Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
MICK German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name MIKOLAJ or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread". The name was reportedly taken from Germany to Ireland in the 18th century.
MICKLEY French
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
MIDDENDORF German
"middle of the village"
MIELE Italian
It means "honey" in Italian.
MIGNOGNA Italian
In part a Southern Italian a habitational name from Mignogna, a minor place in Foggia province.
MINELLA Italian
Southern Italian, from a pet form of the female personal name Mina, a short form of Guglielmina, Giacomina, etc.
MINELLI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Minello, a pet form of the personal name Mino, which is a short form of a personal name formed with the hypocoristic suffix -mino, such as Adimino, Giacomino, Guglielmino, etc.
MINOR English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
MIOLA Italian
italian
MIRABELLA Italian, Sicilian, Italian (Australian)
Italian (Campania and Sicily): habitational name from Mirabella Eclano in Avellino or Mirabella Imbaccari in Catania, or from various places with the name Mirabello, all named from medieval Latin mira, "viewpoint", and bella, "beautiful"... [more]
MIRAMON French
MIRAMON is a French name with Spanish origins. ... [more]
MITTEL German
Literally "middle", probably a topographic name from a farm occupying a middle position in a settlement. Compare Mitter.
MITTELMANN German
From a byname from Middle High German mittelman "mediator, arbitrator".
MITTER German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned a property that was in the middle between two or more others, especially if the others were both held by men with the same personal name (for example, Mitter Hans), from the strong form of Middle High German mitte "mid, middle".
MITTERMAIER German
Variant of Mittermeier.
MÖBIUS German
Patronymic surname derived from the given name Bartholomäus, the German form of Bartholomew.
MÖBUS German
Variant of Möbius.
MODAFFARI Italian
Nickname from Arabic muzaffar "victorious".
MODENA Italian, Judeo-Italian
Italian and Jewish (from Italy) habitational name from the city of Modena in Emilia-Romagna.
MOGASEN German
meaning unknown
MOHLER German, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
MOHR German
From a short form of an old personal name, Morhart (see Morath).
MOHRBACHER German
Likely arose as a name for those living near Morbach, Germany
MOLINARO Italian
The surname Molinaro is a name for a person who owned, managed, or worked in a mill deriving its origin from the Italian word "molino," which meant mill.
MOLINAROLO Italian
Probably from a person's occupation, with molino/mulino meaning "mill" in Italian. The second part may come from rullo, meaning "a roller" or "I roll."
MONACO Italian
Nickname for someone of monkish habits or appearance, or an occupational name for a servant employed at a monastery, from Italian monaco "monk" (from Greek monachos "monk", "solitary").
MONNIER French
It means Miller, someone operating a mill; from "meunier" or "mounier" in Old French.
MONTAG German
It means Monday in German.
MONTAGNET French, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
MONTALBANO Italian
Habitational name from Montalbano di Elicona in northeastern Sicily (earlier simply Montalbano), Montalbano Jonico (Matera province), or the district of Montalbano in Fasano, Brindisi.
MONTAPERTO Italian
My father tells me this name means "open mountain." It seems to have come from a small area around Agrigento in Sicily, Italy.
MONTEBLANCO French, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
MONTEFIORE Italian, Jewish
Derived from Montefiore, which is the name of several places in Italy. For example, there is Castle Montefiore in the town of Recanati (province of Macerata), the municipality of Montefiore Conca (province of Rimini) and the municipality of Montefiore dell'Aso (province of Ascoli Piceno)... [more]
MONTESQUIEU French
From French montagne, meaning "mountain" and possibly also from queue, meaning "line". Charles Montesquieu was a 17th-century French aristocrat, philosopher and politician.
MONTEVERDE Italian
Habitational name from any of various places called Monteverde, for example in Avellino province, from monte meaning "mountain" + verde meaning "green".
MONTEVERDI Italian
Derived from Italian monte meaning "mountain" and verdi meaning "green"; literally means "green mountain".
MONTISCI Italian
Originated in Sardinia, Italy in the 17th century given to fishermen
MONTIVERDI Italian
Green Mountain
MONTY French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
MONZO Italian
Possibly a variant of Monsu, which may be an occupational name for a cook, Calabrian munsu, or a nickname or title from Milanese monsu ‘sir’, ‘lord’, ‘gentleman’.
