Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is SeaHorse15.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABIDAOUD     Arabic
Arabic surname meaning "son of Dawud".
ABREGO     Spanish
As a Spanish surname, it was from Spanish ábrego, which originally meant "African", from Latin africus. The vocabulary word in modern Spanish has lost this general sense and now means "south wind" (literally, "African (wind)").
ACQUAVIVA     Italian
From an Italian place name meaning "running water, spring", literally "living water".
ADORNO     Italian
Southern Italian: from the personal name Adorno, meaning ‘adorned’.... [more]
AGOSTINELLI     Italian
The earliest known instance of this name AGOSTINELLI was St. Aurelius Augustinus, also known as Augustine of Hippo (354-430) the greatest of the Latin church fathers. He was born in Tagaste in Numidia which is modern Tunisia.... [more]
AGUMANU     Igbo, Trinidadian Creole
its an last name and first name that comes from an Igbo tribe in Trinidad
AHEARNA     Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
AKHMATOVA     Tatar, Russian
Feminine form of Akhmatov, meaning "son of Äxmät".
AKINS     Scottish, English, Northern Irish
Variant of Aikens, which is derived from the given name Aiken, a variant of the medieval diminutive Atkin (see Aitken).
ALABASTER     English
From the name of a whitish kind of gypsum used for vases, ornaments and busts, ultimately deriving from Greek alabastros, itself perhaps from Egyptian 'a-labaste "vessel of the goddess Bast"... [more]
ALEXANIAN     Armenian
Variant transcription of Aleksanyan, meaning "son of Aleksan" in Armenian.
AMIDALA     Popular Culture
Queen Amidala is a character from the Star Wars universe. Amidala is her regnal name, having been born Padmé Naberrie.
AMSLER     American, German (Swiss)
As a Swiss German surname it is from the Swiss place name Amslen.
ARDEN     English
From various English place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".... [more]
ARROYO     Spanish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named with arroyo "watercourse", "irrigation channel."
ARUNDEL     English
English surname which comes from two distinct sources. Either it was derived from a place name meaning "horehound valley" in Old English (from harhune "horehound (a plant)" and dell "valley"), or it was from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond "swallow", which was originally a Norman nickname given to someone resembling a swallow.
ASLANIAN     Armenian
Means "son of Aslan" in Armenian.
ASPLIN     English
From a short form of the given name Absalom.
ATMORE     English
Locational surname derived from Middle English atte more meaning "at the marsh".
AUSLEY     English (Modern)
Rare surname which was from an English place name in which the second element is Old English leah "wood, clearing". The first element may be hors "horse" (in which case the name likely referred to a place where horses were put out to pasture) or the river name Ouse (ultimately from the ancient British root ud- "water").
BABAYEV     Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen
This surname is common among central asians and Tatars.
BABUSHKIN     Russian, Jewish
Derived from Russian бабушка (babushka) meaning "grandmother".
BAEZ     Spanish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Spanish Báez, which might be a different form of Peláez (cf. Páez). A famous bearer is American singer and activist Joan Baez (1941-).... [more]
BAFFA     Italian
The origins of this surname are uncertain, but it may be from Italian baffo "mustache", with the Latinate feminine suffix probably due to the influence of the word famiglia "family". Alternatively it may be Albanian in origin, of unexplained meaning.
BANG     Danish
Originally a nickname denoting a loud or brash person, from Old Danish bang "noise" (from Old Norse banga "to pound, hammer" of echoic origin). A literary bearer was Danish author Herman Bang (1857-1912).... [more]
BEAUVOIR     English
From the surname of Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
BÉGON     French
Probably from French béguin "(male) Beguin", referring to a member of a particular religious order active in the 13th century, and derived from the surname of Lambert le Bègue, the mid-12th-century priest responsible for starting it... [more]
BEVILACQUA     Italian
From Italian bevi l'acqua "drinks water", a nickname likely applied ironically to an alcoholic.
BLACKERBY     English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLAYLOCK     English
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
BOSTWICK     English
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
BRAGG     English, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRANNOCK     Irish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
BRAZIL     English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BRIGHTWEN     English
From either of the two Old English given names Beohrtwine (a masculine name which meant "bright friend") or Beohrtwynn (a feminine name which meant "bright joy").
