French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Motel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
Motte French, Walloon, Flemish, German
from old French motte "motte" a word of Gaulish origin denoting a man-made protective mound or moat surrounding a castle or other fortified strongholds; or a habitational name from any of the various places in France and in Belgium named with this word.... [more]
Mouton French
Nickname from Old French mouton "sheep" used for a docile mild-mannered person for someone easily led or perhaps for a curly-haired man. Original French cognitive of Mutton.
Mullinix French
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
Munch Danish, French, Norwegian (Rare)
Either a variant of Münch or Munk, both meaning "monk". A notable bearer was Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (1863-1944), whose best known work is 'The Scream'.
Muskow French (Archaic)
French Variant of Moscow.
Nadeau French
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
Narcisse French
From the given name Narcisse.
Nard French
From Nard a short form of Bernard. French cognitive of Nardi.
Nault French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
Navarre French
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
Nazaire French
From the given name Nazaire.
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Neveu French
Relationship name from Old French neveu "nephew" also "grandson" used to distinguish the two bearers of the same personal name.
Nice French
From Nice, in France.
Nicolay German, French, Romansh
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nicolin French
From the given name Nicolas.
Noble English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
Noël French
Means "Christmas".
Noelle French
Noelle is a French And Latin Name That Means Chirstmas its Also a film About A Girl Named Noelle
Noir French
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
Noisette French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
Noland Irish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
Noons French
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
Nostradamus History, French (Latinized)
Latinized form of de Nostredame. This surname was borne by the French physician and writer Michel de Nostredame (1503-1566), famous for his collection of prophecies Les Prophéties (1555) allegedly predicting the apocalypse and danger from the Arab world.
Nugent English, Irish, French
An English, Irish (of Norman origin) and French habitational surname derived from any of several places in northern France (such as Nogent-sur-Oise), From Latin novientum and apparently an altered form of a Gaulish name meaning "new settlement".
Octavien French
From the given name Octavien.
Octobre French
Means "October" in French.
Odelin French
Not to be confused with the similarly spelled Odelín, which is Spanish rather than French, though they could have similar origins in name.
Odige French, African
A Name from french Odige (O.DI Zeouf) zeouf with means egg Zeouf is spelled as ge to shorten the name. This surname means fighter The French has been known to be Lovely and the language of love un-violent... [more]
Ogier French, English
From the given name Ogier.
Olive French
Given to someone who worked with olives from old french olive "olive" ultimately latin oliva "olive".
Olyphant English, Scottish, French, German
Variant form of Oliphant. A famous bearer is American actor Timothy Olyphant (1968-).
Onfroy French
From the given name Onfroy, a form of Humphrey.
Orgeron French (Cajun)
From the Norman French family name Orger, which is a abbreviated form of the ancient Norman name Orglander.
Orleans French
From Orléans, a city in France sieged by the English in 1429. Orléans is derived from Aurelianum, meaning "of Aurelius" in Latin.
Ostiguy Basque, French
Worn Quebec (Ostéguy variant), the name is visibly Basque and assumes initially a Ostegi form, which could designate a place where the foliage is abundant (osteo = + -egi sheet suffix). Alternatively, place the cold, cold house (Ortz, otz, followed -egi or -tegi).
Ouellette French (Quebec)
Canadian spelling of French (Norman and Champenois) Ouilet, from a Frenchified form of Willet, a pet form of William.
Ouy French
Some derive this name from the French word "gui," meaning mistletoe. Others think it comes through the Celtic name "Kei," from Caius. Others belive the name comes from the French words "guide," a leader, or "guidon," a banner... [more]
Packard English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
Pamphile French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Pamphile.
Papin French
Either from Old French papin "pap (for kids)" a noun derivative of paper "to munch or eat" (from Late Latin pappare in origin a nursery word) as a nickname probably referring to a glutton... [more]
Papon French (Huguenot)
Derived from Old French papon "grandfather", ultimately from Latin pappus.
Paquette French
From the personal name Paquet, a pet form of Pascal.
Paquin French
Originated in east France. This last name signified a freehold that permitted use of a cluster of land or pastures. The name became “he who possesses lands” and "he who is wise."
