Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
QUETZ German
German family name originating from the town of Quetz (today Quetzdölsdorf).... [more]
QUINTO Aragonese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian
Habitational surname for a person from a place called Quinto, for example in Zaragoza province. However, the high concentration of the surname in Alacant province suggests that, in some cases at least, it may derive from the personal name QUINTO (from Latin QUINTUS denoting the fifth-born child or Catalan quinto "young soldier").... [more]
RAAB German
Derived from German rabe "raven". As a surname, it was given to a person with black hair.
RAABE German
Cognate of RABE.
RAASCH German
Variant of RASCH.
RABE German
German surname meaning "raven, crow".
RABENSTEIN German
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Rabenstein.
RACHEL English, German
From the English female given name RACHEL or derived from German rau "rough".
RADER German
Variation of Rademacher, meaning "maker of wheels" in German ("rat" meaning wheel), later shortened to Rader and other variations such as Redder, Raeder, Redler, etc.
RADLER German
Occupational name, which was derived from the kind of work done by the original bearer. It is a name for a wheelmaker or wheelwright. The name stems from the German noun rat, meaning wheel. The origin is more clear in the variant RADEMACHER
RAFFENSPERGER German
Altered spelling of Ravensburger or Ravensberger, a habitational name for someone from Ravensburg in Württemberg, but there are a number of similar surnames, for example Raffenberg, a farm name near Hamm, and Raffsberger.
RAGATZ German (Swiss)
Habitational name from Ragaz in Grison canton.
RAGONESI Italian
Meaning: People Of Aragon
RAGUSA Italian
Habitational name from Ragusa in Sicily, or from the ancient city of Dubrovnik on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia (Italian name Ragusa).
RAHE German
Nickname for a rough individual, from a North German variant of Rauh.
RAISCH German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German rīsch, rūsch ‘reed’, ‘rush’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near a reed bed, or perhaps a metonymic occupational name for someone who used or harvested reeds... [more]
RAISON English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
RAITER German
Occupational name for a taxman or accountant, from an agent derivative of Middle High German reiten ‘to reckon’, ‘to calculate’.
RAMAGE French, Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for a hot-tempered or unpredictable person (from Old French ramage "wild, uncontrollable" (applied to birds of prey)).
RAMBEAU French (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, RAINBAUT, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
RAMP German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: variant of Rampf, from Middle High German ramft, ranft ‘edge’, ‘wall’, ‘crust (of bread)’; applied as a topographic name for someone who lived at the limit or outer edge of some feature, for example a field, or possibly, in the sense ‘crust’, a nickname for a poor person.
RANDAZZO Italian
Habitational name from a place in Catania called Randazzo. Possibly from a derivative of the personal name Rando.
RANDEL French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name RANDO, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element... [more]
RANDOLPH English, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
RANG German
Variant of RANGE.... [more]
RANGE German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
RANGEL German, Spanish, Portuguese
A variant of RENGEL. This name is also found in Portugal.
RANGER English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RAPHAN German
Unknown
RAPPA Italian, Sicilian
from Sicilian rappa meaning ‘bunch, cluster’ or Italian rappa meaning ‘lock, quiff’, which was presumably applied as a nickname with reference to someone’s hair.
RAPPOLD German
From a personal name composed of the Germanic elements rad "counsel", "advice" + bald "bold", "brave".
RASSI Italian
Comes from the Italian rosso, meaning "red".
RATHER German, Jewish
1. Occupational name for a counsellor or nickname for a wise person, from Middle High German rater ‘adviser’. ... [more]
RATHGEBER German
From Middle High German ratgebe or Middle Low German ratgever "giver of advice, counselor", an occupational name for an adviser or wise man.
RAU German
Nickname for a ruffian, earlier for a hairy person, from Middle High German ruch, ruhe, rouch "hairy", "shaggy", "rough".
RAU Italian
From a local variant of the personal name Rao, an old form of RALPH.
RÄUBER German, German (Swiss)
German, Swiss German: derogatory nickname, from Middle High German roubære ‘robber’, ‘bandit’, ‘highwayman’ (from roub, roup ‘booty’, ‘spoils’).
RAUCH German
Perhaps an occupational nickname for a blacksmith or charcoal burner, from Middle High German rouch, German Rauch ‘smoke’, or, in the case of the German name, a status name or nickname relating to a hearth tax (i.e. a tax that was calculated according to the number of fireplaces in each individual home).
