American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Hetherington English
Derived from Hetherington, a like-named place in Northumberland
Hew English
English: variant of the name Hugh. This was at one time the usual form of the personal name in Scotland. English: occupational name from Middle English hewe ‘domestic servant’
Hewit English
Variant of Hewitt
Heyer English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
Heygate English
From a location which is either "hay gate" (hay + Old English geat) or "high gate" (heáh + geat).
Heywood English
From a place name derived from Old English heah meaning "high" and wudu meaning "tree, wood".
Hiatt English
From the given name Hiatt
Hibbard English
English: variant of Hilbert.
Hibberts English
A variant of Hibbert, ultimately coming from Hilbert to begin with.
Hibbs English
This possibly derived from a medieval diminutive, similar to Hobbs for Robert.
Hick English
From the medieval personal name Hicke. The substitution of H- as the initial resulted from the inability of the English to cope with the velar Norman R-.
Hickel English
Variant of Huck
Hicklin English (American)
The closest surname found is Hickey, an Irish name dirived from descendant from the healer.... [more]
Hickory English
Meaning uncertain.
Hickson Irish, English
It means ‘countryman’ similar to Hickman
Hiddleston English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
Hider English
A name for someone who tans hides.
Higdon English
From the personal name Hikedun.
Higgin English
From the given name Higgin
Higginbotham English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire now known as Oakenbottom. The history of the place name is somewhat confused, but it is probably composed of the Old English elements ǣcen or ācen "oaken" and botme "broad valley"... [more]
Higgins English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of Hick.
Higginson English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of Hick.
High English
A name for someone who lives in a high place, like a mountain or hill.
Highland English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland 1 or Hyland 2.... [more]
Hike English
To hike or move, to walk, someone who hikes.
Hilbert English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
Hilder English
English (mainly Sussex and Kent): topographic name from the Middle English hilder “dweller on a slope” (from Old English hylde “slope”).
Hildersley English
Meadow of the hilldweller.
Hile English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Heil.
Hillary English
From the given name Hillary. A famous bearer is explorer Edmund Hillary (1919-2008)
Hillenburg English (American), German (Archaic)
Possibly taken from a place named Hallenberg in Germany.
Hillery English, Irish
Variant of Hillary. This surname has long been established in the county of Clare in Ireland. It was borne by the Irish president Patrick Hillery (1923-2008).
Hilliard English
English: from the Norman female personal name Hildiarde, Hildegard, composed of the Germanic elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + gard ‘fortress’, ‘stronghold’... [more]
Hills English
Variant of Hill.
Hinckley English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
Hind English, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
Hindle English
Habitational name from a place in the parish of Whalley, Lancashire, so called from the same first element + Old English hyll 'hill'.
Hindley English
English (Lancashire): habitational name from a place near Manchester, so named from Old English hind ‘female deer’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
Hine English
occupational name from Middle English Old English hine "servant member of a household" also "farm laborer" (such as a herdsman or shepherd)... [more]
Hingeston Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hingestone Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hingston English
The distribution of the Hingston surname appears to be based around the South Hams area of Devon. The English Place Name Society volumes for Devon give the best indication of the source of the name... [more]
Hinkle American
Americanized spelling of Dutch and German Hinkel. Variant spelling of English Hinckley.
Hinshelwood Scottish, English
Denoted a person from a lost place called Henshilwood near the village of Carnwath on the southern edge of the Pentland Hills of South Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is derived from Scots hainchil obscurely meaning "haunch" and Old English wudu meaning "wood"... [more]
Hinton English (Archaic)
Comes from Old English heah meaning "high" and tun meaning "enclosure" or "settlement." A notable person with the surname is female author S.E Hinton.
Hinxstone Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
Hipkin English
English name meaning relative of Herbert
Hipkins English
Patronymic surname from the nickname "Hib" or "Hibkin" for Hilbert (see Hibbert).
Hirst English
Variant of Hurst
Hirt German, English (Anglicized), Czech, Polish
From German Hirte meaning "shepherd".
Hisaw English
Of uncertain origin and meaning.