Paradis French
From a learned variant of Old French pareis "Paradise" (from Greek paradeisos). As a toponym this was applied to verdant places and it is quite common as a place name in Nord and Normandy; the surname therefore can be a topographic or habitational name.
Paramore French (Rare)
origin is unknown but the meaning of the name is lover used in France and England
Pardon French
A nickname for someone who had received the royal clemency.
Parenteau French (Rare), French (Quebec)
Diminutive of Parent. In France, this name is predominantly found in the Poitou-Charentes region.
Pariseau French
Derived from a pet form of Paris.
Parmentier French
An occupational surname for a maker of "facings" and "trimmings".
Parrot French
Form of Pierone.... [more]
Parsley Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
Pasqua French
Derived from Pasqua, a nickname for a person born during Easter (which itself is derived from Latin pascua). Famous beaters include Charles Victor Pasqua (1927-2015), a French businessman and a Gaullist politician.
Pasquier French
Meaning uncertain. Possibly "keeper of the oven."
Passe French
Possibly a nickname from passe 'sparrow
Passet French (Huguenot)
Derived from French pas "(geography) strait, pass" in combination with a diminutive suffix.
Pasteur French
French for "shepherd" or "preacher, pastor". Famous bearer Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist who created the first rabies vaccine, gave his name to the process of 'pasteurization'.
Pathé French
Meaning, "Dweller near an important path or footway."
Patrix Norman
Variant of Patrice.
Payen French, French (Caribbean)
From the old French given names Pagen Paien from Latin paganus "pagan"... [more]
Pêcheur French
French for "fisher."
Peevey Norman, English
Means "a place with a fine view". Composed of the Old French roots beu, which means "fair" and "lovely", and voir, which means "to see".
Pelissier French
From Old French "Pelicier", (Meaning "Furrier", from an agent derivative of pelice, meaning "Fur cloak", from Late Latin "pellicia", from "pellis", meaning "skin fur". An occupational name of someone likely in the fur and hide trade.
Pelkey French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surnames Peltier and Pelltier.
Pellegrin French
Unknown. Possibly a variant of Pellegrino. This surname was given to the Chilean named Raúl Alejandro Pellegrin Friedmann (1958-1988; nicknamed José Miguel).
Pellerin French
From Old French pellerin pelegrin "pilgrim" (from Latin peregrinus "traveler") applied as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to a famous holy site elsewhere... [more]
Peltier French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
Pémonge French, Occitan
Meaning unknown.
Pense French
Pense is, quite literally, a French word meaning "to think" or "thought", but is also a surname. Sometimes confused with the surname Pence, which is German.
Pépin French
From the Old French name Pepis, itself a form of the given name Pépin. Alternatively, it may be derived from French pépin meaning "(fruit) seed", thus making it an occupational name for a gardener or someone who grew fruit-bearing trees.
Perceval English, Norman
Derived from either the Old French given name Perceval, or from one of two places called Perceval in the department of Calvados in Normandy, France... [more]
Percival English, Norman
Variant of Perceval, derived from the given name Percival.
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Perre French (Rare), Jèrriais, Guernésiais
Derived from the given name Pierre.
Perron French (Quebec)
Probably a diminutive of Pierre.
Petitjean French
Nickname for a small or little man, or ironically a large or tall man, derived from Old French petit meaning "small, little" combined with the given name Jean 1... [more]
Pettee French, Scottish, English
Meaning "Petit", a word meaning "small" in French.
Peugeot French
Meaning unknown.
Peureux French
In the war there was a French resistance fighter named Maurice Peureux.
Peyron French
Unknown meaning. French surname. Famous bearer of this name is Bruno Peyron and the German princess Louise Peyron (1918-1989).... [more]
Pharamond French
From the given name Pharamond.
Phénix French (Quebec)
French Canadian variant of Phoenix.
Phenix French (Quebec, Anglicized)
Either (i) an anglicization of French Canadian Phénix, literally "phoenix", probably originally a nickname of now lost import; or (ii) a different form of Fenwick.
