American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Pine English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a pine forest or who sold pine firs for a living.
Pines English (American)
Surname of the characters, Dipper, Mabel and Stan from Gravity Falls.
Pink English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
Pinkham English
habitational name from a lost or unidentified place in or bordering on Devon
Pinkney English
Variant spelling of Pinckney.
Pinn English, German
Derived from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne, both meaning "peg" or "pin". This was an occupational name from a maker of these things. The German name can in some cases be an occupational name for a shoemaker.
Pinner English (Rare)
Parish in Middlesex.
Pistolet English (Americanized, Modern)
Mishgan Pistolet is the first waiter of the surname.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Pitcock English
Old English pytta
Pittman English
Described someone who lived in a hollow or pitt (see Pitt).
Plant English
An occupational surname for a gardener.
Plantz English (American)
Deriving from England. "Men known as a Planter was an English term for people who were "planted" abroad in order to promote a political, religious cause or for colonization purposes." ... [more]
Plato German, Dutch, Polish, English
From the Given name Plato the Latinized form of Platon. English variant of Plater.
Platten English
Diminutive of Platt.
Playfair English
From a medieval nickname for an enthusiastic competitor in sports and games (from Middle English pleyfere "companion in play, playmate"), or else a different form of Playford (from a Suffolk place-name meaning "ford where sports are held")... [more]
Pleasance English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Plaisance, literally "pleasantness"; or (ii) "person from Piacenza", Italy (from Latin Placentia, literally "pleasing things").
Pleasant American
Means being a very bright man in the near future. Also can be used as a alias.
Plemmons English, Irish, German
Altered spelling of Fleming.
Plemons English, Irish, German
Variant form of Plemmons. A famous bearer is American actor Jesse Plemons (1988-).
Plum English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Plummer English
1. Occupational name for a worker in lead, especially a maker of lead pipes and conduits, from Anglo-Norman French plom(m)er, plum(m)er ‘plumber’, from plom(b), plum(b) ‘lead’ (Latin plumbum)... [more]
Plumtree English
From any of the locations called Plumtree for anyone who lived near a plum tree derived from Old English plume "plum" and treow "tree".
Plunket English
Either an occupational name for someone who sold plunket, a "coarse white woollen cloth", or a location in France with the name Planquette or Planquenet.
Plymouth English (Rare)
Derived from the place name Plymouth.
Pobjoy English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
Poe English
From a medieval nickname for a vain or flamboyantly dressed person (from Old Norse "peacock"). American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was a famous bearer.
Pogue Irish, American
An Irish surname meaning "kiss"
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Pole English
Variant of Poole, from Old English pól.
Poling English, Welsh
Altered form of Bolling, possibly also of Bollinger or Pollinger.
Polite English
Derived from the English word polite. This name was most likely given to a person who was considered to be polite.
Pollak English, German
A name for someone who came from the place called Poland.
Pollett English
Patronymic of Paul, with the diminutive suffix -et.
Poltimore English (Rare)
Rare English surname derived from a Devon place name of Celtic origin, allegedly meaning “pool by the large house”.
Pomeroy English
From an English surname meaning "dweller by the apple orchard".
Pompey French, English
Variant of Italian Pompei.
Ponce Spanish, English
The Ponce name was carried into England after the migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066.'Ponce' is derived from 'Ponsoby',a place in Cumberland, where the family settled. The Ponce motto is 'Pro rege, lege grege' meaning "For the King, law, and people"
Ponsonby English
From a place name in England.
Pontz English
The name Pontz likely came from Germanic origin, probably originating from the German Pflanzen.
Pook English
Pooke was the original version... [more]
Pool English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pool or pond, Middle English pole (Old English pōl), or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Poole in Dorset, South Pool in Devon, and Poole Keynes in Gloucestershire.
Pooley English
Habitational name from Pooley Bridge in Cumbria, so named from Old English pol ‘pool’ + Old Norse haugr ‘hill’, ‘mound’. topographic name from Middle English pole ‘pool’ + ey ‘low-lying land’ or hey ‘enclosure’
Poor English
Referred to someone who was poor or impoverished.
