English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Grazer English
Not available.
Grealish English
The name derives from the Old Norman French word "greslet", meaning pitted or scarred, and is itself derived from the very early Germanic word "gresle", or hailstone.
Greasby English
One who came from Greasby, a parish on the Wirral Peninsula, in Cheshire, now Merseyside.
Greay English (Rare)
The name Greay originated when a family matriarch changed the name to differentiate between the two families with the same name Grey. There was a wedding between the two families and it was easier if the name was changed.
Greeley English, Norman
English (of Norman origin): nickname for someone with a pock-marked face, from Old Northern French greslé ‘pitted’, ‘scarred’ (from gresle ‘hailstone’, of Germanic origin).
Greenall English
From Lincolnshire in England, meaning "green hill".
Greenfeld English
Partly Americanized form of the Ashkenazic Jewish ornamental name Grun(e)feld or Grinfeld, a compound of Yiddish grin + German Feld 'field', or of German Grünfeld (see Grunfeld).
Greengrass English
Notable bearers include film director Paul Greengrass and baseball player Jim Greengrass.
Greenhill English
The name is derived from a geographic locality, "at the green hill", or rather, more specifically of "Greenhill". The surname could also derive from the liberty on the wapentake of Corringham in Lincolnshire, or a hamlet in the parish of Harrow in Middlesex... [more]
Greenidge English
From Greenhedge Farm in Aslockton, Nottinghamshire, itself derived from Old English grene “green” + hecg “hedge”.
Greening English
Meaning unknown.
Greenland English (Germanized)
Greenland Name Meaning. English: topographic name for someone who lived near a patch of land left open as communal pasturage, from Middle English grene 'green' + land 'land'. Translated form of German Grönland, a topographic name with the same meaning as 1, from Low German grön 'green' + Land 'land'.
Greenlaw English
From one of two placenames, located near the Anglo-Scottish border. Named with Old English grēne, 'green' and halw, 'hill, mound'.
Greenleaf English
From Old English grēne "green" and lēaf "leaf", presumably applied as a nickname, the significance of which is now lost.
Greenlee English
habitational name from any of various minor places, for example in Staffordshire, so named from Old English grene ‘green’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
Greenway English
Originally given to a person who lived near a grassy path, from Middle English grene "green" and weye "road, path" (cf. Way).... [more]
Greenwood English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a dense forest, from Middle English grene "green" and wode "wood", or a habitational name from a minor place so named, as for example Greenwood in Heathfield, East Sussex.
Gregerson English
Means "son of Gregory/Greg"
Gregg English
Variant of Greg.
Gregson English
Means "son of Greg"
Griggs English
Means "son of Grigg", Grigg being a short form of Gregory.
Grimes English
Patronymic derived from Grime.... [more]
Grimm English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name Grímr derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
Grissom English
From a diminutive of Grice, which was originally a nickname for a grey-haired man, derived from Middle English grice, gris meaning "grey" (itself from Old French gris, apparently of Germanic origin).
Griswold English
meaning: from the gray forest.
Groover English (American)
Americanized form of German Gruber.
Grosvenor English
English surname of Norman origin meaning ‘the master huntsman’. Derived from Le Grand Veneur, this title was held by Hugh d'Avranches who accompanied William the Conqueror in the Norman invasion of England in 1066.
Grove English, American
Americanized spelling of the French surname Le Grou(x)or Le Greux (see Groulx)
Grove English
Name for someone who lived by a grove or thicket, Middle English grove, Old English graf.
Grow English
Likely from the English word "grow".
Grundy English
Probably a Middle English metathesized form of the Old French personal name Gondri, Gundric (see Gundry).
Grylls English (Rare)
There was an old and distinguished family of Grylls of Tavistock (Devon) and Lanreath (Cornwall) in the 17th century; two high sheriffs of the county then bore the name. The manor of Gryils (commonly mispronounced Garles), near the rocks called the Gryils or Garles, from which they probably derive their name, is in the parish of Lesneweth in that county.
Gudgeon English
from Middle English gojon, gogen, Old French gougon ‘gudgeon’ (the fish) (Latin gobio, genitive gobionis), applied as a nickname or perhaps as a metonymic occupational name for a seller of these fish... [more]
Guest English
Nickname for a stranger or newcomer to a community, from Middle English g(h)est meaning "guest", "visitor" (from Old Norse gestr, absorbing the cognate Old English giest).
Guilder English
Occupational name for someone who worked in gold. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th Century "gyldan" and the Old High German "gold", a refiner, jeweller, or gilder.
Gullick English
From the Middle English personal name Gullake, a descendant of Old English Gūthlāc, literally "battle-sport".
Gulliver English
From a medieval nickname for a greedy person (from Old French goulafre "glutton"). Jonathan Swift used it in his satire 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726), about the shipwrecked ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, whose adventures "offer opportunities for a wide-ranging and often savage lampooning of human stupidity and vice."
Gumm English
From a nickname or byname from Middle English gome, Old English guma "man".
Gundry English
From Gondri, Gundric, an Old French personal name introduced to Britain by the Normans, composed of the Germanic elements gund "battle" and rīc "power(ful)".
