Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
RINDT German
Variant of Rind.
RINGELBERG German
From the mountain on which sat Castle Ringel.
RINGGOLD German
Comes from Germanic ring "ring" or "assembly" and wald "rule"
RIPPAS German (Swiss)
The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
RITA Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan
From the female personal name Rita, a reduced form of MargharitaMargaret’, chosen in particular in honor of a 15th-century Italian saint who bore the name in this form.
RITCH English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGS French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RITSCHEL German, History
Derived from Old High German hruod "fame". This was the maiden name of Magda Goebbels who was the wife of Paul Joseph Goebbels. Her husband was Nazi Germany's propaganda minister between the years 1933 and 1945... [more]
RITTENHOUSE German
Means "Knight House."
RITTMAN German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
RITZ German
From a short form of the personal name Rizo, itself derived in part from Richard and in part from Heinrich (see Henry).
RIVES French, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name Rive a back-formation from Rivke (see Rifkin).... [more]
RIVET French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
RIVETT English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
RIVIERE French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
Possibly from the French word meaning "river"
RIX German
given to a person who resided near a hill, stream, church, or tree
RIZZA Italian
Variant of Rizzo.
RIZZOTTI Italian
Variant of 'Rizzo', which means 'curly haired'
ROASCIO Italian (Rare)
Derived from Roascio, the name of a municipality in the province of Cuneo in the Piedmont region of Italy. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roass in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROASIO Italian
This surname originates from the Piedmont region of Italy. It is most likely derived from Roasio, which is the name of a municipality in that same region. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roaso in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROBER German
Variant of Röber (see Roeber).
ROBERTIN French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name Robert.
ROBICHAUX French
An altered spelling of Robichon or Roubichou, pet forms of Robert.
ROBIN Scottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROBINET French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Robin.... [more]
ROCHER French
From French roche, meaning "rock'. It indicates a person who worked at a quarry.
ROCKEFELLER German
Means "from Rockenfeld." Some famous bearers include founder of the Standard Oil Company and philanthropist John Davison Rockefeller (1839-1937), and 41st Vice President of the U.S.A. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979).
ROCKETT French
From the French "la roche," or "of the rock." Some family histories trace this back to French Hugenots (sp) who immigrated to England in the 1500's from the Normandy region of France.
ROCKMAN German
Possibly a habitational name for someone from Rockau in Thuringia.
ROCKMAN German, Jewish
Possibly an altered spelling of ROCHMAN.
ROCQUEMORE French
Variant of Roquemore.
RODIA Italian
Habitational name from Rodia, a locality in Messina, Sicily.
ROEHRENBAECK German
qwerftghyjkl
ROEL English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
ROESCHLAUB German (Rare, Archaic)
Comes from the Bavarian meaning 'Rustling Leaves'
ROGER Scottish, English, North German, French, Catalan
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hrōd "renown" and gār, gēr "spear, lance", which was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Rog(i)er... [more]
ROHME German
From the Germanic personal name Ruom (Old High German hruom ‘fame’), a short form of Ruombald and similar personal names containing this element.
ROHR German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area thickly grown with reeds, from Middle High German ror. Also a habitational name from one of the several places named with this word.
ROHRBACH German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: habitational name from any of numerous places called Rohrbach (‘reed brook’ or ‘channel brook’) in many parts of Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. It is a common surname in Pennsylvania.
ROHRLACH German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
ROHRSEN German
Unknown source.
ROLAND French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
ROLF German
English: Composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wulf ‘wolf’. This name was especially popular among Nordic peoples in the contracted form Hrólfr and seems to have reached England by two separate channels; partly through its use among pre-Conquest Scandinavian settlers, partly through its popularity among the Normans, who, however, generally used the form Rou (see Rollo).... [more]
ROLFS German
This surname means "son of Rolf," a patronymic surname from northern Germany.
ROLL Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
ROLLIN English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
ROMAN Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belorussian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROMIE Italian
From a diminutive of Roman or its derivative names.
ROMMEL Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
ROMP English, German
Likely a variant of Rump.
RÖNTGEN German
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923) who discovered and studied x-rays. Röntgen called the radiation "X" because it was an unknown type of radiation... [more]
ROOS Estonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of Ros, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
ROSBERG German
Meaning "rose" "mountain"
ROSEN German, Jewish
Means "Roses" in German
ROSENBAUM German
Habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a rosebush, Middle High German rōsenboum.
