Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
KIPPENBERGER German, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
KIPPING German
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
KIPPS German
Topographical name for someone living on a hill, from Kippe 'edge', 'brink'.
KIRCHOFER German
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
KIRSCH German
Means 'cherry' in German, short form of Kirschstein or other surnames starting with Kirsch.
KIRSCHENBAUM German
From German means "cherry tree".
KIRSCHSTEIN German
German surname meaning "cherry stone".
KIRSTEIN German
Derivative of the Latin personal name Christianus, also an Americanized spelling of Kirschstein.
KISER German
Variant of Kaiser.
KISSEL German
From a pet form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf.
KISSINGER German
HouseofNames.com: The Kissinger surname derives from the Old High German word "kisil," meaning "pebble," or "gravel." The name may have been a topographic name for someone who lived in an area of pebbles or gravel; or it may have evolved from any of several places named with this word.
KLARERSTEIN German
German surname meaning "Clear stone".
KLASS German
The name is patronymic and it comes from the German first name "Clausen" which is a variant of the name "Nicholas".
KLEFFNER German
Topographic name from Middle Low German clef, cleff "cliff", "precipice".
KLEFFNER German
Nickname for a prattler or gossip, from Middle High German, Middle Low German kleffer(er).
KLEINKNECHT German
A combining of the German word klein "small" and knecht "servant", originally an occupational name for a secondary hired hand. A famous historic figure who bore this surname was Jakob Friedrich Kleinknecht (8 April 1722 in Ulm - 11 August 1794 in Ansbach), a German composer of many works of chamber music and symphonies, flutist and Kapellmeister (chapel master).
KLIEBERT German
Occupational name for a woodsman or woodworker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German klieben meaning "to cleave or split".
KLIEWER German, German (West Prussian), Mennonite
Germanized form of Dutch Kluiver, an occupational name for a court official, originally a hangman or torturer.
KLINGBEIL German
From Middle High German klingen "to ring or sound" and bīl "axe", literally "sound the axe", an occupational nickname for a journeyman, carpenter, shipwright (or any occupation involving the use of an axe)... [more]
KLINGEMANN German
A German occupational surname for a knife maker, meaning "knife maker" or "weapons smith", from the German word Klinge, meaning "blade".
KLINGER German
Klinger is a German surname meaning ravine or gorge in Old German. The English variant of Klinger is Clinger.
KLOPFENSTEIN German
It means striking stones
KLOSTERMANN German
Combination of "kloster" meaning "monastery," and common German suffix Mann.
KLUTZ German
The ancient and distinguished German surname Klutz is derived from the old Germanic term "Klotz," meaning "awkward, clumsy." The name was most likely initially bestowed as a nickname, either on someone who was clumsy or in an ironic way on someone who was exceptionally graceful.
KNAB German
Variant of Knabe.
KNABE German
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
KNAPE German
Variant of Knapp.
KNAPP German
Occupational name from the German word Knapp or Knappe, a variant of Knabe "young unmarried man". In the 15th century this spelling acquired the separate, specialized meanings "servant", "apprentice", or "miner"... [more]
KNAPPE German
German variant of Knapp.
KNAUS German
Comes from Middle High German knuz ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’, ‘daring’, hence a nickname for a haughty person. In Württemberg knaus (and in Switzerland knus) also meant ‘gnarl’, hence a nickname for a short, fat, gnarled person; topographic name for someone living on a hillock, from knaus ‘hillock’ in the Swabian and Alemannic dialects of German
KNAUSS German
A variant of Knaus.
KNODEL German
dweller near a hilltop; descendant of Knut (hill, or white-haired); a lumpish, thickset person.
KNOEDLER German
Occupational name, probably for someone who made dumplings, from an agent derivative of Middle High German knödel.
KNOLL English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
KNORR German (Rare)
The name 'Knorr' was used by a collection of knights during the feudal period in Germanic History. Originally laborers to an existing feudal Lord, they gained their freedom and knight status after sucessfully protecting their master's land from invasion... [more]
KNUTZ German
Variant of Kuntz
KOBOLDT German (Rare)
Derived from German Kobold (Middle High German kobolt) "kobold; hobgoblin; puck; imp".
KOCHENDORFER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Kochendorf, in Württemberg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Bohemia.
KÖCHER German
It literally means "quiver".
KOEHNLINE German
Believed to be a form of the German name Köhnlein used by people who moved to America from Germany sometime during the 1800s.