Hiscock English
From Hick, a Middle English pet form of Richard, with the diminutive suffix -cok.
Hitchens English
The name Hitchens has a rich and ancient history. It is an Anglo-Saxon name that was originally derived from the baptismal name Richard. As the naming tradition grew in Europe baptismal names began to be introduced in many countries.
Hitchins English
Comes from the town Hitchin
Hix English
Variant of Hicks
Hoadley English
Habitational name from East or West Hoathly in Sussex, so named from Old English hað / Middle English hoath "heath" + leah "wood, clearing".
Hoagland American
American form of Scandinavian topographical surnames, such as Swedish Högland or Norwegian Haugland, both essentially meaning "high land".
Hoar English
Nickname meaning gray haired.
Hoare English
From a nickname meaning "gray-haired", ie. "hoary".
Hockenhull English
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of Tarvin, Cheshire West and Chester.
Hodder English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of hoods, from a Middle English agent derivative of Old English hod
Hodge English
From the given name Hodge, a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Hodge English
Nickname from Middle English hodge "hog", which occurs as a dialect variant of hogge, for example in Cheshire place names.
Hodgkinson English
Means "son of Hodge".
Hodsen English
Variant of Hodson.
Hodson English
Hodson is a very interesting surname in that it has multiple origins, depending on the Hodson lineage in question. ... [more]
Hoe English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spur of a hill.
Hoerman English, German
Variant of Herman. Variant of Hörmann.
Hogg English
An occupational name for someone who herded swine.
Hoggatt English
A name for someone who worked as a keeper of cattle and pigs.
Hoit English
A variant of Hoyt.
Holbrook English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
Holcomb English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Greater Manchester, Oxfordshire, and Somerset, so named from Old English hol meaning "hollow", "sunken", "deep" + cumb meaning "valley".
Holden English, Irish
habitational name from one or more of various places so named especially Holden in Haslingden (Lancashire) but also Holden in Bolton and Holden in Silsden (both Yorkshire) Holedean Farm in Henfield and Holden in Rotherfield (both Sussex) Holding Farm in Cheriton and Woolding Farm in Whitchurch (Hampshire) and Holden in Southborough (Kent)... [more]
Holder German, Jewish, English
1. German: topographic name for someone who lived by an elder tree. Middle High German holder, or from a house named for its sign of an elder tree. In same areas, for example Alsace, the elder tree was believed to be the protector of a house... [more]
Hole English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a depression or low-lying spot, from Old English holh "hole, hollow, depression".
Holiday English
Variation of Holladay.
Holl German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
Holladay English
English: from Old English haligdæg ‘holy day’, ‘religious festival’. The reasons why this word should have become a surname are not clear; probably it was used as a byname for one born on a religious festival day.
Hollander German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
Holley English
English (chiefly Yorkshire) topographic name from Middle English holing, holi(e) ‘holly tree’. Compare Hollen.
Hollier English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
Hollifield English
habitational name from a minor place called as "the holy field" (Old English holegn "holy" and feld "open country") perhaps Holyfield in Waltham Holy Cross (Essex) or less likely for linguistic reasons Hellifield (Yorkshire).
Holliman English
Possibly means "holly man"
Holling English
Location name for someone who lived near holly trees.
Hollinger English, Northern Irish, Scottish
Topographical name from Middle English holin 'holly' + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
Hollingshead English
Habitational name from a lost place in County Durham called Hollingside or Holmside, from Old English hole(g)n "holly" and sīde "hillside, slope"; there is a Hollingside Lane on the southern outskirts of Durham city... [more]
Hollis English
Topographic name for someone who lived where holly trees grew.
Hollister English
English: occupational name for a brothelkeeper; originally a feminine form of Hollier.
Hollobone English
Common surname in the southeast England, predominantly Sussex
Hollow English
Variant of Hole.
Holloway Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
Hollowell English
Either a variant of Halliwell or derived from another place named with Old English hol "hollow" and wella "spring, well".