BROGDEN     English
From the name of a place in West Yorkshire meaning "valley brook", from Old English broc "brook" and denu "valley".
BYLILLY     Navajo
Derived from Navajo ‎"for him" and álílee "magic power".
CANELLA     Italian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
CARMICHAEL     Scottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CATTLEY     English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
CAVARAI     Indian, Tamil
Variant transcription of Kavarai.
CHÉNIER     French
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
CHETTI     Indian, Tamil
Variant transcription of Chetty.
CHUCKLER     Indian, Telugu
Telugu occupational name for a leather worker, a job historically considered spiritually polluting and impure in India, where the surname belongs to Dalit, or "Untouchables" - members of the lowest caste.
CLY     Navajo
From Navajo tłʼaaí meaning ‎"lefty, left-handed one", from the verb nishtłʼa ‎"to be left-handed".
COKAYNE     English
Medieval English nickname which meant "idle dreamer" from Cockaigne, the name of an imaginary land of luxury and idleness in medieval myth. The place may derive its name from Old French (pays de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty", ultimately from the Low German word kokenje, a diminutive of koke "cake" (since the houses in Cockaigne are made of cake).
CONWAY     Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
CORRIGAN     English
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
CULLY     English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
DAAE     Literature, Norwegian, Danish (Rare), Swedish (Rare)
Norwegian surname, originating in Trondheim in the 17th century. Also a variant of Daa, the name of a Danish noble family which originated in Southern Jutland in the 14th century. ... [more]
DANZ     German
Derived from a given name, a short form of the name Tandulf, the origins of which are uncertain. (In some cases, however, this surname may have originated as a nickname denoting a person who liked to dance, from the Middle High German word tanz, danz "dance".)
DEBS     French
From the given name Debus, a variant of Thebs or Thebus, which was an altered short form of Mattheus. This was borne by American union leader Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926).
DES ROCHES     French
Either a topographic name for someone living among rocks or a habitational name from any of several places named with this word, meaning "from the rocks" in French.
DOBY     English
From a diminutive of the given name Dob or Dobbe, itself a medieval diminutive of Robert (one of several rhyming nicknames of Robert in which the initial letter was altered; compare Hobbs).
DRAGOO     American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
DRURY     English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DUSHANE     American, French (Anglicized)
Anglicized variant of Duchesne.
EBERLE     Upper German, German (Swiss)
From a diminutive of Eberhard.
ELPHEE     English
Derived from the Old English given name Ælfwig.
ELSEGOOD     English (British), English (Australian)
Derived from an Old English given name, possibly *Ælfgod or *Æðelgod, in which the second element is god "god". (Another source gives the meaning "temple-god", presumably from ealh and god.)... [more]
ENEVOLDSEN     Danish
Means "son of Enevold".
ENJOLRAS     Literature
From a surname which was from Occitan enjeura meaning "to terrify". This was the name of a charismatic activist in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862).
ESKELL     Old Danish
Variant of Eskil, a form (found in Old Danish) of the Norse name Áskell, Ásketill.
ESPLIN     Scottish
Scottish variant of Asplin. This was borne by the English stained glass artist and muralist Mabel Esplin (1874-1921).
ETIENAM     Nigerian, Ibibio (?), Spanish (Caribbean, ?)
This is a name which originates from the Calabar/Akwa Ibom region of southeastern Nigeria. It means "a doer of good, or benevolent". It is also found in Spanish-speaking regions of the Caribbean such as Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and Cuba (El Oriente) which have populations of people of Ibibio/Efik decent known as "Carabali".
EYRE     English
Derived from Middle English eyer, eir "heir", originally denoting a man who was designated to inherit or had already inherited the main property in a particular locality. The surname was borne by the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
FAHEY     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fathaidh or Ó Fathaigh ‘descendant of Fathadh’, a personal name derived from fothadh ‘base’, ‘foundation’. This name is sometimes Anglicized as Green(e as a result of erroneous association with faithche ‘lawn’.
FAHY     Irish
Variant of Fahey.