KOELL Upper German (Rare)
(Koell) named used when came1880s to 1905 in America changed to( Kohl)... [more]
KOELSCH German
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
KOERNER German
Koerner is an occupational name for a grain merchant or possibly an administrator of a granary. ... [more]
KOHLHAAS German
Apparently a nickname from Middle Low German kōlhase, literally "cabbage rabbit".
KÖHN German
From the given name KÖHN.
KOHR German
1. occupational name for a guard or watchman on a tower, Middle Low German kure.... [more]
KOLB German
Comes from Middle High German Kolbe.
KOLDEN German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
KOLESAR Czech (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), German (Austrian, Modern, Rare)
Means either 'wheelwright' or 'coleminer' depending on the region.
KOLKMANN German
Kolk is an old German word that means '' man who lives by the river'' and Mann is German for 'man'. The name Kolkmann comes from a man who lived by the North Rhine.
KOLL German
From the given name Colo or Koloman. Alternatively derived from Middle Low German kolle "head".
KOLLAR German
Derived from the kolar "cartwright".
KÖLLE German
Variant of Koll.
KÖLSCH German
From German kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (Köln in German).
KONITZER German
A German habitational name for someone who lives in various places called Konitz in places like Thuringia, Pomerania, Moravia, or West Prussia.
KONRAD German
From the given name KONRAD.
KONZELMAN German
Orginating from Konrad, which is a variant of Conrad, meaning "brave counsel." The second half of the name indicates one who was a councilman or advisor to someone of importance or power.
KOPPEN German
Patronymic from a reduced pet form of the personal name JAKOB.
KOPPEN German
Habitational name from any of several places named Koppen.
KORBECI German, Albanian
German name for Korb "basket" changed over time to Korbeci
KORBEL German
Diminutive of Korb "basket".
KORN German
From Middle High German korn "grain", a metonymic occupational name for a factor or dealer in grain or a nickname for a peasant.
KORNFELD German, Jewish
Means "cornfield" in German.
KOSSOW German
unknown
KOT Polish, Slovak, Czech, Belorussian, Jewish, German
From a personal name or nickname based on Slavic kot "tom cat".
KOTEN German
Derived from German Kate / Kote, originally from Middle Low German kote "small house; hut".... [more]
KÖTH German
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
KOTT German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
KRÄFT German, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
KRAHE German, Spanish
From the German word Krähe, meaning "crow".... [more]
KRAHN German
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
KRAIS German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Greis; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil.
KRANICH German
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
KRATT German
German metonymic occupational name for a ''basketmaker'', from Middle High German kratte ''basket''.
KRECHTER German
Possibly derived from Krämer
KREGER German
Mercenary or warrior for hire.
KREISEL German, Jewish
Jewish family name and originally a nickname for an active or disorganized person, derived from German kreisel meaning "spinning top, top", ultimately from kreis "circle". Alternatively, it could've be used as a nickname for a person with curly hair in the context of "spiral" or "curl".
KREMER German
Variant of Krämer.
KREPP German
topographic name for someone living in a hollow
KRESS German
From Middle High German kresse "gudgeon", hence probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way or an occupational name for a fisherman.
KRESS German
From Old High German krassig, gratag "greedy".
KRESS German
From a much altered pet form of the personal name ERASMUS.
KRETZER German
Occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kretze 'basket'.
KREUTZ German
Topographical name for someone who lived near a cross set up by the roadside, in a marketplace, or as a field or boundary marker, from Middle High German kriuz(e) 'cross'.
KRIEG German
German word meaning "war"
KRIEGER German
Noun to kriegen, kämpfen meaning "to fight (with words)". Describes a person who likes to argue. A wrangler, a quarreler, a brawler. Literal translation "warrior", from the German noun krieg "war" and the suffix -er.
KRIEGSHAUSER German
Probably a habitational name for someone from an unidentified place called Kriegshaus, literally "war house".
KRIER German, Luxembourgish
Occupational name from Middle High German krier "herald".
KRONEN German
From German Krone 'crown', probably as an ornamental name. Or a nickname for a slender, long-legged individual, from a dialect form of Kranich.
KRONSTADT German
Means "crown state" (i.e., capital city) in German
KRUMHOLZ Jewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Krumbholz ‘bent timber’, ‘mountain pine’, hence probably a metonymic occupational name for a cartwright or wheelwright. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
KRUMWIEDE German
Location-based name for people who lived by a gnarled old willow tree.... [more]
KUCH German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
KUCHENMEISTER German
Occupational name for a master cook (literally "kitchen master"), a court official.
