English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Atwell English
Topographic name from Middle English atte welle "by the spring or stream"
Atzerodt English, German
This was the surname of George Atzerodt, a conspirator in a plot to kidnap Abraham Lincoln.
Auden English
This surname is derived from the Germanic given name Aldwin, of which the Old English equivalent is Ealdwine... [more]
Audish English (British)
Audish was first found in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Lincolnshire in the south of England, people who had the surname 'Audish' were wealthy landowners, thus held in high esteem.
August English
From the given name August.
Augustus English
Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase".
Aulcy English
English surname, of unknown meaning.
Ault English
Variant of Old.
Aus English
Variant spelling of Scandinavian Aas.
Ausage Samoan, English (Australian), American
Possibly from the given name Ausage.
Ausley English (Modern)
Rare surname which was from an English place name in which the second element is Old English leah "wood, clearing". The first element may be hors "horse" (in which case the name likely referred to a place where horses were put out to pasture) or the river name Ouse (ultimately from the ancient British root ud- "water").
Austen English
A variant of the surname Austin. This exact spelling is also on the first name site.
Austinson English
Means "son of Austin".
Autry English, French
A habitational name from any of the places in France named Autrey or Autry. French: from the Old French personal name Audry, from Germanic Aldric ‘ancient power’.
Avalon English
Means "island of apples".
Aveley English
From the Flemish, Evely; from the Dutch, Evelein; in the Domesday Book, Avelin; a personal name.
Aven Scandinavian, English, German, Dutch, French (Anglicized)
Scandinavian: unexplained.... [more]
Aves English
Derived from the given name Avice.
Axe English
Locational surname which describes one who lived by the Axe Rivers in Somerset or Dorset.
Axels English
Derived from the given name Axel.
Axelson English
Means "son of Axel".
Axford English
Derived from Axford, which is the name of two villages in England (one is located in the county of Hampshire, the other in Wiltshire). Both villages derive their name from Old English æsc(e) "ash tree(s)" and Old English ford "ford", which gives their name the meaning of "ford by the ash trees" or "a ford with ash trees"... [more]
Ayden English, Scottish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
Aykroyd English
Variant of Ackroyd. A famous bearer is Canadian actor and comedian Dan Aykroyd (1952-).
Aylen English
Either derived from the given name Alan or from the Old English word ætheling which were princes eligible to be king. The word ætheling was sometimes used as a given name
Ayler English
occupational name from Old French aillier ‘garlic seller’, from ail ‘garlic’ (from Latin allium).... [more]
Aylesworth English
It was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Kineton.... [more]
Ayliff English
From the medieval female personal name Ayleve (from Old English Æthelgifu, literally "noble gift"), or from the Old Norse nickname Eilífr, literally "ever-life".
Ayre English
Variant of Eyre
Ayres English
Variant of Ayers.
Azalea English, Indonesian, Various
From the name of the flower (see Azalea). A notable bearer is Australian rapper Amethyst Amelia Kelly, who's better known by her stage name Iggy Azalea.
Babbs English (Rare)
A matronymic of Barbara.
Babington English
Habitational name for someone from Babington in Somerset or Great or Little Bavington in Northumberland, named with the Old English personal name Babba + the connective particle -ing- meaning "associated with", "named after" + tūn meaning "settlement".
Bacca English
Origin: English (Norman origin).... [more]
Bacca English
Origin: English (Norman origin).... [more]
Bacchus English
(i) Variant of Backus (meaning "one who lives in or works in a bakery", from Old English bǣchūs "bakehouse, bakery"), the spelling influenced by Bacchus (name of the Greek and Roman god of wine).... [more]
Backhurst English (British)
Meaning bake house or wood cutter
Backman English, Swedish, German
Combination of Old English bakke "spine, back" and man "man". In Swedish, the first element is more likely to be derived from Swedish backe "hill", and in German the first element can be derived from German backen "to bake"... [more]
Bacon English, French, Norman
An occupational surname for someone who sold pork, from Middle English and Old French bacun or bacon, meaning 'bacon', which is ultimately of Germanic origin. Can also be derived from the Germanic given names Baco, Bacco, or Bahho, from the root bag-, meaning 'to fight'... [more]
Baddeley English
From place names in both Suffolk and Staffordshire derived from an Old English personal name, 'Badda,' possibly meaning "battle" and lee or leah for a "woodland clearing," therefore meaning someone from "Badda's woodland clearing."