RAVENEL English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
RAYMOND English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
RÉAL French
This can derive from several different sources: southern French réal "royal", a word which was applied to someone either as a nickname (presumably given to people perceived as being regal) or as an occupational name (given to a person in the service of the king); or the French place name Réal, in which case this is a habitational name taken from any of various places which were named for having been part of a royal domain (also compare Reau, Reaux).
REALE Italian
From reale "royal", either an occupational name for someone in the service of a king or a nickname for someone who behaved in a regal manner.
RECCHIA Italian
Nickname from a reduced form of orecchia "ear".
RECCHIO Italian
Probably a shortened form of orecchio "ear".
RECHT German
Probably a habitational name from a place so named in the Rhineland.
RECHT German, Jewish
Nickname for an upright person, from Middle High German reht, German recht "straight". As a Jewish name it is mainly of ornamental origin.
RECK German
Nickname from Middle High German recke ‘outlaw’ or ‘fighter’. North German and Westphalian: from Middle Low German recke ‘marsh’, ‘waterlogged ground’, hence a topographic name, or a habitational name from a place named with this term.
RECKTENWALD German
habitational name from Recktenwald, near Saarbrücken.
REDDING English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of READING. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDIG Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of REDDING.
REDNER German
German: possibly a variant of REDMER, or an occupational name for a spokesman, Middle High German rednære.
REESE Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
REEVER German
Possibly an altered form of German Riefer, a patronymic from the personal name RÜEF, a reduced form of RUDOLF.
REGINATTO Italian
nato means "born" in italian... [more]
REICH German, Jewish
Nickname for a wealthy or powerful man, from Middle High German rīch "of noble descent, powerful, rich", German reich "rich".
REICH German
From a short form of a personal name containing the Old High German element rīhhi "power, might".
REICHSTEIN German
Habitational name from places named Reichstein (in Saxony) or Reichenstein (in Rhineland, Schleswig-Holstein, and Württemberg).
REIMANN German
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with a first element from ragin 'advice', 'counsel' or ric 'power(ful)', 'rich'.
REIMER German
From a Germanic personal name, a reduced form of Reinmar, composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + mari, meri "fame".
REIMERS German
North German variant of REIMER.
REINBOLD German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave."
REINHARDT German
Comes from a personal name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin, meaning counsel, with hard, hardy, brave, strong.
REINHOLDT German
From the German given name Reinhold.
REINKING German
Reinking is a German-derived surname meaning "one who is neat and tidy"
REISE German, Jewish
German (Westphalia) topographic name, from Middle Low German ris, res ‘swamp’. ... [more]
REISER German, Upper German
Habitational name for someone from Reis or Reissen in Bavaria (see REIS). An occupational name from Middle High German reisære ‘warrior’, ‘traveler’... [more]
REISNER German
A habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river. A variant of REISER Also from an agent derivative of Middle High German, Middle Low German rise ‘veil’; perhaps an occupational name for someone who made veils.
REISS German, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of REIS or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename RIS, rendered as REIS and REISS.... [more]
REISSER Upper German
An occupational name for a woodcutter, Middle High German risser.
REMINI Italian
Famous bearer: Actress and Scientology critic Leah Remini.
REMIS Greek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name REMIGIUS (see French REMY)... [more]
RENAUDIN French
From the given name RENAUD.
RENDA Italian
Possibly a derivative of LORENZO.
RENGEL German (Swiss)
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with rang "curved", "bending"; "slender".
RENNA Italian
Variant of RENDA.
REPASS German (Swiss)
An Americanization of the Swiss RIPPAS. The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
REQUA German
Variant of Ricward, from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + ward ‘guardian’.
RESEN German
Unknown source.
RESTIVO Italian
From an Italian nickname derived from the dialectal word restivu meaning "uncommunicative, reserved".
REUS Dutch, German, Catalan
Dutch: nickname for a big man, from Middle Dutch reuse(n) 'giant'. German: topographic name from Middle High German riuse 'fish trap' (Middle Low German ruse) or from a regional term reuse 'small stream', 'channel'... [more]
REUSSER Swiss, German, Upper German
In Switzerland, an occupational name for a fisherman or maker of fish traps, from an agent derivative of Middle High German riuse ‘fish trap’, ‘weir basket’. A nickname from an agent noun based on Middle High German riusen ‘to moan or complain’... [more]
REVERE English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
REX English, German (Latinized)
English: variant of RICKS. ... [more]
REZNOR German
May be a variant of the German surname REISNER, a habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river.
RHEIN German
From the German name for the River Rhine, denoting somebody whom lived within close proximity to the river. The river name itself comes from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'run, flow').
