French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Leloup French
Means “the wolf” in French.
Le Maistre French
From French meaning 'master'
Lemaître French
Means "the master" in French, either used as a nickname for someone who behaved in a masterful manner or an occupational name for someone who was a master of their craft.
Lemercier French
French surname designating a vendor of sewing materials, from the word mercier.
Le Monnier French
Occupational surname for a miller, literally meaning "the miller" in French.
Lemonnier French
Variant spelling of Le Monnier.
Lenglet French
Means "The Englishman".
Lenoir French
French surname which was originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or skin, derived from noir "black" combined with the definite article le. A famous bearer is Étienne Lenoir (1822 - 1900), the inventor of the internal combustion engine.
Léonce French
From the given name Léonce.
Léotard French
From the given name Leopold. Jules Léotard was an acrobat who popularized the leotard, a gymnastics garment. The garment is named after him.
Lepère French
Means "the father" in French.
Lepine French
From Old French espine "thorn bush".
Leprince French
Means "the prince" from Old French prince (Latin princeps).
Le Roux French
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Old French rous "red." Variant spelling of Leroux.
Lessard French
Name for someone who lived in a clearing, derived from French l'essart meaning "the assart" (a term for cleared forest land used for agriculture). It is also a habitational name for someone from any of various locations named Lessard or Lessart, of the same origin and meaning.
Lesueur French
Means "the shoemaker" in French.
Letendre French
From 'tendre', meaning "tender" or "delicate".
Létourneau French
Nickname for a chatty, gregarious person or an occupational name for a birdcatcher, derived from French l'étourneau meaning "the starling".
Leva Bulgarian (Rare), Czech (Rare), French (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
From the Hebrew given name Lev, meaning Lion. It is also the name of the currency in Bulgaria, and a verb in French meaning to lever or to lift.
Levan French, English
Comes from le vent, meaning "the wind."
Lever French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
Levin Jewish, Lithuanian, Belarusian, German, Russian, French (Quebec, Anglicized), Various
As a Lithuanian Jewish and Belarusian Jewish name, it is a Slavicized form of Levy. As a German and German Jewish name, it is derived from the given name Levin... [more]
L'Heureux French
Means "the happy one" in French.
L'Homme French
Variant spelling of Lhomme.
Lhomme French
From the name of the commune of Lhomme, located in the Sarthe department in northwestern France.
Lihou Norman
From the island of Lihou.
Lincourt French (Quebec)
Possibly a habitational name.
Liné French (Rare)
From Old French liné meaning "made of linen". This name was an occupational name for someone who weaved linen or was a linen merchant.
Lisle Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
Listrat French
From Occitan "listrat" meaning "chopped off, striped" or from "Listrac", a commune in the Gironde department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of southwest France.
Loche French
From the Old French word loche meaning "freshwater fish."
Loiseau French
Means "The Bird" in French.
Lombard French, English
French and English cognate of Lombardi.
Lorain French
Occupational name for a saddler, derived from the Old French word lorain, meaning "a leather strap used on a horse's breastplate".
Lorang French
Surname of uncertain origin. Might be derived from:... [more]
Lord French
Nickname from Old French l'ord "the dirty one".
Lorrain French
French and English: variant spelling of Lorraine.
Lorraine French
Indicates origin within Lorraine, in eastern France
Lott French
From the Department (Region/State)in France, "Lot" and "Lot-et-Garrone"; also a river in France (Lot). Brought to the British Isles, Holland (Netherlands) and later the United States, Canada and South Africa, by French Huguenots.
Louise French
From the given name Louise or a variant of Louis.
Louisin French
From the given name Louis.
Lovett English, French
From Ango-Norman French "louvet" meaning "young wolf".
Lucien French
From the given name Lucien.
Lupin French
Lupin is a variant on the Latin word "lupus", meaning "wolf". Two important literary characters, Arsène Lupin, the famous French gentleman-burglar, and Professor Remus Lupin, from the world of Harry Potter, have this name... [more]
Luquette French (Quebec)
Canadian spelling of French Luquet, derived from a pet form of the given name Luc. It is also a variant of French Loquet, a metonymic occupational name for a locksmith.
Luxenberg German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Lyé French
A habitational name from places named Lié located in Deux-Sèvres and Vendée.
Mace English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Macron French
Contracted form of Macqueron.
Maffret French
beleived to originated in{ NICE, france} in the late 19th century, emmigration from france to london,{stepney}, where the surname was mistakenly added an extra letter "T" resulting in the surname MAFFRETT
Main Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
Maine French
French topographic name from Old French maine ‘dwelling’, ‘residence’, ‘abode’, or a habitational name from any of numerous places so named.
