American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Duckworth English
Habitational name from Duckworth Fold, in the borough of Bury, Lancashire, which is named from Old English fuce "duck" and wor{dh} "enclosure".
Duddridge English
It is locational from a "lost" medieval village probably called Doderige, since that is the spelling in the first name recording (see below). It is estimated that some three thousand villages and hamlets have disappeared from the maps of Britain over the past thousand years... [more]
Dude English
Derived from Old English word doughty which meant "manly".
Duffield English
The meaning is dove field or open country. It's origin is the Yorkshire area named after a few places there.... [more]
Duggan Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
Dukelow English
This surname is of Old French origin. It was initially introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, and subsequently by French Huguenot refugees fleeing religious persecutions in their own country... [more]
Dummer German, English
From Middle High German tump "simple".
Dummitt English
Habitational name from Dumart-en-Ponthieu in Somme, France.
Dumper English
Variant of Dummer.
Dumper English
Variant of Dummer.
Dumper English
Variant of Dummer.
Dumper English
Variant of Dummer.
Dumper English
Variant of Dummer.
Dunaway English
Originally indicated someone who came from the village and civil parish of Dunwich in Suffolk, England, derived from Old English dun meaning "hill" (or possibly dune meaning "valley") and weg meaning "way"... [more]
Dundale English
((Anne))... [more]
Dundreary English
This was a nickname for someone who had dundrearies, which were long sideburns.
Dunford English
Derived either from Dunford Bridge in Yorkshire (named after the River Don and the English word “Ford”), or from Dunford House in Yorkshire (named after “Dunn’s Ford”). One known bearer is US General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Dunleavy Irish, English
Anglicized form of Mac Duinnshléibhe meaning "son of Donn Sléibhe".
Dunmore English, Scottish
Habitational name from Dunmore Farm in Oxfordshire or from any of many places in Scotland named in Gaelic as Dún Môr 'great hill'.
Dunne Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
Dunstan English
Either from the given name Dunstan or habitational name from Dunston (Derbyshire Lincolnshire Norfolk) from the Old English personal name Dunn and tun "settlement"... [more]
Dupree English
Variant of Dupré.
Durden English
A different form of Dearden. A fictional bearer is Tyler Durden, a character from Chuck Palahniuk's 'Fight Club' (1996) and its subsequent film adaptation (1999).
Durham English
Denotes a person from either the town of Durham, or elsewhere in County Durham, in England. Durham is derived from the Old English element dun, meaning "hill," and the Old Norse holmr, meaning "island."
Durward English, Scottish (?)
Means "guardian of the door, door-keeper" (cf. Durward). A fictional bearer of the surname is Quentin Durward, eponymous hero of the novel (1823) by Sir Walter Scott.
Duska English (Rare)
Anglicized spelling of Duška.
Dutton English
habitational name from any of the places called Dutton, especially those in Cheshire and Lancashire. The first of these is named from Old English dun ‘hill’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the second is from Old English personal name Dudd + Old English tun.
Duxbury English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, recorded in the early 13th century as D(e)ukesbiri, from the genitive case of the Old English personal name Deowuc or Duc(c) (both of uncertain origin) + Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke).
Dye English, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name Dennis. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
Dylan English
From the given name Dylan.
Dymock English
From the parish of Dymock in Gloucestershire, England. The name comes from Old English Dimóc meaning "dim/shady oak".
Dyne English
Derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "dence", the Middle English "dene", meaning a valley.
Eachus English
Name is said to have originated in Cheshire and Lancashire. A variant of Etches, possibly a variant of Edge , with post-medieval excrescent -s and devoicing of the consonant, or an altered pronunciation of the nickname Edgoose (Middle English Edcus, early modern English Etcus)... [more]
Eadie English
Variant of Eady
Eagle English
Nickname for a lordly, impressive, or sharp-eyed man, from Middle English egle "eagle" (from Old French aigle, from Latin aquila).
Eagleburger English (American)
Americanized form of German Adelberger, a habitational name for someone from a place called Adelberg near Stuttgart.
Ealey English
Variant of Ely.