Hollywood English
Habitational name from any of various farms or hamlets in England called Hollywood such as one in Sandon and Burston (Staffordshire) perhaps named with Middle English holegn "holly" and wudu "wood".
Holter English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
Holyfield English, Scottish
Although the Scottish surname is known to derive from the Medieval Latin word "olifantus," meaning "elephant," its origins as a surname are quite uncertain. ... He was one of the many Anglo-Norman nobles that were invited northward by the early Norman kings of Scotland.
Holyoak English
Habitational name from Holy Oakes (Leicestershire) or else a topographic name from residence near a "holy oak" (or "gospel oak") from Middle English holy "holy" and oke "oak" (from Old English halig and ac).
Home English, Scottish
English and Scottish variant spelling of Holme.
Honeyball English
From Honeyball, a medieval personal name of uncertain origin: perhaps an alteration of Annabel, or alternatively from a Germanic compound name meaning literally "bear-cub brave" (i.e. deriving from the elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and bald "bold, brave").
Hood English, Scottish, Irish
English and Scottish: metonymic occupational name for a maker of hoods or a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive hood, from Middle English hod(de), hood, hud ‘hood’. Some early examples with prepositions seem to be topographic names, referring to a place where there was a hood-shaped hill or a natural shelter or overhang, providing protection from the elements... [more]
Hook English
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "at the hook," from residence in the bend or sudden turn of a lane or valley.
Hookham English
This surname may derive from Old English hóc meaning "hook, angle" and hám meaning "village, hamlet, dwelling."
Hopkinson English
Means "son of Hopkin"
Hore English
Variant of Hoare.
Hornby English
A habitational name from locations called Hornby in northern England, though predominantly associated with Lancashire. Derived from the Norse horni meaning "horn" and býr meaning "farm" or "settlement".
Horner English
1 English, Scottish, German, and Dutch: from Horn 1 with the agent suffix -er; an occupational name for someone who made or sold small articles made of horn, a metonymic occupational name for someone who played a musical instrument made from the horn of an animal, or a topographic name for someone who lived at a ‘horn’ of land.... [more]
Hornsby English
A habitational name from Cumbria, derived from the Norse Ormr meaning "serpent" and býr meaning "farm". Similar in form to Hornby, Hornsby is a widespread surname in northern England.
Hornton English (Rare, Archaic)
Derived from the surname Horton or perhaps used to describe a horn maker meaning “maker of horns.”
Horsley English
Old English hors ‘horse’ + lēah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
Horvitz English (American)
Surname of Richard Steven Horvitz, a voice actor in Angry Beavers, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, and Invader Zim.
Hoseason English
Means "son of Hosea", a personal name that was originally probably Osie, a pet-form of Oswald, but came to be associated with the biblical personal name Hosea.
Hoseason English
The roots of the Hoseason family name are in ancient Scotland with the Viking settlers. Hoseason was derived from the name Aassi, which is a Old Norse form of the Old English personal name Oswald, which means divine power... [more]
Hoseason English
The roots of the Hoseason family name are in ancient Scotland with the Viking settlers. Hoseason was derived from the name Aassi, which is a Old Norse form of the Old English personal name Oswald, which means divine power... [more]
Hoskin English
From the Middle English personal name Osekin.
Hoskins English
Patronymic form of Hoskin.
Hoskinson English
Patronymic form of Hoskin.
Hosmer English
From the Old English name Osmaer, a combination of the Old English elements oss, meaning "god", and maer, meaning "fame".
Hotaling English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Hoogteijling, an indirect occupational name for a productive farmer, from hoogh ‘high’ + teling ‘cultivation’, ‘breeding’.
Hotchkiss English
Patronymic from Hodgkin, a pet form of Hodge.
Hotchner Scottish, English
An occupational surname for a person who drove cattle.
Hough English
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cheshire and Derbyshire, so named from Old English hoh ‘spur of a hill’ (literally ‘heel’). This widespread surname is especially common in Lancashire... [more]
Houghton English
English habitational name from any of the various places so called. The majority, with examples in at least fourteen counties, get the name from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ (literally ‘heel’) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Householter English (American, Rare)
Americanized form of the German surname Haushalter.
