English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BEDWORTH English
An English habitational surname from a place so named near Nuneaton, in Warwickshire, derived most likely from the Old English personal name Baeda (see Bede), suffixed with worþ, 'enclosure', denoting an enclosed area of land belonging to Baeda.
BEE English
From Middle English be meaning "bee", Old English beo, hence a nickname for an energetic or active person or a metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper.
BEECH English
Dweller at the beech tree.
BEEDEN English (British)
Probably means "from Beeden", a village near Newbury in Berkshire. Ultimately coming from either Old English byden, meaning "shallow valley", or from the pre 7th century personal name Bucge with the suffix dun, meaning "hill of Bucge".
BEELER English
Anglicized spelling of German BIEHLER.
BEER English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BEIHL English, German
Variant of BIEHL, a short form of BIEHLER.
BELGRAVE English
Aristocratic surname from French, meaning "beautiful grove"; comes from a place name in Leicestershire. A famous namesake is British polar explorer Belgrave Ninnis, who perished in Antarctica on a 1912 expedition.
BELLE English
Possibly a variant of Bell(1) or Bell(2).
BELLERS English
Name came from the son of a French Noble born in Leicestershire, England. Hamon Bellers took his last name after the Kirby Bellers (Bellars) which was the name of the land given to him by his father.
BELLINGHAM English
Habitational name from places called Bellingham.
BENEDICT English
Of Latin origin. Due to an early association as a saint's name and a papal name, often said to mean "blessed." Originally the Latin elements are 'bene-' meaning "good" or as an adverb "well" plus '-dict,' meaning "spoken." Thus, the literal meaning is "well spoken." ... [more]
BENEDICTSON English
English surname meaning "Son of Benedict"
BENGTSON English, Swedish
Variant of the Swedish surname Bengtsson.
BENJAMIN English
From the given name Benjamin.
BENNETTSON English
Means 'Son of Bennett'.
BENNINGFIELD English, Anglo-Saxon
Benningfield is believed to be either ... [more]
BENNINGTON English
Habitational name from either of two places called Benington, in Hertfordshire and Lincolnshire, or from Long Bennington in Lincolnshire. The first is recorded in Domesday Book as Benintone "farmstead or settlement (Old English tūn) by the Beane river"; both Lincolnshire names are derived from the Old English personal name Beonna combined with -ing-, a connective particle denoting association, and tūn.
BENSEN English
Related to Benson, meaning "Son of Ben"
BENTHAM English
Habitational name from any of various places named Bentham, from Old English beonet "bent grass" + ham "homestead" or hamm "enclosure hemmed in by water".
BERESFORD English
English: habitational name from a place in the parish of Alstonfield, Staffordshire named Beresford, from Old English beofor ‘beaver’ (or possibly from a byname from this word) + Old English ford ‘ford’... [more]
BERKELEY English
It is English and it is also a surname.
BERLIN German, English
Habitational name from the city in Germany, the name of which is of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from an Old Slavic stem berl- meaning swamp or from a West Slavic word meaning "river lake".
BERNER English, Norman
From the Norman personal name Bernier from Old English beornan ‘to burn’, hence an occupational name for a burner of lime (compare German Kalkbrenner) or charcoal. It may also have denoted someone who baked bricks or distilled spirits, or who carried out any other manufacturing process involving burning... [more]
BERNETT Scottish, English
Altered spelling of Scottish and English Burnett or French Bernet.
BERRICK English
Variation of Barwick.
BERRYCLOTH English (Rare)
This name is of English locational origin, from the place called Barrowclough near Halifax in West Yorkshire.
BERSFORD English (Canadian)
Named after the city 'Bersford'... [more]
BESS English
Popularly grown surname from the diminuative form of "Elizabeth" during any time of a Queen Elizabeth
BETH English
From the given name Beth, itself a short form of Elizabeth and Bethany.
BETHEL English, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of ITHEL".
BETHENCOURT French, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BETTENCOURT French, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BEXLEY English
Habitational name from Bexley (now Bexleyheath in Greater London), which was named from Old English byxe ‘box tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
BIBLE English
From the given name BIBEL or an altered spelling of German BIEBL.
BICKHAM English
Habitational name from places so named in Devon and Somerset, most of which are most probably named with an Old English personal name Bicca and Old English cumb "valley". The first element could alternatively be from bica "pointed ridge".
BICKNELL English (British)
Contracted form of the placename Bickenhill in Somerset, England.
BIDDLE English, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIGELOW English
Habitational name from a place in England called Big Low meaning "big mound".