Bade English
From the Old English personal name Bada which possibly a short form of various names with the first element being the Old English beadu "battle". It could also be a short form of a Germanic personal name composed with badu "strife", or from an occupational North German surname from the Middle Low German bade "messenger".
Badrinette English
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
Baggerly English
English: variant of Bagley .
Bagnall English
From a place in England, derived from the Old English name "Badeca", a short form of any name beginning from beadu "battle", and halh "nook, recess".
Bagshaw English
Derived from the village in Derbyshire called Bagshaw
Bails English
Indicated that the bearer lived outside the walls of a feudal castle, from the Old French baile, refering to the structure
Baily English
Variant of Bailey.
Bain Scottish, French, English
Nickname for a hospitable person from northern Middle English beyn, bayn meaning "welcoming", "friendly".... [more]
Bainbridge English
from Bainbridge in North Yorkshire, named for the Bain river on which it stands (which is named with Old Norse beinn ‘straight’) + bridge.
Bainebridge English, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
Bairnsfather English
From a medieval nickname in Scotland and northern England for the (alleged) father of an illegitimate child (from northern Middle English bairnes "child's" + father). This surname was borne by British cartoonist and author Bruce Bairnsfather (1888-1959).
Bake English
Probably an occupational name for a baker.
Balcom English
Altered spelling of English Balcombe, a habitational name from Balcombe in West Sussex, which is named with Old English bealu "evil, calamity" (or the Old English personal name Bealda) combined with cumb "valley".
Baldock English (Rare)
Means "person from Baldock", Hertfordshire ("Baghdad": in the Middle Ages the lords of the manor were the Knights Templar, whose headquarters were in Jerusalem, and they named the town Baldac, the Old French name for Baghdad).
Baldy English
Possibly derived from an Old English feminine given name, *Bealdgýð, composed of the elements beald "bold" and gyð "battle", first recorded c.1170 as Baldith, and in other cases from the Old Norse byname or given name Baldi.
Bale English
Variant of Bail. This is the surname of Welsh footballer Gareth Bale.
Balen English
English surname, perhaps of Cornish British origin, from belen, meaning "mill."
Ballard English
English and Scottish: derogatory nickname from a derivative of bald ‘bald-headed’ (see also Bald).
Ballaster English
Meant "person who makes or is armed with a crossbow" (from a derivative of Middle English baleste "crossbow", from Old French).
Balston English
From the name of a place meaning "Beald's valley" from Old English denu meaning valley.
Baltimore English (American)
From the name of the American city of Baltimore, and an anglicisation of Irish Gaelic Baile an Tí Mhóir meaning "town of the big house".
Bamborough English
Bamborough name origin from early Northumberland early times other name know from the Bamborough is bamburgh as in bamburgh castle, ... [more]
Bane English
Variant of Bain.
Bangs English
Variant of Banks
Bankston English
Derived from the old English world "Banke" usually given to a family who lived near a hill or a slope.
Banksy English, Popular Culture
This is pseudonyms Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter. Banksy's real name might be Robin Gunningham. How Banksy got his pseudonym is unknown... [more]
Banwell English
Means "person from Banwell", Somerset ("killer spring (perhaps alluding to a contaminated water source)").
Baptist German, English
From the given name Baptist, or an Anglicized form of Baptiste.
Barbour English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Occupational name for a barber, one who cuts hair for a living.
Barclay Scottish, English
Habitational name of English origin, from Berkeley in Gloucestershire, named in Old English with be(o)rc "birch" and lēah "woodland clearing".
Barcroft English
English habitational name from for example Barcroft in Haworth, West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bere (barley) and croft (smallholding).
Bardell English
Originally meant "person from Bardwell", Suffolk ("Bearda's spring"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Bardell, Mr Pickwick's widowed landlady in Charles Dickens's 'Pickwick Papers' (1837), who misconstrues an innocent remark about having a companion as a marriage proposal, which leads to her suing Pickwick for breach of promise.
Barden English
English: habitational name from places in North and West Yorkshire named Barden, from Old English bere ‘barley’ (or the derived adjective beren) + denu ‘valley’.
Barefoot English
English: nickname for someone who was in the habit of going about his business unshod, from Old English bær ‘bare’, ‘naked’ + fot ‘foot’. It may have referred to a peasant unable to afford even the simplest type of footwear, or to someone who went barefoot as a religious penance.In some instances, probably a translation of German Barfuss, the northern form Barfoth, or the Danish cognate Barfo(e)d.