Gunner English
Derived from the given name Gunnvǫr
Gunner English
From Old English gunne meaning "cannon, gun" and the agent suffix "-er"
Guppy English
English habitational name from a place in Wootton Fitzpaine, Dorset, Gupehegh in Middle English. This is named with the Old English personal name Guppa (a short form of Guðbeorht "battle bright") + (ge)hæg "enclosure"... [more]
Guy English
Occupational name for a guide, Old French gui (a derivative of gui(d)er "to guide", of Germanic origin).
Guy English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
Guyton English
Means "hill of Gaega".
Gwilliam English
Anglicised form of the Welsh given name Gwilym.
Hackberry English
Means simply "hackberry".
Hackney English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hackney in Greater London, named from an Old English personal name Haca (genitive Hacan) combined with ēg "island, dry ground in marshland".
Hackney English, Scottish
From Middle English hakenei (Old French haquenée), an ambling horse, especially one considered suitable for women to ride; perhaps therefore a metonymic occupational name for a stablehand... [more]
Haddock English
Haddock is a surname of English. It may refer to many people. It may come from the medieval word Ædduc, a diminutive of Æddi, a short form of various compound names including the root ēad, meaning prosperity or fortune... [more]
Haddon English
Derived from the Old English word had meaning "heathland" and the Old English suffix -don meaning "hill"; hence, the "heathland hill" or the "heather-covered hill".... [more]
Hadley English
A habitational name from either a place named Hadley, or a place named Hadleigh. The first is named from the Old English personal name Hadda + lēah (means ‘wood’, ‘(woodland) clearing’), and the other three are from Old English hǣð (meaning ‘heathland’, ‘heather') + lēah.
Hagstrom English
Anglicized form of Swedish Hagström.
Hailes Scottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
Hainey Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish, English
(Celtic) A lost me devil village in Scotland; or one who came from Hanney island in Berkshire.
Hairfield English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
Haizlip English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
Haldane English, Scottish
From an old personal name, Old Norse Halfdanr, Old Danish Halfdan, Anglo-Scandinavian Healfdene, meaning ‘half-Dane’.
Haldon English (Rare)
From a place name in Devon, England.
Hallett English
Derived from the given name Hallet (see Adalhard).
Halley English
Location name combining the elements hall as in "large house" and lee meaning "field or clearing."
Hallgren Swedish, English
Combination of the dialectal Swedish word hall (Standard Swedish häll, Old Norse hallr), a type of flat rock, and gren meaning "branch". The first element may be taken from the name of a place named with this element (e.g. Halland, Hallsberg, or Hallstavik)... [more]
Hallie English
Spelling variant of Halley.
Hallingsworth English (British, Rare), English (Australian, Rare)
Unknown origin and meaning. I found it listed a few times on the 1881 census in the County Durham and in London; it is also supposedly a surname in Australia. Possibly a misspelling of Hollingsworth.
Halliwell English
Derived from various place names in England named with Old English halig "holy" and well "spring, well".
Hallmark English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
Hallow English
English: topographic name from Middle English hal(l)owes ‘nooks’, ‘hollows’, from Old English halh (see Hale). In some cases the name may be genitive, rather than plural, in form, with the sense ‘relative or servant of the dweller in the nook’.
Hallow English
To make holy; to set apart for religious use. Chandler Hallow
Hallowell English
Variant of Halliwell meaning "holy spring".
Halprin English
Halprin is the last name of the main character the book called Ashfall by Mike Mullin.
Halverson English
Anglicized form of Norwegian or Danish Halvorsen.
Ham English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
Hamer English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
Hames English, Welsh, Scottish
Son of "Amy", in Old English. An ancient Leicestershire surname.
Hamill English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
Hamlin English
From an Old English word meaning "home" or "homestead" and a diminutive suffix -lin.
Hammer German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
Hammersley English (Modern)
From southern England. From homersley meaning homestead, that later changed to hamersley
Hammersmith German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
Hamnett English
From the given name Hamnet.
Hamp English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
Hamson English
A variant of Hampson.
Hance English
Allegedly a patronymic from the personal name Hann.
Hands English
Plural form of Hand.
Hanes English, Welsh
variant spelling of Haynes.
Haney English, Irish
One who came from Hanney (island frequented by wild cocks), in Berkshire; grandson of Eanna (bird).
Hankin English
From the given name Hankin
Hanks English
Patronymic form of Hank.
Hanlin Scottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish Hanlon.
Hannam English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
Hansard English
occupational name for a cutler.
Happy English
It comes from an Old English word that means "aspen".
Happygod English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
Harbey English
Derived from the given name Harvey.
Harbin English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins, and is derived from the personal names Rabin, Robin, and Robert. It has the English prefix 'har', which means gray.... [more]
Harbor English
English: variant spelling of Harbour.
Harbour English
Variant of French Arbour or a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from Old English herebeorg "shelter, lodging".
Hardacre English
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of poor, stony land, from Middle English hard "hard, difficult" and aker "cultivated land" (Old English æcer), or a habitational name from Hardacre, a place in Clapham, West Yorkshire, which has this etymology.
