Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SABELLA Italian
From the given name Sabello or Savello, Latin Sabellus, originally derived from a tribal name.
SACCENTE Italian
Nickname from medieval Italian saccente "wise".
SACHTLEBEN German
Nickname for someone perceived to lead a carefree, easy life, from Middle Low German sacht(e) meaning "soft" + leben meaning "life".
SACKMANN German
Occupational name from Middle High German sacman meaning "baggage servant", one who was in charge of transporting and looking after a knight’s baggage and supplies on campaign.
SADAT German (Rare)
The last name Sadat means "master" and "gentleman," and is originally a religious last name which was popular in the west, more precisely in Germany.
SAENGER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a chorister or a nickname for someone who liked singing, from Middle High German senger, German Sänger meaning "singer".
SAETTA Italian
Means "lightning" in Italian.
SAFFEELS English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).
SAFFIOTI Italian
From the place name Punta Safò, a settlement in Briatico.
SAINT English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
SAINT-JEAN French
Means Saint John in French
SALAÜN Breton, French
Form of the given name SOLOMON.
SALE English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SALERNO Italian
Southern Italian habitational name from the city of Salerno in Campania.
SALLWASSER German
It is derived from the German words (Salz) meaning "salt", & (Salweide) meaning "water".
SALTZMAN Jewish, German
Altered spelling of SALZMANN.
SALVATORE Italian
Derived from the Italian masculine given name SALVATORE, which in turn was derived from the Italian noun salvatore meaning "saviour, rescuer"... [more]
SALZMANN German, Jewish
Occupational name for a producer or seller of salt, from German salz "salt" + mann "man".
SAMET German, Jewish, Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of velvet, from Yiddish samet ‘velvet’ (German Samt, ultimately from Greek hexamiton, a compound of hex ‘six’ + mitos ‘thread’).
SAMIS Dutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name SAMUEL.
SAND English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived on patch of sandy soil, from the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish or Jewish name it was often purely ornamental.
SANDANO Italian
San means "saint" in Italian, but I don't know what the... [more]
SANDBERG Swedish, German, Norwegian
Either a Swedish and Norwegian combination of sand "sand" and berg "mountain", or (Middle High) German combination of sand "sand" and berc "mountain".
SANDE German
Variant of SAND.
SANDMEIER German, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
From Middle High German sand combined with Meier, referring to a tenant farmer whose farm was on sandy soil.
SAN GIORGIO Italian
“Saint George.”
SAN GIOVANNI Italian
Means Saint John in Italian
SANKT JOHANN German
Means Saint John in German.
SAN PIETRO Italian
Means Saint Peter in Italian.
SANTANGELO Italian
Originating someone from Sant' Angelo in Italy.
SANTERRE French
Habitational name from a place to the southeast of the Somme river, named with Latin sana terra "healthy, wholesome land".
SANTI Italian (Latinized, Archaic)
Santi is a surname of Christian inspiration and it means Son of Santo (Saint). It also has a second meaning in plural that is Santos (Saints). Santi is a last name that comes from Piedmont (northern Italy)... [more]
SANTORA Italian
Feminine variant of SANTORO.
SANTORUM Italian
Variant of SANTORO. A notable bearer is former American Senator Rick Santorum (1958-present).
SANZ German, Spanish
From a short form, Sando, of a Germanic personal name formed with sand "true" and variant of Sancho.... [more]
SANZIO Italian
Meaning: Holy or Blessed.
SAPERSTEIN Jewish, German
“Sapphire” and “stone”
SAPIENZA Italian
It means "knowledge" in Italian.
SARAZEN French
From a medieval French nickname for a swarthy person, or for someone who had gone on a Crusade (from Old French sarrazin "Saracen"). It was borne by American golfer Gene Sarazen (1902-99), original name Eugene Saraceni.
SARD English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
SARDO Italian, Catalan
Ethnic name from sardo "Sardinian".
SARTAIN French
Means, "Tailor".
SATTLER German
An occupational name meaning "saddle maker".
SAUERWEIN German
Occupational nickname for someone who sold sour wine, or perhaps a nickname for someone with a sour disposition, from Middle High German sur "sour" + win "wine", i.e. vinegar.
SAULNIER French
In Middle French (the form of French spoken from 1340 to 1610), it literally means "salt merchant".
SAUR German
Variant of SAUER.
SAUVE' French
Sauve' from France to Canada. Changed probably due to an "a" and an "o" confusion in cursive. My granfather's was typo-ed on WW II old men's sign up in MA. or RI, USA.