Barfield English
Dweller at the boar-field.
Barham English
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, are named with Old English beorg ‘hill’ + ham ‘homestead’. The one in Kent, however, is from an unattested Old English byname Biora, Beora (a derivative of bera ‘bear’) + ham.
Barker English
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
Barkis English
Meant "person who works in a tannery" (from Middle English barkhous "tannery" - bark was used in the tanning process). A fictional bearer is Barkis, a carrier in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849) who sends a message via David to Clara Peggotty that "Barkis is willin'" (i.e. to marry her).
Barkus English
Probably a reduced form of Barkhouse, a topographic name for someone who lived by a tannery, Middle English barkhous, or an occupational name for someone who worked in one.
Barnaby English
Either (i) means "person from Barnaby", Yorkshire ("Beornwald's settlement"); or (ii) from the medieval male personal name Barnaby, the English form of Barnabas, a biblical name ultimately from Aramaic Barnabia "son of Nabia".
Barnal English
Variant of Bernal.
Barner English
Southern English habitational name for someone who lived by a barn.
Barnette English, French (?)
Variant of Bernet and perhaps also a variant of English Barnett, under French influence.
Barney English
It probably came from the given name Barney, if nothing else.
Baron English, French
From a title of nobility derived from Old French baron of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly from Frankish barō meaning "servant, man, warrior". It was used as a nickname for someone who worked for a baron or for a peasant with ideas above their station.
Barq English
Ever drank Barq's root beer?
Barrick English
Variation of Barwick.
Barrington English, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
Barron English
Variant of Baron.
Barrow English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Old English bearo, bearu "grove" or from Barrow in Furness, Cumbria, which is named with an unattested Celtic word, barr, here meaning "promontory", and Old Norse ey "island"... [more]
Barrowman English
A man employed in wheeling a barrow; specifically, in coal-mining, one who conveys the coal in a wheelbarrow from the point where it is mined to the trolleyway or tramway on which it is carried to the place where it is raised to the surface.
Barsby English
Derived from the Old Norse word barn, which occured as a byname and meant "child", and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement"
Bartholomew English
From a medieval personal name, Latin Bart(h)olomaeus, from the Aramaic patronymic bar-Talmay "son of Talmay", meaning "having many furrows", i.e. rich in land. This was an extremely popular personal name in Christian Europe, with innumerable vernacular derivatives... [more]
Barthorpe English
This surname originates from the village of the same name in the East Riding of Yorkshire, likely combining the Old Norse personal name Bǫrkr with Old Norse þorp meaning "village."
Bartlett English
From the Middle English personal name Bartelot, a pet form of Bartholomew.
Bartley English, American
1. English: habitational name from Bartley in Hampshire, or from Bartley Green in the West Midlands, both of which are named with Old English be(o)rc ‘birch’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’; compare Barclay... [more]
Bartman English
Last name Bartman is very rare but I believe it’s a English last name .Possibly variant of the last name BAUMAN
Barwick English, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
Baskerville English
Means "bush town", from Anglo-Norman French boschet (a little bush) and ville (town).
Basom English
origin possible of saxon origin
Bassett English
From Old French bas meaning "short", low". It was either used as a nickname for a short person or someone of humble origins.
Batchelor English, Scottish
Status name for a young knight or novice at arms, deriving from Middle English and Old French bacheler (from medieval Latin baccalarius), a word of unknown ultimate origin. The word had already been extended to mean "(young) unmarried man" by the 14th century, but it is unlikely that many bearers of the surname derive from the word in that sense... [more]
Bateman English, Scottish
Occupational name meaning ‘servant of Bartholomew.’
Batey English (?)
Originates from mostly northern England. Is the presumed given name to fishers. (With it meaning "Small fishing boat" in old English.)
Bathgate Scottish, English
From the town of Bathgate, west of Edinburgh, Scotland. The town's name derives from Cumbric *beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and *gaith. meaning 'wood' (Welsh coed).
Batt English
This is patronymic form of the medieval personal name "Batte", meaning "son of Batte", ... [more]
Battye English (British)
A surname common in parts of Yorkshire. Meaning unknown.
Baucom English
Variant spelling of BALCOMBE, a habitational name from West Sussex derived from Old English bealu "evil" and cumb "valley".