Hardley English
The name comes from when a family lived in the village of Hartley which was in several English counties including Berkshire, Devon, Dorset, Kent, Lancashire, York and Northumberland. This place-name was originally derived from the Old English words hart which means a stag and lea which means a wood or clearing.
Hargreaves English
English: variant of Hargrave.
Hargreeves English
Variant of Hargreaves.
Hargrove English
English: variant of Hargrave.
Harington English
Variant spelling of Harrington. A famous bearer is English actor Kit Harington (1986-).
Harkaway English
From a sporting phrase used to guide and incite hunting dogs.
Harker English (British)
English (mainly northeastern England and West Yorkshire): habitational name from either of two places in Cumbria, or from one in the parish of Halsall, near Ormskirk, Lancashire. The Cumbrian places are probably named from Middle English hart ‘male deer’ + kerr ‘marshland’... [more]
Harkless English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Harkin, a Scottish diminutive of Henry.
Harkness Scottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name Hereca (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
Harless English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
Harlin English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
Harmer English (British)
Meaning, of the Army or man of Armor, from the battle at Normandy, France. It was formerly a French last name Haremere after the battle at Normandy it moved on to England where it was shortened to Harmer.
Harnage English
Derived from the personal name Agnes
Harnden English
From an English village Harrowden in Bedfordshire. This place name literally means "hill of the heathen shrines or temples," from the Old English words hearg and dun.
Harold English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans... [more]
Harr English
Short form of Harris
Harriman English
Means "Harry's man" or "Harry's servant".
Harrington English
From Old English word meaning "hare town"
Harrod English
Variant of Harold.
Harrold Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of Harold.
Harrow English
Means "person from Harrow", the district of northwest Greater London, or various places of the same name in Scotland ("heathen shrine").
Harry English
From first name Harry.
Hartford English
Habitational name from Hertford, or from either of two places called Hartford, in Cheshire and Cumbria; all are named with Old English heorot ‘hart’ + ford ‘ford’.
Hartnell English
From a location in Marwood, Devon, derived from Old English heort "stag" + cnoll "hill".
Harton English
This surname is a habitational one, denoting someone who lived in a village in County Durham or in North Yorkshire.... [more]
Hartwell English
Habitational name from places in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Staffordshire called Hartwell, from Old English heorot ‘stag’, ‘hart’ + wella ‘spring’, ‘stream’... [more]
Harvard English
From the Old English given name Hereweard, composed of the elements here "army" and weard "guard", which was borne by an 11th-century thane of Lincolnshire, leader of resistance to the advancing Normans... [more]
Harvie English
Variant of Harvey.
Harwin English
From the Old French personal name Harduin, composed of the Germanic elements hard 'hardy', 'brave' + win 'friend'.
Harwood English, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
Haschak English (American)
This may be influenced from the English word hashtag, meaning number.
Haskell English
From the Norman personal name Aschetil.
Haskin English
Variant of Askin.
Haskins English
Variant of Askin.
Hasley English
Habitational name of uncertain origin. The surname is common in London, and may be derived from Alsa (formerly Assey) in Stanstead Mountfitchet, Essex (recorded as Alsiesheye in 1268). nother possible source is Halsway in Somerset, named from Old English hals ‘neck’ + weg ‘way’, ‘road’.
Hassall English
Means "person from Hassall", Cheshire ("witch's corner of land").
Hasting English
Variant of Askin.
Hastings English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hastings, a place in Sussex, on the south coast of England, near which the English army was defeated by the Normans in 1066. It is named from Old English H?stingas ‘people of H?sta’... [more]
Hatch English
English (mainly Hampshire and Berkshire): topographic name from Middle English hacche ‘gate’, Old English hæcc (see Hatcher). In some cases the surname is habitational, from one of the many places named with this word... [more]
Hatcher English
Southern English: topographic name for someone who lived by a gate, from Middle English hacche (Old English hæcc) + the agent suffix -er. This normally denoted a gate marking the entrance to a forest or other enclosed piece of land, sometimes a floodgate or sluice-gate.
Hatler English (American)
Variant of the German surname Hattler.
Hatter English
This name derives from the Old English pre 7th Century "haet" meaning a hat and was originally given either as an occupational name to a maker or seller of hats
Hatton English
Habitational name from any of the various places named Hatton.
Haughn English (Canadian, Modern)
Alternative/Modern form of Hahn.
Havelock English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
Haverford Welsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
Hawke English
Variant of Hawk
Hawks English
Variant of or patronymic from Hawk.
Hawley English, Scottish
Means "hedged meadow". It comes from the English word haw, meaning "hedge", and Saxon word leg, meaning "meadow". The first name Hawley has the same meaning.
Hawthorn English, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Hawthorne.
Hawtrey English (British)
It is the surname of Mr. Hawtrey from the book The Boy In The Dress, by David Walliams. Hawtrey means "To succeed".
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Haycock English
English (West Midlands): from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Hay, formed with the Middle English hypocoristic suffix -cok (see Cocke).