MOOK German
This surname means 'flying insect' from a German word that is mauke. (I think it is mauke, I am SO not sure.)
MORALEE English, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
MORELLI Italian
Patronymic / plural form of Morello.
MORTICELLI Italian
Means "died small" in Italian.
MOSBRUCKER German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bridge over a swamp, from Middle High German mos meaning "bog", "swamp" + brucke meaning "bridge".
MOSCATELLI Italian
The name Moscatelli has its origins in a type of grape called Moscatel. This grape has its origin in ancient Egypt or Greece, but it was in Italy that it became famous. Here the farmers that planted the grape became known as the Moscatelli.
MOSCATI Italian
Possibly a variant of Moscato.
MOSCATO Italian
Variant of the personal name Muscato, also Americanized spelling of Greek Moskatos, a metonymic occupational name for a grower of muscat grapes.
MOSELE Italian, German (Austrian)
This surname is to be found in north-eastern Italy, more specifically in the Vicenza and Verona provinces. Families with this name are certain to be originally from the mountain town of Asiago, situated on a plateau north of Vicenza and now a well-known skiing resort... [more]
MOST German
Metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of must, i.e. unfermented grape juice, from Middle High German most, ultimately derived from Latin mustum vinum meaning "young (i.e. fresh) wine"... [more]
MOTEL French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
MOZART German
The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt, and later as Motzhardt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos)... [more]
MUCCIARONE Italian
From an augmentative form of the dimunitive suffix -muccio short form of pet names ending in -muccio such as ANSELMUCCIO or GIACOMUCCIO.
MUCCIO Italian
Short form of pet names ending in -muccio such as Anselmuccio or Giacomuccio.
MULLINIX French
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
MÜSCH German
Either a habitational name from a place named Müsch in Germany, or a topographic name meaning "bog", perhaps given to someone living near a bog.
MUSCH Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
MUSKOW French (Archaic)
French Variant of Moscow.
MUTTER German
(also Mütter): occupational name for an official employed to measure grain, from Middle High German mutte, mütte 'bushel', 'grain measure' (Latin modius) + the agent suffix -er.
MUZIO Italian (Rare)
Northern Italian from a medieval personal name derived from the Latin personal name Mucius or Mutius.
NABROTZKY German
Supposedly means "lived near water". Originated from Prussia.
NACHTIGALL German, Jewish
Nickname from Middle High German nachtegal "nightingale" from Old High German galan "to sing". Cognate to NIGHTINGALE.
NACHTRIEB German
It possibly comes from the German name of a nachtrab, which is a "night bird like the owl". Another possible meaning is "night tribe".
NADEAU French
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
NADEL German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of needles, or in some cases for a tailor, from Middle High German nadel(e), German Nadel "needle".
NAEGELE German
Variant of Nagel.
NAPELLO Italian
a nickname taken from the plantname Aconitum napellus, possibly for someone with a 'venerous' character (because the plant is venerous)
NAPOLITANO Italian
Originally indicated a person from Napoli (Naples) in Italy.
NARR German
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
NASERS German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
NASSER German
Someone from any of the places called Nassen, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Hesse, and Bavaria.
NAST German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, or a metonymic occupational name for a woodcutter, from Middle High German nast meaning "branch", a regional variant of ast, resulting from the misdivision of forms such as ein ast meaning "a branch".
NATTI Italian
from the Latin name Nattius
NAU German
A variant of Neu; meaning "ship" or "boat."
NAULT French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
NAVARRE French
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
NAVARRO Spanish, French, English
Describes a former member of the ancient kingdom of Navarre. Possibly means 'the treeless country' or 'the country above the trees'
NEESON Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as McNeese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen. Surname made famous by the actor Liam Neeson
NEFF German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German neve 'nephew', hence probably a distinguishing name for a close relation or familiar of a prominent personage.
NEGLEY German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Swiss German Nägele, Naegeli, or Nägeli, variants of Nagel.
NEGRO Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Jewish
Nickname or ethnic name from negro "black" (Latin niger), denoting someone with dark hair or a dark complexion.
NEGRO Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Jewish
From a medieval continuation of the Latin personal name Niger.
