American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Cortright English
Habitational surname from the Dutch Kortrijk for a person from a place of this name in Flanders. Perhaps also a respelling of English Cartwright.
Cosgrove English
Habitational name from Cosgrove in Northamptonshire, named with an Old English personal name Cof + Old English graf "grove", "thicket".
Coss English
English short form of Cossio.
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Costain English, Scottish, Manx
When originating in Scotland Northern Ireland, and the Isle of Man the surname is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Austain, meaning "son of Austin"... [more]
Coster English
Metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of costards (Anglo-Norman French, from coste 'rib'), a variety of large apples, so called for their prominent ribs.
Costic English (American)
Americanized form of Polish, Ukrainian and Rusyn Kostyk, Slovak and Czech Kostik and in some cases possibly also of Serbian Kostić or Croatian and Serbian Koštić.
Cott English
From the Old English personal name Cotta. Possibly an altered spelling of French Cotte, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of chain mail, from Old French cot(t)e ‘coat of mail’, ‘surcoat’... [more]
Cotter English
Derived from the Old English elements cot "cottage, hut" and the suffix -er. In the feudal system a cotter held a cottage by service (rather than by rent). Reaney gives the surname deriving from the Old French cotier "cottager" (see: villein)... [more]
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottonwood English
The name of a person who lived among cottonwood trees.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Coullson Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic Mac Cumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger" and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
Coulson English
Means "son of Cole".
Council English, German
1 English: nickname for a wise or thoughtful man, from Anglo-Norman French counseil ‘consultation’, ‘deliberation’, also ‘counsel’, ‘advice’ (Latin consilium, from consulere ‘to consult’)... [more]
Countryman English
Translation of German Landmann, Landsmann or Dutch Landman, Landsman, which means ‘countryman’ or ‘fellow countryman’.
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courts English
Variant of Court.
Cousin English, French
Nickname derived from Middle English cousin and Old French cosin, cusin meaning "cousin".
Couter English
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
Couzens English
Patronymic form of Cousin.
Coventry English
habitational name from the city of Coventry in the West Midlands, which is probably named with the genitive case of an Old English personal name Cofa (compare Coveney) + Old English treow 'tree'.
Covert English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
Covey Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
Coward English
several origins... [more]
Cowart English
Variant of Coward.
Cowburn English
The place-name, in turn, comes from the Old English cocc, meaning "rooster," and burna, meaning "a stream." As such, the surname is classed as a local, or habitational name, derived from a place where the original bearer lived or held land.
Cowgill English
From the name of a hamlet in West Riding of Yorkshire.
Cowlishaw English
Derived from either of two minor places named Cowlishaw, in Derbyshire and Lancashire, England.
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Crabbe English, Literature, Popular Culture
The character 'Vincent Crabbe' has this surname in the Harry Potter series.
Crabtree English
The ancestors of the Crabtree surname lived in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It comes from when they lived in the county of Yorkshire. Their name, however, indicates that the original bearer lived near a prominent crabtree.
Craft English (American)
Variant of Croft and Americanized spelling of Kraft.
Cragg Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
Cram English
From the the Scottish place name Crambeth (now Crombie), a village and ancient parish in Torryburn, Fife.
Cramer German, English
Variant of German surname Krämer.
Crane English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
Cranford English
English: habitational name from any of several places, for example in the county of Middlesex (now part of Greater London) and Northamptonshire (Cranford St. Andrew and Cranford St. John), named with Old English cran ‘crane’ + ford ‘ford’.
Cranshaw English
From Cranshaw in Lancashire, named from Old English cran(uc) ‘crane’ + sceaga ‘grove’, ‘thicket’.
Crashman American
Surnames of fictional characters Carl and Chloe Crashman from Carl².
Craven Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
Craw English, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
Crawley English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley... [more]
Creamer English
Derived from Middle English and Old French creme "cream". This was an occupational name for a seller of dairy products.