Poplar English
Nickname for someone living by a poplar tree.
Popp English
Derived from an Old English personal name, Poppa, of unknown origin and meaning.
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Porcari Italian, English
From Italian porci "pigs", denoting someone who worked as a pig herder.
Portman English (Anglicized), German (Anglicized), Dutch
Either an elaborated form of English Port, an Americanised form of German Portmann or a Dutch name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town, derived from Dutch poort meaning "gate" and man meaning "man"... [more]
Portugal Spanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
Posey English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
Postgate English
From Postgate in Danby (NR Yorks) which is recorded as Postgate in the 12th century. The place-name derives from Old English post "post pillar" and Old Scandinavian gata ‘way path road" or Old English gaet "gate".
Posy English
Variant of Posey
Poteet English, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
Pothier English
One of the Many spellings of Pottier
Poulton English
English surname that means "settlement by a pool".
Powalski English (American)
Surname of Leon Powalski from the Star Fox 64 series.
Powis English
The English of Welsh Surname Powys, which derives from the place "Powys" in Wales.
Powles Welsh, English
Patronymic form of Powell or the given name Paul.
Powyes English
Unknown source. Surname of many early American pilgrims.
Prat English
Variant of Pratt.
Pratley English
Originates from a now "lost" medieval village believed to have been in the south east of England.
Preece Welsh (Anglicized), English
Variant of Price. From Welsh ap Rhys meaning "son of Rhys". ... [more]
Prentice English
Derived from apprentice.
Prescod English
A cognate of Prescott.
Press English, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
Prett English
Variant of Pratt.
Prewitt English
English surname meaning brave, valor.
Pridmore English
unexplained; perhaps a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name.
Priest English
Derived from the occupation priest, which is a minister of a church. It could also be a nickname for a person who is / was a priest.
Priestland English
From Middle English prest priest "priest" and land "landed property land" (Old English prēost land) meaning "land that belonged to priests"... [more]
Prince English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
Prior English
Occupational surname for a prior (a high-ranking official in a monastery), ultimately from Latin prior meaning "superior, first".
Privett French, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see Privatus). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
Proctor English
Occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour "steward" (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator "agent", from procurare "to manage"). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.
Prophet English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
Providence English
From the name of the capital city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island, derived from Middle English providence meaning "divine guidance, care", ultimately from Latin providentia.
Provost English, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
Prowse English
Nickname for a person who was proud, haughty, brave or valiant, derived from Old French prous, prou, preux, proz and prouz meaning "proud, brave, valiant". A famous bearer was David Prowse (1935-2020), an English bodybuilder, weightlifter and character actor who portrayed the villain Darth Vader in the Star Wars movies.
Prude English (American)
This surname comes from the English word prude. The definition for the word prude is a person who is or claims to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity.
Prude African American
This surname came from the English word prude. The definition of the word prude is a person who is or claims to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity.
Prudhomme French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
Prue English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
Pruett English
Derived from the Middle English word "prou," meaning "brave," or "valiant," with the addition of either of two common diminutive suffixes: "-et" or "-ot." As such, this name is thought to have originally been a nickname for someone small, but brave.
Pruitt English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
Prynne English
Derived from an Anglo-Norman form of the Late Latin name Primus. A fictional bearer is Hester Prynne, the protagonist of Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel 'The Scarlet Letter' (1850).
Puckett English
Of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Pocket(t), from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French poque "small pouch", hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of purses and pouches or a nickname... [more]
Puddephat English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a roly-poly physique (from Middle English puddy fat "round-bellied vat").
Puett English (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
Pulsifer English
Probably a variant of Percival.
Pulver Low German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
Purdey English
Variant of Purdie (see Purdie on the given name site)
Purdie English
It means "by God" in Norman French.
Purdom English
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
Purdum English
Variant spelling of English Purdom.