ROSENCRANTZ German
Means "rose wreath" in German.
ROSENHEIM German (Rare)
Derived from "home of roses".
ROSENSWEIG German, Jewish
Variant form of Rosenzweig.
ROSENTHAL German, Jewish
name for any of numerous places named rosenthal or rosendahl. means " rose valley"
ROSENZWEIG German, Jewish
A German and Jewish surname, meaning "rose twig" or "branch".
ROSER German
German: topographic name for "someone who lived at a place where wild roses grew" (see Rose 1), with the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.German (Röser): habitational name from places called Rös, Roes, or Rösa in Bavaria, Rhineland, and Saxony, or a variant of Rosser.Swiss German (Röser): from a short form of a Germanic personal name based on hrod "renown".English: "unexplained".
ROSI Greek, Italian
Greek: Metronymic from the female personal name Rosa, or alternatively a variant of Rosso.... [more]
ROSIER French
French for "rose tree" or "rose bush". A common surname in Francophone areas. It is also the name of a fallen angel who was considered the patron demon of tainted love and seduction.
ROSMARIN German
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary and Latin dictonaries the name Rosmarin derives from the Latin words 'ros' ('dew' or 'tear') and 'marin' ('sea')... [more]
ROSSEAU French, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
RÖSSEL German
Means "knight" in German.
ROSSIGNOL French
Means "nightingale" or "picklock" in French.
ROST German
From a nickname for a red-haired person, from Middle High German rost meaning ‘rust’.
ROST German
A metonymic occupational name for a limeburner or blacksmith, from Middle High German, Middle Low German rōst meaning ‘grate, grill’ or Middle High German rōst(e) meaning ‘fire, embers, pyre, grate’ (typically one for burning lime).
ROSZHART German
The original spelling of the name is Roßhart. Roß means "horse" and hart means "hard" in German. The name was changed when the family immigrated to the United States in the 1850's. Some took on the name "Rosshart", and some "Roszhart" as the ß has the "sss" sound.
ROTHBERG German
From the elements rot "red" and berg "mountain" meaning "red mountain".
ROTHFUS German
Middle High German rot "red" + vuoz "foot", a nickname for someone who followed the fashion for shoes made from a type of fine reddish leather. Or a variant of Rotfuchs, from the Middle Low German form fos "fox", a nickname for a clever person.
ROTHMAN German, Jewish
German (Rothmann) and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a person with red hair, from an elaborated form of Roth 1. ... [more]
ROTHMANN German
German: see Rothman.
ROTHSTEIN German, Jewish
From German rot meaning "red" and stein meaning "stone".
ROTSTEIN German
German surname that means "red stone".
ROTT German
As far as I've researched the name dates back to a man by the name of Count Palatine Kuno von Rott (~1083). After he got land from the Pfalzfrafs which seem to be a nobile family line.... [more]
ROTTSCHEIT German
Modernization of Rotscheidt, also a city in Germany (Rottscheidt) bearing another modern alternate spelling. When broken down it ultimately means "red" and "piece of wood", implying that the families of today descends from woodwrokers.
ROUGE French
Nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROUGEAU French
Diminutive of Rouge, a nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
RÖVER German
This surname was originally used as a derogative nickname for an unscrupulous individual, from Middle Low German rover meaning "pirate, robber."
ROVER English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
ROVIARO Italian (Modern)
From northern Italy
ROZELLE French
Beautiful flower from France brought over by an immigrant named Page Rozelle. People said when she said something nice or touched you, good luck would come to you.
RUBINSTEIN German, Jewish, Polish
Means "ruby stone", from rubin and stein. Rubin means "ruby" in German and stein means "stone" in German.
RUCCI Italian
Patronymic from the personal name Ruccio, from a short form of various pet names formed with this suffix, as for example Gasparuccio (from Gaspari) or Baldassaruccio (from Baldasare).
RUCH German (Swiss)
It was originally a nickname for a greedy person, from Middle High German ruoch ‘eager,’ ‘intent.’... [more]
RUCKER German
Middle High German: nickname rucken "to move or draw". North German: nickname from Middle Low German rucker "thief", "greedy or acquisitive person". German: from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Rudiger... [more]
RÜCKMANN German
From a Germanic personal name based on hrok "intent", "eager" (Old High German ruoh).