Crease English
Variant of Creese.
Creath English
Reduced form of the Scottish McCreath.
Creek English
"Creek".
Creese English
From Middle English crease "fine, elegant".
Creig Scottish, English
Derived from Scottish Gaelic crioch "border".
Creighton English
From Irish 'crioch' meaning "border", and Old English 'tun' meaning "town".
Creme English
Variant spelling of Cream.
Crenshaw English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
Crespin American (Hispanic)
A Last name originating from Colonial New Mexico. It is derived from the last name Crespi
Crew English
From the given name Crew, possibly a variant of Crewe
Cribbs English (Rare)
Unknown origin. Likely either from the Old English given name Crispin, which derives from a Latin nickname meaning "curly-haired", or from the place Cribbis near Lauder, England.
Crichton English, Scottish
Variant of Creighton. It could also in some cases be an anglicized form of Dutch Kruchten.
Cricks American
"living near a river." Comes from a similar origin of Rios
Cripps English
Occupational name of a pouch maker. Derived from the Middle English plural "crippes" meaning pouch. Metathesized version of Crisp.
Crispen English
Variant spelling of Crispin.
Crispin English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name Crispin.
Crist English
Applied to someone who played the part of christ in a pageant
Croak English
Variant of Croke
Croake English
Variant of Croak
Croaker English
Meant "person from Crèvecoeur", the name of various places in northern France ("heartbreak", an allusion to the poverty of the local soil).
Crock English
Meaning "barrel," signifying one who made or worked with barrels.
Crockett English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
Crofter English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
Crofton English
Derived from a place name meaning "town with a small enclosed field" in Old English.
Croke English
Derived from the Irish name Cróc or the Norse name Krókr
Crompton English
Derived from the Old English word "Crometun"
Cromwell English
Habitational name from places in Nottinghamshire and West Yorkshire named Cromwell, from Old English crumb "bent, crooked" and well(a) "spring, stream".
Crook Scottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
Crooks English
Habitational name from Crookes in Sheffield (Yorkshire), named with Old Norse krókr ‘hook, bend’.... [more]
Croom English
Based on a nickname for a crippled person or a hunchback, derived from Middle English crom(p) and Old English crumb, meaning "bent", "crooked", or "stopping". (See Crump.)
Croom English
An occupational surname for a maker, seller, or user of hooks. Derived from Middle English crome or cromb, meaning "hook" or "crook".
Croom English
A habitational surname, describing someone who lived in a place named Croom or Croome.
Croom English (American)
Americanized spelling of Krumm.
Crooms English
Variant of Croom.
Croslay English
The name is derived from their residence in a region known as the "cross" or "for the dweller at the cross."
Crossley English
From the word cross, of Latin origin, and leah "woodland, clearing". Indicated that the bearer lived by a cross in a clearing
Crosthwaite English
Means the clering of the cross
Crough English
Variant of Croke
Crow English
From Middle English crow, Old English crawa, applied as a nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion or for someone thought to resemble the bird in some other way.
Crowcroft English
From the village in England, Crowcroft
Crowe English
Variant of Crow.
Crowley Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
Crowner English
Means "coroner" (from Anglo-Norman corouner "coroner", a derivative of Old French coroune "crown").
Crowther English
Originally meant "person who plays the crowd (an ancient Celtic stringed instrument)". It was borne by British entertainer Leslie Crowther (1933-1996).
Croydon English
From the name of a town in England, which comes from Anglo-Saxon croh “crocus” and denu “valley”.
Crozier English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
Crumb English
From the English word "crumb".
Crumbaugh English (American)
Americanised form of German Krumbach or Swiss German Grumbach.
Crumbley English
Derived from the Old English word crump meaning "bent, crooked." Perhaps a name for a person with an abnormal spine. One notable person with this surname is evil doer Ethan Crumbley, who was a school shooter in Oxford High School in Michigan.