BIGGINS English
Habitational name from any of the various places in England named with northern Middle English bigging "building" (from Old Norse). This word came to denote especially an outbuilding, and is still used in and around Northumberland and Cumbria.
BIGGS English
Derived from the ancient word, "bigga", meaning large.
BILLARD English, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
BILLINGHAM English
A surname of English origin.
BILLSON English
Means "Son of Bill."
BINGHAM English
Ultimately deriving from the toponym of Melcombe Bingham in Dorset. The name was taken to Ireland in the 16th century, by Richard Bingham, a native of Dorset who was appointed governor of Connaught in 1584... [more]
BINGLEY English
Habitual surname for someone from Bingley in West Yorkshire, derived either from the given name Bynna or the Old English element bing meaning "hollow" and leah meaning "woodland clearing"... [more]
BINK English
Topographic name for someone living by a bink, a northern dialect term for a flat raised bank of earth or a shelf of flat stone suitable for sitting on. The word is a northern form of modern English bench.
BINKS English
Variant of Bink.
BIRCH English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare)
From Middle High German birche, Old English birce, Old Danish birk, all meaning "birch". This was likely a topographic name for someone living by a birch tree or a birch forest... [more]
BIRCHALL English
Probably a habitational name from Birchill in Derbyshire or Birchills in Staffordshire, both named in Old English with birce "birch" + hyll "hill".
BIRCHARD English
From the Old English personal name, Burgheard. See also Burkett.
BIRCHFIELD English
Variant of English BURCHFIELD or an anglicized form of German BIRKENFELD.
BIRDSONG English
From the English words bird and song. Possibly an English translation of the German surname Vogelsang.
BIRDWHISTLE English (Rare)
derived from whistling like a bird or the sound of the birds were sold.
BIRKET English
It's a locational surname taken from the village of Birket Houses in Lancashire.
BIRKIN English
The surname "Birkin" comes from a village in Yorkshire of the same name, first recorded as "Byrcene" in the Yorkshire charters of 1030, and as "Berchine" and "Berchinge" in the Domesday Book. The first known person with the surname "Birkin" was Jon de Birkin, a baron who lived in the late-11th century.
BIRKS English
Northern English variant of Birch.
BIRNEY English
Scottish: habitational name from a place in Morayshire, recorded in the 13th century as Brennach, probably from Gaelic braonach 'damp place'.
BISBEE English
Named after the city of Bisbee which is in Arizona.... [more]
BISBY Medieval Scottish, Medieval English, English (British), Scottish, English (Australian), Anglo-Norman
Either originating from the village Busby in historic county East Renfrewshire in Scotland, or Great Busby in Yorkshire. The place name is likely derived from the Norman buki, "shrub". See also Busby.
BITTERMAN English, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BIZZELL English
a corn merchant; one who made vessels designed to hold or measure out a bushel.
BJORKLUND English (American)
Anglicized form of Swedish Björklund or Norwegian Bjørklund.
BLACKERBY English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLACKMORE English
BLACKMORE, an English name, has two possible beginnings: ... [more]
BLACKSMITH English, Welsh, Scottish
This last name is an occupation last name. A "blacksmith" means a person who makes and repairs things in iron by hand.
BLACKSTOCK English
English and southern Scottish: topographic name from Middle English blak(e) ‘black’, ‘dark’ + stok ‘stump’, ‘stock’.
BLACKWELL English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cumbria, Derbyshire, County Durham, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire, named Blackwell, from Old English blæc "black, dark" and wæll(a), well(a) "spring, stream".
BLADE English
Metonymic occupational name for a cutler, from Middle English blade "cutting edge, sword".
BLAIN Scottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLAIRE Scottish, English
Variant spelling of Blair.
BLAKEWAY English
Literally means "black way", thus referring to a black road near which the original bearer must have lived. A famous bearer of this surname was Jacob Blakeway (b. 1583-?), the biological father of Mayflower passenger Richard More (1614-1696).
BLANCHFLOWER English
From a medieval nickname applied probably to an effeminate man (from Old French blanche flour "white flower"). This surname was borne by Northern Irish footballer Danny Blanchflower (1926-1993).
BLAND English
Bland is a habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire called Bland, the origin of which is uncertain. Possibly it is from Old English (ge)bland ‘storm’, ‘commotion’ (from blandan ‘to blend or mingle’), with reference to its exposed situation... [more]
BLANDFORD English
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
BLANKENSHIP English
Variant of Blenkinsop, a surname derived from a place in Northumberland called Blenkinsopp. The place name possibly derives from Cumbric blaen "top" and kein "back, ridge", i.e. "top of the ridge", combined with Old English hōp "valley" (compare Hope).