Eames English
Probably from the possessive case of the Middle English word eam ‘uncle’, denoting a retainer in the household of the uncle of some important local person. Possibly also a variant of Ames.
Earenfight English
appears in early American history in Pennsylvania and New Jerssey. Jacob Earenfight fought in the Battle of Princeton in the American Revolutionary War.
Eargle English
Variant of Ergle.
Earhart English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ehrhardt.
Early Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
Earnshaw English
Means "person from Earnshaw", Lancashire ("Earn's nook of land" - Earn from an Old English personal name meaning literally "eagle"). In fiction this surname is borne by Catherine Earnshaw, her brother Hindley and her nephew Hareton, characters in Emily Brontë's 'Wuthering Heights' (1847).
East English
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately derived from Proto-Germanic *austrą "east". It originally denoted someone who lived to the east of something, or someone who came from the east.
Eastburn English
Habitational name from either of two places, one in Humberside and one in West Yorkshire, so named from Old English ēast, ēasten "east" and burna "stream".
Eastep English
Altered form of Easthope.
Easterbrook English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a brook to the east of a main settlement, from Middle English easter meaning "eastern" + brook meaning "stream".
Easthope English
From the name of the village and civil parish of Easthope in Shropshire, England, derived from Old English est meaning "east, eastern" and hop meaning "enclosed valley".
Eastin English
Variant of Easton.
Eastlake English
"East lake".
Eastland English
Meaning "east land".
Eastley English
A Saxon village called East Leah has been recorded to have existed since 932 AD. (Leah is an ancient Anglo-Saxon word meaning 'a clearing in a forest'). There is additional evidence of this settlement in a survey from the time which details land in North Stoneham being granted by King Æthelstan to his military aid, Alfred in 932 AD... [more]
Eastman English
Derived from the Old English given name Eastmund, or a variant of East.
Eastvold English (American)
Anglicized form of the Norwegian surname Østvold.
Eatherton English
Probably a variant spelling of Atherton.
Ebanks English
Probably a variant of Eubanks.
Eben English
Meaning unknown. It could be from the given name Eden, from the place name Eden, meaning "Place Of Pleasure".
Ebeneezer English
Obtained from the given name Ebenezer
Ebenezer English
From the given name Ebenezer.
Eberly Upper German, German (Swiss), English (American)
Variant of Eberle, which is a diminutive of Eberhard.
Ebert German, American
Believed to be a variant of Herbert or of Everett.
Eccles English
From the name of a town in Greater Manchester, England or another town or village named Eccles, derived from Latin ecclesia via Romano-British ecles meaning "church".
Echelbarger English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Eichelberger.
Eckland English (Rare), Norwegian (Anglicized, Rare, Expatriate), Swedish (Anglicized, Expatriate)
Possibly a variant of Ecklund. It might also be an anglicization of the rare Swedish surname Ekland or of a Norwegian name derived from several farmsteads named with eik "oak" and land "land".
Ecklund English
English spelling of Swedish Eklund.
Economy Greek (Americanized), English
Americanized form of Greek Οικονόμος (see Economos) meaning "steward", or of the patronymic Οικονόμου (see Economou).
Eddowes English
Derived from the given name Aldus, a medieval variant of Aldous.
Eddy American
A common surname used among people whose ancestry originates from the United Kingdom (England, Ireland and Scottland etc.) Shelia Eddy is an American who was convicted in 2014 for the murder of Skylar Neese in the state of West Virginia.
Edge English
Topographic name, especially in Lancashire and the West Midlands, for someone who lived on or by a hillside or ridge, from Old English ecg "edge".
Edgecombe English
From a location meaning ridge valley, from Old English ecg "edge, ridge" and cumb "valley".
Edgell English
Probably derived from the Old English given name Ecgwulf.
Edgely English
A surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a place name taken from either a village in Cheshire or one in Shropshire. The name means “park by the wood” in Old English.
Edgerly English
Habitational name from any of numerous minor places named Edgerley, Edgerely, or Hedgerley.
Edgerton English
From a place name meaning either "settlement of Ecghere" or "settlement of Ecgheard" (see Ekkehard).