Crump English
Originally a nickname for a crippled or deformed person, from Middle English cromp, crump meaning "bent, crooked, stooping" (from Old English crumb).
Cruse English, Irish
Name for someone from an unidentified place in Normandy, from Old French crues, crus, creus "hollow".
Crusoe English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
Cuerden English
Derived from a geographical locality. 'of Cuerden,' a township in the parish of Leyland, Lancashire.
Cuff English
From the english word "cuff"
Culberson African American
Magee Mitchell "Courageous, strong, nice and happy"
Culbert Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
Culbertson English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
Cullimore English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
Cully English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
Culpeper English
Variant of Culpepper. Known bearers of this surname include: Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1664), an English herbalist, physician and astrologer; and English colonial administrator Thomas Culpeper, 2nd Baron Culpeper (1635-1689), governor of Virginia 1680-1683... [more]
Culpepper English
Means "person who collects, prepares and/or sells herbs and spices" (from Middle English cullen "to pick" + pepper).
Culver English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Cumberbatch English
Name for someone from Comberbach in North Cheshire. May come from etymological elements meaning "stream in a valley."
Cumberland English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
Cummer English
The surname Cummer has origins in both English and Scottish cultures. In English, it's thought to be a topographic name for someone who lived by a bend in a river, derived from the Middle English word "cummer," meaning "bend" or "meander." In Scottish, it could also be a variant of the surname Comer, derived from the Gaelic word "comar," meaning "confluence" or "meeting of waters."
Cumming Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
Cunard English
Derived from the Anglo-Saxon given name Cyneheard.
Cundall English
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
Cunliffe English
Originally meant "person from Cunliffe", Lancashire ("slope with a crevice" (literally "cunt-cliff")).
Cunnington English (American)
Scottish linked to {Marshall}
Currer English
It was a name given to someone who was a messenger or person who "dresses tanned leather". In the former case, the surname Currer is derived from the Old French words corëor or courreour, which means "courier".
Currie Scottish, Irish, English
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
Currier English
Occupational surname meaning "a worker who prepared leather".
Curry Scottish, English
Scottish and northern English: variant of Currie.
Curtin English
Derived from a diminutive of Old French curt "short".
Cushing English, French (Anglicized)
Altered form of Cousin, or an Americanized spelling of Cauchon. The English actor Peter Cushing (1913-1994) was a famous bearer of this name.
Cust English
Metronymic short form of the given name Custance.
Cuthbert English
Derived from the name Cuthbert
Cuthbertson English, Scottish
Patronymic surname from the personal name Cuthbert.
Cutler English
Given to a "knife maker" or a man that "makes cutlery"
Cutright English (?)
Possibly an occupational name for someone who makes carts.
Cutter English
This surname is derived from an occupation. 'the cutter,' i.e. cloth-cutter
Cyle English
Variant of Kille.
Cypress English
Translation of German Zypress, a topographic name for someone living near a cypress tree or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a cypress, Middle High German zipres(se) (from Italian cipressa, Latin cupressus), or possibly of any of various Greek family names derived from kyparissos ‘cypress’, as for example Kyparissis, Kyparissos, Kyparissiadis, etc.
Cyprian English
Possibly an altered spelling of French Cyprien, from a medieval personal name, from Latin Cyprianus (originally an ethnic name for an inhabitant of Cyprus), or a shortened form of Greek Kyprianos, Kyprianis, Kyprianidis, ethnic names for an inhabitant of Cyprus (Greek Kypros), or patronymics from the personal name Kyprianos (of the same derivation)... [more]
Cyrus English
From the given name Cyrus. A notable bearer is American singer and songwriter, Miley Cyrus (1992-).
Czech Polish, English
From the ethnonym meaning "Czech", or from the short form of a personal name such as Czesław. The English surname is borrowed from the Polish surname, or from Czech or Slovak Čech.