Piaget French (Swiss)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. This name was borne by Jean Piaget (1896-1980), a Swiss child psychologist noted for his studies of intellectual and cognitive development in children.
Picot French
From Old French picot "pointed object pickaxe" a nickname for someone who used such an implement.
Picquet French
A variant of Piquet of which it's meaning is of a military terminology of one soldier/small group of soldiers on a line forward of a postion to provide a warning of an enemy advance... [more]
Piednoel French
Modern (and also more common) form of Piénoel.
Piénoel French (Rare)
French surname that possibly refers to the buckled shoes that the original bearer was wearing, in which case it is derived from Old French pié meaning "foot" combined with Old French noiel meaning "buckle"... [more]
Pierrin French
From the given name Pierre.
Piggott English, Irish, Norman
From the Old French and Old English given names Picot and Pigot, or derived from Old English pic meaning "point, hill", hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point (see Pike).
Pigue French
French family last name may have been changed from the original French
Piketty French
Perhaps related to the English surname Pickett. A notable bearer is French economist Thomas Piketty (1971-).
Pillot French
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Middle French pilot or pillot both meaning "stake, pole". This is the name of a wealthy merchant family from Besançon, France.
Pin French, Dutch
A topographic name for someone living by a pine tree or in a pine forest, or a habitational name from a place named with the Old French word pin, meaning ‘pine’.
Pineau French
Either a diminutive of Pin from Old French pin "pine" or a habitational name from (Le) Pineau the name of several places in the western part of France of the same origin.
Pinochet Basque, French, Spanish
Derived from Basque pinoche meaning "pine cone". Alternately, it could be derived from the name of the hamlet of Pinouchet, located in the Gironde department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of France... [more]
Pinson French
From Old French pinson "finch" a nickname applied to someone who whistles or sings like a finch or to a bright and cheerful person.
Piquet French
Occupational name for someone who dealt with picks from a diminutive of pic ''pick, pickax''.
Pittler French
A surname which originally belonged to a person who lived by a pit or hollow. Meaning "King of the Pit" or "King of the Hollow".
Plain French
from Old French plain an adjective meaning "flat" and a noun meaning "plain" hence a topographic name denoting e.g. a dwelling on a flat terrain.
Plante French
French cognate of Plant.
Platon French, German, Romanian, Spanish (Philippines)
From the given name Platon. Spanish variant of Pláton more common in the Philippines.
Platte French
From Old French plat, meaning "flat."
Plimsoll French (Acadian)
I don't know the meaning, but it is my maiden name, and I understand it to be French. Samuel Plimsoll is my ancestor. He was born in Bristol, UK. He was an MP who spoke up in parliament and subsequently the Plimsoll or loading line was introduced on ships... [more]
Plumier French, Belgian
Possibly an occupational name for a dealer in feathers and quills, from an agent derivative of Old French plume "feather, plume" (compare English and Dutch Plumer)... [more]
Pointe French
Derivation of the name is from the pre 10th century Old French "pointe" meaning a sharp or pointed end, and ultimately from the Latin "puncta", to pierce.
Poisson French
Poisson is the French word for fish, and was given to one who was a fishmonger, fisherman, or could be a nickname for one who had the appearance similar to a fish.
Poitier French
Evidently an altered spelling of Pothier. A famous bearer of this surname was the Bahamian-American actor Sidney Poitier (1927-2022).
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Poley French, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
Policier French (Caribbean), Haitian Creole
From French meaning "policeman".
Polidore Italian (Americanized), French
Americanized form of Polidoro and French variant of Polydore from the given name Polydore.
Polnareff French
Most known by famous French singer Michel Polnareff, and fictional Jojo's Bizarre Adventure character Jean-Pierre Polnareff (who is named after the singer).
Polydore French
From the given name Polydore.
Pompey French, English
Variant of Italian Pompei.
Pons Catalan, French, Occitan, Dutch
From the given name Pons.
Pontiff French
Means "bridge builder". Comes from the French word pont, which means bridge. ... [more]
Popuchet French
Wise and classy
Porte French
from Old French porte "gateway entrance" (from Latin porta) hence a topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town (typically the man in charge of them).
