English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Fresh English
Probably a nickname for someone who's young.
Frett English
English from Middle English frette, Old French frete ‘interlaced work (in metal and precious stones)’ such as was used for hair ornaments and the like, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such pieces.
Fretwell English
Taken from the Old English "freht," meaning "augury," and "well," meaning "spring, stream."
Frewin English
From the Middle English personal name Frewine, literally "noble or generous friend".
Friar English
Denoted a member of any of certain religious orders of men, especially the four mendicant orders. (Augustinians, Carmelites, Dominicans, and Franciscans)
Frias English
English form of Frías.
Friend English
Nickname for a companionable person, from Middle English frend "friend" (Old English freond). In the Middle Ages the term was also used to denote a relative or kinsman, and the surname may also have been acquired by someone who belonged to the family of someone who was a more important figure in the community
Frisby English
Means "person from Frisby", Leicestershire ("farmstead of the Frisians"). A frisbee is a plastic disc thrown from person to person as a game; the trademarked name, registered in 1959 by Fred Morrison, was inspired by the Frisbie bakery of Bridgeport, Connecticut, whose pie tins were the original models for the plastic discs.
Frizzell English (Rare)
Either (i) from Friseal, the Scottish Gaelic form of Fraser; or (ii) from a medieval nickname applied to someone who dressed in a showy or gaudy style (from Old French frisel "decoration, ribbon").
Frog English
From the English word frog which is a type of amphibian.
Froggatt English
Topographical name from the village of Froggatt in Derbyshire.
Froud English
From the Old English personal name Frōda or Old Norse Fróthi, both meaning literally "wise" or "prudent". A variant spelling was borne by British historian James Anthony Froude (1818-1894).
Fruitman English
Likely referring to someone who sold fruit.
Fulcher English
English (chiefly East Anglia): from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + hari, heri ‘army’, which was introduced into England from France by the Normans; isolated examples may derive from the cognate Old English Folchere or Old Norse Folkar, but these names were far less common.
Fullerton English
Habitational name from a place in Scotland. Derived from Old English fugol "bird" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
Furlong English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
Furlow English (British), Irish
the warrens came over to America on the Mayflower. they made settlements and went through the revolutionary war. the name changed to Baughman then Furlow. the furlows fought in the cival war and were slave owners... [more]
Furman Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
Furneaux French (Anglicized), English
Locational surname from any of several places in France called Fourneaux, or from fourneau "furnace".
Furness English (British)
It originated from the river in England.
Furse English
Variant of Furze
Furze English
Given to someone who lived by a field of furzes, a type of flower
Fyfe English
From the place 'Fyfe'
Fyler English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Feiler.
Fynch English
Variant of Finch.
Gabbett English
From the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name Gabriel.
Gable English
Northern English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a habitational name from a minor place named with Old Norse gafl ‘gable’, which was applied to a triangular-shaped hill. The mountain called Great Gable in Cumbria is named in this way.... [more]
Gabriella English (American)
Derived from the given name Gabriella.
Gadbury English
Habitational name from Cadborough, alias Gateborough, in Rye, Sussex, probably so named from Old English gāt meaning "goat" + beorg meaning "hill".
Gaffney English (American)
This may sound like the female given name Daphne
Gaines English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
Gainsborough English
From the city of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, England. A famous bearer of this surname includes English painter Thomas Gainsborough.
Gaisford English
Habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Gall Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
Gallant English
Nickname for a cheerful or high-spirited person, from Old French, Middle English galant "bold, dashing, lively". The meanings "gallant" and "attentive to women" are further developments, which may lie behind some examples of the surname.
Galpin English
English: occupational name for a messenger or scullion (in a monastery), from Old French galopin ‘page’, ‘turnspit’, from galoper ‘to gallop’.
Galt English
An early member was a person with a fancied resemblance to the wild boar.
Gamble English
from the Old Norse byname Gamall meaning "old", which was occasionally used in North England during the Middle Ages as a personal name. ... [more]
Gambon English, Irish
Derived from Anglo-Norman French gambon meaning "ham", itself derived from a Norman-Picard form of Old French jambe meaning "leg". A famous bearer is the Irish-English actor Sir Michael Gambon (1940-).
