Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is elbowin.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AMSLER American, German (Swiss)
As a Swiss German surname it is from the Swiss place name Amslen.
ANDRÁSSY Hungarian
man, warrior... a surname that derives from the personal name "Andreas", meaning manly, and was held by the first of Christ's disciples.
CABLE English
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
DEXHEIMER German
From the German village Dexheim (south of Mainz).
FABRONIUS German
An elaboration of the name Faber.
GROZDANOVA Bulgarian, Macedonian
Feminine form of Grozdanov, which means "son of Grozdan".
HUMPERDINCK German (?), Literature
From the German surname Humperdinck. As a surname it was born by the composer Engelbert Humperdinck. As a first name it was used for the villain Prince Humperdinck in William Goldman's novel The Princess Bride.
MAKICE American (Modern, Rare)
Taken as a new common familyname by Kevin McGrew Isbister and Amy Elizabeth Clendening. They scrambled their initials (KMI and AEC), and came up with “Makice” as their family name.
MÄRZ German
März means 'March' in German.
NAEGELE German
Variant of Nagel.
NEY German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
OLEVIAN German (Latinized)
Olevian is a latinised word meaning "from Olewig" (a town today incorporated into Trier, Germany). ... [more]
PASSEPARTOUT Literature
Derived from French passe-partout, which literally means "goes everywhere" but is actually an idiom for "skeleton key".... [more]
PETRYNIEC Ukrainian
From the given name Peter.
ROHRLACH German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
SATTLER German
An occupational name meaning "saddle maker".
TRAUTWIG German (Modern)
From an Ancient German given name made of the name elements TRUD "strength" and WIG "fight"