RUDE Norwegian, German
German: From a pet form of a personal name formed with Old High German hrōd "fame", for example Rudolf or Rüdiger. See also Ruhe.... [more]
RUDNER German
German: unexplained. Perhaps a variant of Redner.
RUDOLF German
From a personal name composed of Old High German hrōd "renown" and wolf "wolf", equivalent to English Ralph. This name is also found in Slovenia.
RUEDIG German
Variation of Rudig.
RUELAS French
A last name common in Mexico which is believed to have derived from the French word ruelle (or Portuguese word ruela) meaning lane or alley.
RUESCH German (Swiss), Jewish
Swiss/German variant of Rusch. Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
RUF German
From a reduced form of the personal name Rudolf.
RUFF German
Variant of Ruf.
RUGE German
Nickname from Middle High German ruowe, ruge ‘quiet’, ‘calm’ or Low German rug ‘rough’, ‘crude’.... [more]
RUGH German
A variant of the Alsacian German (and probably Swiss before that) Ruch. Also a variant of the Danish Rügh (not related as far as is known)
RUHE German
Variant of Ruge. (Rühe) is also a nickname from Rüde ‘hound.’ Habitational name from places named Rühen, Rüden, Rhüden in northern Germany.
RUHLAND German
Variation of Rüland.
RUHR German
Name given to a person who lived near the Ruhr River in Germany.
RULAND German
Medieval form of Roland.
RUMMEL German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
RUMPLE German
It is derived from Rumbald, an Old German personal name.
RUMSCHLAG German
This name is possibly a derivative of the German word for "envelope" which is spelled 'Umschlag'.
RUNDLETT French
this is a french word for little wine barrels.
RUNGE German
From the old word "runga", meaning stick or whip
RUOTINA Italian
Means "wheel" in Italian. This meant that a bearer of this surname was a wheel maker.
RUSHER German
Americanized version of the German surname Rüscher or Roshcer. Either a topographic name for someone who lived among rushes or an occupational name for someone who created things out of rushes.
RUTH English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
RUTIGLIANO Italian
From the name of a town located in Bari Province of Apulia, Italy.
RUTMAN Jewish, German
1. Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): origin uncertain; perhaps a variant of Rothman. ... [more]
RUTMANN German
German: see Rutman.
RUTT English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
RYDÉN German, Swedish
Can come from the island Rügen in Germany. Bengt Rydén was the cheif editor at a Swedish magazine called Veckans Affärer.
RYNE German (Swiss)
Respelling of Swiss German Rhyn, a topographic name for someone living on the Rhine river, Middle High German Rin.
SABA French, Occitan
Nickname from a variant of Occitan sabe meaning "tasty, flavorsome". Compare Sabourin.
SABAT French
Nickname for a noisy, rowdy person, from Middle French sab(b)at "noise", "racket".
SABATINI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Sabatino.
SABELLA Italian
From the given name Sabello or Savello, Latin Sabellus, originally derived from a tribal name.
SACCENTE Italian
Nickname from medieval Italian saccente "wise".
SACHTLEBEN German
Nickname for someone perceived to lead a carefree, easy life, from Middle Low German sacht(e) meaning "soft" + leben meaning "life".
SACKMANN German
Occupational name from Middle High German sacman meaning "baggage servant", one who was in charge of transporting and looking after a knight’s baggage and supplies on campaign.
SADAT German (Rare)
The last name Sadat means "master" and "gentleman," and is originally a religious last name which was popular in the west, more precisely in Germany.
SAENGER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a chorister or a nickname for someone who liked singing, from Middle High German senger, German Sänger meaning "singer".
SAETTA Italian
Means "lightning" in Italian.
SAFFEELS English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).
SAFFIOTI Italian
From the place name Punta Safò, a settlement in Briatico.
SAINT English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
SAINT-JEAN French
Means Saint John in French
SALAÜN Breton, French
Form of the given name Solomon.
SALE English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SALERNO Italian
Southern Italian habitational name from the city of Salerno in Campania.
SALLWASSER German
It is derived from the German words (Salz) meaning "salt", & (Salweide) meaning "water".