SAVINO Italian
From the given name SAVINO.
SAVIO Italian
Italian nickname given to a wise, sage man. Saint Dominic Savio is a well-known bearer of this surname.
SCAGLIETTI Italian
The name of an Italian coachbuilder, with one of its famous customers being Ferrari when it doesn't want a design from Pininfarina.
SCALA Italian, Greek
Habitational or topographic name from any of various places named with scala, "ladder", "steps", "wharf".
SCALI Italian
Habitational name from Scali in Piedimonte Etneo, Sicily. From greek skali, "step", "terrace".
SCALI Italian
Variant of SCALA.
SCALIA Italian
Habitational name derived from Scalea in the province of Cosenza, deriving ultimately from medieval Greek skaleia meaning "hoeing".
SCANNADINARI Italian (Rare)
Taken from the Italian scanna meaning "slaying" and dinari meaning "money" in the plural form. Therefore, killer of money.
SCARLATA Italian
Feminine variant of SCARLATO.
SCARLATO Italian
Occupational name for a dyer, or as a nickname for someone who habitually wore scarlet or who had bright red hair, From Sicilian scarlatu "scarlet".
SCHAAF German
Metonymic occupational name for a shepherd, from Middle High German schāf ‘sheep’. In some cases it may have been a nickname for someone thought to resemble a sheep, or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a sheep... [more]
SCHABEN German
Describes an inhabitant of the region Swabia
SCHACHNER German
German origins (as told to me by my family); popular in Austria and also has Jewish and Slavic origins, according to the internet/ancestry.com.
SCHADE German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
SCHAFF German
Name given to sheepherders, accounding to personal family history.
SCHÄFFLER German
Occupational name for a cooper, from an agent derivative of Middle High German scheffel "bushel".
SCHAFFNER German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
German: occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of Schaffer.
SCHALK German
germany
SCHATTNER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Schaten or Schatten, or a topographic name for someone living in a shady location, from Middle High German schate "shade", "protection".
SCHATZ German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a treasurer, from German Schatz ‘treasure’, Middle High German scha(t)z. It may also have been a nickname for a rich man (or ironically for a miser), or else for a well-liked person or a ladies’ favorite, from the use of the vocabulary word as a term of endearment... [more]
SCHÄTZEL German
German diminutive of SCHATZ, or a nickname for a lover meaning "little sweetheart" (from the same word used as a term of endearment).
SCHAUBLE German
Diminutive of Scaub
SCHAUER German
The Schauer surname comes from the Middle High German word "schouwen" meaning "to inspect;" as such, the name is thought to have originally been occupational, for some kind of inspector, perhaps an official of a market.
SCHAUMBURG German, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
SCHAUS German, Luxembourgish
A nickname for a simpleton, from schaus, a word in Rhenish Franconian and Lower Rhine dialects of German.
SCHAUWECKER German
habitational name for someone from Schaubeck near Marbach (Württemberg).
SCHEETZ German
Anglicized version of the German surname, Schütz, "archer," "yeoman," "protect."
SCHELL German
Means "noisy" or "loud" from the German word "schel"
SCHEMMEL German
Nickname for a disabled person, from Middle High German schemel "stool", which was used as a crutch by invalids.
SCHENKEL German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
SCHERMAN German
German version of Sherman
SCHEUNEMANN German
It literally means someone who either lives near (or in, if poor &/or homeless) a barn or works within its general vicinity.
SCHIAVO Italian
From the Italian word schiavo "slave".
SCHIEFELBEIN German
Habitational name from Schievelbein in Pomerania.
SCHILD German, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
SCHILDHAUER German
First appeared during the Middle Ages in Central Europe/Germany. The name means "Shield-Maker" and suggests correlation to Blacksmiths or or other forms of metalwork in the time period.
SCHINK Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare SCHENKEL. ... [more]
SCHLAUTMAN German
Variant of Schlautmann.
SCHLEMMER German
Derived from a Middle High German word meaning "feast" and thus used as a nickname for a "gourmet".
SCHLEP German
Probably a nickname or occupational name for a laborer or carrier, especially in a mine, from Middle Low German slepen, Middle High German slepen 'to drag or carry (a load)' (modern German schleppen, schleifen).
SCHLEY German
Name for someone living by the Schlei river.
SCHLOTE German
literal meaning: smokestack
SCHMALTZ German (Rare), German (Austrian, Rare)
Schmaltz is a German and Austrian surname. It was used as an occupational surname for chandlers.