FALSEN     Norwegian
Means "son of Falle".
FARADAY     English
From an English surname meaning "servant of Fair", Fair being derived from Old English fæger used as a personal name.
FEOKTISTOV     Russian
Means "son of Feoktist".
FILEMONSEN     Greenlandic
Means "son of Filemon".
FINNBOGASON     Icelandic
Means "son of Finnbogi".
FITZEMPRESS     History, Anglo-Norman
Means "son of the empress" in Anglo-Norman French. The three sons of Empress Matilda were known as Henry FitzEmpress (King Henry II of England), Geoffrey FitzEmpress, Count of Nantes, and William FitzEmpress, Count of Poitou.
FLENOT     American (South, ?)
I think this could be a French Indian name however, it may be misspelled, and I don't know the correct spelling.
FOLEY     Irish
Irish surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a southern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic byname Foghlaidh meaning "pirate, marauder". As a northern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic personal name Searrach, which was based on searrach "foal, colt" and anglicized as Foley because of its phonetic similarity to English foal.
FOUQUEREAU     French (Quebec)
Jean Fouquereau was born on November 6, 1617, in Anjou, Isère, France, his father, Louis, was 23 and his mother, Catherine, was 20. He married Renee Bataille on December 31, 1639, in Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France... [more]
GANGELHOFF     German
Gangelhoff - German
GRANTAIRE     Literature
This is the name of a minor character in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862), a follower of the revolutionary Enjolras.
GREENWAY     English
Originally given to a person who lived near a grassy path, from Middle English grene "green" and weye "road, path" (cf. Way).... [more]
GREENWAY     Welsh
Derived from the given name Goronwy.
GULLIVER     English
From a medieval nickname for a greedy person (from Old French goulafre "glutton"). Jonathan Swift used it in his satire 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726), about the shipwrecked ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, whose adventures "offer opportunities for a wide-ranging and often savage lampooning of human stupidity and vice."
HADDLEY     English
Variant of Hadley.
HALLGRÍMSSON     Icelandic
Means "son of Hallgrímur".
HARO     Spanish (Mexican)
Perhaps a shortened version of the name "de Haro"
HATATHLI     Navajo
From Navajo hataałii meaning ‎"medicine man, shaman", literally "singer" (from the verb hataał ‎"he sings, he is chanting").
HAVELOCK     English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
HEARD     English
Occupational name for a tender of animals, normally a cowherd or shepherd, from Middle English herde (Old English hi(e)rde).
HENNESSY     Irish
Reduced form of O’Hennessy, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAonghusa ‘descendant of Aonghus’ (see Angus, and compare McGinnis).
HINCKLEY     English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
HINKLEY     English
Variant of Hinckley.
HOLLIER     English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOLLISTER     English
English: occupational name for a brothelkeeper; originally a feminine form of Hollier.
HORTA     Catalan, Portuguese
Means "garden" (Latin hortus), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosed garden or an occupational name for one who was a gardener.
HOVHANNISIAN     Armenian
Means "son of Hovhannes" in Armenian. This is the most common surname in Armenia.
HOWDYSHELL     American, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
HUCKABAY     English
Variant of Huckaby.
HUMPHREYS     Welsh, English
Patronymic form of Humphrey. A famous bearer was Murray Humphreys (1899-1965), an American mobster of Welsh descent.
HURD     English
Variant of Heard.
HUSSEY     English, Irish
As an English surname, it comes from two distinct sources. It is either of Norman origin, derived from Houssaye, the name of an area in Seine-Maritime which ultimately derives from Old French hous "holly"; or it is from a Middle English nickname given to a woman who was the mistress of a household, from an alteration of husewif "housewife"... [more]
IMPEY     English
From Impey, the name of various places in England, derived from Old English *imphaga, *imphæg "sapling enclosure". Alternatively it could have indicated a person who lived near an enclosure of young trees.
IPATIEV     Russian
Means "son of Ipatiy".
JAVERT     Literature
The name of the policeman in Victor Hugo's "Les Misérables." His name was taken from the word Javert, which means "to pursue relentlessly."... [more]
KARENINA     Literature
In Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), this is the title character's surname, the feminine form of her husband's surname, Karenin.