KUCHLER German (Rare)
Often confused with Küchler a name for a cookie baker, Kuchler is a noble name for an old german family. Kuchler is origined in a city named Kuchl at the border of todays german bavaria. Sometimes they are reffered to "Herrn von Kuchl" meaning "Ruler of Kuchl"
KUES German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
KÜHL German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
KUHLMAN German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
KUHLMANN German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
KULP German
anglicized version of Kolbe
KÜLPER German
German cognate of Culpeper.
KUMMEROW German
Habitational name from any of various places in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg called Kummerow.
KUNIS German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name KONRAD.
KÜNNEN German
Metronymic from the given name KUNIGUNDE.
KÜNZI German, Swiss, German (Austrian)
From a pet form of the personal name Kuntz.
KÜNZLER German
Nickname for a flatterer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German künzen "to flatter".
KUPFER German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’. As a Jewish name it is often an ornamental name.
KÜRSCHNER German
Occupational name for a furrier, Middle High German kürsenære, from Middle High German kürsen meaning "fur coat".
KURTZ German
Variant of Kurz.
KURZHALS German
Short Neck
KÜSTER German
It literally means "sexton".
KUTCH German (Anglicized)
Americanized variant of German Kutsch.
KUTSCH German
Topographic name of Slavic origin, from Sorbian kut ‘corner’, ‘nook’. Variant of Kutsche, metonymic occupational name for a coachman or coachbuilder, from the Hungarian loanword kocsi (see Kocsis).
KUTTELWASCHER German
Surname given to those who had the occupation of cleaning tripe. Combines the words kuttel meaning "tripe" and washer meaning "washer". Bearers of the surname typically live in Austria.
KUTZ Italian
Habitational name for someone from Kuhz, near Prenzlau.
KUTZ German
From a pet form of the personal name Konrad.
KUTZLER German
This is the surname of my great-grandfather, of German ancestry.
LABORDE French
Occupational or status name for a tenant farmer, from borde "small farm" (from Frankish bord "plank") and the definite article la.
LABRIE French
Topographic name from l’abri meaning "the shelter", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
LACKYARD French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surname, Lacaillade.
LACOMBE French
French (western and southwestern): topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine, from la combe ‘the ravine’ (a word of Gaulish origin, related to English Combe).... [more]
LACROIX French
Means "the cross" in French. It originally denoted someone who lived near a cross.
LADOUCEUR French
french canadian
LADSTETTER German
JEWS AND GREMAM
LA FORGE French
This is my Grandmother's maiden name
LAGASSE French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
LAGHI Italian
Possibly originated to denote someone from the Italian town of Laghi.
LAGRANGE French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
LAHAIE French
Locational name for someone who lived near a hedge or large bush, from old French "La" the and "Haie" hedge.
LAHNER German, Hungarian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Lahn in Hungary and Germany. In southern Germany and Austria, Lahn denotes a place where there had been an avalanche or landslide, from Middle High German laen, lēne meaning "avalanche".
LA LIVERES French
Means 'the books' in French
LALONDE French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
LAMANTIA Italian
Italian:vail, the last name of a general in Palrmo, Sicily, Italy.
LA MARCA Italian
Means 'the mark' in Italian.
LAMARCHE French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
LAMBERG German
Habitational name from any of several places so called in Bavaria, Westphalia, and Schleswig-Holstein.
LAMBILLOTTE French (Modern)
Currently, a common name in Wallonia, Belgium with some descendants in USA. Believed to be derived from three terms..."lamb" "ill" "otte". The first term has remained unchanged from early Germanic term; the second is latin for "of the" and the third a dimiuative or feminine form suffix... [more]
LAMBORGHINI Italian
Probably from Germanic landa "land" and burg "fortress, castle".
LAMONT Scottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
L'AMOREAUX French
French surname meaning "The Lovers"
LAMOUREAUX French
Means "the lover" in French. It would be the nickname of an amorous person.
LAMPERT German, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
LAND English, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
LANDE French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
LANDIS German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German nickname for a highwayman or for someone who lays waste to the land, from Middle High German landoese.
LANDRY French, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
LANGHANS German
German and Dutch: distinguishing nickname for a tall man (see Lang) called Hans.
LANGWIESNER German
Derived from location means 'Long field'
LANSDOWNE French, English
The first marquis lansdowne, land owners for there lords and farmers also know as tenants.