SCHMIED German
Variant of Schmidt.
SCHMIEDT German
Variant spelling of Schmidt.
SCHMUCK German, German (Austrian)
From Middle High German smuc meaning "jewel", "finery", hence a metonymic occupational name for a jeweler, or a nickname for someone who wore a prominent jewel or ornament.North German: nickname from Middle Low German smuck meaning "neat", "dainty".
SCHNEID German, Jewish
Variant form of Schneider. Means "cut"
SCHNIEDER German
North German and American variant of SCHNEIDER
SCHOCK German
German origin. Means "shock" in German, as in surprise.
SCHOEN German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
SCHOENWETTER German
German (Schönwetter): nickname for someone with a happy disposition, from Middle High German schœn ‘beautiful’, ‘fine’, ‘nice’ + wetter ‘weather’.
SCHÖMER German
Nickname for an offensive person, from Middle High German schemen "to insult."
SCHOMMER German
"one who was a gossip, a vagabond or rascal"... [more]
SCHÖN German, Swedish
Derived from Middle High German schoene "beautiful, friendly".
SCHÖNENBERGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Germany and Switzerland named Schönenberg.
SCHORR German
In the south a topographic name from Middle High German schor(re) 'steep rock', 'rocky shore'.
SCHOTTE German
From schotte, an ethnic name for a Scottish person or somebody of such descent.
SCHOTTLANDER German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
SCHRAM German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
SCHROCK German
Some think that the last name Schrock comes from the German word which meant something along the lines of "Jump" or "Leaps" and was probably a nickname to someone who was a great jumper, or someone who was easily startled.
SCHRÖDINGER German
Denoted a person from Schröding, a old placename in Bavaria.
SCHUCH German
Likely derived from SCHUMACHER (Shoe Maker)
SCHUELER German
The surname Schueler was first found in southern Germany, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history.
SCHUKNECHT German
Occupational name for a shoemaker’s assistant, from Middle High German schuoch meaning "shoe" + knecht meaning "journeyman", "assistant".
SCHULLER German
Possibly a habitational name from Schüller in the Eifel.
SCHUTZ German
Occupational surname for an archer or a watchman (from Middle High German schützen "to guard or protect"). Also a habitational name from Schutz, a place near Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
SCHWAAB German
The surname of German VfB Stuttgart footballer Daniel Schwaab, born in Waldkirch, Germany.
SCHWAB German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): regional name for someone from Swabia (German Schwaben), from Middle High German Swap, German Schwabe ‘Swabian’. The region takes its name from a Germanic tribe recorded from the 1st century BC in the Latin form Suebi or Suevi, of uncertain origin; it was an independent duchy from the 10th century until 1313, when the territory was broken up.
SCHWABE German
1. The name given to those who lived in Swabia
SCHWAN German
Means "Swan" in German.
SCHWANBECK German
Habitational name from any of several places so named, for example near Lübeck and near Anklam.
SCHWANDT German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a forest clearing, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
SCHWANDT German
Habitational name from any of the various places called Schwand or Schwanden, all in southern Germany, named with this element, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
SCHWANZ German
Form of Schwan. Also means tail in German.
SCHWARZKOPF German
Means "black head", from German Schwarz "black", and Kopf "head".
SCHWEDER German, Upper German
German: ethnic name for a Swede.... [more]
SCHWEHR German
German: relationship name, a variant of Schwäher, a variant of Schwager.
SCHWEIGERT German
Derives from an agent derivative of the German "schweigen", to be silent, and the nickname would have been given to a silent, quiet, taciturn person.
SCHWEINHARDT German
an occupational or nickname having to do with pigs
SCHWEINSTEIGER German
Means "Swine Climber". ... [more]
SCHWEITZ German
Ethnic name for a Swiss, from German Schweitz meaning "Swiss".
SCHWER Upper German, German, Jewish
South German relationship name from Middle High German sweher ‘father-in-law’. ... [more]
SCHWING German
Occupational name for someone whose job was to swingle flax, i.e. to beat the flax with a swingle in order to remove the woody parts of the plant prior to spinning, from Middle German swingen meaning "to swing" or swing meaning "swingle".
SCILLATO Italian, Sicilian
Comes from the commune of Scillato in Sicily, Italy, southeast of Palermo.
SCIUTO Italian
Meaning "thin"... [more]
SCORNAVACCHE Italian
Possibly deriving from Italian words scorno meaning shame, and vacca meaning cow. Sicilian variant of Scornavacca.
