American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Flash English
Means "person who lives near a pool" (Middle English flasshe "pool, marsh").
Flax English
Metonymic occupational name for someone who grew, sold, or treated flax for weaving into linen cloth,
Fleck English
Meaning unknown. It is used in the 2019 movie Joker as the real name of the titular character played by actor Joaquin Phoenix.
Fleetwood English
Means "From the town of Fleetwood, in Lancaster".
Flenot American (South, ?)
I think this could be a French Indian name however, it may be misspelled, and I don't know the correct spelling.
Fleury French, English
Either a habitational name from Fleury the name of several places in various parts of France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Florus (from Latin florus "blooming flowering") and the locative suffix -acum or from the given name Fleury.
Fling Irish, English
Perhaps derived from Flynn.
Flint English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
Flook English
Derived from the Old Norse name Flóki.
Florence English
Either a patronymic or matronymic from Florence, or to denote someone from Florence, Italy.
Flower English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
Flower English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
Flower English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
Flowers English
Patronymic from Flower.
Floyde English
Variant of Floyd.
Flury English
Variant of Fleury.
Flute English
From the English word flute which is an instrument.
Flyte English
Means "stream" from Old English fleot.
Folkerts German, English
Derived from the given name Folcher. See also Fulcher
Foot English
Variant of Foote.
Foote English
Nickname for someone with a peculiarity or deformity of the foot, from Middle English fot (Old English fot), or in some cases from the cognate Old Norse byname Fótr.
Force English
From the word "force" meaning waterfall in the North of England.
Forde English, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
Fordham English
Habitational name from any of the places in Cambridgeshire, Essex, and Norfolk named Fordham, from Old English ford ‘ford’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’.
Fore English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Fahr.
Forman English
An occupational surname for a keeper of swine, Middle English foreman, from Old English for hog, "pig" and mann ‘man’. The word is attested in this sense from the 15th century but is not used specifically for the leader of a gang of workers before the late 16th century.
Formby English
From the name of a town in Merseyside, England, meaning "Forni's village". The second part is derived from Old Norse býr meaning "farm, settlement". A famous bearer is George Formby (1904-1961), English comedian and entertainer.
Forster English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
Fort French, Walloon, English, Catalan
Either a nickname from Old French Middle English Catalan fort "strong brave" (from Latin fortis). Compare Lefort. From Fort a French form of the Latin personal name Fortis (from fortis "strong brave") chosen by early Christians as a symbol of moral strength and steadfastness and borne by an obscure saint whose cult was popular during the Middle Ages in southern and southwestern France... [more]
Fosdick English
From Fosdyke in Lincolnshire, England, meaning "fox dyke".
Fossoyeur American
A surname meaning "Gravedigger" in French.
Fouch English
not sure how i can up with this but i used it for my hp professor oc
Foulkes English (Anglicized, ?)
English variant spelling of Foulks.
Foulks English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also Volk.
Fountain English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a spring or well, from Middle English fontayne, "fountain".
Fowl English, Popular Culture
This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and derives from the Old English pre 7th Century word fugol, "fowl", "bird", which was used as a byname and as a personal name. The medieval form of the word was the Middle English development foul, fowl(e), used as a continuation of the Old English personal name and also as a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a bird.
Foxe English
Variant of Fox
Foxwell English
Means "fox stream", from Old English fox and well(a), meaning stream.
Foxworth English
"dweller at the homestead infested by foxes." or "house of Fox" aka Foxworthy... [more]
Foxx English
Variant of Fox.
Fraley English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
Frampton English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Franck English, French
From the given name Franck.
Frankland English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
Franks English
This surname is derived from the given name Frank.
Frankson English
This surname means "son of Frank."
Fray French, English
From the German surname Frey or the Old French given name FRAY.
Frederick English
Derived from the given name Frederick.
Fredericks English
Patronymic from Frederick.
Fredric English
From the given name Fredric
Fredrickson English, Swedish (Rare)
Means "son of Fredrick", sometimes used as an Americanized spelling of Fredriksson or Fredriksen.
Free English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
Freeling English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
Frémont French (Americanized), English (American)
Fremont is a French surname meaning Free Mountain. People include John Frémont a US Explorer and Politician who fought in the Mexican-American War to free California and many places named after him, Including Fremont, California, and Fremont Nebraska.
French English, Anglo-Saxon
Ethnic name for someone from France, Middle English frensche, or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who adopted French airs. Variant of Anglo-Norman French Frain.
Fresh English
Probably a nickname for someone who's young.
Frett English
English from Middle English frette, Old French frete ‘interlaced work (in metal and precious stones)’ such as was used for hair ornaments and the like, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such pieces.
Fretwell English
Taken from the Old English "freht," meaning "augury," and "well," meaning "spring, stream."