BLAXTON English
There are two possible origins for this surname; one- from the name of the village in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England) on the border of Lincolnshire, or two- from the Old English personal name Blaecstan, meaning "black stone"
BLAYLOCK English
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
BLAZE English
Variant of Blaise.
BLEDSOE English
Comes from a place in Gloucestershire called Bledisloe, comes from an Old English personal name Blið.
BLENNERHASSETT English
The Blennerhassett surname comes from someone having lived in Cumberland, on the Borderlands between Scotland and England. ... [more]
BLESSED English
From a medieval nickname for a fortunate person. This surname is borne by British actor Brian Blessed (1936-).
BLEWETT English
From a medieval nickname for a blue-eyed person or one who habitually wore blue clothing (from Middle English bleuet "cornflower" or bluet "blue cloth").
BLISSETT English
A different form of Blessed. A bearer of this surname is Luther Blissett (1958-), a Jamaican-born English footballer ("Luther Blissett" has been used since 1994 as a cover name for activists engaging in anti-cultural establishment polemics and spoofs on the internet and elsewhere).
BLIZZARD English
A different form (influenced by blizzard "heavy snowstorm") of Blissett.
BLOOD English
Evidently from Old English blod ‘blood’, but with what significance is not clear. In Middle English the word was in use as a metonymic occupational term for a physician, i.e. one who lets blood, and also as an affectionate term of address for a blood relative.
BLOOD English
Derived from the Old English byname Blīþa (meaning "happy, blithe").
BLOODGOOD English (American), Dutch (Americanized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Bloetgoet. The progenitor of the American Bloodgood family was Francis Bloodgood, a 17th-century Dutch emigrant to Flushing, Queens, New York, originally named Frans Jansen Bloetgoet.
BLOODSWORTH English
Variant spelling of Bloodworth. At the time of the British Census of 1881, its relative frequency was highest in Nottinghamshire (5.1 times the British average), followed by Lancashire, Derbyshire, Surrey, County Durham and London.
BLOOM English
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
BLOOMFIELD English
This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational name from either of the two places thus called in England, one in Staffordshire, and the other in Somerset, or it may be a dialectal variant of Blonville (-sur-Mer) in Calvados, Normandy, and hence a Norman habitation name... [more]
BLOUNT English
Variant of Blunt.
BLOW English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a pale complexion (from Middle English blowe "pale"). This surname was borne by English composer John Blow (1649-1708) and British fashion editor Isabella Blow (original name Isabella Delves Broughton; 1958-2007); additionally, "Joe Blow" is a name used colloquially (in US, Canadian and Australian English) as representative of the ordinary uncomplicated unsophisticated man, the average man in the street (of which the equivalent in British English is "Joe Bloggs").
BLUFORD English, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
BLUME German, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
BLUNT English
From the Old French word blund which means "blonde, fair". It also coincides with the Middle English word blunt or blont meaning "dull". A famous bearer is Emily Blunt, a British actress.
BOATFIELD English
Occupational name for a person who worked on the deck of a ship.
BOCK German, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BODEN English
Possibly a variant of BALDWIN.
BODIN French, English
Derived from Old French personal name BODIN or a variant spelling of BAUDOUIN.
BODKIN English
From the medieval male personal name Bowdekyn, a pet-form of Baldwin.
BOEING English (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of German Böing. This was the surname of American industrialist William Boeing (1881-1956) who founded The Boeing Company, a manufacturer of airplanes.
BOEKHOUT English
Probably a habitational name from the village Boekhoute in northern Belgium, close to the border to The Netherlands.
BOHART English (Rare)
Meaning unknown.
BOLD German, English
English: nickname from Middle English bold ‘courageous’, ‘daring’ (Old English b(e)ald, cognate with Old High German bald). In some cases it may derive from an Old English personal name (see Bald)... [more]
BOLDING English, German
Patronymic from Bold as a personal name.
BOLEN English
Variant of BULLEN.
BOLEYN English
Franciscanized form of "Bullens", a Dutch surname meaning "son of Baldo (meaning "strong")".
BOLLARD English, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BOLT English
From Middle English bolt meaning "bolt", "bar" (Old English bolt meaning "arrow’). In part this may have originated as a nickname or byname for a short but powerfully built person, in part as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of bolts... [more]
BOMENGEN English (American), Norwegian (Rare)
Name created from during immigration from Norway to the United States in either the late 19th or early 20th century meaning, "The farm with the big gate."