SEAGER English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name SEGAR, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]
SEBERT German, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
SEDITA Italian
From Italian sei "six" + dita, plural of dito "finger", hence a nickname either for someone having six fingers or metaphorically for someone who was very dextrous.
SEE English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by the sea-shore or beside a lake, from Middle English see meaning "sea", "lake" (Old English sǣ), Middle High German sē. Alternatively, the English name may denote someone who lived by a watercourse, from an Old English sēoh meaning "watercourse", "drain".
SEES German
Variant of SEESE.
SEESE German
Comes from a Germanic personal name, Sigizo, from a compound name formed with sigi ‘victory’ as the first element.
SEGALE English, Italian
Respelling of SEGAL. A famous bearer is Mario A. Segale, the inspiration for Nintendo's video game character Mario
SEIB German
Short form of SEIBOLD. Ultimately derived from names composed of the Germanic name element sigi "victory".
SEID German
From the Germanic given name Sito, a short form of a compound name formed with sigi "victory".
SEIDE German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from Middle High German side, German Seide ‘silk’ (from Late Latin seta, originally denoting animal hair), hence a metonymic occupational name for a manufacturer or seller of silk.
SEIDER German
Originating in the region of Saxony. Name of a silk merchant, from the German word for silk: seide
SEIDMAN Jewish, German
Derived from SEID.
SEILER German
German and Jewish occupational surname for a rope maker.
SEIM Upper German
German: metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper, from Middle High German seim ‘honey’.
SEINFELD German, Jewish
From the German word sein "to be" and the word of German Jewish origin feld which means "field". It was a name given to areas of land that had been cleared of forest.
SEITZ Upper German
A mainly Bavarian surname, from a reduced form of the personal name Seifried, a variant of SIEGFRIED... [more]
SEITZER German
Variant of SEITZ.
SELMER German
Teutonic name meaning "hall master" for a steward or keeper of a large home or settlement.
SELVA Catalan, Italian
From any of various places in Catalonia, the Balearic Islands, or northern Italy named Selva, as for instance the Catalan district La Selva, from selva "wood", Latin silva.
SELZ German
The Selz is a river in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, and a left hand tributary of the Rhine. It flows through the largest German wine region, Rheinhessen or Rhenish Hesse. Also, Seltz (German: Selz) is a commune in the Bas-Rhin department of the Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine region in north-eastern France.... [more]
SENG German
1. Topographic name for someone who lived by land cleared by fire, from Middle High German sengen ‘to singe or burn’. ... [more]
SENN German
Derived from the Middle High German word senne meaning "dairy farmer".
SENSENBACH German
A topographic name formed with an unexplained first element + Middle High German bach ‘creek’. Pretty common in Iowa and Pennsylvania.
SERRE French
Means 'greenhouse' in French.
SEUL French
From Fr. "only, alone"
SEUSS German, Jewish
Means "sweet", "pleasant", or "agreeable".
SÉVIGNY French
A kind of bush.
SEWINA German, Polish
The first available record of the Sewina family name is around 1620 in the province of Silesia, a mixed cultural region between Germany and Poland. Once part of the Prussian Empire and Germany. After World War Two, the area is now part of Poland... [more]
SEYLER German
Germanic surname
SFERRAZZA Italian
Occupational name for a scrap-metal merchant, from a derivative of Sferro in the sense ‘old and broken iron’. Habitational name from the district of Paternò in Catania, Sicily.
SFORZA Italian
Derived from the Italian verb sforzare meaning "to force, strain"; also compare the related word forza "force, strength". This was the surname of a dynasty of Milanese dukes, which held power in the 15th and 16th centuries.
SHADE English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
SHADEL German (Anglicized, ?)
Derived from the German 'Schadle', meaning cranium or skull.
SHAFFNER German, German (Swiss)
Americanized version of German occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of SCHAFFNER and Schaffer.... [more]
SHAINWALD German
German for "beautiful forest", probably (?) related to SHEINFELD
SHATNER German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of SCHATTNER. A notable bearer was Canadian actor William Shatner (1931-), who is known for his roles as Captain James T. Kirk in 'Star Trek', T.J. Hooker in 'T.J. Hooker', Denny Crane in 'Boston Legal', and the Priceline Negotiator in Priceline.com commercials.