Gamiz American (Hispanic, Anglicized, Rare), Spanish, Filipino, English (American)
The last name Gamiz is a varient of Gamez and Gomez. It is a very rare last name that not many people have.
Gammon English
From a medieval nickname applied to a merry or sportive person (from Middle English gamen "game"), or to someone who walked in a strange way or had some peculiarity of the legs (from Anglo-Norman gambon "ham").
Gamp English (British)
This surname is thought to originate from Sarah or Sairey Gamp, Mrs. Gamp as she is more commonly known, in the novel Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens.... [more]
Gardlin English (American, Rare)
Possibly an anglicized form of a Swedish surname like Gardelin.
Garington English
Possibly from the given name Gareth.
Garlick English
(i) "grower or seller of garlic"; (ii) perhaps from a medieval personal name descended from Old English Gārlāc, literally "spear-play"; (iii) an anglicization of the Belorussian Jewish name Garelick, literally "distiller"
Garrick English
From the first name Garrick.
Garrison English
Patronymic from Garrett.
Garwood English
Comes from a lost locational name from the Olde English gara, referring to a "triangular piece of land" or to a "spearhead", and wudu meaning a "wood".
Gascoigne English (British)
Originally denoted a person from the province of Gascony in France.
Gascoyne English
Variant of Gascoigne, which was originally a regional name for someone from the province of Gascony, via Old French Gascogne.
Gaskill English
Meaning "Goat Shelter". English (Lancashire) habitual name from Gatesgill in Cumbria, so named from Old Norse geit ‘goat’ + skáli ‘shelter’. The surname is first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century.
Gasper English (American, Rare)
Variant of Jasper. George Gasper is a famous American Mathematician.
Gatlin English
English of uncertain origin; probably a variant of Catlin or Gadling, a nickname from Old English gœdeling ‘kinsman’, ‘companion’, but also ‘low fellow’.
Gatling English, German (Anglicized)
English variant of Gatlin. Possibly a respelling of German Gättling (see also Gatlin).
Gaunt English
This name is believed to have derived "from the town of Gaunt, now Ghent, in Flanders."... [more]
Gavin Scottish, English
From the given name Gavin.
Gavitt English
Perhaps an altered spelling of the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name Gabriel.
Gawkrodger English
From a medieval nickname meaning "clumsy Roger".
Gay English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
Gay English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
Gaydos Hungarian, English
Anglicized spelling of Hungarian GAJDOS.
Gaye English
Possibly a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the archaic word "gay" meaning "happy". A famous bearer was the American singer Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
Gayler English (American)
Variant of Gaylord
Gaylord English
Derived from Old French gaillard meaning "high-spirited, boistrous".
Gear English
Derived from the Germanic name element ger, meaning "spear".
Gearhart English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Gierhard, a variant of Gerhardt.
Gearing English
probably an Americanized spelling of Gehring
Gee Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
Gegge English
Medieval English variant of Gegg.
Geoffrey English, French
From the given name Geoffrey
Georgia English
From the given name Georgia.
Gerald English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
Geraldson English
Means "son of Gerald".
Gere English
Variant of Geer, Gehr or Geary, all related to the Old High German element gēr (Old English gār, Old Norse geirr) meaning "spear, arrow". A famous bearer is American actor Richard Gere (b... [more]
German English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
Gerrard English
From the given name Gerrard.
Gerry English
Diminutive of names containing ger, meaning "spear".
Gershon English, Hebrew
Hebrew One of the tribes of Israel ... [more]
Gervais English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
Gibbon English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
Gibbons English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
Gibs English
Variant of Gibbs
Gidlow English
The first recorded use of the name is from 1291; Robert de Gidlow was a freeholder in Aspull, Lancanshire, United Kingdom and the name occurs frequently down to the 17th century. The Gidlow family moved to the United States in the mid-18th century where the spelling was changed to Goodlow and eventually to Goodloe.
