American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Round English
Variant of Rounds.
Roundtree English
Variant spelling of Rowntree.
Rouse English
nickname for a person with red hair, from Middle English, Old French rous ‘red(-haired)’
Routh English
From the village and civil parish of Routh in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England (recorded in the Domesday book as Rutha). The place name may derive from Old Norse hrúedhr meaning "rough shaly ground"... [more]
Rover English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
Rowell English
From a diminutive of Rowland or Rolf or a location name meaning "rough hill".
Rowett English
English from a medieval personal name composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wald ‘rule’, which was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the form Róaldr, and again later by the Normans in the form Rohald or Roald... [more]
Rowlands English
Derived from the given name Rowland.
Rowley English
Anglo Saxon Name- locational, comes from several places in England such as in Devonshire, Yorkshire, County Durham and Staffordshire. It means ' rough wood or clearing', from the Old English 'run' meaning rough and 'leah', meaning clearing in a wood.
Rowling English
From diminutives for the given names Rollo or Rolf. Famous bearer is the author of the Harry Potter series, J. K. Rowling whose initials stand for Joanne Kathleen.
Royal English
From the given name Royal.
Rudd English
The surname Rudd is derived from the Old English root "rud-," a component in the words "rudig," which means "ruddy," and "ruddoc," which means "red-breast." The surname was originally a nickname for a ruddy complexioned or red-haired person, or perhaps for someone who habitually wore the color red.
Rudel English
Derived from the location of Ryedale or Rydal
Ruffin English
From the medieval French male personal name Ruffin, from Latin Rūfīnus, a derivative of Rūfus (literally "red-haired one")... [more]
Rugby English
From Rugby, Warwickshire. Originally named *Rocheberie, from Old English *Hrocaburg, 'Hroca's fort', the name was altered due to influence fort Danish settlers, with the second element being replaced with Old Norse byr, 'farm'.... [more]
Rugg English
Nickname for a person associated with the color red, whether through hair color, clothing, or complexion. Accordingly, the name is derived from the Old French word ruge, meaning red.
Rule Scottish, English
Scottish name from the lands of Rule in the parish of Hobkirk, Roxburghshire. The derivation is from the River Rule which flows through the area, and is so called from the ancient Welsh word "rhull" meaning "hasty or rushing".... [more]
Rumbelow English
Means "person from Rumbelow", the name of various locations in England ("three mounds").
Rumble English
Descended from the personal name Rumbald/Rombold, which is composed of the Germanic elements hrom "fame, glory" and bald "bold, brave".
Rumford English
From the parish of Romford in Essex, England. The name means "the wide ford" from Old English rúm "wide".
Rumney English
Variant of Romney.
Rumpole English
A different form of Rumbold (from the Norman personal name Rumbald, of Germanic origin and probably meaning literally "fame-bold"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Horace Rumpole, the eccentric QC created by John Mortimer (originally for a 1975 television play).
Runcie English, Scottish
Derived from Latin runcinus, and related to the Old French "roncin", for a horse of little value. Middle English, Rouncy, as in Chaucer's Cantebury Tales.... [more]
Rundell English
Nickname derived from a diminutive of Middle English and Old French rond, rund meaning "fat, round" (see Rounds), or derived from Rundale, a local place in the village and civil parish of Shoreham in Kent, England, named with Old English rum(ig) meaning "roomy, spacious" and dæl meaning "valley".
Rusby Scottish, English
Alternative spelling of Busby, a parish in Renfrewshire. A name well represented in the Penistone, and Cawthorne districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire.
Rushe English, Irish
Variant of Rush
Rushen English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a marsh, noted for its rushes (see Rush). A famous bearer of this surname is the American singer Patrice Rushen (b. 1954).
Rust English, Scottish
A nickname to someone with reddish hair or a ruddy complexion.
Ruth English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
Ruthven English, Scottish
From the name of a barony in Perthshire, Scotland, which comes from Scottish Gaelic Ruadhainn "Dun uplands".