Edith English
From the given name Edith.
Edmeades English
Meant "son of Edmede", from a medieval nickname for a self-effacing person (literally "humble", from Old English ēadmēde "easy mind").
Edmison English, Scottish
Patronymic surname meaning “Son of Edmund”.
Edmunds English, Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Edmund (see Edmond).
Edmundson English
Means "son of Edmund".
Edson English
Patronymic or metronymic from Eade.
Edward English
From the given name Edward
Edy English
Edy... [more]
Efner English
Variant of Hefner.
Eggington English
Surname derived from a parish named "Eggington" in England.
Eggleston English
Habitational name from a place in County Durham so called, or from Egglestone in North Yorkshire, both named in Old English as Egleston, probably from the Old English personal name Ecgel (unattested) + tūn ‘settlement’, ‘farmstead’.
Eigenmann English
Not available.
Eilish Irish, English (American)
From the given name Eilish.
Eisenhower English (American)
American form of German Eisenhauer. A notable bearer was Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), president of the United States between 1953 and 1961. His ancestors immigrated to Pennsylvania from Germany in the 1740s and at some point the spelling changed from Eisenhauer to Eisenhower.
Elam English
English habitational name for someone from a place called Elham, in Kent, or a lost place of this name in Crayford, Kent. The first is derived from Old English el ‘eel’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’... [more]
Elden English
Variant of Eldon.
Eldon English
Habitation name from the Old English personal name Ella- and -don from dun meaning "hill."
Elgar English
Surname meaning the son of Eggar.
Elias Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name Elias. Compare Ellis.
Elich German, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
Elie American
From Rembrandt and Giacomo Elie, professional footballers for Genoa FC and Juventus FC.
Eliezer English, Hebrew
From the given name Eliezer
Elijah English
From the given name Elijah
Elizabeth American
From the given name Elizabeth.
Elizabethson English (Rare)
Means “son of Elizabeth”.
Elkin English
Patronymic of a diminutive of the given name Elis.
Elkington English
According to Wikipedia Elkington is a deserted medieval village and civil parish in the West Northamptonshire in England. The villages name means "Elta's hill" or perhaps, less likely, "swan hill".... [more]
Elkins English
Patronymic of Elkin.
Ellender English
English variant of Allender.
Ellens English
Metronymic from Ellen 1.
Ellert English
Son of Elliott.
Ellingham English
Habitational name from places so named in Hampshire, Northumbria, and Norfolk. The first of these is named from Old English Edlingaham ‘homestead (Old English ham) of the people of Edla’, a personal name derived from a short form of the various compound names with a first element ead ‘prosperity’, ‘fortune’; the others may have the same origin or incorporate the personal name Ella (see Ellington).
Ellsey English
Variant of Elsey.
Elm English
This is a kind of tree
Elmore English
An English habitational name from Elmore in Gloucestershire, named from Old English elm ‘elm’ + ofer ‘river bank’ or ofer ‘ridge’.
Elms English
Variant of Elm.
Elphee English
Derived from the Old English given name Ælfwig.
Elric English, Popular Culture
From the medieval English givin name Elric. Notable bearers were the Fullmetal Alchemist characters Edward and Alphonse Elric, as well as their mother, Trisha Elric.
Elsemere English
The surname Ellesmere was first found in Shropshire at Ellesmere, a market-town and parish, and the head of a union.
Elsey English
Derived from the Middle English given names Elfsi and Elsi, which in turn were derived from the Old English given name Ælfsige.
Elsworth English
Variant spelling of Ellsworth.
Elwell English
Means "person from Elwell", Dorset (probably "spring from which omens can be read").
Elwood English
It's either from a place name in Gloucestershire, England called Ellwood that is derived from Old English ellern "elder tree" and wudu "wood", or a form of the Old English personal name Ælfweald, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and weald "rule".
Elzea Hebrew (Gallicized, Rare), American (South, Gallicized, Rare)
The name means G-d’s help It is a French transition of the Hebrew name Eleazar applied to Jews that came to France by way of Egypt. Later it was carried over to the French Caribbean mainly St. Martinique which was the first major Jewish settlement in the Caribbean, but the name also spread to other Latin American Islands including Mexico... [more]
Emanuel English, German, Welsh, Jewish, African
From the given name Emanuel.