Gierc English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
Gifford English
Gifford is an English name for someone who comes from Giffords Hall in Suffolk. In Old English, it was Gyddingford, or "ford associated with Gydda." Alternatively, it could come from the Middle English nickname, "Giffard," from Old French meaning "chubby-cheeked."
Gilbertson English
Means "son of Gilbert".
Gilby English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
Gilford English
English or Welsh.
Gilkeson English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
Gillard English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
Gillard English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
Gillette English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
Gillian English
From the first name Gillian.
Gilliard English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
Gillibrand English
From the Norman personal name Gillebrand, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "hostage-sword".
Gillingham English
Habitational name from places in Dorset, Norfolk, and Kent, named Gillingham, 'homestead
Gilmore English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
Gilpin English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
Gilstrap English (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
Gingell English
Either (i) from a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gangulf, literally "walking wolf"; or (ii) a different form of Gingold.
Gipson English (American)
Variant of Gibson more commonly used in the United States.
Girling English
From a medieval nickname applied to a brave man (or, with heavy irony, to a cowardly one), from Old French cuer de lion "lion heart".
Glad English
From a short form of the various Old English personal names with a first element glæd "shining, joyful". Compare Gladwin.
Glad English, Scandinavian
Nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English, Scandinavian glad "merry, jolly".
Gladding English
Given as a nickname to someone who is glad, in high spirits, and happy.
Gladney English
Probably means "bright island", from the Old English element glæd "bright" (cf. Glædwine) and the English element ney "island" (cf.... [more]
Glasgow English (American), English (British)
Derived from the city of Glasgow in Scotland.
Gleave English
Means either "sword-maker" or "sword-seller", or else from a nickname applied to a skilled swordsman (in either case from Middle English gleyve "sword").
Glendon Scottish, English
From the first name, which means "from the dark glen" in Scottish Gaelic.
Glissen English, Irish
Possible British version of the Irish surname Glasson from the the Gaelic word O’Glasain. Meaning green from the counties of Tipperary.
Gober English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
Goble English
From “Gobble”, meaning “to gorge, to guzzle”
Godil English
English: habitational name for someone from Gadshill in Kent, either of two places called Godshill in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, or Godsell Farm in Wiltshire, which were all originally named Godeshyll ‘God's hill’.
Godin English
Comes from the Germanic personal name Godin-, a pet form of any of various compound names beginning with god, got ‘god’. Compare Godbold, Goddard, and Godfrey.
Godwin English
Derived from the first name Godwine.
Godwinson English
Means "Son of Godwin". First born by Harold Godwinson. From his father Godwine, Earl of Wessex... [more]
Goforth English
Probably given to someone who likes to lead
Golden English
From the English word golden which is the yellow color.
Goldring German, English, Jewish
This surname was probably given to someone who wore a gold ring.
Goldsmith English
Occupational name for a worker in gold, a compound of Old English gold "gold" and smið "smith". In North America it is very often an English translation of German or Jewish Goldschmidt.
Goldthwaite English
Possibly derived from Guilthwaite in South Yorkshire, which is named from Old Norse gil meaning "ravine" and þveit meaning "clearing". However, the modern surname is associated with Essex, suggesting some other source, now lost.
Goldwyn English, Jewish
Derived from the Old English given name Goldwine, composed of the elements gold meaning "gold" and win meaning "friend".
Golston English
The Gol part has uncertain meaning, but Ton means "Town".
Gonsalves English (British), Portuguese, Indian (Christian)
Variant of Gonçalves more commonly used in Britain and western India.
Goodall English
Habitational name from Gowdall in East Yorkshire, named from Old English golde "marigold" and Old English halh "nook, recess".
Goodall English
From Middle English gode "good" and ale "ale, malt liquor", hence a metonymic occupational name for a brewer or an innkeeper.
Goodbar German (Anglicized), English
Possibly an altered spelling of English Godber, derived from the medieval given name Godebert, or an occupational name for a beer brewer and a nickname for a toper... [more]
Goodenough English
From a medieval nickname probably applied either to someone of average abilities or to an easily satisfied person; also, perhaps from a medieval nickname meaning "good servant".