LANTZ German
Habitational name from places called Lanz or derived from the given name Lanzo.
LAPETINA South American, Italian (?)
Possibly from Italian La Petina, the meaning of which is uncertain.
LAPIN French
Means "Rabbit" in French.
LAPORTE French
Topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town (and often was in charge of them; thus in part a metonymic occupational name), from Old French porte "gateway", "entrance" (from Latin porta, "door", "entrance"), with the definite article la... [more]
LAPP German
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
LARCELLA Italian
Variation of Lauricella, from a pet form of Laura.
LARIVIÈRE French (Modern)
From the region of Bourgoigne, in France, meaning 'the river'. The name is likely a topographic reference to the physical location, likely a river in this case.
LAROSA Italian
Means "rose" in italian.
LAROSE Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived at a place where wild roses grew; or a habitational name from a town house bearing the sign of a rose. It may also have been a nickname for a man with a ‘rosy’ complexion, as well as a nickname of a soldier... [more]
LASALLE French
1. French: local name or occupational name for someone who lived or worked at a manor house, from Old French sal(e) ‘hall’ (modern French salle; see also Sale), with the definite article la. ... [more]
LASCELLES French
French location name from Lacelle in Orne, northern France and referring to "small rooms or cells inhabited by monks".
LATINA Italian
From a feminine form of Latino.
LATINO Italian
From the medieval personal name Latino, originally an ethnic name for someone of Latin as opposed to Germanic, Byzantine or Slavic descent.
LATTANZIO Italian
My great-great grandmother's name was Patrizia Maria Lattanzio. After she passed and my Great-grandmother sent my grandmother to America, the officials mis-spelled her name on her documents and the last name was shortened to Lattanzi... [more]
LÄUFER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Lauf, also an occupational name for a messenger or a nickname for a fast runner, from an agent derivative of Middle High German loufen, German laufen ‘to run’.
LAUFFER German
The lauffer name is generally thought to have evolved from a place name to a surname. ... Versions of the name that evolve from the word "läufer," which meant "runner," are thought to have originally been an occupational name for a messenger.
LAUMANN German
Meaning unknown.
LAUPER German (Swiss)
From the short form of a Germanic personal name composed of the elements liut 'people', 'tribe' + berht 'famous'. topographic name for someone who lived at a Lauben, a row of houses and stores with an arcade in front, from Middle High German loube 'arbor', 'bower', 'gallery'.
LAURA Italian
Either from the given name Laura or a topographic name from Latin laurea meaning "laurel".
LAURENCE English, French
From the given name Laurence.
LAURICELLA Italian
From the pet form of Laura.
LAURSEN German, Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian, Danish, and North German: patronymic from Laur, a short form of Lawrence.
LAUTERMILCH German (Modern)
Comes from German words Lauter, meaning 'pure', or 'nothing but', and Milch, meaning 'milk'. This could mean that the people who first used this name were farmers.
LAVALLE French
means "of the valley" in english.
LAVECCHIA Italian
Means "Old Lady"
LAVELLE French
From Old French val "valley".... [more]
LAVELY French (Anglicized, ?)
Possibly an English variant of Lavallée.
LAVERDIÈRE French
Habitational name from various places named La Verdière in France, or a variant of the name Leverdier (see VERDIER).
LAVERDURE French
From the French place name La Verdure meaning "greenness, greenery".
LAVIOLETTE French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
A secondary surname, associated with some forty family names in Canada and also used independently since 1698, a nickname from the flower violette ‘violet’, with the definite article la. In feudal France it was a name given to soldiers and domestic servants.
LEBKUCHEN German
A German surname meaning "gingerbread".
LE BRETON French
Describes someone from the French region Breton.
LECHAT French
Means "The Cat" in French.
LECOQ French
Coq means rooster or fowl
LEDERER German
Leatherworker
LEDERMAN German
Variant of Leatherman.
LEDERMANN German
Spelling variation of Leatherman.
LEDGER English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’. The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEDOUX French
Means "the amiable" from French doux meaning "sweet, soft, gentle".
LEFFLER German, Swedish
Occupational name for a spoonmaker. Derived from German Löffel "spoon".
LEFRANÇOIS French, French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name François.
LEGORE Italian
Possibly Italian, a nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from a northern variant of lepre "hare". However, only the plural form Legori is attested in Italian records.