KEHLER     German
Habitational name from various places called Kehl, notably the town across the Rhine from Strasbourg. In some cases it may be a variant of Köhler.
KELLEHER     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Céileachair meaning "son of Céileachar". The Irish given name Céileachar means "companion-dear", i.e., "lover of company".
KELLEN     German
From the name of a place in Rhineland, which is derived from Middle Low German kel (a field name denoting swampy land) or from the dialect word kelle meaning "steep path, ravine".
KELTY     Scottish
From the name of a village in Fife, Scotland, which was derived from Scottish Gaelic coillte "wooded area, grove".
KEMPTON     English
From the name of a place in Shropshire meaning "Cempa's town" or "warrior town", from a combination of either the Old English word cempa "warrior" or the byname derived from it and tun "farmstead, settlement".
KIDWELL     Welsh, English
The origins of this surname are uncertain, but it may be derived from Middle English kidel "fish weir", denoting a person who lived by a fish weir or made his living from it, or from an English place called Kiddal, probably meaning "Cydda's corner of land" from the Old English given name Cydda and halh "nook or corner of land".
KILGORE     Scottish
Habitational name for someone from Kilgour in Fife, named with the Gaelic coille "wood" and gobhar, gabhar "goat".
KINSELLA     Irish
From Gaelic Uí Ceinnsealaigh meaning "descendant of Cinnsealach", a given name probably meaning "chief warrior".
KIRWAN     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Ciardhubháin meaning "descendant of Ciardhubhán", a given name composed of the elements ciar "dark" and dubh "black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
KNIGHTON     English
English surname which was derived from a place name composed of the Old English elements cnihta meaning "servant, retainer" (genitive plural of cniht) and tun "enclosure, settlement".
KNOWLES     English, Irish
As an English surname it is derived from a genitive or plural form of Middle English knolle meaning "hilltop, hillock", denoting a person who either lived at the top of a hill or near a hillock, or hailed from one of the many places in England named with this word.... [more]
KYNE     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Cadháin meaning "descendant of Cadhán", a byname meaning "barnacle goose".
LANSING     Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
LANSING     English
Derived from the name of Lancing, a place in West Sussex, which was composed of the Old English personal name Wlanc and -ingas meaning "family of" or "followers of".
LARAMORE     English, Scottish
Variant of Lorimer.
LAVERDURE     French
From the French place name La Verdure meaning "greenness, greenery".
LAVERICK     English
Derived from Old English lāferce meaning "lark", making it a cognate of Lark.
LAZENBY     English
From a place name which was derived from leysingi and byr, two Norse words meaning "freedman" and "settlement" respectively.
LEGORE     Italian
Possibly Italian, a nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from a northern variant of lepre "hare". However, only the plural form Legori is attested in Italian records.
LENOIR     French
French surname which was originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or skin, derived from noir "black" combined with the definite article le.
LESTRADE     Literature
The name of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional head of Scotland Yard. Possibly from the French surname Lestrange
LESZCZYŃSKI     Polish
Name for someone who lived in a place called Leszczyno, Leszczynek or others derived from leszczyna "hazel".
LOMASNEY     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Lomasna meaning "descendant of Lomasna", a byname from lom "bare" and asna "rib".
LOVELAND     English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, possibly meaning "Lufa's land" in Old English or "leaf land" in Norwegian.
LUSTER     English
Variant of Lester.
MAC PHÁIDÍN     Irish
Patronymic of (a Gaelic diminutive of) Patrick.
MADIGA     Indian, Telugu
Telugu occupational name for a leather worker, a job historically considered polluting and impure in India, where the surname belongs to Dalit, or "Untouchables" - members of the lowest caste.
MAITLAND     English, Scottish
Possibly from Mautalant, the name of a place in Pontorson, France meaning "inhospitable" or "bad temper" in Norman French (ultimately from Late Latin malum "bad" and talentum "inclination, disposition"), which was so named because of its unproductive soil; or perhaps it was originally a nickname for an ungracious individual, derived from the same source.
MARLING     English
Variant of Merlin.