Dabb English
Variant of Dobb, a pet form of Robert.
D'abbadie French, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
Dacy English
Variant of Dacey.
Daft English
This is an English surname which was especially associated with the Midland counties of the country. It derived from the Old English word of the pre-7th century "gedaeft" meaning "meek" or "mild", and as such it was a pre-Medieval personal name of some kind of popularity.
Daggett English
Derived from the Old French word "Dague", meaning knife or dagger, and as such was a Norman introduction into England after the 1066 Conquest. The name is a medieval metonymic for one who habitually carried a dagger, or who was a manufacturer of such weapons.
Daice English
Of obscure origin and meaning.
Daintith English
From a medieval nickname (roughly equivalent to "precious") applied to a dearly loved person (from Middle English deinteth "pleasure, titbit", from Old French deintiet).
Daintry English
Means "person from Daventry", Northamptonshire ("Dafa's tree"). The place-name is traditionally pronounced "daintry".
Dainty English
From a medieval nickname meaning "handsome, pleasant" (from Middle English deinte, from Old French deint(i)é). This was borne by Billy Dainty (1927-1986), a British comedian.
Daisy English (American)
Taken from the given name Daisy
Dake English
The origins of the name Dake are from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from the personal name David. Daw was a common diminutive of David in the Middle Ages. The surname is a compound of daw and kin, and literally means "the kin of David."
Dalby English, Danish, Norwegian
From any of the locations call Dalby from the old Norse elements dalr "valley" and byr "farm, settlement" meaning "valley settlement". Used by one of the catholic martyrs of England Robert Dalby... [more]
Dallimore English
An English surname probably derived from the French de la mare, meaning "of the sea", though some contend that "mare" springs from the English word moor. This surname probably arose after the Norman conquest of Britain.
Dalloway English
Meant "person from Dallaway", West Midlands (perhaps from a Norman personal name, "person from (de) Alluyes", northern France). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Dalloway, central figure of the eponymous novel (1925) by Virginia Woolf.
Damask English
Presumably an occupational name for someone who sold damask a richly woven material of a kind originally made in Damascus.
Dame French, English
From the old French dame, "lady" ultimately from Latin domina, "mistress".
Damon English, Scottish
From the personal name Damon, from a classical Greek name, a derivative of damān "to kill". Compare Damian.
Dan Romanian, Vietnamese, English, Danish
Ethnic name in various European languages (including Danish and English) meaning ‘Dane’. ... [more]
Danbury English
Habitational name for someone from Danbury in Essex.
Dancer English
Occupational name for someone who dances.
Dancy French, English
Denoted a person from Annecy, France.
Danforth English
Probably a habitational name, perhaps from Darnford in Suffolk, Great Durnford in Wiltshire, or Dernford Farm in Sawston, Cambridgeshire, all named from Old English dierne ‘hidden’ + ford ‘ford’.
Danger English (Rare), Popular Culture
This has been seen in records of the most uncommon American surnames. It has also been used in popular culture, in the show Henry Danger. Although, it's not the character's actual last name.
Dangerfield English
Habitational name, with fused preposition d(e), for someone from any of the various places in northern France called Angerville, from the Old Norse personal name Ásgeirr and Old French ville "settlement, village"... [more]
Danielle American
From the given name Danielle.
Danser German, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
Danson English
Means "son of Dan 2".
Danvers Irish, English
For someone from Anvers, which is the French name of a port called Antwerp, located in what is now Belgium.
D'arcy English, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
Darden English
A habitation name in Northumberland of uncertain origin.
Dare English
This interesting surname has two possible derivations. Firstly, it may derive from the Olde English pre-7th Century personal name "Deora", Middle English "Dere", which is in part a short form of various compound names with the first element "deor", dear, and in part a byname meaning "Beloved"... [more]
Dark English
Nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion, from Middle English darke, Old English deorc "dark". In England, the surname is most frequent in the West Country.