Bax English
Possibly a short form of Baxter, or maybe from the Anglo-Saxon word box, referring to the box tree.
Baxendale English
Habitational name, probably an altered form of Baxenden, a place near Accrington, which is named with an unattested Old English word bæcstān meaning "bakestone" (a flat stone on which bread was baked) + denu meaning "valley"... [more]
Baxley English
Variant of Bexley.
Bay English
From the Middle English given name Baye.
Bay English, French, Dutch
Derived from Middle English and Old French bay, bai and Middle Dutch bay, all meaning "reddish brown". It was originally a nickname for someone with a hair color similar to that.
Bayley English
Variant of Bailey.
Baylis English
Derived from the Middle English 'bail(l)i', a development of the Old French 'baillis'. In Scotland the word survives as 'bailie', the title of a chief magistrate for a part of a county or barony. The word survives in England as 'bailiff', an officer who serves writs and summonses for the court.
Baylor English
Possibly derived from the legal term bailor "one who delivers goods". It could also be a respelling of German name BEILER, an occupational name for an inspector of measures or a maker of measuring sticks... [more]
Beaber English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Bieber or Biber, from Middle High German biber ‘beaver’, hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal in some way, a topographic name for someone who lived in a place frequented by beavers or by a field named with this word, or a habitational name from any of various place names in Hesse containing this element.
Beach English
Name for someone living near a beach, stream, or beech tree.
Beachem English, African American
Variant of Beauchamp, reflecting its traditional English pronunciation.
Beacher English
Means "near the beech trees".
Beachum English (American)
Variant of Beauchamp, reflecting the traditional English pronunciation.
Beakley English
The surname Beakley is a nickname for a person with a prominent nose. Looking back further, we find the name Beakley was originally from the Old English word beke or the Old French word bec, each of which referred to the beak of a bird.
Beall English
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Beal.
Beals English
English: patronymic from Beal.
Beam English
From Old English beam "beam" or "post". It could be a topographic name from someone living near a post or tree, or it could be a metonymic occupational name for a weaver.... [more]
Beaman English
A beekeeper.
Bear English
From the Middle English nickname Bere meaning "bear" (Old English bera, which is also found as a byname), or possibly from a personal name derived from a short form of the various Germanic compound names with this first element... [more]
Bearcub English (American, Rare)
Surname meaning a bear cub.
Beard English (American)
Nickname for a bearded man (Middle English, Old English beard). To be clean-shaven was the norm in non-Jewish communities in northwestern Europe from the 12th to the 16th century, the crucial period for surname formation... [more]
Bearden English
English habitational name, a variant of Barden, or from places in Devon and Cornwall called Beardon.
Beardmore English
A habitational name from a lost place (probably in the county of Staffordshire in the West Midlands of England, where the surname is particularly common).
Bearn English
An old English name meaning "Son"
Beas English
Varient spelling of the surname Bees.
Beaton English
As an English surname, it is derived from either the French town of Béthune, or from the medieval diminutive Beaton, short for Bartholomew or Beatrice... [more]
Beauchamp English, French
From the name of various places in France, for example in Manche and Somme, which was derived from Old French beu, bel meaning "fair, lovely" and champ, champs "field, plain".
Beauford English
Variation of Buford. It is derived from the French word "beau", meaning "beautiful", and "ford", an Old English word meaning "river crossing".
Beaufoy French (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Beaufay. Known bearers of this surname include the English astronomer and physicist Mark Beaufoy (1764-1827) and the British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (b... [more]
Beauvoir English
From the surname of Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
Bechet English
A famous bearer of this surname was Sidney Bechet (1897–1959), an American jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer.
Becker English
Occupational name for a maker or user of mattocks or pickaxes, from an agent derivative of Old English becca "mattock".
Beckett English
An Old English name simply meaning "beehive". Famous Irish playwrite Samuel Beckett bears this name.
Beckley English
This surname was taken from an English habitational name from any of the various places, in Kent, Oxfordshire, and Sussex, named Beckley whose name was derived from the Old English byname Becca and the Old English lēah "woodland clearing".... [more]
Beckson English (British)
The name comes from having lived in an enclosed place, means dweller at the old enclosure or dwelling. The surname Aldeman was first found in Essex, Suffolk and Yorkshire at Aldham. In all cases, the place name meant "the old homestead," or "homestead of a man called Ealda," from the Old English personal name + "ham."
