English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Enfield English
Place in England. Like Uxbridge.
Engelbert German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
Englund Swedish, English
Combination of Swedish äng "meadow" and lund "grove".
Ennals English
This unusual and interesting surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from either of two Anglo-Scandinavian male given names: Ingald or Ingulf. The former derives ultimately from the Old Norse "Ingialdr", having as its initial element the divine name "Ing", borne by a minor Norse god associated with fertility, and meaning "swelling, protuberance", with "gialdr", tribute; hence, "Ing's tribute"... [more]
Ennor English
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Welsh given name Ynyr and a derivation from Jenner.
Enoch English
From the given name Enoch
Ensign English
From the military rank.
Enslie English
Variant of Ensley.
Erikson English, Swedish
Means "son of Erik". This was famously used by Icelandic explorer Leif Erikson (Old Norse: Leifr Eiríksson).
Erland English
Derived from the Swedish given name Erland.
Eroll English
From a Scottish place name.
Erpingham English
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous village in Norfolk.
Errey English
This uncommon and intriguing name is of Old Norse origin, and is found chiefly in the north western counties of England, reflecting the dense settlement of Scandinavian peoples in those areas. The surname is locational, from places such as Aira Beck or Aira Force near Ullswater in Cumberland, or some other minor or unrecorded place also named with the Old Norse term "eyrara", meaning "gravel-bank stream river”.
Ervin English (American)
meaning : little hare
Esmond English
It was a name for a person who was of "grace" or "favourable protection". The surname Esmond originally derived from the Old English word Eastmund which referred to "grace"
Essex English
From the place name Essex.
Estes Welsh, Spanish, English
a popular surname derived from the House of Este. It is also said to derive from Old English and have the meaning "of the East." As a surname, it has been traced to southern England in the region of Kent, as early as the mid-16th century.
Etcheberry Basque, English
From Basque etxe (house) and berri (new).
Etchells English (British)
This surname was a habitation name derived from the Old English word "ecels" which is roughly translated as the "dweller on a piece of land added to an estate." Alternatively, the name may have derived from the Old English word "ecan" which means "to increase."
Etherington English (British)
An Old English surname from Kent, the village of Etherington, which derives from the Old English "Ethel"red' ing (meaning people of, coming from) and "ton" a town/village.
Eubanks English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bank of yew trees, from Old English iw "yew" and bank "bank".
Eve English
Possibly from the given name Eve.
Everard English
From the given name Everard
Everest English
Surname of Norman origin, introduced into England after the Conquest of 1066, and is a locational name from "Evreux" in Eure, Normandy. The place is so called from having apparently been the capital of the "Eburovices", a Gaulish tribe.
Everingham English
Means "homestead of the followers of Eofor". From Old English eofor "boar" inga, meaning "the people of, followers of" and ham meaning "home, estate, settlement".
Evermore English
From ever + more, meaning "at all times; all the time; forever, eternally;" Replacing evermo from Old English æfre ma.
Everson English
Patronymic from the personal name Ever. See also Evers.
Everton English
Habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Merseyside, and Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English eofor ‘wild boar’ + tun ‘settlement’.
Evesham English
Derived from the Old English homme or ham and Eof, the name of a swineherd in the service of Egwin, third bishop of Worcester.
Ewbank English
Variant spelling of Eubanks.
Ewell English
Habitation name from the town of Ewell in Surrey or from Temple Ewell or Ewell Manor, both in Kent or Ewell Minnis near Dover. Originally from Old English Aewill meaning "river source" or "spring".
Eyre English
Derived from Middle English eyer, eir "heir", originally denoting a man who was designated to inherit or had already inherited the main property in a particular locality. The surname was borne by the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
Ezekiel English
From the given name Ezekiel
Fackrell English
It means woodcutter
Failor English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Failer or Fehler, variants of Feiler.
Fair English, Irish
English: nickname meaning ‘handsome’, ‘beautiful’, ‘fair’, from Middle English fair, fayr, Old English fæger. The word was also occasionally used as a personal name in Middle English, applied to both men and women.... [more]
Fairbrother English
From a medieval nickname probably meaning either "better-looking of two brothers" or "brother of a good-looking person", or perhaps in some cases "father's brother".
Fairey English
Either (i) meant "person from Fairy Farm or Fairyhall", both in Essex (Fairy perhaps "pigsty"); or (ii) from a medieval nickname meaning "beautiful eye". This was borne by Fairey Aviation, a British aircraft company, producer of the biplane fighter-bomber Fairey Swordfish... [more]
Fairfax English
From a medieval nickname for someone with beautiful hair, from Old English fæger "fair" and feax "hair". It was borne by the English general Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cameron (1612-1671), commander of the Parliamentary army during the Civil War... [more]
Fairweather English, Scottish
Nickname for a person with a sunny temperament.