MAYBERRY     English, Irish
Of uncertain origin, probably an altered form of Mowbray. Possibly it is derived from an English place name.
MAZARIN     French
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
MAZZARINO     Italian
A diminutive of Mazzaro, an Italian surname meaning "mace-bearer".
MCFADDEN     Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Phaid(e)in (Scottish) and Mac Pháidín (Irish) - both patronymics of Patrick (via Gaelic diminutives of the given name).
MOWBRAY     English
Ultimately from the name of a place in Normandy meaning "mud hill" in Old French.
MOXLEY     English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish
From the name of a minor place in the West Midlands.
NEWBY     English
Means "person from Newby", Newby being a combination of the Middle English elements newe "new" and by "farm, settlement" (ultimately from Old Norse býr "farm"). British travel writer Eric Newby (1919-2006) bore this surname.
OSLER     English
Possibly derived from Ostler (from the the Norman 'Hostelier') meaning clerk or bookkeeper. First used in England after the Norman invasion of 1066. Surname of a 19th cent. Canadian doctor, Sir William Osler, widely viewed as the 'Father of Internal Medicine'.
PADAIYACHI     Indian, Tamil
Variant transcription of Padiachy.
PALAFOX     Spanish (Mexican)
From Palafolls, a Catalan place name.
PEABODY     English
Probably from a nickname for a showy dresser, from Middle English pe "peacock" (see Peacock) and body "body, person". Alternatively it may be from the name of a Celtic tribe meaning "mountain men" from Brythonic pea "large hill, mountain" combined with Boadie, the tribe's earlier name, which meant "great man" (or simply "man") among the Briton and Cambri peoples... [more]
PEGRAM     English
Variant of Pilgrim.
PELHAM     English
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
PELTIER     French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
PENROSE     Cornish, Welsh
Originally meant "person from Penrose", Cornwall, Herefordshire and Wales ("highest part of the heath or moorland"). It is borne by the British mathematician Sir Roger Penrose (1931-).... [more]
PETROSIAN     Armenian
Means "son of Petros" in Armenian.
PILGRIM     English, German
From Middle English pilegrim, pelgrim or Middle High German bilgerin, pilgerin (from Latin pelegrinus "traveler"; see Pellegrino). This originated as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to some seat of devotion nearer home, such as Santiago de Compostella, Rome, or Canterbury... [more]
PITAN     ?
Guatemalan?
POBJOY     English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
POLIDORI     Italian
Means "son of Polidoro". Famous bearers include John William Polidori (1795-1821), a physician to Lord Byron and author of 'The Vampyre' (1819), and his sister Frances Polidori (1800-1886), the mother of painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti, poet Christina Rossetti, critic William Michael Rossetti, and author Maria Francesca Rossetti.
POSTHUMUS     Dutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
POSTMA     Frisian
Frisian variant of the Dutch and North German surname Posthumus.
PULSIFER     English
Probably a variant of Percival.
PUMFREY     Welsh
Variant of Pumphrey.
PUMPHREY     Welsh
From Welsh ap Umffrey meaning "son of Humphrey".
RATHGEBER     German
From Middle High German ratgebe or Middle Low German ratgever "giver of advice, counselor", an occupational name for an adviser or wise man.
RAVENHILL     English
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
RODELA     Galician
Possibly habitational name from a place called Rodel (in A Coruña province, Galicia), derived from a diminutive of roda "wheel".
ROSEVEAR     Cornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
SALM     Dutch
SANDMEIER     German, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
From Middle High German sand combined with Meier, referring to a tenant farmer whose farm was on sandy soil.
SAYWARD     English (Rare)
English surname which was a variant of Seward.
SELF     English
East Anglian surname, from the medieval English masculine name Saulf which was derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wulf "wolf".
SEVERN     English
From the name of the River Severn, which is of unknown meaning. The Severn is Great Britain's longest river, flowing from Wales through much of western England to the Bristol Channel. It is one of Britain’s most ancient river names, recorded as early as the 2nd century AD in the form Sabrina; its original meaning may have been "slow-moving" or "boundary".
SEVERN     English
From a medieval personal name derived from Severinus (Latin).
