
Galant French
Original French cognitive of Galante.
Galante Italian, French, Jewish
Comes from the ancient French word "galant" meaning someone in love or who has fun. In the case of Mordecai Galante, a Spanish exile in 16th century Rome, his courteous manners won for him from the Roman nobles the surname "Galantuomo" (gentleman), from which Galante was eventually derived.... [more]
Galliard French
It resembles the French word "galliard," meaning "brave, cheerful, spirited." Marcel and Porco Galliard from Attack on Titan are known bearers of this name.
Galloni D'istria French, Italian
Meaning "Gallons from Istria" in French and Italian.
Gambier French
Derived from gambier, a Northern French variant of jambier, the masculine form of jambière "greave (a piece of armour that protects the leg, especially the shin, and occasionally the tops of the feet)"... [more]
Gamelin French
From pet form of any of the compound personal names formed with gamal, related to Old Norse gamall, Old German gamel "old", "aged". ... [more]
Gandin French
From the French gandin, pronounced /ɡɑ̃dœ̃/, which is a word used for a dandy, an elegant young man with affected, quite often ridiculous, manners.
Garneau French
From a pet form of the Germanic given name Warinwald, composed of the elements war(in) meaning "guard" and waldan meaning "to govern".
Garrigues French, Provençal
This surname comes from Old Provençal garrique meaning "grove of holm oaks or kermes oaks."
Gasnier French
From Old French gaaigner meaning "to win, to earn" or "to till, to cultivate", possibly used as an occupational name for a farmer.
Gaubert French
From the given name Gaubert.
Gaucher French
Means "left-handed" in French.
Gay English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
Gay English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
Gayheart German (Anglicized), French (Anglicized)
Americanised form of German Gerhardt or possibly French Jolicoeur. A famous bearer is American actress Rebecca Gayheart (1971-).
Gee Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
Gendron French
Either a diminutive of French gendre meaning "son-in-law" or a habitational name for someone from the town of Gendron in Belgium.
Gentry French
From the English word, which is in turn from French gentrie, referring to that which is "noble," or the "nobility." From earlier gentillece, which was originally from gentil, "refinement."
Geoffrey English, French
From the given name Geoffrey
Geoffroy French
From the given name Geoffroy
Gérald French
Derived from the given name Gérald.
Germaine French
Germaine was first found in Savoy in the Rhône-Alpes region of the French Alps, where the family held a family seat from ancient times.
German English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
Gervais English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
Gillard English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
Gillette English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
Gilliard French, Swiss
French and Swiss French from a derivative of Gillier, from the Germanic personal name Giselher, composed of gisil ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble offspring’ (see Giesel) + heri ‘army’.
Giresse French
Alain Giresse is a French footballer and manager... [more]