LEHIGH German, Irish
Derived from a Native American word "Lechauwekink", meaning "where there are forks in the stream". Variant of Lechau .
LEHNER German
Status name for a feudal tenant or vassal, from an agent derivative of Middle High German lehen 'to hold land as a feudal tenant'. variant of Leonhardt.
LEHNHART German
"Lean deer." From the German words lehn and Hart, "lean" and "deer" respectively.
LEICH German
A coworker at my job has this surname and they told me that it’s German. I know nothing more about this surname.
LEIDIG German
From a short form of any of several Germanic personal names composed with the first element liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’. Also a nickname for a disagreeable, cantankerous person, from Middle High German leidic ‘disagreeable’, ‘tiresome’.
LEINBACH German
German topographic name from any of several streams called leinbach, from Middle High German lin ‘flax’ or Middle Low German leie (genitive leien) ‘rock’, ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’.
LEINEN German
Name means LINEN in German. The first known Leinen was a tailor
LEITER German
From Leiter ‘leader’, status name for a foreman or for the leader of a military expedition, from Middle High German leiten ‘lead’.German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Leitner.
LELOUP French
Means “the wolf” in French.
LE MAISTRE French
From French meaning 'master'
LEMBERG German
Habitational name from a place called Lemberg in Silesia, originally Löwenberg, from Middle High German lewe, löwe "lion" and berg "mountain".
LEMERCIER French
French surname designating a vendor of sewing materials, from the word mercier.
LEMOINE French, French (Quebec)
Means "The Monk" in French. Lemoine is also an English given name derived from this surname.
LENCIONI Italian
Italian. My family is from the Tuscany region of Lucca.
LENNIN German
Variant of Lennon.
LENOIR French
French surname which was originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or skin, derived from noir "black" combined with the definite article le. A famous bearer is Étienne Lenoir (1822 - 1900), the inventor of the internal combustion engine.
LENTZ German
Variant of LENZ.
LEO Italian
Nickname for a fierce or brave warrior, from Latin leo meaning "lion".
LEO Italian
From a short form of the personal name Pantaleo.
LEONARDI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of the personal name Leonardo.
LEONARDO Italian, Spanish, German
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese from the Germanic personal name Leonhard, formed from the elements leo ‘lion’ + hard, ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’; this was an early medieval saint’s name (see Leonard).
LEONHARDT German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
LÉOTARD French
From the given name Leopold. Jules Léotard was an acrobat who popularized the leotard, a gymnastics garment. The garment is named after him.
LEPP German
Unflattering nickname from Middle High German lappe "coxcomb", "puppy" (modern German Laffe).... [more]
LERNER German, Jewish
Its literal meaning can be either "student" or "scholar".
LE ROUX French
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Old French rous "red." Variant spelling of Leroux.
LESCH German
German variant of Loesch.
LESCHER German
German metonymic occupational name for a mediator or arbitrator, or possibly for a fireman, from Middle High German leschære ‘extinguisher’.
LESNAR German
Variant spelling of German Lessner, a habitational name from any of various places in eastern Germany called Lessen, all named with Slavic les 'forest'.
LESUEUR French
Occupational surname for a shoemaker, cobbler, or rarely a tailor; derived from Old French sueur "one who sews" (from Latin sutor).
LETO Italian
From the personal name Leto. From Latin Laetus meaning "happy, joyful"... [more]
LETOURNEAU French
From Old French estournel 'starling'.... [more]
LEUENBERGER German (Swiss)
Means "one who came from Löwenberg" in German.
LEVA Bulgarian (Rare), Czech (Rare), French (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
From the Hebrew given name Lev, meaning Lion. It is also the name of the currency in Bulgaria, and a verb in French meaning to lever or to lift.
LEVAN French, English
Comes from le vent, meaning "the wind."
LEVASSEUR French
Status name from Old French vasseor, a short form of vavasour, a term of the feudal system for a tenant ranking immediately below a baron. Such a tenant would have been a prosperous man, and the surname may have been used for someone in his service more often than for the man himself... [more]
LEVER French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
LEVIN Jewish, Lithuanian, Belarusian, German, Russian, French (Quebec, Anglicized), Various
As a Lithuanian Jewish and Belarusian Jewish name, it is a Slavicized form of Levy. As a German and German Jewish name, it is derived from the given name Levin. As a Jewish name, it can also be related to Loewe... [more]
LEVY English, French, Jewish
There are three possible sources of this surname. ... [more]
LEX German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.