RHINE German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see RHEIN). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RHOTON German, French
Rhoton is a German and French surname from the 1800s. Some people believe that it is derived from the French word for red, but the origin is overall unknown. The name represents strength and power.
RICCIARDI Italian
Patronymic from Ricciardo, a variant of the personal name RICCARDO.
RICHE English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RICHERS English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common RICHARD... [more]
RICHIE English (Rare), Italian
Diminutive form of RICHARD. It could also have been a nickname for one who was rich or wealthy, or, in Italy, a variant of RICCI... [more]
RICKELS German
Patronymic form of Rickel or possibly Richel. May have been derived from any of a number of Old German personal names including Richild (or the feminine form Richeldis) or Richold.
RICKEN German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names composed with rīc "power(ful)".
RIDINGER German
A habitational name for someone from a place named Riding or Rieding. It is also possibly an altered spelling of Reitinger, a topographic name from Reit(e), which means ‘clearing’ (Old High German riuti).
RIECHERS German
German patronymic from RICHARD.
RIECK German
South German: from a pet form of the personal name Ru(o)diger, a compound of Old High German hrod ‘renown’ + ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’ (see Roger). ... [more]
RIEGEL German
From Middle High German rigel "bar, crossbeam, mountain incline", hence a topographic name or a habitational name from any of numerous places named with this word in Baden, Brandenburg, and Silesia; in some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbars, locks, etc.
RIEK German
German: variant spelling of RIECK.
RIESEN German
It is a name for a wood carver.
RIESER Swiss, German
Alemannic form of REISER. A habitational name for someone from Ries near Passau. Alemannic variant of Rüsser and Rüser, a variant of REUSSER... [more]
RIETH German
"reed" -- a tall, slender-leaved plant of the grass family that grows in water or on marshy ground.
RINATO Italian
means "reborn" in italian
RIND German
Probably a metonymic occupational name for a cattle dealer or butcher, from Middle High German rint meaning "cow".
RINDT German
Variant of RIND.
RINGELBERG German
From the mountain on which sat Castle Ringel.
RINGGOLD German
Comes from Germanic ring "ring" or "assembly" and wald "rule"
RIPPAS German (Swiss)
The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
RITA Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan
From the female personal name RITA, a reduced form of MARGHARITAMARGARET’, chosen in particular in honor of a 15th-century Italian saint who bore the name in this form.
RITCH English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGS French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RITSCHEL German, History
Derived from Old High German hruod "fame". This was the maiden name of Magda Goebbels who was the wife of Paul Joseph Goebbels. Her husband was Nazi Germany's propaganda minister between the years 1933 and 1945... [more]
RITTENHOUSE German
Means "Knight House."
RITTMAN German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
RITZ German
From a short form of the personal name Rizo, itself derived in part from RICHARD and in part from Heinrich (see HENRY).
RIVES French, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name RIVE a back-formation from RIVKE (see Rifkin).... [more]
RIVET French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see RIVES).... [more]
RIVETT English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
RIVIERE French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
Possibly from the French word meaning "river"
RIX German
given to a person who resided near a hill, stream, church, or tree
RIZZA Italian
Variant of RIZZO.
RIZZOTTI Italian
Variant of 'Rizzo', which means 'curly haired'
ROASCIO Italian (Rare)
Derived from Roascio, the name of a municipality in the province of Cuneo in the Piedmont region of Italy. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roass in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROASIO Italian
This surname originates from the Piedmont region of Italy. It is most likely derived from Roasio, which is the name of a municipality in that same region. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roaso in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROBBEN French, Dutch
It is a French surname that was originally derived from the Germanic name ROBERT, which is composed of the elements hrod, meaning famous, and berht, meaning bright.
ROBER German
Variant of Röber (see ROEBER).
ROBERTIN French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name ROBERT.
ROBICHAUX French
An altered spelling of ROBICHON or Roubichou, pet forms of ROBERT.
ROBINET French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name ROBIN.... [more]
ROCHER French
From French roche, meaning "rock'. It indicates a person who worked at a quarry.
ROCKEFELLER German
Means "from Rockenfeld." Some famous bearers include founder of the Standard Oil Company and philanthropist John Davison Rockefeller (1839-1937), and 41st Vice President of the U.S.A. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979).
ROCKETT French
From the French "la roche," or "of the rock." Some family histories trace this back to French Hugenots (sp) who immigrated to England in the 1500's from the Normandy region of France.
ROCKMAN German
Possibly a habitational name for someone from Rockau in Thuringia.
ROCKMAN German, Jewish
Possibly an altered spelling of ROCHMAN.