Beckwith English (African)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Beckwith, from Old English bece "beech" + Old Norse viðr "wood" (replacing the cognate Old English wudu).
Becraft English (American)
English, variant of Beecroft. topographic name for someone who lived at a place where bees were kept, from Middle English bee ‘bee’ + croft ‘paddock’, ‘smallholding’.
Beddall English (British, ?)
According to the Forebears website: ... [more]
Bedell English
This place name derives from the Old English words byde, meaning "tub," and "well," meaning a "spring," or "stream." As such, Bedell is classed as a habitational name.
Bedford English
From the English county Bedfordshire and its principal city or from a small community in Lancashire with the same name. The name comes from the Old English personal name Beda, a form of the name Bede and the location element -ford meaning "a crossing at a waterway." Therefore the name indicates a water crossing once associated with a bearer of the medieval name.
Bedwell English
Derived from the town of Bidwell, Hertfordshire, England, from Old English words "Byde", which meant tub, and "Well", meaning fountain or spring.The surname is classified as a habitational name. The name Bedwell is most common in Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire, England, and the state of Indiana in the USA.
Bedworth English
An English habitational surname from a place so named near Nuneaton, in Warwickshire, derived most likely from the Old English personal name Baeda (see Bede), suffixed with worþ, 'enclosure', denoting an enclosed area of land belonging to Baeda.
Bee English
From Middle English be meaning "bee", Old English beo, hence a nickname for an energetic or active person or a metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper.
Beech English
Dweller at the beech tree.
Beeden English (British)
Probably means "from Beeden", a village near Newbury in Berkshire. Ultimately coming from either Old English byden, meaning "shallow valley", or from the pre 7th century personal name Bucge with the suffix dun, meaning "hill of Bucge".
Beeler English
Anglicized spelling of German BIEHLER.
Beer English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
Beerbrewer English
Means Brewer of Beer.
Beihl English, German
Variant of BIEHL, a short form of BIEHLER.
Belgrave English
Aristocratic surname from French, meaning "beautiful grove"; comes from a place name in Leicestershire. A famous namesake is British polar explorer Belgrave Ninnis, who perished in Antarctica on a 1912 expedition.
Belladonna English (Rare), Popular Culture
Named after an extremely poisonous plant (Atropa belladonna; also known as the deadly nightshade). One fictional bearer of this surname is Blake Belladonna, a main character from the popular web series RWBY.
Belle English
Possibly a variant of Bell 1 or Bell 2.
Bellers English
Name came from the son of a French Noble born in Leicestershire, England. Hamon Bellers took his last name after the Kirby Bellers (Bellars) which was the name of the land given to him by his father.
Bellingham English
Habitational name from places called Bellingham.
Bellman English
Occupational name for someone who worked as a bell-ringer.
Bellman Swedish, English
Swedish and English form of Bellmann. A notable bearer was Swedish composer, poet and entertainer Carl Michael Bellman (1740-1795).
Bellringer English (British, Rare)
Occupational name for a person who rung bells (usually a church bell).
Belmont English
English surname of Norman origin, a variant of the surname Beaumont, which was derived from place names meaning "lovely hill" in Old French (from beu, bel "fair, lovely" and mont "hill").
Benedict English
Of Latin origin. Due to an early association as a saint's name and a papal name, often said to mean "blessed." Originally the Latin elements are 'bene-' meaning "good" or as an adverb "well" plus '-dict,' meaning "spoken." Thus, the literal meaning is "well spoken." ... [more]
Benedictson English
English surname meaning "Son of Benedict"
Bengtson English, Swedish
Variant of the Swedish surname Bengtsson.
Benjamin English
From the given name Benjamin
Bennettson English
Means 'Son of Bennett'.
Benningfield English, Anglo-Saxon
Benningfield is believed to be either ... [more]
Bensen English
Related to Benson, meaning "Son of Ben"
Bentham English
Habitational name from any of various places named Bentham, from Old English beonet "bent grass" + ham "homestead" or hamm "enclosure hemmed in by water".
Beollan English, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
English: variant of Boland.... [more]
Beresford English
English: habitational name from a place in the parish of Alstonfield, Staffordshire named Beresford, from Old English beofor ‘beaver’ (or possibly from a byname from this word) + Old English ford ‘ford’... [more]