Frewin English
From the Middle English personal name Frewine, literally "noble or generous friend".
Friar English
Denoted a member of any of certain religious orders of men, especially the four mendicant orders. (Augustinians, Carmelites, Dominicans, and Franciscans)
Frias English
English form of Frías.
Friedman English (American), Jewish
Americanized form of Friedmann as well as a Jewish cognate of this name.
Friend English
Nickname for a companionable person, from Middle English frend "friend" (Old English freond). In the Middle Ages the term was also used to denote a relative or kinsman, and the surname may also have been acquired by someone who belonged to the family of someone who was a more important figure in the community
Frisby English
Means "person from Frisby", Leicestershire ("farmstead of the Frisians"). A frisbee is a plastic disc thrown from person to person as a game; the trademarked name, registered in 1959 by Fred Morrison, was inspired by the Frisbie bakery of Bridgeport, Connecticut, whose pie tins were the original models for the plastic discs.
Frizzell English (Rare)
Either (i) from Friseal, the Scottish Gaelic form of Fraser; or (ii) from a medieval nickname applied to someone who dressed in a showy or gaudy style (from Old French frisel "decoration, ribbon").
Frog English
From the English word frog which is a type of amphibian.
Froggatt English
Topographical name from the village of Froggatt in Derbyshire.
Froud English
From the Old English personal name Frōda or Old Norse Fróthi, both meaning literally "wise" or "prudent". A variant spelling was borne by British historian James Anthony Froude (1818-1894).
Fruitman English
Likely referring to someone who sold fruit.
Fulcher English
English (chiefly East Anglia): from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + hari, heri ‘army’, which was introduced into England from France by the Normans; isolated examples may derive from the cognate Old English Folchere or Old Norse Folkar, but these names were far less common.
Fullerton English
Habitational name from a place in Scotland. Derived from Old English fugol "bird" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
Furlong English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
Furman Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
Furneaux French (Anglicized), English
Locational surname from any of several places in France called Fourneaux, or from fourneau "furnace".
Furse English
Variant of Furze
Furze English
Given to someone who lived by a field of furzes, a type of flower
Fyfe English
From the place 'Fyfe'
Fyler English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Feiler.
Fynch English
Variant of Finch.
Fyres English (Rare)
Variant of Ayres or Ayers.... [more]
Gabbett English
From the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name Gabriel.
Gable English
Northern English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a habitational name from a minor place named with Old Norse gafl ‘gable’, which was applied to a triangular-shaped hill. The mountain called Great Gable in Cumbria is named in this way.... [more]
Gabriella English (American)
Derived from the given name Gabriella.
Gadbury English
Habitational name from Cadborough, alias Gateborough, in Rye, Sussex, probably so named from Old English gāt meaning "goat" + beorg meaning "hill".
Gaetz English (American)
Americanization of Gätz.
Gaffney English (American)
This may sound like the female given name Daphne
Gaines English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
Gainsborough English
From the city of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, England. A famous bearer of this surname includes English painter Thomas Gainsborough.
Gaisford English
Habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Gaither English
Occupational name for a goatherd, derived from Middle English gaytere literally meaning "goatherd".
Gall Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
Gallant English
Nickname for a cheerful or high-spirited person, from Old French, Middle English galant "bold, dashing, lively". The meanings "gallant" and "attentive to women" are further developments, which may lie behind some examples of the surname.
Gally English
Variant of Galley.
Galpin English
English: occupational name for a messenger or scullion (in a monastery), from Old French galopin ‘page’, ‘turnspit’, from galoper ‘to gallop’.
Galt English
An early member was a person with a fancied resemblance to the wild boar.
Gamble English
from the Old Norse byname Gamall meaning "old", which was occasionally used in North England during the Middle Ages as a personal name. ... [more]
Gambon English, Irish
Derived from Anglo-Norman French gambon meaning "ham", itself derived from a Norman-Picard form of Old French jambe meaning "leg". A famous bearer is the Irish-English actor Sir Michael Gambon (1940-).
Gamiz American (Hispanic, Anglicized, Rare), Spanish, Filipino, English (American)
The last name Gamiz is a varient of Gamez and Gomez. It is a very rare last name that not many people have.
Gammon English
From a medieval nickname applied to a merry or sportive person (from Middle English gamen "game"), or to someone who walked in a strange way or had some peculiarity of the legs (from Anglo-Norman gambon "ham").
Gardlin English (American, Rare)
Possibly an anglicized form of a Swedish surname like Gardelin.
Garington English
Possibly from the given name Gareth.
Garlick English
(i) "grower or seller of garlic"; (ii) perhaps from a medieval personal name descended from Old English Gārlāc, literally "spear-play"; (iii) an anglicization of the Belorussian Jewish name Garelick, literally "distiller"
Garrick English
From the first name Garrick.