Falaas English (American, Rare)
Maybe an americanized form of Falås.
Falke English
Variant of Falk
Falkner English
Variant spelling of Faulkner.
Fallow English, Jewish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of fallow land, Middle English falwe (Old English f(e)alg). This word was used to denote both land left uncultivated for a time to recover its fertility and land recently brought into cultivation.... [more]
Fambro English
Variant of English Fambrough.
Fancourt English
Derived from the English surname Fancourt, which originated in the county of Bedfordshire in England.
Fane English
From a medieval nickname for a well-disposed person (from Old English fægen "glad, willing"), or from a medieval Welsh nickname for a slim person (Welsh fain). This is the family name of the earls of Westmorland.
Fanshawe English
Meant "person from Featherstonehaugh", Northumberland (now known simply as "Featherstone") ("nook of land by the four-stones", four-stones referring to a prehistoric stone structure known technically as a "tetralith")... [more]
Fanthorpe English
Fan means "From France" and Thorpe is a Middle English word meaning "Small Village, Hamlet"
Farand English (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
Farewell English (Rare)
Means "goodbye,departing" in English.
Farman English
(i) from an Old Norse personal name denoting literally a seafarer or travelling trader, brought into English via French; (ii) "itinerant trader, pedlar", from Middle English fareman "traveller"
Farnum English
English and Irish. The origins of the Farnum name lie with England's ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It comes from when the family lived at Farnham, in several different counties including Buckinghamshire, Dorset, Essex, Suffolk, and the West Riding of Yorkshire... [more]
Farnworth English
Farnworth is a combination of two words: old-English fearn meaning "fern" and worth, making the full meaning of Farnworth "settlers from a place where ferns are abundant." The oldest known record of the surname was in Farnworth with Kearsley (modern-day Farnworth), Lancashire in 1185... [more]
Farrar English (British)
Northern English: occupational name for a smith or worker in iron, from Middle English and Old French farrour, ferour, from medieval Latin ferrator, an agent derivative of ferrare ‘to shoe horses’, from ferrum ‘iron’, in medieval Latin ‘horseshoe’... [more]
Farrimond English
From Faramund, a Norman personal name of Germanic origin.
Farrow English
Northern English: hyper-corrected form of Farrar, occupational name for a smith or worker in iron. The original -ar or -er ending of this name came to be regarded as an error, and was changed to -ow.
Farthing English
(i) "someone who lives on a 'farthing' of land" (i.e. a quarter of a larger area); (ii) from a medieval nickname based on farthing "1/4 penny", perhaps applied to someone who paid a farthing in rent; (iii) from the Old Norse male personal name Farthegn, literally "voyaging warrior"
Fastolf English
From the Old Norse male personal name Fastúlfr, literally "strong wolf". It was borne by Sir John Fastolf (1380-1459), an English soldier whose name was adapted by Shakespeare as "Falstaff".
Faucett English
Locational surname from various British places: Fawcett in Cumberland, Facit in Lancashire, Forcett in North Yorkshire, or Fa’side Castle in East Lothian, Scotland. The linguistic origins of the name arise variously from, in Cumberland and Lancashire, "multi-coloured hillside" in 7th century Old English fag or fah, "brightly coloured, variegated, flowery" with side, "slope"; in North Yorkshire from Old English ford, "ford", and sete, "house, settlement"; or, reputedly, in East Lothian, "fox on a hillside"... [more]
Fawkes English
From the Norman personal name Faulques or Fauques, which was derived from a Germanic nickname meaning literally "falcon". A famous bearer of the surname was Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), the English Catholic conspirator... [more]
Fawley English
This is a name for someone who worked as a person who worked as the fowler or the bird-catcher having derived from the Old English word "fugelere" which literally means "hunter of wild birds, fowler"... [more]
Faye French, English
Refers to one who came from Fay or Faye (meaning "beech tree") in France.
Fayre English
Variation of Fair.
Fazakerley English
Means "person from Fazakerley", Liverpool ("glade by the borderland").
Fearnley English (British)
Comes from the family having resided in a forest glade carpeted with ferns. The name Fearnley is derived from two Old English elements: fearn, the old English word for ferns, and leah, a word for a clearing in a forest.
Featherston English (British)
The name probably means feudal stone where the locals paid the lord of the manor their taxes. It probably starts spelled in the 1500's as Fetherston which is mainly when parish records began and moves though the century's to Fetherstone and then to Featherston then Featherstone, In the Doomsday book the lord of the manor of Featherstone in West Yorkshire but in both cases it was of course Fetherston was Ralph de Fetherston... [more]
Featherstonhaugh English
Indicates a person lived in or near Featherstonhaugh in Northumberland, England. From Old English feðere "feather", stān "stone", and healh "corner."
Feemster English, Scottish
Occupational name meaning "herdsman", from Middle English fee "cattle" and English master.