Houseman English
Referred to a man who lived or worked in a house, as opposed to a smaller hut (see House). Famous bearers of this name include Romanian-British-American actor John Houseman (1902-1988; real name Jacques Haussmann), Argentine soccer player René Houseman (1953-2018) and Canadian actor Tyson Houseman (1990-).
Houser English
Variant of House.
Howardson English
Means "Son of Howard".
Howarth English
"From a hedged estate", from Old English haga ("hedge, haw") and worð ("farm, estate"). Likely originating from the Yorkshire village of the same name. Common in Lancashire and recorded from at least 1518, as Howorthe, with an earlier version of Hauewrth in Gouerton dated 1317 recorded in the Neubotle charters.
Howcroft English
Means "enclosed field on a hill". Derived from the words haugr "hill", of Norse origin, and croft "enclosed field"
Howdyshell American, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
Howlett English
The name Howlett was brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. It comes from the Norman personal name Hugh. Howlett was a baptismal name which means the son of Hugh... [more]
Howley English, Irish
English habitational name from Howley in Warrington (Lancashire) or Howley in Morley (Yorkshire). The Lancashire name also appears as Hooley and Wholey while the Yorkshire placename comes from Old English hofe "ground ivy... [more]
Hoxie English
They were first found in the settlement of Hawkshaw in the county of Lancashire. The surname Hoxie belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.
Hoy English
Metonymic occupational name for a sailor, from Middle Dutch hoey "cargo ship".
Hoyland English, Norwegian
English (South Yorkshire): habitational name from any of various places in South Yorkshire named with Old English hoh ‘hill spur’ + land ‘(cultivated) land’. ... [more]
Hoyle Welsh, English
Derived from Old English holh meaning "hole". It is thought to have originally been a name for someone who lived in a round hollow or near a pit.
Hoyt English
Generally a topographical name for someone who lived on a hill or other high ground. As such Hoyt is related to words such as heights or high. Hoyt is also possibly a nickname for a tall, thin person where the original meaning is said to be "long stick".
Hubble English
From the Norman personal name Hubald, composed of the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind, spirit" and bald "bold, brave".
Huck English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Uhtræd, literally "dawn-power".
Huckabee English
This surname originated as a habitational name, derived from Huccaby in Devon, England; this place name is derived from two Old English elements: the first, woh, meaning "crooked"; the second, byge, meaning "river bend".... [more]
Huckaby English
Means "person from Huccaby", Devon (perhaps "crooked river-bend"), or "person from Uckerby", Yorkshire ("Úkyrri's or Útkári's farmstead").
Hucke English
Variant of Huck
Huckle English
English surname
Huckleberry English
From the name of the variety of shrubs (genus Vaccinium) or the berries that grow on them. This is also the anglicized form of the German surname Hackelberg.
Huddlestun English
Variant spelling of Huddleston.
Hudkins English
Means "son of Hudkin"
Hudspeth English
English (northeastern counties): unexplained. Compare Hedgepeth.
Huet English, French
From the nickname from given name Hugh, Hugues, Hugo or Hubert.
Huffington English
Means "Uffa's town". A famous bearer is Arianna Huffington, born Αριάδνη-Άννα Στασινοπούλου
Hughson Scottish, English
Means "son of Hugh".
Hulbert English
1 English and German: from a Germanic personal name, Holbert, Hulbert, composed of the elements hold, huld ‘friendly’, ‘gracious’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.... [more]
Hulke English
a nickname for a person who literally "towed" ships and barges
Huller English
Topographical name for a 'dweller by a hill', deriving from the Old English pre 7th Century 'hyll' a hill, or in this instance 'atte hulle', at the hill.
Humble English
Nickname for a meek or lowly person, from Middle English, Old French (h)umble (Latin humilis "lowly", a derivative of humus "ground").
Hummer German, English
Hummer is the German word for 'Lobster' in English. It is also the name of a vehicle- the 'Hummer'!
Humphery English, Irish
English and Irish: variant of Humphrey.