NEGRON Spanish, Italian
This surname is a most likely variant of the word and name Negro.
NEHER German
An occupational name for a tailor from a deritive of Middle Low German, 'nehen' which means 'to sew' or 'to embroider'
NEIN German
Unexplained. Perhaps from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with an element cognate with Old High German niuwi meaning "new".
NENNINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Nenningen in Württemberg.
NERZ German
From the German word Nerz meaning "Mink".
NETTESHEIM German
"nice home"
NEU German (Modern)
The name Neu is a common German last name.
NEUBERGER German
German surname meaning 'new mountaineer'
NEUENFELDT German
Habitational name for someone from places so named in Brandenburg and Pomerania, or from places in Lower Saxony or Westphalia called Neuenfelde.
NEUGER German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
NEUHAUS German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived in a new house, Middle High German niuwe hus, modern German neu Haus, or a habitational name for someone from any of several places named Neuhaus ('new house') in various parts of Germany and Austria, also in Bohemia.
NEUHAUSER German, German (Austrian)
Means "new house" in German.
NEUJAHR German
nickname for someone who owed feudal dues at the New Year, or sometimes a name given to someone born on that day
NEUSER German (Rare)
Person who had ancestors that lived in Germany near Dusseldorf in the town called Neuss.
NEUWIRTH German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
NEY German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
NIBBE German
Nickname meaning ‘beak’, or from a short form of a Germanic personal name Nippo, composed of Old High German nit ‘hostility’, ‘eagerness’ + boto ‘messenger’.
NICKAL German
Variant of Nickel
NICKEL German
From the German word "kupfernickel" meaning Devil's copper or St Nicholas's (OLd Nick's) copper.
NICKS English, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
NICOLAY German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay. This is the name of a French family of nobility.
NICOLIN French
From the given name Nicolas.
NICOLINI Italian
patronymic from Nicolino, a pet form of Nicola
NIED Upper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
NIEDERHÄUSER German, Swiss
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Niederhaus or Niederhausen, denoting the lower of two dwellings or settlements or one in a low-lying position.
NIEDERMEIER German, German (Austrian)
Initially used as a distinguishing name for a farmer ("Meier") who had a farm lower ("nieder") than the neighboring one(s). This surname and its variant spellings are common to Austria and the Free State of Bavaria in Germany.
NIEDERMEYER German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
NIEHAUS German
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
NIES German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
NIESEN Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis). ... [more]
NIGG German, German (Swiss)
From a short form of the personal name Niklaus, a German form of Nicholas.
NIKKEL German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
NOBLE English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
NOCE Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived where nut trees grew, from noce "nut" (Latin nux, genitive nucis).
NOCELLA Italian
Diminutive of NOCE.
NOËL French
Means "Christmas".
NOIR French
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
NOISETTE French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
NOLAND Irish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
NOLF German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
NONNENMACHER German
Occupational name for a gelder of hogs, from Middle High German nunne, nonne meaning "nun", and by transfer "castrated hog" + an agent derivative of machen meaning "to make".
NOONS French
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
NORA Italian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
NORMAND French
Means North Man, meaning vikings
NORRELL English, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
NOTBOHM German, Low German
Low German cognate of High German Nussbaum.
NOVI Italian
Derived from Italian novello and ultimately derived from Latin novellus meaning "new". "Novi" also means "new" in several Slavic languages.
NÜRNBERGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from the city of Nürnberg in Bavaria.
NUSS German
from Middle High German nuz ‘nut’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a gatherer and seller of nuts, or a nickname for a man thought to resemble a nut in some way
OBENAUF German
Surname used to refer to someone who lived 'up there' (on a mountain, hill, etc.).
OBERLIN German, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]
OCCHIOGROSSO Italian
Descriptive nickname meaning "big eye".
OCHSNER German (Swiss)
Means "oxen herder" in Swiss, from Middle High German ohse "ox".
OCTOBRE French
Means "October" in French.
ODELIN French
Not to be confused with the similarly spelled ODELÍN, which is Spanish rather than French, though they could have similar origins in name.
ODIGE French, African
A Name from french Odige (O.DI Zeouf) zeouf with means egg Zeouf is spelled as ge to shorten the name. This surname means fighter The French has been known to be Lovely and the language of love un-violent... [more]
OFFUTT German
Possibly a respelling of German Auffahrt ‘ascension’.
