English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HAILES Scottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
HAINEY Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish, English
(Celtic) A lost me devil village in Scotland; or one who came from Hanney island in Berkshire.
HAIRFIELD English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
HAIZLIP English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish HYSLOP.
HALDON English (Rare)
From a place name in Devon, England.
HALLETT English
Derived from the given name Hallet (see ADALHARD).
HALLEY English
Location name combining the elements hall as in "large house" and lee meaning "field or clearing."
HALLIE English
Spelling variant of HALLEY.
HALLINGSWORTH English (British, Rare), English (Australian, Rare)
Unknown origin and meaning. I found it listed a few times on the 1881 census in the County Durham and in London; it is also supposedly a surname in Australia. Possibly a misspelling of HOLLINGSWORTH.
HALLIWELL English
Northern English (Lancashire) habitational name from a place near Manchester called Halliwell, from Old English halig ‘holy’ + well(a) ‘well’, ‘spring’, or from any of the numerous other places named with these elements (see Hollowell).
HALLMARK English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
HALLOW English
English: topographic name from Middle English hal(l)owes ‘nooks’, ‘hollows’, from Old English halh (see HALE). In some cases the name may be genitive, rather than plural, in form, with the sense ‘relative or servant of the dweller in the nook’.
HALLOWELL English
The ancestors of the name Hallowell date back to the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the Hallowell family lived near a holy spring having derived from the Old English terms halli, which meant "holy", and welle, which meant "spring".
HALLWELL English
Related to Halliwell, this surname means "Lives by the Holy Spring"
HALPRIN English
Halprin is the last name of the main character the book called Ashfall by Mike Mullin.
HALVERSON English
Anglicized form of Norwegian or Danish HALVORSEN.
HAM English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
HAMER English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
HAMES English, Welsh, Scottish
Son of "Amy", in Old English. An ancient Leicestershire surname.
HAMILL English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
HAMLIN English
From an Old English word meaning "home" or "homestead" and a diminutive suffix -lin.
HAMMER German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
HAMMERSLEY English (Modern)
From southern England. From homersley meaning homestead, that later changed to hamersley
HAMMERSMITH German, English
Normally an anglicization of German HAMMERSCHMIDT. Perhaps also from Norwegian HAMMERSMED.... [more]
HAMP English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HAMSON English
A variant of HAMPSON.
HANCE English
Allegedly a patronymic from the personal name HANN.
HANES English, Welsh
variant spelling of HAYNES.
HANKIN English
From the given name HANKIN
HANKS English
Patronymic form of HANK.
HANLIN Scottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish HANLON.
HANNAM English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
HANSARD English
occupational name for a cutler.
HAPPYGOD English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
HARBIN English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins, and is derived from the personal names Rabin, Robin, and Robert. It has the English prefix 'har', which means gray.... [more]
HARBOR English
English: variant spelling of HARBOUR.
HARBOUR English
Variant of French ARBOUR or a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from Old English herebeorg "shelter, lodging".
HARDACRE English
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of poor, stony land, from Middle English hard "hard, difficult" and aker "cultivated land" (Old English æcer), or a habitational name from Hardacre, a place in Clapham, West Yorkshire, which has this etymology.
HARDLEY English
The name comes from when a family lived in the village of Hartley which was in several English counties including Berkshire, Devon, Dorset, Kent, Lancashire, York and Northumberland. This place-name was originally derived from the Old English words hart which means a stag and lea which means a wood or clearing.
HARGREAVES English
English: variant of HARGRAVE.
HARGREEVES English
Variant of Hargreaves.
HARGROVE English
English: variant of HARGRAVE.
HARKAWAY English
From a sporting phrase used to guide and incite hunting dogs.
HARKER English (British)
English (mainly northeastern England and West Yorkshire): habitational name from either of two places in Cumbria, or from one in the parish of Halsall, near Ormskirk, Lancashire. The Cumbrian places are probably named from Middle English hart ‘male deer’ + kerr ‘marshland’... [more]
HARKLESS English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from HARKIN, a Scottish diminutive of HENRY.
HARKNESS Scottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name HERECA (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
HARLESS English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
HARLIN English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
HARMER English (British)
Meaning, of the Army or man of Armor, from the battle at Normandy, France. It was formerly a French last name Haremere after the battle at Normandy it moved on to England where it was shortened to Harmer.
HARNAGE English
Derived from the personal name AGNES
HAROLD English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name HEREWEALD, its Old Norse equivalent HARALDR, or the Continental form HEROLD introduced to Britain by the Normans... [more]
HARR English
Short form of HARRIS
HARRINGTON English
From Old English word meaning "hare town"
HARROLD Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of HAROLD.
HARROW English
Means "person from Harrow", the district of northwest Greater London, or various places of the same name in Scotland ("heathen shrine").