Fegley English
A notable bearer is Oakes Fegley, an actor.
Feinsot English
Possibly related to Feinstein.
Feldwick English (Rare)
Descendant of one who lived on a farm or field.... [more]
Felker English
The surname Felker was a patronymic surname, created from a form of the medieval personal name Philip. It was also a habitational name from a place name in Oxfordshire. Forms of the name such as de Filking(es) are found in this region from the 12th and 13th centuries.
Fell English
From Middle English fell ”high ground”, ultimately derived from Old Norse fjall, describing one who lived on a mountain.
Fell English, German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a furrier, from Middle English fell, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel, all of which mean "skin, hide, pelt". Yiddish fel refers to untanned hide, in contrast to pelts "tanned hide" (see Pilcher).
Feller English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle English fell, Middle Low German, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel "hide, pelt". See also Fell.
Fellows English
English: patronymic from Fellow, from Middle English felagh, felaw late Old English feolaga ‘partner’, ‘shareholder’ (Old Norse félagi, from fé ‘fee’, ‘money’ + legja to lay down)... [more]
Felton English
A habitation name composed of the elements feld-, meaning "field or pasture" and -tun, meaning "settlement."
Fenimore English
From a medieval nickname meaning literally "fine love" (from Old French fin amour).
Fenley English
This surname may be:... [more]
Fenner English
A surname of either Old French origin, allegedly meaning “huntsman”, or else more probably referring to those who were brought over from the Low Countries to assist in draining the “fens” or wetlands of England and Ireland – a process which lasted from the 9th to the 18th centuries.
Fenning English
Topographic name for a fen dweller, from a derivative of Old English fenn (see Fenn).
Fenway English
Meaning, "through the fens," itself meaning, "through the marsh."
Fenwick English
Means "person from Fenwick", Northumberland, Strathclyde and Yorkshire ("dairy farm in fenland"). The name is pronounced as "Fennick". It belongs to a chain of department stores, founded in Newcastle in 1882 by John Fenwick (1846-1905).
Fergus English, Scottish, Irish
From the given name Fergus.
Ferrand French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
Ferrar English
The Ferrars are the Lincolnshire branch of the noble De Ferrers family. The latter having been linked to Tamworth Castle, manors in Baddesley Clinton, Tutbury Castle and the now ruined Groby Castle as well as many other estates around the UK.... [more]
Fett English
Nickname from Old French fait, Middle English fet meaning "suitable", "comely".
Feverel English
From a Middle English form of February, probably used as a nickname either for someone born in that month or for someone with a suitably frosty demeanor. In fiction, this surname was borne by the central character of George Meredith's novel 'The Ordeal of Richard Feverel' (1859).
Fey German, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
Ffelan English
Anglisized version of the Gaelic Ó Faoláin meaning "descendent of Faolán", a given name meaning "wolf".
Ffrench English
English and Scottish:... [more]
Fiander English (British)
The Fiander surname may have it's origins in Normandy, France (possibly from the old-French "Vyandre"), but is an English (British) surname from the Dorset county region. The Fiander name can also be found in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, Canada the origins of which can be traced back to the mid-1700's in the village of Milton Abbas, Dorsetshire.
Fielder English
Southern English from Middle English felder ‘dweller by the open country’.
Fieldhouse English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a house in open pasture land. Reaney draws attention to the form de Felhouse (Staffordshire 1332), and suggests that this may have become Fellows.
Fielding English
Topographic name from an Old English felding ‘dweller in open country’.
Fieldman English
This surname most likely means, "Field Man", if it's not derived from the English words themselves.
Fifield English
Local. Has the same signification as Manorfield. Lands held in fee or fief, for which the individual pays service or owes rent.
Figgis English
From a medieval nickname for a trustworthy person (from the Anglo-Norman form of Old French fichais "loyal").
Filkins English
Means either (i) "person from Filkins", Oxfordshire ("settlement of Filica's people"); or "son of Filkin", a medieval personal name meaning literally "little Phil", from Philip.
Fillery English
From a medieval nickname derived from Anglo-Norman fitz le rei "son of the king" (see also Fitzroy), probably applied mainly (and ironically) to an illegitimate person or to someone who put on quasi-royal airs.
Fillmore English
Of uncertain origin: it could be derived from the Norman given name Filimor, composed of the Germanic elements filu ("very") and mari or meri ("famous"), or it might be a combination of the Saxon elements fille ("abundance") and mere, a word denoting a lake or otherwise humid land.
Finck English, German
From the German word for "finch" a type of bird
Fine English (?)
English nickname for a clever or elegant man, from Old French fin ‘fine’, ‘delicate’, ‘skilled’, ‘cunning’ (originally a noun from Latin finis ‘end’, ‘extremity’, ‘boundary’, later used also as an adjective in the sense ‘ultimate’, ‘excellent’).