OHNMACHT German
Means "powerlessness; helplessness; without power" in German. This was often used to describe someone very weak.
OLEVIAN German (Latinized)
Olevian is a latinised word meaning "from Olewig" (a town today incorporated into Trier, Germany). ... [more]
ONFROY French
From a form of the given name Humphrey.
OPEL German
Derived from the given name ALBERT.
OPP German
Generally considered a (very) contracted form of given names that contained the Old High German element od "fortune; wealth" (or a variant thereof) and a second element that began with or contained the letter B, for example Audobald.
ORLEANS French
From France. Middle ages??
OROWITZ Jewish, German
The name comes from a famous Rabbinical dynasty.... [more]
ORSI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Orso. It may also be an Italianized form of Slovenian Uršic, metronymic from the female personal name Urša, short form of Uršula (Latin Ursula), or a patronymic from the male personal name Urh, Slovenian vernacular form of Ulrik, German Udalrich
OSSOLA Italian
Likely a habitational name from an area in the Verbano-Cusio-Ossola province in Northern Italy.
ÖSTERREICHER German, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
OVERHOLSER German (Swiss)
The Oberholtzer family originated in the Swiss village of Oberholtz, south of Zurich, before the 15th century. However, in 1661, one family left Switzerland for the Palatinate in Germany.
PACETTI Italian
Variant of Pacetto, a pet form of the personal name Pace.
PACIELLO Italian
Italian surname for "Little peacemaker"; a diminutive for the Italian word "paciere", meaning Peacemaker.
PACIFICO Italian
means "peacefull" in Italian.
PACIONE Italian
From an augmentative of the personal name Pace.
PACKARD English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PADGETT French
In French the meaning of the name Padgett is: Attendant
PAGANINI Italian
Patronymic form of PAGANINO.
PAGANINO Italian
Diminutive of PAGANO.
PAGE German
Metonymic occupational name for a horse dealer, from Middle Low German page "horse".
PAGLIARO Italian
Occupational name for someone who gathered or used straw, derived from the Italian word paglia "straw".
PAGLIARULO Italian
Southern Italian diminutive of PAGLIARO.
PAINTER English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
PALADINO Italian
Means "paladin, knight" in Italian.
PALLMANN German
The name Pallmann originates from the Landsuhl area of Bavaria, Germany (nor in Rhineland-Palatinate). The meaning of the name is unknown. Some Pallmanns came to America and Americanized the spelling, by dropping the second "n", while others retained the "n".
PALLOMINY Italian
Old surname first used in northern Italy,was derived from the old latin word "palominus", used to refer to a yellowish horse. The lastname Pallominy, originally spelled "Pallomini", was used to denote a heard of those horses in the medieval Italy ( circa 1350 AD), more especifically in the city of Florence and its surroundings.
PALMA Spanish, Catalan, Galician, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Catalan, Galician, Portuguese, and southern Italian: habitational name from any of various places named or named with Palma, from Latin palma ‘palm’. ... [more]
PALMERO Italian
The Palmero family lived in the territory of Palma, which is in Campania, in the province of Naples. The surname Palma was also a patronymic surname, derived from the personal name Palma, which was common in medieval times... [more]
PALMTAG German
Means "Palm Sunday" in German.
PANARO Italian
metonymic occupational name for a baker, from Latin panarium ‘bread basket’.
PANCORVO Italian
A famous Spanish cave, located in Burgos, where the arabs hid from Spanierds.
PANEBIANCO Italian
given to someone who worked with high quality breads. from italian word pane "bread" and bianco "white"
PANEPINTO Italian
Derived from the word "pane" meaning "bread" in Italian and "pinto" meaning "painted", "flecked", or possibly "bad". The name is generally given to a baker.
PANETTIERE Italian
Means "baker" in Italian.
PANOZZO Italian
Venice, one of the oldest and most beautiful regions of Italy, is the esteemed birthplace of numerous prominent families, and of a family that bears the surname Panozzo. Although people were originally known only by a single name, it became necessary for them to adopt a second name to identify themselves, as populations grew and travel became more frequent... [more]
PANTALEO Italian
From the given name PANTALEON.