Maire French (Swiss)
French Swiss surname ... [more]
Maison French
Means "house" in French.
Maisonneuve French
Means "new house" in French.
Maitre French
occupational name for one who was the head of a craft or trade guild, from Old French maistre ‘master’ (Latin magister).
Majors Norman
Based on the Norman given name Mauger. The name indicates one who is the son of Maugier, an Old French personal name, which is derived from the Old Germanic name Malger, which means council spear.
Malecuit French
Means "doughy," "soggy," or "undercooked" in French.
Malfait French
Derived from French mal fait, which literally means "poorly done, badly done". In the context of the surname, it refers to the first bearer being "malformed" or "deformed" (as it was in the eyes of people from older times), which means that he either was physically disabled or able-bodied but with a physical trait that deviated from the norm.
Malfoi French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfois French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfoy French
Malfoy is a French name roughly translating to "bad faith"
Malin English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
Mallet Anglo-Norman, Medieval English, French, Catalan
Originated in Norman France and spread to England following the Norman conquest of 1066. The surname comes from the given name Malle, an Old English diminutive of Mary or from the given name Malo, a popular form of the name of Saint Maclovius, a 6th-century Welsh monk who the church of Saint Maclou in Rouen is named for.... [more]
Maloret French
This surname comes from the French and means 'unfortunate' or 'luckless'.
Malpass English, Scottish, French
Habitational name from any of various places named Malpas, because of the difficulty of the terrain, from Old French mal pas "bad passage" (Latin malus passus). It is a common French minor place name, and places in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gwent, and elsewhere in England were given this name by Norman settlers... [more]
Mancio French
Mancio derives from the surname Venâncio and Amâncio, being an unusual French variation.
Mansell Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
Mansell English (Canadian), Norman
Of Norman origin, a habitational or regional name from Old French mansel ‘inhabitant of Le Mans or the surrounding area of Maine’. The place was originally named in Latin (ad) Ceromannos, from the name of the Gaulish tribe living there, the Ceromanni... [more]
Manuel Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
Manville French
A locational surname deriving from any of the various places in France called "Manneville or Magneville", named, from the Old Germanic personal name "Manno" or the Old French adjective "magne", great, with the word "ville", meaning a town or settlement.
Maqueron French
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from Picard maqueron "chin" (in which case this would have been a pejorative nickname for someone with a protruding chin) and a diminutive of Macquart.
Marant English, French
Probably a variant of Morant.
Marc French
Derived from the French given name Marc.
Marceau French
From the given name Marcel.
Marcel French
From the given name Marcel
Marcelin French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Marcelin.
Marcellin French
From the given name Marcellin
Marchant French, English, Spanish
Variant of Marchand, from French marchand meaning "merchant, mercantile". Though it is of French origin, it was transferred into the Spanish-speaking world, especially Chile, by French invasion of the Iberian Peninsula.
Marois Norman, Picard, French
topographic name from the Old French words "mareis", "maresc", mareis, marois meaning "marsh" ‘marshy ground’.
Marquis French, English, Scottish
for someone who behaved like a marquis or an occupational name for a servant in the household of a marquis, from Old Northern French marquis. The title originally referred to the governor of a border territory (from a Germanic word; compare March1 and Mark2)... [more]
Marriott English, French
Derived from Mary.
Martelle English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
Martial French
Derived from the given name Martial.
Martineau French
Diminutive of Martin.
Martinet French
From a pet form of the personal name Martin.
Martinique French, Antillean Creole, French (Caribbean)
From the French department named Martinique.
Mary French
Habitational name from places in Saône-et-Loire, Seine-et-Marne, and Nièvre, named in Latin as Mariacum meaning "estate of Marius".
Masey English, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
Massard French
French form of Massaro.
Masse English, French
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
Matheny French (Anglicized)
Of French origin. According to Matheny family tradition, this surname comes from the name of a village in France named Mathenay. This may also have been a French Huguenot surname.
Mathias French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mathis German, French
From the given name Mathis.
Matthieu French
From the given name Matthieu.
Maturin French
From the French male personal name Maturin, from Latin Mātūrīnus, a derivative of Mātūrus, literally "timely". It was borne by the Irish "Gothic" novelist Charles Maturin (1782-1824).
Maurice English, French
This surname is taken from a given name which is derived from the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of Maurus.
Maury French, Occitan, English
As a French name, it derives from a short form of the given name Amaury (see Emery)... [more]
Maxime French
From the French given name Maxime.