Finger English, German, Jewish
Probably applied as a nickname for a man who had some peculiarity of the fingers, such as possessing a supernumerary one or having lost one or more of them through injury, or for someone who was small in stature or considered insignificant... [more]
Fink German, Slovene, English, Jewish
Nickname for a lively or cheerful person, Jewish ornamental name derived from the Germanic word for "finch", and German translation of Slovene Šinkovec which is from šcinkovec or šcinkavec meaning "finch".
Firman English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants Firman and Firmin... [more]
Firth English, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
Fisk English (British)
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone supposedly resembling a fish in some way, from Old Norse fiskr ‘fish’ (cognate with Old English fisc).
Fiske English, Norwegian
From the traditionally Norwegian habitational surname, from the Old Norse fiskr "fish" and vin "meadow". In England and Denmark it was a surname denoting someone who was a "fisherman" or earned their living from selling fish.
Fitzhugh English
English (Northamptonshire): Anglo-Norman French patronymic (see Fitzgerald) from the personal name Hugh.
Flack English
probably from Middle English flack, flak "turf", "sod" (as found in the place name Flatmoor, in Cambridgeshire), and hence perhaps an occupational name for a turf cutter.
Flake English
Surname. Meaning, "lives by a swamp."
Flanders English
Given to a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands (compare Fleming).
Flanner English
This early occupational and mainly 'midlands' English surname, is actually of pre-medieval French origins. Introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066, it derives from the French word flaonet meaning a 'little flan', and described a maker of patisserie or pancakes.
Flash English
Means "person who lives near a pool" (Middle English flasshe "pool, marsh").
Flax English
Metonymic occupational name for someone who grew, sold, or treated flax for weaving into linen cloth,
Fleck English
Meaning unknown. It is used in the 2019 movie Joker as the real name of the titular character played by actor Joaquin Phoenix.
Fleetwood English
Means "From the town of Fleetwood, in Lancaster".
Fling Irish, English
Perhaps derived from Flynn.
Flint English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
Flook English
Derived from the Old Norse name Flóki.
Florence English
Either a patronymic or matronymic from Florence, or to denote someone from Florence, Italy.
Flower English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
Flower English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
Flower English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
Flowers English
Patronymic from Flower.
Floyde English
Variant of Floyd.
Flute English
From the English word flute which is an instrument.
Flyte English
Means "stream" from Old English fleot.
Folkerts German, English
Derived from the given name Folcher. See also Fulcher
Foot English
Variant of Foote.
Foote English
Nickname for someone with a peculiarity or deformity of the foot, from Middle English fot (Old English fot), or in some cases from the cognate Old Norse byname Fótr.
Forde English, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
Fordham English
Habitational name from any of the places in Cambridgeshire, Essex, and Norfolk named Fordham, from Old English ford ‘ford’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’.
Fore English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Fahr.
Forman English
An occupational surname for a keeper of swine, Middle English foreman, from Old English for hog, "pig" and mann ‘man’. The word is attested in this sense from the 15th century but is not used specifically for the leader of a gang of workers before the late 16th century.
Forster English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
Fouch English
not sure how i can up with this but i used it for my hp professor oc
Foulds English (British)
Mr. Fould-Dupont supplied the steel for the Eiffel tower. Later on, he fled to England and changed his last name from Fould-Dupont to Foulds.
Foulkes English (Anglicized, ?)
English variant spelling of Foulks.
Foulks English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also Volk.
Fountain English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a spring or well, from Middle English fontayne, "fountain".
Fowl English, Popular Culture
This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and derives from the Old English pre 7th Century word fugol, "fowl", "bird", which was used as a byname and as a personal name. The medieval form of the word was the Middle English development foul, fowl(e), used as a continuation of the Old English personal name and also as a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a bird.
Foxe English
Variant of Fox
Foxwell English
Means "fox stream", from Old English fox and well(a), meaning stream.
Foxworth English
"dweller at the homestead infested by foxes." or "house of Fox" aka Foxworthy... [more]
Foxx English
Variant of Fox.
Fraley English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
Frampton English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Franck English, French
From the given name Franck.
Frankland English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
Franks English
This surname is derived from the given name Frank.
Frankson English
This surname means "son of Frank."
Fray French, English
From the German surname Frey or the Old French given name FRAY.
Frederick English
Derived from the given name Frederick.
Fredericks English
Patronymic from Frederick.
Fredric English
From the given name Fredric
Fredrickson English, Swedish (Rare)
Means "son of Fredrick", sometimes used as an Americanized spelling of Fredriksson or Fredriksen.
Free English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
Freeling English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
Frémont French (Americanized), English (American)
Fremont is a French surname meaning Free Mountain. People include John Frémont a US Explorer and Politician who fought in the Mexican-American War to free California and many places named after him, Including Fremont, California, and Fremont Nebraska.