SHIEMKE German, Polish, Slavic
Americanized spelling of Kashub Name: "Shiemke" Root Name: "Schimke" "Szymek" or "Szymko" ... [more]
SHOEN German (Anglicized), Jewish
Americanized spelling of German or Ashkenazic Jewish SCHÖN or SCHOEN.
SHROUT German
This surname is related to the German surname Schroder which means cut as in a wood cutter etc.
SIEBER German
The roots of the German surname Sieber can be traced to the Old Germanic word "Siebmacher," meaning "sieve maker." The surname is occupational in origin, and was most likely originally borne by someone who held this position
SIEBERN German
German. People known with this name are: Emelia Siebern, Hannah Siebern, Caleb Siebern.
SIECK German
The name is originally spelled "Siecke". Eric Siecke came from Norway and settled in Holstein, Germany in the year 1307. The final "e" was dropped by most of the family, though one branch still retains it... [more]
SIEGFRIED German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements sigi "victory" and fridu "peace". The German surname has also occasionally been adopted by Ashkenazic Jews.
SIEMENS German
Derived from the given name SIEM.
SIEVERTSEN German
Patronymic of SIEVERT.
SIEWERT German
Derived from the Frisian and Low German given name SIEVERT.
SILBER German, Jewish
From Middle High German "silber," meaning "silver." Metonymic occupational name for a silversmith, or often, in the case of the Jewish surname, an ornamental name.
SILBERMAN German, Jewish
Variant of SILBER, with the addition of Middle High German man meaning "man" or Yiddish man meaning "man".
SILBERSTEIN German, Jewish
From Middle High German silber "silver" and stein "stone"; a habitational name from a place so named in Bavaria, or a topographic name.... [more]
SILVESTRINI Italian
Means "Little Tree" or "Little Woods." Derived from the given name SILVESTER.
SILVIO Italian
From the personal name SILVIO (Latin SILVIUS, a derivative of silva "wood").
SIMBECK German
Originates from the German prefix sim meaning "of the head" and the German word becka meaning "bull". When combined in this order, the meaning was "bull-headed", meaning stubborn and obstinant.
SIMM German
A shortening of the given name Simon.
SIMONETTI Italian
The name Simonetti originated from the personal name Simon, itself a derivative of the Hebrew name "Sim'on," from the verb "sama" meaning "to listen." Thus, the name Simonetti means "God has listened," referring to the gratitude of the parents who, having wished for a child, had their prayers answered.... [more]
SIMONI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Simone
SINATRA Italian
Comes from a personal name in Sicily and souther Calabria. The name was apparently in origin a nickname from Latin senator member of the Roman senate, Latin senatus, a derivative of senex ‘old’... [more]
SING German, Chinese (Cantonese), Indian
German: probably a variant of SENG. ... [more]
SINGER German
variant of Sänger, in the sense of ‘poet’
SIRTORI Italian
Perhaps a habitational name from a comune (municipality) in Northern Italy.
SIVELLE French
A rare surname.
SKELTON English, German, Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from places in Cumbria and Yorkshire, England, originally named with the same elements as SHELTON, but with a later change of ‘s’ to ‘sk’ under Scandinavian influence.
SLYVESTRE Italian
Derived from the given name SYLVESTER.
SMOKE English, German, German (Austrian)
Possibly a variant of English SMOCK or an altered form of German SCHMUCK.
SNYDER Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
SOLDNER German
German surname meaning mercenary. German spelling has umlaut over the O, but American spelling is Soldner or Soeldner.
SOLEBELLO Italian
Means, "beautiful sun". Derived from "bello", meaning beautiful, and "sole", meaning sun.
SOLITAIRE French
the card game
SONNENBLUME German
Means "sunflower" in German.
SONNENSCHEIN German
Surname meaning "sunshine".
SONTAG German, Jewish
"sunday;" usually given to a person who was born on a sunday.
SOPRANO Italian
For soprano "higher, situated above", a topographic name for someone who lived at the top end of a place on a hillside.
SORDINO Italian (Rare), Literature
Derived from Italian sordino, referring to a mute for musical instruments. It is ultimately from Italian sordo "deaf" or "muffled (sound), silent, hidden, voiceless". American author Laurie Halse Anderson uses this for her novel Speak (1999), on high school rape victim MELINDA Sordino... [more]
SOTTILE Italian
Southern Italian: nickname from sottile ‘delicate’, ‘refined’, also ‘lean’, ‘thin’ (from Latin subtilis ‘small’, ‘slender’).
SOULE English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
SOULIER French
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
SOVEREIGN French
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
SOYER French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
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