SALTZMAN Jewish, German
Altered spelling of SALZMANN.
SALVATORE Italian
Derived from the Italian masculine given name Salvatore, which in turn was derived from the Italian noun salvatore meaning "saviour, rescuer". The word ultimately comes from Latin salvator meaning "saviour"... [more]
SALZMANN German, Jewish
Occupational name for a producer or seller of salt, from German salz "salt" + mann "man".
SAMET German, Jewish, Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of velvet, from Yiddish samet ‘velvet’ (German Samt, ultimately from Greek hexamiton, a compound of hex ‘six’ + mitos ‘thread’).
SAMIS Dutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name Samuel.
SAND English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived on patch of sandy soil, from the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish or Jewish name it was often purely ornamental.
SANDANO Italian
San means "saint" in Italian, but I don't know what the... [more]
SANDE German
Variant of Sand.
SANDMEIER German, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
From Middle High German sand combined with Meier, referring to a tenant farmer whose farm was on sandy soil.
SAN GIORGIO Italian
“Saint George.”
SAN GIOVANNI Italian
Means Saint John in Italian
SANKT JOHANN German
Means Saint John in German.
SAN PIETRO Italian
Means Saint Peter in Italian.
SANTANGELO Italian
Originating someone from Sant' Angelo in Italy.
SANTERRE French
Habitational name from a place to the southeast of the Somme river, named with Latin sana terra "healthy, wholesome land".
SANTI Italian (Latinized, Archaic)
Santi is a surname of Christian inspiration and it means Son of Santo (Saint). It also has a second meaning in plural that is Santos (Saints). Santi is a last name that comes from Piedmont (northern Italy)... [more]
SANTORA Italian
Feminine variant of SANTORO.
SANTORUM Italian
Variant of Santoro. A notable bearer is former American Senator Rick Santorum (1958-present).
SANZ German, Spanish
From a short form, Sando, of a Germanic personal name formed with sand "true" and variant of Sancho.... [more]
SANZIO Italian
Meaning: Holy or Blessed.
SAPERSTEIN Jewish, German
“Sapphire” and “stone”
SAPIENZA Italian
It means "knowledge" in Italian.
SARAZEN French
From a medieval French nickname for a swarthy person, or for someone who had gone on a Crusade (from Old French sarrazin "Saracen"). It was borne by American golfer Gene Sarazen (1902-99), original name Eugene Saraceni.
SARD English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
SARDO Italian, Catalan
Ethnic name from sardo "Sardinian".
SARTAIN French
Means, "Tailor".
SATTLER German
An occupational name meaning "saddle maker".
SAUER German, Jewish
Nickname for an embittered or cantankerous person, from Middle High German sur, German sauer "sour".
SAUERWEIN German
Occupational nickname for someone who sold sour wine, or perhaps a nickname for someone with a sour disposition, from Middle High German sur "sour" + win "wine", i.e. vinegar.
SAULNIER French
In Middle French (the form of French spoken from 1340 to 1610), it literally means "salt merchant".
SAUR German
Variant of SAUER.
SAUVE' French
Sauve' from France to Canada. Changed probably due to an "a" and an "o" confusion in cursive. My granfather's was typo-ed on WW II old men's sign up in MA. or RI, USA.
SAVIO Italian
Italian nickname given to a wise, sage man. Saint Dominic Savio is a well-known bearer of this surname.
SCAGLIETTI Italian
The name of an Italian coachbuilder, with one of its famous customers being Ferrari when it doesn't want a design from Pininfarina.
SCALA Italian, Greek
Habitational or topographic name from any of various places named with scala, "ladder", "steps", "wharf".
SCALI Italian
Habitational name from Scali in Piedimonte Etneo, Sicily. From greek skali, "step", "terrace".
SCALI Italian
Variant of SCALA.
SCALIA Italian
Habitational name derived from Scalea in the province of Cosenza, deriving ultimately from medieval Greek skaleia meaning "hoeing".
SCANNADINARI Italian (Rare)
Taken from the Italian scanna meaning "slaying" and dinari meaning "money" in the plural form. Therefore, killer of money.
SCARLATA Italian
Feminine variant of SCARLATO.
SCARLATO Italian
Occupational name for a dyer, or as a nickname for someone who habitually wore scarlet or who had bright red hair, From Sicilian scarlatu "scarlet".