HARRY English
From first name HARRY.
HARTFORD English
Habitational name from Hertford, or from either of two places called Hartford, in Cheshire and Cumbria; all are named with Old English heorot ‘hart’ + ford ‘ford’.
HARTLEY English
Habitational name for someone originally from any of various locations in England named Hartley, from Old English heorot meaning "hart" or "stag, deer" and leah meaning "woodland, clearing".
HARTON English
This surname is a habitational one, denoting someone who lived in a village in County Durham or in North Yorkshire.... [more]
HARTWELL English
Habitational name from places in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Staffordshire called Hartwell, from Old English heorot ‘stag’, ‘hart’ + wella ‘spring’, ‘stream’... [more]
HARVARD English
From the Old English given name Hereweard, composed of the elements here "army" and weard "guard", which was borne by an 11th-century thane of Lincolnshire, leader of resistance to the advancing Normans... [more]
HARWOOD English, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
HASCHAK English (American)
This may be influenced from the English word hashtag, meaning number.
HASKELL English
From the Norman personal name ASCHETIL.
HASLEY English
Habitational name of uncertain origin. The surname is common in London, and may be derived from Alsa (formerly Assey) in Stanstead Mountfitchet, Essex (recorded as Alsiesheye in 1268). nother possible source is Halsway in Somerset, named from Old English hals ‘neck’ + weg ‘way’, ‘road’.
HASSALL English
Means "person from Hassall", Cheshire ("witch's corner of land").
HASTINGS English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hastings, a place in Sussex, on the south coast of England, near which the English army was defeated by the Normans in 1066. It is named from Old English H?stingas ‘people of H?sta’... [more]
HATCH English
English (mainly Hampshire and Berkshire): topographic name from Middle English hacche ‘gate’, Old English hæcc (see Hatcher). In some cases the surname is habitational, from one of the many places named with this word... [more]
HATCHER English
Southern English: topographic name for someone who lived by a gate, from Middle English hacche (Old English hæcc) + the agent suffix -er. This normally denoted a gate marking the entrance to a forest or other enclosed piece of land, sometimes a floodgate or sluice-gate.
HAUGHN English (Canadian, Modern)
Alternative/Modern form of HAHN.
HAVELOCK English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
HAVERFORD Welsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
HAWKS English
Variant of or patronymic from HAWK.
HAWLEY English, Scottish
Means "hedged meadow". It comes from the English word haw, meaning "hedge", and Saxon word leg, meaning "meadow". The first name HAWLEY has the same meaning.
HAWTHORN English, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of HAWTHORNE.
HAWTREY English (British)
It is the surname of Mr. Hawtrey from the book The Boy In The Dress, by David Walliams. Hawtrey means "To succeed".
HAY English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYCOCK English
English (West Midlands): from a medieval personal name, a pet form of HAY, formed with the Middle English hypocoristic suffix -cok (see COCKE).
HAYFORD English
English habitational name from several places called Heyford in Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire, or Hayford in Buckfastleigh, Devon, all named with Old English heg ‘hay’ + ford ‘ford’.
HAYLING English
Either (i) "person from Hayling", Hampshire ("settlement of Hægel's people"); or (ii) from the Old Welsh personal name Heilyn, literally "cup-bearer" (see also PALIN).
HAYLOCK English
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly from the Old English given name Hægluc, a diminutive of the unrecorded name *Hægel, found in various place names... [more]
HAYMES English
Patronymic derived from the Norman given name HAMO.
HAYTHORNTHWAITE English (British)
Derived from the Old English word haguthorn, which means "hawthorn". Originated in the township of Hawthorn, parish of Easington, County Durham circa 1155.
HAYWORTH English
English: habitational name from Haywards Heath in Sussex, which was named in Old English as ‘enclosure with a hedge’, from hege ‘hedge’ + worð ‘enclosure’. The modern form, with its affix, arose much later on (Mills gives an example from 1544).
HAZARD English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HAZELDEN English
Means "person from Hazelden", the name of various places in England ("valley growing with hazel trees").
HAZELTINE English
This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname from any of the various places that get their name from the Olde English pre 7th century “hoesel”, hazel and “-denut”, a valley, for example Heselden in Durham and, Hasselden in Sussex.
HAZELTON English
Hazel is referring to hazel trees, while ton is from old english tun meaning enclosure, so an enclosure of hazel trees, or an orchard of hazel trees.
HAZELWOOD English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Derbyshire, Suffolk, Surrey, and West Yorkshire, so called from Old English hæsel (or Old Norse hesli) ‘hazel (tree)’ + wudu ‘wood’; or a topographic name from this term.