Rutledge English, Scottish
Origin unknown
Rutt English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
Rutter English
Either (i) "player of the rote (a medieval stringed instrument played by plucking)"; or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a dishonest or untrustworthy person (from Old French routier "robber, mugger")... [more]
Ryall English
From any of several places in England named from Old English ryge "rye" + hyll "hill".
Ryals English
English occupational surname.
Rycroft English
Derived from Rycroft, in the parish of Birstall, Yorkshire
Rydell English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Riddell.
Ryerson English (American)
Americanized spelling of Swedish Reierson or of any of its cognates, for example Dutch Ryerse, Ryersen or Norwegian and Danish Reiersen.
Ryle English
Habitational name from Royle in Lancashire (see Royle).
Rylo English
Variant of the surname Rilo.
Ryser English
Variant of Reiser based on the English word riser.
Sadile English
1 English (mostly Lancashire): probably a variant of Sale .... [more]
Saffeels English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).
Sage English (Modern)
From the English word sage (see Sage).
Sailer English
Variant spelling of Saylor.
Sailor English
Variant of Saylor.
Saint English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
Saipe English
English: perhaps a habitational name from a minor place in Wiltshire named Stype.
Saker English
Occupational name for a maker of sacks or bags, derived from an agent derivative of Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag".
Sale English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
Salisbury English
Habitational name from the city in Wiltshire, the Roman name of which was Sorviodunum (of British origin). In the Old English period the second element (from Celtic dun ‘fortress’) was dropped and Sorvio- (of unexplained meaning) became Searo- in Old English as the result of folk etymological association with Old English searu ‘armor’; to this an explanatory burh ‘fortress’, ‘manor’, ‘town’ was added... [more]
Salk English (American)
Likely the English form of Schalk, which means "dweller near a willow tree".
Sallis English
A name for someone who lives where sallows grow - sallows being a type of willow, from the Middle English 'salwe'.
Sallow English (Rare)
Sallow comes from the medieval word for willow tree. It is a location surname.
Salt Anglo-Saxon, English
Of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the town in Staffordshire.
Salter English
Occupational name for an extractor or seller of salt (a precious commodity in medieval times), from Middle English salt 'salt' + the agent suffix -er.
Salthouse English
"Salthouse" and other variants come from the place name in Northumberland.
Saltmarsh English
Last name of cricket player Ian Saltmarsh (1901-1970).
Sambourne English
From the name of a hamlet in Warwickshire, England.
Samways English
From a medieval nickname for a fool (from Middle English samwis "foolish", literally "half-wise").
Sand English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
From the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish and Jewish name, often ornamental. Otherwise topographic.
Sand English, Scottish
Derived from a short form of Alexander.
Sandell English
Originated from a name for someone who lived on a sand hill
Sandeman English
Scottish surname of famous merchant family engaged in banking in Scotland and London and in the Port Wine trade in London. The same family were earlier the founders of an obscure Protestant sect the Sandemanians.
Sandler English
Norman origin. Habitational name from Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët in La Manche, which gets its name from the dedication of its church to St. Hilary, or alternatively from either of the places, in La Manche and Somme, called Saint-Lô... [more]
Sandwell English
From a place called SANDWELL.
Sanguinem American
Means "blood" in Latin.
Sangwin English
From Middle English sanguine (blood) ,one of the four humours.
Sankey English, Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, which derived from the name of an ancient British river, perhaps meaning "sacred, holy." ... [more]
Santee English
A topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree.
Sappingfield American (Anglicized, Rare)
From the German name "Sappenfeld," a small town in Bavaria, Germany. (Pop. 380.) The town itself is named after an early resident named "Sappo;" in English, the name means "Sappo's Field." The name "Sappo" may mean noble (unconfirmed)... [more]
Sard English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
Sarré English
“apologetic”
Sarver English, Jewish
English and Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic) occupational name from Old French serveur (an agent derivative of server ‘to serve’), Yiddish sarver ‘servant’.
Satterthwaite English
From a place in England named with Old English sætr "shielding" and Old Norse þveit "pasture".