Garrison English
Patronymic from Garrett.
Garson Scottish, French, English, German (Anglicized), Spanish, Jewish
Variant of Scottish Carson and Corston, French Garçon, Spanish-Jewish Garzon and English Garston, or an Americanised form of German Gerson... [more]
Garwood English
Comes from a lost locational name from the Olde English gara, referring to a "triangular piece of land" or to a "spearhead", and wudu meaning a "wood".
Gascoigne English
Originally denoted a person from the province of Gascony in France. A famous bearer is the English soccer player Paul Gascoigne (1967-). Another was the television host and author Bamber Gascoigne (1935-2022).
Gascoine English
Variant form of Gascoigne.
Gascoyne English
Variant of Gascoigne, which was originally a regional name for someone from the province of Gascony, via Old French Gascogne.
Gaskill English
Meaning "Goat Shelter". English (Lancashire) habitual name from Gatesgill in Cumbria, so named from Old Norse geit ‘goat’ + skáli ‘shelter’. The surname is first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century.
Gasper English (American, Rare)
Variant of Jasper. George Gasper is a famous American Mathematician.
Gatlin English
English of uncertain origin; probably a variant of Catlin or Gadling, a nickname from Old English gœdeling ‘kinsman’, ‘companion’, but also ‘low fellow’.
Gatling English, German (Anglicized)
English variant of Gatlin. Possibly a respelling of German Gättling (see also Gatlin).
Gatton English
Gat means "goat" and ton from tun means "enclosure".
Gaudet Louisiana Creole
Derived from the Germanic personal name Waldo (from waldan ‘to govern’).
Gaunt English
This name is believed to have derived "from the town of Gaunt, now Ghent, in Flanders."... [more]
Gavin Scottish, English
From the given name Gavin.
Gavitt English
Perhaps an altered spelling of the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name Gabriel.
Gawkrodger English
From a medieval nickname meaning "clumsy Roger".
Gay English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
Gay English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
Gaydos Hungarian, English
Anglicized spelling of Hungarian GAJDOS.
Gaye English
Possibly a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the archaic word "gay" meaning "happy". A famous bearer was the American singer Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
Gayler English (American)
Variant of Gaylord
Gaylord English
Derived from Old French gaillard meaning "high-spirited, boistrous".
Gear English
Derived from the Germanic name element ger, meaning "spear".
Gearhart English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Gierhard, a variant of Gerhardt.
Gearing English
probably an Americanized spelling of Gehring
Gee Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
Gegge English
Medieval English variant of Gegg.
Geoffrey English, French
From the given name Geoffrey
Georgia English
From the given name Georgia.
Gerald English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
Geraldson English
Means "son of Gerald".
Gere English
Variant of Geer, Gehr or Geary, all related to the Old High German element gēr (Old English gār, Old Norse geirr) meaning "spear, arrow". A famous bearer is American actor Richard Gere (b... [more]
German English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
Gerrard English
From the given name Gerrard.
Gerry English
Diminutive of names containing ger, meaning "spear".
Gershon English, Hebrew
Hebrew One of the tribes of Israel ... [more]
Gervais English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
Gibbon English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
Gibbons English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
Gibs English
Variant of Gibbs
Gidlow English
The first recorded use of the name is from 1291; Robert de Gidlow was a freeholder in Aspull, Lancanshire, United Kingdom and the name occurs frequently down to the 17th century. The Gidlow family moved to the United States in the mid-18th century where the spelling was changed to Goodlow and eventually to Goodloe.
Gierc English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
Gifford English
Gifford is an English name for someone who comes from Giffords Hall in Suffolk. In Old English, it was Gyddingford, or "ford associated with Gydda." Alternatively, it could come from the Middle English nickname, "Giffard," from Old French meaning "chubby-cheeked."
Gilbertson English
Means "son of Gilbert".
Gilby English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
Gilkeson English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
Gillard English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
Gillard English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
Gillette English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
Gillian English
From the first name Gillian.
Gilliard English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
Gillibrand English
From the Norman personal name Gillebrand, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "hostage-sword".
Gillingham English
Habitational name from places in Dorset, Norfolk, and Kent, named Gillingham, 'homestead
Gilly English
Variant of Gilley.
Gilmore English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
Gilpin English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
Gilson English, French (Belgian)
Means "son of Gill" or "son of Giles".
Gingell English
Either (i) from a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gangulf, literally "walking wolf"; or (ii) a different form of Gingold.
Gipson English (American)
Variant of Gibson more commonly used in the United States.
Girling English
From a medieval nickname applied to a brave man (or, with heavy irony, to a cowardly one), from Old French cuer de lion "lion heart".