Purple English
Nickname for someone wore purple clothing or has a purple complexion
Pusey English
Habitational name from Pusey in Oxfordshire (formerly in Berkshire), so called from Old English peose, piosu ‘pea(s)’ + ēg ‘island’, ‘low-lying land’, or from Pewsey in Wiltshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Pevesie, apparently from the genitive case of an Old English personal name Pefe, not independently attested + Old English ēg ‘island’.
Putney English
habitational name from Putney in Surrey (now Greater London) named in Old English from the personal name Putta (genitive Puttan) and hyth "landing place quay".
Pyburn English (?)
Apparently from some lost or minor place so named. 1881 British census has 109; KH.
Pygall English (Hellenized, Rare)
From ancient Greek for rump, associations with prostitution across Europe, commonly given to illegitimate children of prostitutes, found especially in North East England and Nottinghamshire.
Pyke English
Most likely originates from the words pike (the weapon or the fish), having to do with fishermen or soldiers, or pick, having to do with miners or somebody who tills the ground.
Pyle English
From the Middle English word pile, meaning "stake" or "post", which is derived via Old English from Latin pilum, meaning "spike" or "javelin". This was a topographic name for someone who lived near a stake or post serving as a landmark, a metonymic occupational name for a stake maker, or a nickname for a tall, strong man.
Pym English
Recorded in several forms including Pim, Pimm, Pimme, Pym, and Pymm, this is a surname which at various times has been prominent in the history of England... [more]
Pyne English
Means "pine" from the Old French pin. This was originally given as a topographical name for someone who lived by a conspicuous pine tree or in a pine forest.
Quail English, Manx
A variant of Quayle, derived from various patronymics meaning "son of Paul". Alternately, an English nickname derived from the bird, perhaps given to a person who was timid, or known for being promiscuous.
Quaker English, Scottish
This surname was used to indicate someone who worked as a son of a vicar, who was a priest in charge of a parish in which most or all of the tithes were paid to another recipient, while the vicar received a stipend.
Quantrell English
From a medieval nickname for an elegantly or flamboyantly dressed person (from Middle English quointerel "dandy, fop", from quointe "known, knowledgeable, crafty, elegant").
Quarry English
From Middle English quarey "quarry", a topographic name for someone who lived near a stone quarry, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in one. ... [more]
Quartermain English
From a medieval nickname for a very dextrous person, or for someone who habitually wore gloves (from Old French quatremains, literally "four hands"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Allan Quartermain, the hero of 'King Solomon's Mines' (1886) and other adventure novels by H. Rider Haggard... [more]
Quartermaine English
Variant of Quartermain. This surname was borne by British actor Leon Quartermaine (1876-1967).
Quenby English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Quarmby, a habitational name from a place so called in West Yorkshire.
Quennell English
From the medieval female personal name Quenilla, from Old English Cwēnhild, literally "woman-battle". This was borne by Peter Quennell (1905-1993), a British poet, critic and historian.
Quimby English
Perhaps a variant of Quenby.
Quin English
Variant of Quinn.
Quinby English
Variant of Quenby.
Quiney English, Irish
Variant of Quinney ??
Quinley English, Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Apparently an altered form of Scottish McKinley or a reduced form of Irish Mcquinnelly, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
Quinney English, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinne “descendant of Coinne”
Quinton English
From a place name meaning "queen's town" in Old English.
Rachel English, German
From the English female given name Rachel or derived from German rau "rough".
Rachels English
This surname is derived from the given name Rachel.
Rachelson English
This surname means “son of Rachel”.
Rackham English
Means "person from Rackham", Sussex ("homestead or enclosure with ricks"). This surname was borne by British watercolourist and book illustrator Arthur Rackham (1867-1939).
Rackley English
It means ‘mound’ ‘homestead’ and ‘ham’.
Radford English
Habitational name from any of the various places so named, for example in Devon, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire, and Hereford and Worcester. Most are named from Old English read "red" + ford "ford", but it is possible that in some cases the first element may be a derivative of Old English ridan "to ride", with the meaning "ford that can be crossed on horseback".
Ragan English
A variant of Reagan.