ROCQUEMORE French
Variant of Roquemore.
RODIA Italian
Habitational name from Rodia, a locality in Messina, Sicily.
ROEHRENBAECK German
qwerftghyjkl
ROEL English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name ROELAND, meaning "famous country".
ROESCHLAUB German (Rare, Archaic)
Comes from the Bavarian meaning 'Rustling Leaves'
ROHME German
From the Germanic personal name RUOM (Old High German hruom ‘fame’), a short form of RUOMBALD and similar personal names containing this element.
ROHR German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area thickly grown with reeds, from Middle High German ror. Also a habitational name from one of the several places named with this word.
ROHRBACH German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: habitational name from any of numerous places called Rohrbach (‘reed brook’ or ‘channel brook’) in many parts of Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. It is a common surname in Pennsylvania.
ROHRLACH German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
ROHRSEN German
Unknown source.
ROLAND French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare ROWLAND).... [more]
ROLF German
English: Composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wulf ‘wolf’. This name was especially popular among Nordic peoples in the contracted form HRÓLFR and seems to have reached England by two separate channels; partly through its use among pre-Conquest Scandinavian settlers, partly through its popularity among the Normans, who, however, generally used the form ROU (see ROLLO).... [more]
ROLFS German
This surname means "son of ROLF," a patronymic surname from northern Germany.
ROLL Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
ROLLIN English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
ROMAN Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the Latin personal name ROMANUS, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROMIE Italian
From a diminutive of ROMAN or its derivative names.
ROMMEL Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of RUMMEL.
ROMP English, German
Likely a variant of RUMP.
RÖNTGEN German
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923) who discovered and studied x-rays. Röntgen called the radiation "X" because it was an unknown type of radiation... [more]
ROOS Estonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of ROS, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
ROSBERG German
Meaning "rose" "mountain"
ROSEN German, Jewish
Means "Roses" in German
ROSENBAUM German
Habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a rosebush, Middle High German rōsenboum.
ROSENCRANTZ German
Means "rose wreath" in German.
ROSENHEIM German (Rare)
Derived from "home of roses".
ROSENSWEIG German, Jewish
Variant form of Rosenzweig.
ROSENTHAL German, Jewish
name for any of numerous places named rosenthal or rosendahl. means " rose valley"
ROSENZWEIG German, Jewish
A German and Jewish surname, meaning "rose twig" or "branch".
ROSER German
German: topographic name for "someone who lived at a place where wild roses grew" (see Rose 1), with the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.German (Röser): habitational name from places called Rös, Roes, or Rösa in Bavaria, Rhineland, and Saxony, or a variant of Rosser.Swiss German (Röser): from a short form of a Germanic personal name based on hrod "renown".English: "unexplained".
ROSI Greek, Italian
Greek: Metronymic from the female personal name Rosa, or alternatively a variant of ROSSO.... [more]
ROSIER French
French for "rose tree" or "rose bush". A common surname in Francophone areas. It is also the name of a fallen angel who was considered the patron demon of tainted love and seduction.
ROSMARIN German
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary and Latin dictonaries the name Rosmarin derives from the Latin words 'ros' ('dew' or 'tear') and 'marin' ('sea')... [more]
ROSSEAU French, American
Variant spelling of ROUSSEAU. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
RÖSSEL German
Means "knight" in German.
ROSSIGNOL French
Means "nightingale" or "picklock" in French.
ROSSO Italian
Variant of RUSSO.
ROST German
From a nickname for a red-haired person, from Middle High German rost meaning ‘rust’.
ROST German
A metonymic occupational name for a limeburner or blacksmith, from Middle High German, Middle Low German rōst meaning ‘grate, grill’ or Middle High German rōst(e) meaning ‘fire, embers, pyre, grate’ (typically one for burning lime).
ROSZHART German
The original spelling of the name is Roßhart. Roß means "horse" and hart means "hard" in German. The name was changed when the family immigrated to the United States in the 1850's. Some took on the name "Rosshart", and some "Roszhart" as the ß has the "sss" sound.
ROTHBERG German
From the elements rot "red" and berg "mountain" meaning "red mountain".
ROTHFUS German
Middle High German rot "red" + vuoz "foot", a nickname for someone who followed the fashion for shoes made from a type of fine reddish leather. Or a variant of Rotfuchs, from the Middle Low German form fos "fox", a nickname for a clever person.
ROTHMAN German, Jewish
German (ROTHMANN) and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a person with red hair, from an elaborated form of ROTH 1. ... [more]
ROTHMANN German
German: see ROTHMAN.