BONDE English
Variant of BOND.
BONES English
Derives from bon, "good" in Old French.
BONSALL English (British)
This is a locational name which originally derived from the village of Bonsall, near Matlock in Derbyshire. The name is Norse-Viking, pre 10th Century and translates as 'Beorns-Halh' - with 'Beorn' being a personal name meaning 'Hero' and 'Halh' a piece of cultivated land - a farm.
BOOK English (British, Anglicized)
Likely an anglicized form of Buch or Buck.
BOOKER English
English occupational surname meaning "maker of books."
BOORMAN English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived in a particularly noteworthy or conspicuous cottage, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bur", bower, cottage, inner room, with "mann", man, or a locational name from any of the various places called Bower(s) in Somerset and Essex, which appear variously as "Bur, Bure" and "Bura" in the Domesday Book of 1086... [more]
BOOT English, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTHROYD English
Possibly from the Old English booth meaning "hut, shack" and royd meaning "clearing (in the woods)".
BOOTS English, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BORCHERT German, English
Variant of Borchardt (see BURKHARD).
BORECKI English
Habitational name for someone from a place called Borek or Borki, from bór "pine forest".
BORMAN Dutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNE English, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BOSLEY English
English habitation surname derived from the Old English personal name Bosa and the Old English leah "clearing, field". It's also possibly a variant of the French surname Beausoleil meaning "beautiful sun" from the French beau 'beautiful, fair' and soleil 'sun'... [more]
BOSS English
From an originally French term meaning "hunchback".
BOSTON English
Habitational name from the town Boston in Lincolnshire, England. The name means "Botwulf’s stone".... [more]
BOSTWICK English
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
BOTTING English, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOUDREAU English
English variant of French Beaudreau.
BOWDEN English
Habitational name from any of several places called Bowden or Bowdon, most of them in England. From Old English boga "bow" and dun "hill", or from Old English personal names BUGA or BUCGE combined with dun.... [more]
BOWDLER Flemish, English
Originally de Boelare it evolved to Bowdler or Bowdle after Baldwin de Boelare came to England in 1105 & was given a lordship over Montgomery, Wales.
BOWE Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWER English, Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a bow maker, Older Scots bowar, equivalent to English Bowyer. ... [more]
BOWERMAN English, American
1. English: occupational name for a house servant who attended his master in his private quarters (see Bower). ... [more]
BOWERSOCK English
Likely an Americanized spelling of Bauersack.
BOWSER English
Nickname from the Norman term of address beu sire ‘fine sir’, given either to a fine gentleman or to someone who made frequent use of this term of address.
BOWSKILL English
From the place name Bowscale.
BOWYER English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of bows (see Bow), as opposed to an archer. Compare Bowman.
BOYE English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin. Also possibly a variant of Bothe.
BRADSHAW English
Habitational name from any of the places called Bradshaw, for example in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, from Old English brad "broad" + sceaga "thicket".
BRAGG English, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRAGUE English
Began being used in the 1700's
BRAITHWAITE English
Northern English habitational name from any of the places in Cumbria and Yorkshire named Braithwaite, from Old Norse breiðr "broad" + þveit "clearing".
BRAMBLE English
This surname is taken from the word which refers to a common blackberry (British) or any of several closely related thorny plants in the Rubus genus (US). It also refers to any thorny shrub. The word is derived from Old English bræmbel with a euphonic -b- inserted from the earlier bræmel or brémel, which is then derived from Proto-Germanic *bræmaz meaning "thorny bush."
BRANNER Danish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
BRASS English, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRATHWAITE English
Place-name derived from the Old Norse words for a "broad clearing".
BRAUNERSHRITHER German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRAYSON English
Patronymic form of the surname Bray.
BRAYTON English
Derived from the Old Norse name breithr meaning "broad", or the Old Norse personal name Breithi, combined with the Old English suffix tun meaning "town, farmstead".
BRAZIL English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREAKSPEAR English
From a medieval nickname for someone who had achieved notable success in jousts or in battle. Nicholas Breakspear (?1100-1159) was the original name of Pope Hadrian IV, the only English pope.
BREECE English
Variant of BREESE or PREECE.
BREED English
Habitational name from any of various minor places, for example Brede in Sussex, named with Old English brǣdu "breadth, broad place" (a derivative of brād "broad").