Maximin French
From the given name Maxime.
Mayne French
French variant of Maine.
Mazarin French
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
Meaux French
Habitational name from a place in Seine-et-Marne, so named from the Gaulish tribal name Meldi, or from Meaux-la-Montagne in Rhône.
Mée French
French habitational name from places called (Le) Mée in Mayenne, Eure-et-Loir, and Seine-et-Marne, derived from Old French me(i)s ‘farmstead’ (Latin mansus).
Mélançon French
Nickname from a dialect word meaning 'melancholic'.
Mendès French
French form of Mendes.
Menu French
From French meaning "petite".
Mercure French
French cognitive of Mercurio and derived from the given name Mercure.
Merrimen Norman
An ancient Norman name, that would have been used in Britain soon after the Conquest of the island in 1066. This name was given to a person who was a person who was a mischievous child, or who liked to play tricks and make jokes.
Mesly French
Variant of Mesley.
Messiaen Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
Messier French
Occupational name for someone who kept watch over harvested crops, Old French messier 'harvest master' (Late Latin messicarius, agent derivative of messis 'harvest').
Metrejon Louisiana Creole (?), French (?)
Maiden surname of Constance Leto (nee Metrejon). She was born in Louisiana and has Cajun(French) ancestry. The Metrejon line is traced back to Joseph Marie Maitrejean, who was born c. 1778, in Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, an island off the coast of Brittany.
Michaël Dutch, French
From the given name Michaël.
Michelet French (Latinized, Rare)
Its name comes from the name Michael, the angel.
Michelson French
This surname means son of Michelle.
Mickley French
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
Mieles Italian, Spanish, French
Meaning "honey".
Milan Italian, French
Habitational name from the Italian city of Milan (see Milano).
Mimieux French
Unknown.
Minion French
French form of Miner, an occupational name for a someone working in a mine.
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Miramon French
MIRAMON is a French name with Spanish origins. ... [more]
Miramond Medieval Occitan, Occitan, French
From Old Occitan mirar "look" and mond "world".
Moine French
Derived from French moine "monk" (compare Monk).
Moïse French
From the given name Moïse.
Molyneux French
Possibly a habitational name from Moulineux, meaning "mill of the waters", or derives from the Old French name De Molines or De Moulins, meaning "mill". The surname has been linked to a large French family that settled in Lancashire from France.
Monge French
Southern French variant of Moine.
Monge French
Truncated form of Demonge, a regional variant of the given name Dominique (compare Dimanche).
Monique French
A notable bearer is Kylie Monique, a singer.
Monnier French
It means Miller, someone operating a mill; from "meunier" or "mounier" in Old French.
Montagnet French, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
Montaigu French
French form of Montague.
Monteblanco French, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
Montesquieu French
From French montagne, meaning "mountain" and possibly also from queue, meaning "line". Charles Montesquieu was a 17th-century French aristocrat, philosopher and politician.
Montville French
"Mountain town".
Monty French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
Monvoisin French
Married surname of a infamous 17th century fortune teller and poisoner, Catherine Monvoisin nee Deshayes, known as La Voisin. Executed for witchcraft in 1680 in the affair of the poisons. Her clients included the elite of Paris including a mistress of Louis XIV.
Moralee English, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
Morant English, French
From the Old French personal name Morant, perhaps from a nickname meaning "steadfast", or alternatively of Germanic origin and meaning literally "courage-raven". A known bearer was the British-born Australian soldier and poet Breaker Morant, original name Edwin Henry Murrant (?1864-1902).
Motel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
Mouton French
Original French cognitive of Mutton.
Mullinix French
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
Munch Danish, French, Norwegian (Rare)
Either a variant of Münch or Munk, both meaning "monk". A notable bearer was Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (1863-1944), whose best known work is 'The Scream'.
Muskow French (Archaic)
French Variant of Moscow.
Nadeau French
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
Narcisse French
From the given name Narcisse.
Nault French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
Navarre French
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
Nazaire French
From the given name Nazaire.
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Nice French
From Nice, in France.
Nicolay German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nicolin French
From the given name Nicolas.
Noble English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
Noël French
Means "Christmas".
Noir French
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
Noisette French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
Noland Irish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
Noons French
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
Normand French
Means North Man, meaning vikings
Nugent English, Irish, French
An English, Irish (of Norman origin) and French habitational surname derived from any of several places in northern France (such as Nogent-sur-Oise), From Latin novientum and apparently an altered form of a Gaulish name meaning "new settlement".
Octavien French
From the given name Octavien.