Portugal Spanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
Posey English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
Poteet English, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
Pottier French
A variant of the french word for potter, potier.... [more]
Prévost French
From Old French prevost meaning "provost", a status name for officials in a position of responsibility.
Prevot French
A prevot was a govenment position during the Ancient Régime
Prieur French
from prieur Old French prior "prior" a monastic official immediately subordinate to an abbot (from Latin prior "superior") hence an occupational name for a servant of a prior or an ironic nickname... [more]
Primeau French
First found in Burgundy France.
Prince English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
Privett French, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see Privatus). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
Prophet English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
Prophète French, Haitian Creole
Originally a nickname (possibly ironic) from French prophète "prophet", making it a cognate of Profeta.
Proust French
From a nickname derived from French preux meaning "valiant, brave". A famous bearer was Marcel Proust (1871-1922), a French writer.
Provencher French
From the French word for the flower periwinkle. (pervenche) Brought to Canada from France in 1660 by Sebastien Provencher.
Provost English, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
Prudhomme French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
Prue English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
Pruitt English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
Pujol Catalan, French
Catalan and French variant of Puig. Spanish tennis player Marcel Granollers (1986-) bears this name.
Pulver Low German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
Pusey French
Habitational name form Pusey in Haute-Saône, so named from a Gallo-Roman personal name, Pusius, + the locative suffix -acum.
Québedeaux French (Cajun)
Possibly a Parisianized form of Quevedo.
Questel French, Medieval French (?)
The surname Questel was first found in Normandy. Currently, Questel is the most commonly occurring last name in Saint-Barthélemy, a French island in the Caribbean Sea.... [more]
Rabiot French
Occupational name for a radish merchant.
Rabtoy French
Unknown history, most likely originated in the Americas in Quebec. A large percentage of Rabtoy families are from Vermont.
Racine French
Means "(tree) root" in French, used as an occupational name for a grower or seller of root vegetables or as a nickname for a stubborn person.
Raimond Estonian, Dutch, French, Croatian
From the given name Raimond.
Raison English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
Ramage French, Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for a hot-tempered or unpredictable person (from Old French ramage "wild, uncontrollable" (applied to birds of prey)).
Rambeau French (Rare), Frankish
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, Rainbaut, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
Ramsamy Indian (Gallicized), French (African)
Contracted form of Ramasamy, found on the island of Mauritius.
Rancourt French (Quebec)
Habitational name from places in France named Rancourt.
Randel French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element... [more]
Range German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Raoul French, Breton
From the given name Raoul.
Ravel French, French (African)
Derived from either a place called Ravel in the district of Drome or Provence, or from the word 'rave' meaning a root vegetable, and hence a grower or seller of such items.
Ravenel English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
Raymond English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
Réal French
This can derive from several different sources: southern French réal "royal", a word which was applied to someone either as a nickname (presumably given to people perceived as being regal) or as an occupational name (given to a person in the service of the king); or the French place name Réal, in which case this is a habitational name taken from any of various places which were named for having been part of a royal domain (also compare Reau, Reaux).
Régis French
Occupational name for a local dignitary, from a derivative of Old French régir "to rule or manage".
Reille French, Occitan
Topographic name derived from Old Occitan relha meaning "plowshare", or a habitational name from any of several places named Reille or La Reille in southern France. A notable bearer was Honoré Charles Reille (1775-1860), a Marshal of France during the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.
Reine French
From the given name Reine or Rainier
Reiss German, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of Reis or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename Ris, rendered as Reis and Reiss.... [more]
Relyea German, French (Anglicized)
Altered spelling of southern German and French Rellier, or probably a regional variant of Swiss German Reller, especially in the western provinces of Austria... [more]
Remacle French, French (Belgian)
From the given name Remacle.
Rémy French
From the given name Rémy.
Renaudin French
From the given name Renaud.
René French
From the given name René.
Rétif French
Derived from French rétif "restive; rebellious".
Reveille French
Derived from Old French reveille "lively, vivid; alert".