BREEDLOVE English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a likable or popular person (from Middle English breden "to produce" + love). This surname is borne by Craig Breedlove (1937-), US land-speed record holder.
BRESSER English
The surname is derived from the old English word brasian, meaning to make out of brass. This would indicate that the original bearer of the name was a brass founder by trade. The name is also derived from the old English Broesian which means to cast in brass and is the occupational name for a worker in brass.
BRETON French, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BREYETTE English (American)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. First found in the United States around 1880. Self-taught artist Michael Breyette is a bearer of this surname
BRIAN Irish, English, French
1) Variant spelling of Bryan. ... [more]
BRICK Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRIDE Irish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRIDGE English
Indicating one who lived near a bridge.
BRIDGES English, Scottish
Plural of "Bridge"; dweller at the bridge.
BRIGGS English, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BRIGHT English
From a Middle English nickname or personal name, meaning "bright, fair, pretty", from Old English beorht "bright, shining".
BRIGHTWEN English
From either of the two Old English given names Beohrtwine (a masculine name which meant "bright friend") or Beohrtwynn (a feminine name which meant "bright joy").
BRINDLEY English
Habitational name from a place in England so named. From Old English berned "burnt" and leah "woodland clearing".
BRINSON English
Habitational name from Briençun in northern France.
BRINTON English
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
BRITNELL English
Habitational name from a place called Brinton in Norfolk, England. See BRINTON.
BRODERICK Irish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROGDEN English
From the name of a place in West Yorkshire meaning "valley brook", from Old English broc "brook" and denu "valley".
BROGDON English
Variant of Brogden The valley of the brook a rural place now in Lancanshire, England.
BROLIN English (Anglicized, Rare)
In the case of American actors James and Josh Brolin, it seems to be an anglicized form of BRUDERLIN.
BROMLEY English
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. Most of them derived from Old English brom "broom" and leah "woodland clearing".
BRONNI English (British)
The name Bronni means 'bronze', 'love heart' or 'cat lover'.... [more]
BROOKER English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, a variant of BROOK.
BROOKHOUSE English
Means 'house by the brook'.
BROOKMAN English, American
English: variant of Brook. ... [more]
BROOMBY English
A surname well represented in Cheshire, and Nottinghamshire.
BROOMFIELD English
From a place name meaning "gorse field", from Old English brom "gorse" and feld "field, open country".
BROUGHTON English
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. The first name element is derived from Old English broc "brook", burh "fortress", or beorg "castle". The second element is derived from Old English tun "settlement, dwelling".
BROWER English (American)
English variant of Brewer. Respelling of Brauer or Brouwer.
BROWES English (Canadian, ?)
My mothers maiden name.
BROWNING English
English: from the Middle English and Old English personal name Bruning, originally a patronymic from the byname Brun (see Brown).
BROWNLEE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BROWNLEY English, Scottish
Variant spelling of "Brownlee". Brown field in Old English.
BRUCKER English
Variant spelling of BROOKER.
BRUCKMAN German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUMBY Australian (Rare), English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr ‘well’ + býr ‘farmstead’, ‘village’.
BRUNEY English
First found in Languedoc, France, possibly meaning "brown."
BRUNSWICK English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUCK English
From the given name Buck.
BUCKINGHAM English
Habitational name from the former county seat of the county of Buckinghamshire, Old English Buccingahamm "water meadow (Old English hamm) of the people of (-inga-) Bucc(a)".
BUCKLAND English
Habitational name from any of the many places in southern England (including nine in Devon) named Buckland, from Old English boc "book" and land "land", i.e. land held by right of a written charter, as opposed to folcland, land held by right of custom.
BUCKMAN English
Occupational name for a goatherd (Middle English bukkeman) or scholar (Old English bucman "book man"). It could also be a shortened form of BUCKINGHAM or a variant of BUCKNAM.
BUCKS English
Variant of "Buck"; a deer.
BUCKSON English
Either a patronymic from Buck, or possibly an altered form of Buxton.
BUCKWALTER English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Buchwalder.
BUCSIS English (Canadian)
Perhaps of Hungarian origin, but the original surname is not known.
BUDD English
Originated from the Old English personal name Budda, from the word budda, which means "beetle" or "to swell." Specifically of Celtic Welsh origin.
BUDGE English
Nickname from Norman French buge "mouth" (Late Latin bucca), applied either to someone with a large or misshapen mouth or to someone who made excessive use of his mouth, i.e. a garrulous, indiscreet, or gluttonous person... [more]
BUELTER German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
BUFFORD English
Meaning unknown.