SEVERSON     American
Probably an Americanized form of Sivertsen, Sivertson, or Sievertsen.
SHACKLADY     English
Perhaps from a medieval nickname for a man who had had sexual relations with a woman of higher social class (from shag "to copulate with" (not recorded before the late 17th century) and lady).... [more]
SHELDRAKE     English
From a medieval nickname for a dandyish (showy) or vain man, from Middle English scheldrake, the male of a type of duck with brightly-coloured plumage (itself from the East Anglian dialect term scheld "variegated" combined with drake "male duck").
SHIVERS     Irish
Irish variant of Chivers.
SHUCK     English
Origin uncertain; perhaps a nickname from Middle English schucke "devil, fiend".
SIEVERTSEN     German
Patronymic of Sievert.
SIVERTSEN     Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Patronymic of Sivert.... [more]
SIVERTSON     American
Americanized form of Sivertsen or Sivertsson.
SIVERTSSON     Swedish
Swedish cognate of Sivertsen.
SNELSON     English
Means "son of Snell", Snell being a nickname for a brisk or active person, from Middle English snell "quick, lively" (cf. the Dutch cognate Snell), but "in part also representing a survival of the Old English personal name Snell or the Old Norse cognate Snjallr."
SORRELL     English
From a medieval nickname meaning literally "little red-haired one", from a derivative of Anglo-Norman sorel "chestnut".
SOYER     French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
SPENDLOVE     English
From a medieval nickname for someone who spread their amorous affections around freely. A different form of the surname was borne by Dora Spenlow, the eponymous hero's "child-wife" in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849-50).... [more]
STEINBECK     German
Denotes a person hailing from one of the many places in Germany called Steinbeck or Steinbach, from Middle High German stein "stone" and bach "stream, creek". In some cases it is a South German occupational name for a mason... [more]
ST FLEUR     Haitian Creole
From the French place name St Fleur.
ST LEGER     Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
SWAIN     Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
SWAN     English, Scottish
Originally given as a nickname to a person who was noted for purity or excellence, which were taken to be attributes of the swan, or who resembled a swan in some other way. In some cases it may have been given to a person who lived at a house with the sign of a swan... [more]
SWANN     English
Variant of Swan.
TONNESEN     Norwegian
Means "son of Tonnes", Tonnes or Tønne(s) being a Norwegian short form of Antonius.
TRESSILLIAN     English
Derived from a Cornish place name meaning "Sulyen's farmstead" (see Sulien).
TURRENTINE     American
Origin unidentified ('Dictionary of American Family Names': "1881 census has 0, Not in RW, EML"), perhaps from the Italian surname Tarantino.
UNTHANK     English
From a place name meaning "squatter's holding" from Old English unthanc (literally "without consent").
WASHBURN     English
Northern English topographic name for someone living on the banks of the Washburn river in West Yorkshire, so named from the Old English personal name Walc + Old English burna ‘stream’... [more]
WELD     English
Meant "one who lives in or near a forest (or in a deforested upland area)", from Middle English wold "forest" or "cleared upland". A famous bearer is American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-).
WELTY     German (Swiss)
From a Swiss German diminutive of the German given name Walther. A literary bearer was the American writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001).
WHITBY     English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
WINNEY     English
Derived from an unattested Old English given name, *Wyngeofu, composed of the elements wyn "joy" and geofu "battle".... [more]
WINSETT     English
From an English surname of unexplained origin, perhaps related to Winslow, Winston or Windsor.
WINTERSON     English
Patronymic form of Winter.
WYCHERLEY     English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
XYLANDER     German (Rare)
Modern coinage, derived from Greek ξυλον (xylon) "wood, forest" combined with Greek ανδρος (andros) "of a man". The latter element is the genitive of Greek ανηρ (aner) "man"... [more]
ZAFEIRIOU     Greek
Means "son of Zafeiris".
ZALE     Polish (Anglicized)
Possibly from a Polish surname, the meaning of which is uncertain (it may have been a variant of the surname Zalas which originally indicated one who lived "on the other side of the wood", from za "beyond" and las "forest").
ZÚÑIGA     Spanish
Spanish form of Zuñiga.
229 results