PAPACCIO Italian
The root papa comes from the Greek language, whose Italian translation is literally "priest", but during centuries this was also a term of respect, and this is due to the active influence of Greek and Byzantine culture in southern Italy and specifically in Naples... [more]
PAQUETTE French
From the personal name Paquet, a pet form of Pascal.
PARADISO Italian
Means "paradise" in Italian.
PARAMORE French (Rare)
origin is unknown but the meaning of the name is lover used in France and England
PARATORE Italian
Derived from Italian paratore meaning "decorator, fuller", which refers to a craftsman who fulls coarse cloth. In other words: this surname is the Italian cognate of the English surname Fuller... [more]
PARDUHN German
Variant Of Pardon From Middle English Pardun, Pardon "Pardon" A Metonymic occupational name for a pardoner, a person licensed to sell papal pardons or indulgences. German: either a cognate of 1 (also for a sexton), from Old French pardon ‘pardon’, or perhaps a nickname from Middle Low German bardun, Middle High German purdune ‘pipe’ (instrument), ‘tenor’ (voice).
PAROLO Italian
Italian surname coming from the given name Gaspare.
PARROT French
Form of Pierone.... [more]
PARSLEY Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PARTENHEIMER German
Habitational name for someone from Partenheim in Rheinhessen.
PASCH German
Topographic name for a field or meadow which was used at Easter as a playground; etymologically two sources seem to be combined: Latin pascuum ‘pasture’ and Middle Low German pāsche(n) ‘Easter’.
PASSAFIUME Italian
ferryman "across the water"
PASTEUR French
French for "shepherd" or "preacher, pastor". Famous bearer Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist who created the first rabies vaccine, gave his name to the process of 'pasteurization'.
PASTORELLI Italian
An occupational name meaning "shepherd."
PATERNO Italian
Italian surname of unknown origin, most likely comes from Paternò in Sicily. Notable individuals include Joe Paterno (1926 - 2012), head coach at Pennsylvania State University until 2011.
PAULEY English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
PAULICK German
German (of Slavic origin) spelling of Pavlik, a Slavic derivative of Paul.
PAUSTENBACH German
Thomas Paustenbach, family name associated with the town Paustenbach, Germany
PAYSEN German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
PAYSON German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
PECCHIA Italian
Nickname, probably for an industrious person, from pecchia "bee".
PÊCHEUR French
French for "fisher."
PECHMAN German
"Pechman" means "man with bad luck" in many European languages (Polish, German, and Dutch predominantly), though in German, it originally referred to one who prepared, sold, or used pitch.
PECORELLA Italian
Diminutive of PECORA.
PEIA Italian
Village in Italy
PEIK German
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
PEIKERT German
Probably an occupational name for a drummer.
PELKEY French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surnames Peltier and Pelltier.
PELLE Italian
From the Italian word pelle "skin".
PELLE Danish, German
From the personal name Pelle, a vernacular form of PETER.
PELLE German
From Middle Low German pelle "precious purple silk cloth", presumably an occupational name for a maker or seller of such cloth or for a maker of official and church vestments.
PELLEGRINI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Pellegrino.
PELOSI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of PELOSO.
PELOSO Italian
Nickname for a man with long or unkempt hair and beard, from peloso "hairy", "shaggy".
PELTIER French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
PELTZ German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from Middle High German bellez, (modern German pelz) "fur", "animal skin".
PELZ German, Jewish
Variant of PELTZ.
PELZER German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative Middle High German bellez "fur".
PENNING Upper German
Shortened form of Panno, which is a personal given name.
PÉPIN French
From the Old French name Pepis, itself a form of the given name Pépin. Alternatively, it may be derived from French pépin meaning "(fruit) seed", thus making it an occupational name for a gardener or someone who grew fruit-bearing trees.
PERDUE English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
PERETTI Italian
Patronymic from a pet form of the personal name Pero.
PERNIER Italian
A famous bearer is the Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier (1874 - 1937), who discovered the mysterious Phaistos disc on the Greek island of Crete.
PESCI Italian
Derived from the Italian word pesce which means "fish", ultimately from Latin piscis. This could serve as an occupational surname for a fisher / fisherman or a person who looked like a fish... [more]
PETKE German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.