ROTHSTEIN German, Jewish
From German rot meaning "red" and stein meaning "stone".
ROTSTEIN German
German surname that means "red stone".
ROTT German
As far as I've researched the name dates back to a man by the name of Count Palatine Kuno von Rott (~1083). After he got land from the Pfalzfrafs which seem to be a nobile family line.... [more]
ROTTSCHEIT German
Modernization of Rotscheidt, also a city in Germany (Rottscheidt) bearing another modern alternate spelling. When broken down it ultimately means "red" and "piece of wood", implying that the families of today descends from woodwrokers.
ROUGE French
Nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROUGEAU French
Diminutive of Rouge, a nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
RÖVER German
This surname was originally used as a derogative nickname for an unscrupulous individual, from Middle Low German rover meaning "pirate, robber."
ROVER English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
ROVIARO Italian (Modern)
From northern Italy
ROZELLE French
Beautiful flower from France brought over by an immigrant named Page Rozelle. People said when she said something nice or touched you, good luck would come to you.
RUBINSTEIN German, Jewish, Polish
Means "ruby stone", from rubin and stein. Rubin means "ruby" in German and stein means "stone" in German.
RUCCI Italian
Patronymic from the personal name Ruccio, from a short form of various pet names formed with this suffix, as for example Gasparuccio (from Gaspari) or Baldassaruccio (from Baldasare).
RUCH German (Swiss)
It was originally a nickname for a greedy person, from Middle High German ruoch ‘eager,’ ‘intent.’... [more]
RUCKER German
Middle High German: nickname rucken "to move or draw". North German: nickname from Middle Low German rucker "thief", "greedy or acquisitive person". German: from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name RUDIGER... [more]
RÜCKMANN German
From a Germanic personal name based on hrok "intent", "eager" (Old High German ruoh).
RUDE Norwegian, German
German: From a pet form of a personal name formed with Old High German hrōd "fame", for example RUDOLF or RÜDIGER... [more]
RUDNER German
German: unexplained. Perhaps a variant of REDNER.
RUDOLF German
From a personal name composed of Old High German hrōd "renown" and wolf "wolf", equivalent to English RALPH. This name is also found in Slovenia.
RUEDIG German
Variation of Rudig.
RUEGER German
The name was likely first bestowed on someone thought to have the characteristics of a heron as a nickname, eventually becoming a hereditary surname.
RUELAS French
A last name common in Mexico which is believed to have derived from the French word ruelle (or Portuguese word ruela) meaning lane or alley.
RUESCH German (Swiss), Jewish
Swiss/German variant of RUSCH. Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
RUF German
From a reduced form of the personal name RUDOLF.
RUFF German
Variant of RUF.
RUGE German
Nickname from Middle High German ruowe, ruge ‘quiet’, ‘calm’ or Low German rug ‘rough’, ‘crude’.... [more]
RUGH German
A variant of the Alsacian German (and probably Swiss before that) Ruch. Also a variant of the Danish Rügh (not related as far as is known)
RUHE German
Variant of RUGE. (Rühe) is also a nickname from Rüde ‘hound.’ Habitational name from places named Rühen, Rüden, Rhüden in northern Germany.
RUHLAND German
Variation of Rüland.
RUHR German
Name given to a person who lived near the Ruhr River in Germany.
RULAND German
Medieval form of ROLAND.
RUMMEL German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of ROMMEL.... [more]
RUMPLE German
It is derived from Rumbald, an Old German personal name.
RUMSCHLAG German
This name is possibly a derivative of the German word for "envelope" which is spelled 'Umschlag'.
RUNDLETT French
this is a french word for little wine barrels.
RUNGE German
From the old word "runga", meaning stick or whip
RUOTINA Italian
Means "wheel" in Italian. This meant that a bearer of this surname was a wheel maker.
RUSCH German
Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
RUSCHEL German
Variant of RUSCH
RUSHER German
Americanized version of the German surname Rüscher or Roshcer. Either a topographic name for someone who lived among rushes or an occupational name for someone who created things out of rushes.
RUTH English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
RUTIGLIANO Italian
From the name of a town located in Bari Province of Apulia, Italy.
RUTMAN Jewish, German
1. Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): origin uncertain; perhaps a variant of ROTHMAN. ... [more]
RUTMANN German
German: see RUTMAN.
RUTT English, German
English: variant of ROOT.... [more]
RYDÉN German, Swedish
Can come from the island Rügen in Germany. Bengt Rydén was the cheif editor at a Swedish magazine called Veckans Affärer.
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