HAZLETT English (British)
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hazel copse, Old English hæslett (a derivative of hæsel ‘hazel’). habitational name from Hazelhead or Hazlehead in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, derived from Old English hæsel ‘hazel’ + heafod ‘head’, here in the sense of ‘hill’; also a topographic name of similar etymological origin.
HAZZARD English
Variant spelling of HAZARD.
HEACOCK English
variant spelling of HAYCOCK
HEADLEE English (Rare)
The Anglo-Saxon name Headlee comes from when the family resided in one of a variety of similarly-named places. Headley in Hampshire is the oldest. The surname Headlee belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.
HEALEY English
Habitational surname for a person from Healey near Manchester, derived from Old English heah "high" + leah "wood", "clearing". There are various other places in northern England, such as Northumberland and Yorkshire, with the same name and etymology, and they may also have contributed to the surname.
HEARD English
Occupational name for a tender of animals, normally a cowherd or shepherd, from Middle English herde (Old English hi(e)rde).
HEART English
Variant of HART.
HEATHCOTE English
English habitational name from any of various places called Heathcote, for example in Derbyshire and Warwickshire, from Old English h?ð ‘heathland’, ‘heather’ + cot ‘cottage’, ‘dwelling’.
HEATON English
Comes from "town (or farmstead) on a hill".... [more]
HEDDLE English
Famous bearer is William Heddle Nash (1894-1961), the English lyric tenor.
HEDGE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hedge, Middle English hegg(e). In the early Middle Ages, hedges were not merely dividers between fields, but had an important defensive function when planted around a settlement or enclosure.
HELLIWELL English
From various place names in United Kingdom. Derived from Olde English elements of "halig" meaning holy, and "waella", a spring.
HELMSLEY English
This English habitational name originates with the North Yorkshire village of Helmsley, named with the Old English personal name Helm and leah, meaning 'clearing'.
HELTON English
Habitational name from Helton in Cumbria, named in Old English probably with helde "slope" and tun "farmstead, settlement", or possibly a variant of HILTON... [more]
HEMBER English
From the West Country area near Bristol.
HEMMINGS English
Derived from the given name HEMMING. It is the last name of the band member of Five Seconds of Summer (5sos), Luke Hemmings.
HEMMINGTON English
Origin uncertain, possibly derived from the given name HEMMING.
HEMSLEY English
English: habitational name from either of two places in North Yorkshire called Helmsley. The names are of different etymologies: the one near Rievaulx Abbey is from the Old English personal name Helm + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’, whereas Upper Helmsley, near York, is from the Old English personal name HEMELE + Old English eg ‘island’, and had the form Hemelsey till at least the 14th century
HEMSWORTH English
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, England, meaning "Hymel's enclosure".
HENCE German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of HENTZ derived from a German nickname for HANS or HEINRICH or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENDESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENDRYX English
This name was derived from HENDRIX and means "home ruler". This name is the 25841st most popular surname in the US.
HENGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENGSTETON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENKESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENLEY English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNE English
From a diminutive of HENRY.
HENNEBERY English (American)
A berry and an alias used by March McQuin
HENNES English
From the diminutive of HENRY.
HENNI English
A name coined by the contributor of this name, to describe himself
HENRIE English (Rare)
Derived from the given name HENRIE, a variant of HENRY.
HENSEN English, Irish
English patronymic from the personal name HENN/HENNE, a short form of HENRY, HAYNE (see Hain), or Hendy... [more]
HENSLEY English
Probably a habitational name from either of two places in Devon: Hensley in East Worlington, which is named with the Old English personal name HEAHMUND + Old English leah ‘(woodland) clearing’, or Hensleigh in Tiverton, which is named from Old English hengest ‘stallion’ (or the Old English personal name HENGEST) + leah... [more]
HENSLEY-BOOK English (British)
The surname Hensley-Book was originated in December 2013 in Bath by SAMUEL BOOK who changed his name by deed poll... [more]
HERBAUGH English (American)
Americanized form of German HARBACH.
HEREFORD English
Habitational name from Hereford in Herefordshire, or Harford in Devon and Goucestershire, all named from Old English here "army" + ford "ford".
HERITAGE English (Rare)
English status name for someone who inherited land from an ancestor, rather than by feudal gift from an overlord, from Middle English, Old French (h)eritage ‘inherited property’ (Late Latin heritagium, from heres ‘heir’).
HERNDON English
From Herne, a cottage, and den, a valley. The cottage in the valley.
HERO English
From the personal name ROBERT
HEROLD English, Dutch, German
From the given name HEROLD. This was the surname of David Herold, one of the conspirators in the Abraham Lincoln assassination plot.
HERRINGTON English
habitational name from Herrington in County Durham, England
HESTER English
This surname is derived from a given name, which is the Latin form of Esther.
HEYER English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HIBBARD English
English: variant of HILBERT.