Embry English, Scottish
ember, smoldering fire
Emeny English
It may be of Old Celtic origin, from the Celtic female personal names: Isemeine, Isemay, Ismaine... [more]
Emersby English
Meaning "Emery's farm."
Emery English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’... [more]
Emly English
Variant of Elmley.
Emmer English
Derived from a nickname for Emerson
Emmerly English
From the given name Amalric.
Emory English, Irish
English variant spelling of Emery.
Emsley English
A name that came from a family that lived in Yorkshire, where they derived the family name from Helmsley. Probably of Old English origin Helm and ley or leah, which means "a clearing in the woods."
Enchantra American (South, Americanized, Modern, Rare)
American surname feminine mainly in The USA
Enfield English
Place in England. Like Uxbridge.
Engelbert German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
Englund Swedish, English
Combination of Swedish äng "meadow" and lund "grove".
Ennals English
This unusual and interesting surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from either of two Anglo-Scandinavian male given names: Ingald or Ingulf. The former derives ultimately from the Old Norse "Ingialdr", having as its initial element the divine name "Ing", borne by a minor Norse god associated with fertility, and meaning "swelling, protuberance", with "gialdr", tribute; hence, "Ing's tribute"... [more]
Ennor English
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Welsh given name Ynyr and a derivation from Jenner.
Enoch English
From the given name Enoch
Ensign English
From the military rank.
Enslie English
Variant of Ensley.
Ensor English
Derived from Endesor, a village in Derbyshire, indicating a person who lived there. Endesor itself is Old English, coming from the genitive case of the first name Ēadin and ‘ofer’, meaning ‘sloping ridge’ (From ‘Dictionary of American Family Names’, 2nd edition, 2022).... [more]
Ergle English
Of debated origin and meaning; theories include an Anglicization of Ergele.
Erickson English
Americanized form of Erikson.
Erikson English, Swedish
Means "son of Erik". This was famously used by Icelandic explorer Leif Erikson (Old Norse: Leifr Eiríksson).
Erland English
Derived from the Swedish given name Erland.
Eroll English
From a Scottish place name.
Erpingham English
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous village in Norfolk.
Errey English
This uncommon and intriguing name is of Old Norse origin, and is found chiefly in the north western counties of England, reflecting the dense settlement of Scandinavian peoples in those areas. The surname is locational, from places such as Aira Beck or Aira Force near Ullswater in Cumberland, or some other minor or unrecorded place also named with the Old Norse term "eyrara", meaning "gravel-bank stream river”.
Ervin English (American)
meaning : little hare
Erwin English, German, Irish, Scottish
From the given name Erwin. From the Middle English personal name Everwin Erwin perhaps from Old English Eoforwine (eofor "boar" and wine "friend") but mostly from an Old French form of the cognate ancient Germanic name Everwin or from a different ancient Germanic name Herewin with loss of initial H- (first element hari heri "army")... [more]
Escue American (South), English (American)
Likely a variant form of English Askew; also compare Eskew. This surname is concentrated in Tennessee.
Esmond English
It was a name for a person who was of "grace" or "favourable protection". The surname Esmond originally derived from the Old English word Eastmund which referred to "grace".
Essex English
From the place name Essex.
Estes Welsh, Spanish, English
a popular surname derived from the House of Este. It is also said to derive from Old English and have the meaning "of the East." As a surname, it has been traced to southern England in the region of Kent, as early as the mid-16th century.
Etcheberry Basque, English
From Basque etxe (house) and berri (new).
Etheridge English
Derived from the given name Aldrich.
Eubanks English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bank of yew trees, from Old English iw "yew" and bank "bank".
Eve English
Possibly from the given name Eve.
Eveleigh English
From an unknown location, possibly from the village of Everleigh in Wiltshire, England (see Everleigh).
Evenrud Norwegian, American
From the name of several farms in Eastern Norway.