Saunder English
From the given name Alexander.
Savell English
English variant of Saville.
Savery English
Originally from the given name of Germanic origin, Savaric
Saville English
A habitational name from an uncertain place in Northern France. This is most likely Sainville, named from Old French saisne, 'Saxon' and ville, indicating a settlement.
Sax English, Norwegian
English from an Old Norse personal name, Saxi meaning ‘sword’.
Saxton English
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, possibly also one in Cambridgeshire, both so named from Old English Seaxe "Saxons" and tūn "enclosure, settlement".
Sayward English (Rare)
English surname which was a variant of Seward.
Scaggs English
Variant of Skaggs both of English origin and unknown meaning. Famous bearer is singer Boz Scaggs (1944-) of the Steve Miller Band and the band Toto.
Scales English
Name for a person who lives in a shed.
Scarborough English
Habitational name from Scarborough on the coast of North Yorkshire, so named from the Old Norse byname Skarði + Old Norse borg "fortress", "fortified town".
Scargill English
This ancient surname is of Old Norse origin, and is a locational name from a place called Scargill in Northern Yorkshire, deriving from the Old Norse bird name "skraki", a diving duck, plus the Old Norse "gil", valley or ravine.
Scarr English
Derived from the word ‘skjarr’ meaning a rocky outcrop / hill
Schade German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
Scholes English
A name for a person who lives in a shed.
Schram German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
Schug American, German
From the German word Schuh "shoe". ... [more]
Scogings English, Old Danish
A surname of Scandinavian origin from the old Norse and old Danish by-name "Skeggi" or "skoggi", meaning 'the bearded one'. Common in areas invaded and settled by Scandinavians in the 8th and 9th Centuries.
Scotford English
Derived from Scotforth, the name of a village near Lancaster (in Lancashire) in England. The village's name means "ford of the Scot(s)" and is derived from Old English Scott "Scot" combined with Old English ford "ford".
Scotland English
(i) "person from Scotland"; (ii) "person from Scotland or Scotlandwell", Perth and Kinross; (iii) from the Norman personal name Escotland, literally "territory of the Scots"
Scroggs English
From Middle English scrogge meaning "brushwood".
Seaborn English
From an Old English personal name derived from the elements "sea, lake" and beorn "warrior".
Seaforth English
The name of a projection of the sea on the east coast of Lewis, on the Long Island, Scotland. Means "the forth of the sea".
Seager English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name Segar, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]
Seagle English (American)
Americanized form of Jewish Segal or German Siegel.
Seagrave English
Habitational name from a place in Leicestershire, recorded in Domesday Book as Satgrave and Setgrave; probably named from Old English (ge)set meaning "fold", "pen" (or sēað meaning "pit", "pool") + grāf meaning "grove" or græf meaning "ditch".
Seal English
Variant of Seals, perhaps an occupational name for a person who makes saddles.
Sealy English
Derived from Old English sælig "blessed, fortunate, prosperous, happy" and was used as a term to describe someone with a cheerful, happy disposition.
Seaman English
Means "born by a sailor".
Sean English
The stage Surname of English singer Jay Sean (born Kamaljit Singh Jhooti)
Sears English
Version of Sayer. Used in the United States. Famous bearer of the name is Richard Warren Sears, one of the founders of Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Season English
Likely a corruption of the surname Searson, meaning "son of Saer".
Secker English
Variant of Saker.
Seddon English
"Broad hill" in Old English. A surname that most occurs in Merseyside, and Lancashire.
Sedgwick English
Habitational name from Sedgwick in Cumbria, so named from the Middle English personal name Sigg(e) (from Old Norse Siggi or Old English Sicg, short forms of the various compound names with the first element "victory") + Old English wic "outlying settlement", "dairy farm"; or from Sedgewick in Sussex, named with Old English secg (sedge) + wic.