Ragsdale English
Apparently an English habitational name from Ragdale in Leicestershire, which is probably named from Old English hraca "gully", "narrow pass" + dæl "valley", "dale".
Raider English
Taken from a village called "Rait".
Rain English
Variant of Raine.
Rainbird English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-bright" (cf. Raginbert). The modern form of the name has been influenced by English rainbird "plover".
Rainbow English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbaut, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "counsel-brave" (cf. Raginbald)... [more]
Rainwater English (American)
Americanized form of the German family name Reinwasser, possibly a topographic name for someone who lived by a source of fresh water, from Middle High German reine ‘pure’ + wazzer ‘water’.
Raisbeck English
Raisbeck is a hamlet in the civil parish of Orton, in the Eden district, in the county of Cumbria, England. The surname Raisbeck originates from the hamlet. The name of the hamlet derives from Hrridarr, a personal name and beck, a stream or river.
Raish English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Raisch.
Raison English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
Raleigh English
English habitation name in Devon meaning "red woodland clearing".
Raley English
Variant of Raleigh.
Rallison English
Rallison came from the Norman given name Radulphus.
Ralls English (Anglicized, Rare)
From old English or Saxon. Originally Rallf ( Raulf) which meant Wolf Council
Ralph English
From a Middle English personal name composed of Germanic rad "counsel, advice" and wolf "wolf". This was first introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Ráðulfr, and was reinforced after the Conquest by the Norman form Ra(d)ulf... [more]
Rambert English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert (see Rainbird). It was borne by Dame Marie Rambert (original name Cyvia Rabbam, later Miriam Rambach; 1888-1982), a Polish-born British ballet dancer and choreographer.
Rampling English
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, derived from Latin ramus meaning "branch" (see Ramos). Famous bearers include English actress Charlotte Rampling (1946-) and her father, athlete and British Army officer Godfrey Rampling (1909-2009).
Ramsbottom English
Habitational name from a market town called Ramsbottom in Greater Manchester, England (historically in Lancashire), derived from Old English hramsa meaning "wild garlic" or ramm "ram", and bothm meaning "bottom, bottom valley".
Randle English
English: variant spelling of Randall or Americanized spelling of Randel.
Randolf English
From the given name Randolf
Randolph English, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Rannells English
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Rannulf, Ranel, of continental Germanic origin.
Raphael English, German
From the given name Raphael
Rapson English
Means "son of Rab" or "son of Rap". Both Rab and Rap are diminutives of Robert.
Rasband American (Americanized, Rare)
This name is not a very common family name found in the United States. The first Rasband (Thomas) coming to the U.S. arrived in New Orleans on the ship North Atlantic on 1 November 1850 and arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on 13 August 1856... [more]
Rasberry English
Possibly a habitational name from Ratsbury in Lynton, Devon.
Rashleigh English
From a location in Devon, derived from Old English "roe buck" + léah "clearing".
Rason English
Variant of Reason.
Raspberry English
Variant spelling of Rasberry.
Raspberry English
Variant of Rasberry influenced by the name of the fruit but has no connection to it.
Rassmussen English (American, Rare)
Americanized spelling of Danish and Norwegian Rasmussen.
Ratchford English
habitational name from Rochford (Worcestershire) from Old English ræcc ‘hunting dog’ (genitive ræcces) and ford "ford"... [more]
Ratcliff English
Habitational name from any of the places, in various parts of England, called Ratcliff(e), Radcliffe, Redcliff, or Radclive, all of which derive their names from Old English rēad meaning "red" + clif meaning "cliff", "slope", "riverbank".
Rathbone English
Of unknown origin, but might denote a person with short legs. From Olde English rhath, meaning "short, and bon, "legs".
Rau English
From a medieval personal name, a variant of Ralph.
Ravenel English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
Ravenhill English
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
Ravenscroft English
habitational name from Ravenscroft (Cheshire) from the genitive case of an Old English personal name Hræfn (genitive Hræfnes from Old English hræfn "raven") and Old English croft "paddock smallholding enclosure" meaning "Hræfn's croft".