Goodfellow English
Generally explained as a nickname meaning 'good fellow' or 'good companion'.
Goodfriend English
Nickname for a reliable friend or neighbor, from Middle English gode meaning "good", and frend meaning "friend". It is an English translation and cognate of German Gutfreund, from Middle High German guot meaning "good" and vriunt meaning "friend".
Gooding English
The name Gooding comes from the baptismal name for "the son of Godwin"
Goodkind English (Rare)
From the English words "good kind".
Goodloe English
Goodloe traces back to the English Gidlow. The first recorded use of the name is from 1291; Robert de Gidlow was a freeholder in Aspull, Lancanshire, United Kingdom and the name occurs frequently down to the 17th century... [more]
Goodrich English
Derived from the Middle English given name Goderiche (itself derived from the Anglo-Saxon given name Godric), composed of Old English god meaning "good" and ric meaning "ruler, mighty, god's ruler, power"... [more]
Goodson English
Nickname for a dutiful son, from Middle English gode ‘good’ + sone ‘son’.
Goodyear English (American), English (Canadian)
Derived from the Medieval English phrase goodyeare, literally meaning "good year".
Goof English (American, Rare)
The name has been Anglicized from the Dutch short form Goof, from Govert, with its roots from the Dutch and Limburgish cognate Godfried... [more]
Goose English, Norman
Occupational name for a goose-herd (a person who tends to geese) or a medieval nickname for a person who resembled a goose in some way. It could also be a English (of Norman French origins) cognate of Gosse.
Goot English
Variant of Good.
Gorham English
A name originating from Kent, England believed to come from the elements gara and ham meaning "from a triangular shaped homestead." Compare Gore.
Gorringe English
Derived from the name of the village of Goring-by-the-Sea in Sussex
Gorsuch English
Habitational name from the hamlet of Gorsuch, Lancashire, earlier Gosefordsich, derived from Old English gosford meaning "goose ford" and sic meaning "small stream".
Goshawk English
Probably referring to a breeder of Eagle-Owls or an eagle-tamer. Shares its name with the Wizarding World author, Miranda Goshawk.
Gosling English
1. variant of Joslin - see Jocelyn, Jocelyn. ... [more]
Gotham English
English: habitational name from Gotham in Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English gat ‘goat’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘water meadow’.
Goulding English
From the late Old English personal name Golding, which was derived from Golda (or the feminine form Golde) and the patronymic suffix -ing.... [more]
Goulter English (Rare)
This very unusual name has long been recorded in England but perhaps surprisingly as a Norman personal name. The first recording in England was as "Galterii" which appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 for London as a French form of the Olde German "Walter" translating as "Mighty Army".
Grace English
From the given name Grace
Graff English
Metonymic occupational name for a clerk or scribe, from Anglo-Norman French grafe "quill, pen" (a derivative of grafer "to write", Late Latin grafare, from Greek graphein).
Grange English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
Grant English, Scottish
From a medieval personal name, probably a survival into Middle English of the Old English byname Granta (see Grantham).
Grantham English
Habitational name from Grantham in Lincolnshire, of uncertain origin. The final element is Old English hām "homestead"; the first may be Old English grand "gravel" or perhaps a personal name Granta, which probably originated as a byname meaning "snarler"... [more]
Grass English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
Grato English
From a nickname given to somebody with grass-like hair, making this surname’s meaning “he with grass-like hair.”
Grave English
Occupational name from Middle English greyve "steward", from Old Norse greifi or Low German greve
Grave English
Topographic name, a variant of Grove.
Graves English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
Graves French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
Graves English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
Graybill English (American)
Anglicized form of Swiss German Krähenbühl, meaning "crow hill".
Grayling English (British)
Uncommon surname of unclear origin; possible medieval locational name, or a derivative of the French surname Grail or the diminutive Graillon.... [more]
Grazer English
Not available.
Grealish English
The name derives from the Old Norman French word "greslet", meaning pitted or scarred, and is itself derived from the very early Germanic word "gresle", or hailstone.