Sedon English
Variant of "Seddon"
See English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by the sea-shore or beside a lake, from Middle English see meaning "sea", "lake" (Old English sǣ), Middle High German sē. Alternatively, the English name may denote someone who lived by a watercourse, from an Old English sēoh meaning "watercourse", "drain".
Seeley English
Variant of Sealy.
Segale English, Italian
Respelling of SEGAL. A famous bearer is Mario A. Segale, the inspiration for Nintendo's video game character Mario
Seger Swedish, English, Dutch
Means "victory" in Swedish. It is also a variant of the English surname Seager or derived from the Germanic given name Sigiheri "victory army".
Segura Spanish, Catalan, American (Hispanic)
Derived from Spanish segura "safe, secure".
Selbey English
Variant of Selby.
Self English
East Anglian surname, from the medieval English masculine name Saulf which was derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wulf "wolf".
Semer English
From the village of Semer in Suffolk.
Sensabaugh American
Americanized form of German Sensenbach, a topographic name formed with an unexplained first element + Middle High German bach ‘creek’.
Settle English
From the town of Settle in Yorkshire, England.
Severn English
From the name of the River Severn, which is of unknown meaning. The Severn is Great Britain's longest river, flowing from Wales through much of western England to the Bristol Channel. It is one of Britain’s most ancient river names, recorded as early as the 2nd century AD in the form Sabrina; its original meaning may have been "slow-moving" or "boundary".
Severn English
From a medieval personal name derived from Severinus (Latin).
Severson American
Probably an Americanized form of Sivertsen, Sivertson, or Sievertsen.
Sevier English
Occupational name for a sieve-maker, Middle English siviere (from an agent derivative of Old English sife "sieve").
Seville Spanish, English
a city in southwestern Spain; a major port and cultural center; the capital of bullfighting in Spain. Synonyms: Sevilla Example of: city, metropolis, urban center. a large and densely populated urban area; may include several independent administrative districts... [more]
Sewell English
English from the Middle English personal names Siwal(d) and Sewal(d), Old English Sigeweald and Seweald, composed of the elements sige ‘victory’ and se ‘sea’ + weald ‘rule’... [more]
Sewick English
Derived from Sedgwick.
Seymer English
Variant of Seymour, or from the village of Semer in Suffolk.
Shacklady English
Perhaps from a medieval nickname for a man who had had sexual relations with a woman of higher social class (from shag "to copulate with" (not recorded before the late 17th century) and lady).... [more]
Shackleford English, Medieval English
Locational surname deriving from the place called Shackleford in Surrey, near the town of Farnham. The origin of "shackle" is uncertain. It could be derived from Old English sceacan "to shake"... [more]
Shade English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
Shadow English
Origin unidentified. The name Shadue, Schadewe is recorded in England in the 12th and 13th centuries, from Middle English shadwe ‘shadow’, Old English sceadu (see Shade)... [more]
Shadrach English
From the given name Shadrach.
Shadwell English
English surname meaning "By the shed spring"
Shady English, Irish
Origin unidentified. Possibly Irish or English.
Shallcross English
Means "person from Shallcross", Derbyshire ("place by the Shacklecross", an ancient stone cross in the High Peak, its name perhaps denoting a cross to which people could be shackled as a penance).
Shandy English (Rare)
Shandy appears as a rare surname, mostly found in English-speaking countries going back to the 1600s. This name may originate from the English dialect adjective meaning "boisterous" or "empty headed; half crazy", of which the earliest record dates to 1691, though any further explanation for its origins are unknown... [more]
Shanks English (Modern)
Possibly a diminutive of LONGSHANKS, which would be given to a tall or gangly person.
Sharpin English
Variant of Sharp.
Sharpton English
Habitational name from Sharperton in Northumberland, possibly so named from Old English scearp "steep" and beorg "hill", "mound" and tun "settlement".
Shasteen English (American, Modern)
A derivative Chastain.... [more]
Shattuck English
A locational name from a family in Chaddock, a hamlet in the parish in Lancashire, England. Also a variant of Chadwick.
Shawe English
Variant of Shaw.
Sheard English
English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "gap between hills" in Old English.