HIBBERTS English
A variant of HIBBERT, ultimately coming from HILBERT to begin with.
HIBBS English
This possibly derived from a medieval diminutive, similar to Hobbs for Robert.
HICK English
From the medieval personal name HICKE. The substitution of H- as the initial resulted from the inability of the English to cope with the velar Norman R-.
HICKSON Irish, English
It means ‘countryman’ similar to Hickman
HIDDLESTON English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
HIELD English (British)
Olde English pre 7th Century. Topographical name meaning slope.
HIGDON English
From the personal name Hikedun.
HIGGINBOTHAM English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire now known as Oakenbottom. The history of the place name is somewhat confused, but it is probably composed of the Old English elements ǣcen or ācen "oaken" and botme "broad valley"... [more]
HIGGINS English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of HICK.
HIGGINSON English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of HICK.
HIGHLAND English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HILBERT English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HILDERSLEY English
Meadow of the hilldweller.
HILLARY English
From the given name HILLARY. A famous bearer is explorer Edmund Hillary (1919-2008)
HILLIARD English
English: from the Norman female personal name Hildiarde, HILDEGARD, composed of the Germanic elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + gard ‘fortress’, ‘stronghold’... [more]
HILLS English
Variant of HILL.
HINCKLEY English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
HIND English, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
HINDLE English
Habitational name from a place in the parish of Whalley, Lancashire, so called from the same first element + Old English hyll 'hill'.
HINDLEY English
English (Lancashire): habitational name from a place near Manchester, so named from Old English hind ‘female deer’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
HINGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HINGESTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HINGSTON English
The distribution of the Hingston surname appears to be based around the South Hams area of Devon. The English Place Name Society volumes for Devon give the best indication of the source of the name... [more]
HINTON English (Archaic)
Comes from Old English heah meaning "high" and tun meaning "enclosure" or "settlement." A notable person with the surname is female author S.E Hinton.
HINXSTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HIPKIN English
English name meaning relative of HERBERT
HISAW English
Of uncertain origin and meaning.
HISCOCK English
From a pet form of HICK.
HITCHINS English
Comes from the town Hitchin
HIX English
Variant of HICKS
HOAR English
Nickname meaning gray haired.
HOCKENHULL English
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of Tarvin, Cheshire West and Chester.
HODGE English
From the given name HODGE, a medieval diminutive of ROGER.
HODGE English
Nickname from Middle English hodge "hog", which occurs as a dialect variant of hogge, for example in Cheshire place names.
HODGSON English (British)
English patronymic form of the personal name Hodge, a pet form of Rodger. The surname in most cases originated in the North Yorskire Dales, where it is still common to the present day.
HODSEN English
Variant of HODSON.
HOERMAN English, German
Variant of HERMAN. Variant of HÖRMANN.
HOGG English
An occupational name for someone who herded swine.
HOGGATT English
A name for someone who worked as a keeper of cattle and pigs.
HOIT English
A variant of HOYT.
HOLBROOK English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLCOMB English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Greater Manchester, Oxfordshire, and Somerset, so named from Old English hol meaning "hollow", "sunken", "deep" + cumb meaning "valley".
HOLE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a depression or low-lying spot, from Old English holh "hole, hollow, depression".
HOLIDAY English
Variation of HOLLADAY.
HOLL German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLADAY English
English: from Old English haligdæg ‘holy day’, ‘religious festival’. The reasons why this word should have become a surname are not clear; probably it was used as a byname for one born on a religious festival day.
HOLLANDER German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOLLANDSWORTH English (British, Rare)
Possibly an alternative spelling of HOLLINGSWORTH. Likely named after the town of Holisurde(1000s AD)/Holinewurth(1200s)/Hollingworth(Present) The town's name means "holly enclosure"
HOLLEY English
English (chiefly Yorkshire) topographic name from Middle English holing, holi(e) ‘holly tree’. Compare Hollen.
HOLLIER English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOLLIMAN English
Possibly means "holly man"
HOLLING English
Location name for someone who lived near holly trees.
HOLLINGER English, Northern Irish, Scottish
Topographical name from Middle English holin 'holly' + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
HOLLINGSHEAD English
Habitational name from a lost place in County Durham called Hollingside or Holmside, from Old English hole(g)n "holly" and sīde "hillside, slope"; there is a Hollingside Lane on the southern outskirts of Durham city... [more]
HOLLIS English
Topographic name for someone who lived where holly trees grew.
HOLLISTER English
English: occupational name for a brothelkeeper; originally a feminine form of HOLLIER.
HOLLOBONE English
Common surname in the southeast England, predominantly Sussex
HOLLOMAN English (British)
Nickname, perhaps ironic, from Middle English holy ‘holy’ + man ‘man’.
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