SCHAAF German
Metonymic occupational name for a shepherd, from Middle High German schāf ‘sheep’. In some cases it may have been a nickname for someone thought to resemble a sheep, or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a sheep... [more]
SCHABEN German
Describes an inhabitant of the region Swabia
SCHACHNER German
German origins (as told to me by my family); popular in Austria and also has Jewish and Slavic origins, according to the internet/ancestry.com.
SCHADE German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
SCHAFF German
Name given to sheepherders, accounding to personal family history.
SCHÄFFLER German
Occupational name for a cooper, from an agent derivative of Middle High German scheffel "bushel".
SCHAFFNER German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
German: occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of Schaffer.
SCHALK German
germany
SCHATTNER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Schaten or Schatten, or a topographic name for someone living in a shady location, from Middle High German schate "shade", "protection".
SCHATZ German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a treasurer, from German Schatz ‘treasure’, Middle High German scha(t)z. It may also have been a nickname for a rich man (or ironically for a miser), or else for a well-liked person or a ladies’ favorite, from the use of the vocabulary word as a term of endearment... [more]
SCHÄTZEL German
German diminutive of Schatz, or a nickname for a lover meaning "little sweetheart" (from the same word used as a term of endearment).
SCHAUBLE German
Diminutive of Scaub
SCHAUMBURG German, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
SCHAUS German, Luxembourgish
A nickname for a simpleton, from schaus, a word in Rhenish Franconian and Lower Rhine dialects of German.
SCHAUWECKER German
habitational name for someone from Schaubeck near Marbach (Württemberg).
SCHEETZ German
Anglicized version of the German surname, Schütz, "archer," "yeoman," "protect."
SCHELL German
Means "noisy" or "loud" from the German word "schel"
SCHEMMEL German
Nickname for a disabled person, from Middle High German schemel "stool", which was used as a crutch by invalids.
SCHENKEL German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
SCHERMAN German
German version of Sherman
SCHEUNEMANN German
It literally means someone who either lives near (or in, if poor &/or homeless) a barn or works within its general vicinity.
SCHIAVO Italian
From the Italian word schiavo "slave".
SCHIEFELBEIN German
Habitational name from Schievelbein in Pomerania.
SCHILD German, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
SCHILDHAUER German
First appeared during the Middle Ages in Central Europe/Germany. The name means "Shield-Maker" and suggests correlation to Blacksmiths or or other forms of metalwork in the time period.
SCHINK Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
SCHLEMMER German
Derived from a Middle High German word meaning "feast" and thus used as a nickname for a "gourmet".
SCHLEP German
Probably a nickname or occupational name for a laborer or carrier, especially in a mine, from Middle Low German slepen, Middle High German slepen 'to drag or carry (a load)' (modern German schleppen, schleifen).
SCHLEY German
Name for someone living by the Schlei river.
SCHLOTE German
literal meaning: smokestack
SCHMALTZ German (Rare), German (Austrian, Rare)
Schmaltz is a German and Austrian surname. It was used as an occupational surname for chandlers.
SCHMIED German
Variant of Schmidt.
SCHMIEDT German
Variant spelling of Schmidt.
SCHMUCK German, German (Austrian)
From Middle High German smuc meaning "jewel", "finery", hence a metonymic occupational name for a jeweler, or a nickname for someone who wore a prominent jewel or ornament.North German: nickname from Middle Low German smuck meaning "neat", "dainty".
SCHNIEDER German
North German and American variant of Schneider
SCHOCK German
German origin. Means "shock" in German, as in surprise.
SCHOEN German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
SCHOENWETTER German
German (Schönwetter): nickname for someone with a happy disposition, from Middle High German schœn ‘beautiful’, ‘fine’, ‘nice’ + wetter ‘weather’.
SCHÖMER German
Nickname for an offensive person, from Middle High German schemen "to insult."
SCHOMMER German
"one who was a gossip, a vagabond or rascal"... [more]
SCHÖN German, Swedish
Derived from Middle High German schoene "beautiful, friendly".
SCHÖNENBERGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Germany and Switzerland named Schönenberg.
SCHOTTE German
From schotte, an ethnic name for a Scottish person or somebody of such descent.
SCHOTTLANDER German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]