Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
GERALD English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
GERALDSON English
Means "son of Gerald".
GERE English
Variant of Geer, Gehr or Geary, all related to the Old High German element gēr (Old English gār, Old Norse geirr) meaning "spear, arrow". A famous bearer is American actor Richard Gere (b... [more]
GERMAN English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERRARD English
From the given name Gerrard.
GERRY English
Diminutive of names containing ger, meaning "spear".
GERSHON English, Hebrew
Hebrew One of the tribes of Israel ... [more]
GERVAIS English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
GIBBON English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
GIBBONS English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
GIERC English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
GIFFORD English
Gifford is an English name for someone who comes from Giffords Hall in Suffolk. In Old English, it was Gyddingford, or "ford associated with Gydda." Alternatively, it could come from the Middle English nickname, "Giffard," from Old French meaning "chubby-cheeked."
GILBERTSON English
Means "son of Gilbert".
GILBY English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
GILFORD English
English or Welsh.
GILKESON English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
GILL English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a ravine or deep glen, Middle English gil(l), Old Norse gil "ravine"
GILLARD English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
GILLARD English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
GILLETTE English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
GILLIARD English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
GILLIBRAND English
From the Norman personal name Gillebrand, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "hostage-sword".
GILMORE English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
GILPIN English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
GILSTRAP English (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
GINGELL English
Either (i) from a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gangulf, literally "walking wolf"; or (ii) a different form of Gingold.
GIRLING English
From a medieval nickname applied to a brave man (or, with heavy irony, to a cowardly one), from Old French cuer de lion "lion heart".
GLAD English
From a short form of the various Old English personal names with a first element glæd "shining, joyful". Compare Gladwin.
GLAD English, Scandinavian
Nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English, Scandinavian glad "merry, jolly".
GLADNEY English
Probably means "bright island", from the Old English element glæd "bright" (cf. Glædwine) and the English element ney "island" (cf.... [more]
GLEAVE English
Means either "sword-maker" or "sword-seller", or else from a nickname applied to a skilled swordsman (in either case from Middle English gleyve "sword").
GLENDON Scottish, English
From the first name, which means "from the dark glen" in Scottish Gaelic.
GLISSEN English, Irish
Possible British version of the Irish surname Glasson from the the Gaelic word O’Glasain. Meaning green from the counties of Tipperary.
GOBER English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GOBLE English
From “Gobble”, meaning “to gorge, to guzzle”
GODIN English
Comes from the Germanic personal name Godin-, a pet form of any of various compound names beginning with god, got ‘god’. Compare Godbold, Goddard, and Godfrey.
GODWIN English
Derived from the first name Godwine.
GOLD English, German
From Old English, Old High German gold "gold", applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in gold, i.e. a refiner, jeweler, or gilder, or as a nickname for someone who either had many gold possessions or bright yellow hair.
GOLD English
From an Old English personal name Golda (or the feminine Golde), which persisted into the Middle Ages as a personal name. The name was in part a byname from gold "gold", and in part a short form of the various compound names with this first element.
GOLDEN English
From the English word golden which is the yellow color.
GOLDRING German, English, Jewish
This surname was probably given to someone who wore a gold ring.
GOLDSMITH English
Occupational name for a worker in gold, a compound of Old English gold "gold" and smið "smith". In North America it is very often an English translation of German or Jewish Goldschmidt.
GOLSTON English
The Gol part has uncertain meaning, but Ton means "Town".
GOODALL English
Habitational name from Gowdall in East Yorkshire, named from Old English golde "marigold" and Old English halh "nook, recess".
GOODALL English
From Middle English gode "good" and ale "ale, malt liquor", hence a metonymic occupational name for a brewer or an innkeeper.
GOODENOUGH English
From a medieval nickname probably applied either to someone of average abilities or to an easily satisfied person; also, perhaps from a medieval nickname meaning "good servant".
GOODFELLOW English
Generally explained as a nickname meaning 'good fellow' or 'good companion'.
GOODING English
The name Gooding comes from the baptismal name for "the son of Godwin"
GOODKIND English (Rare)
From the English words "good kind".
GOODSON English
Nickname for a dutiful son, from Middle English gode ‘good’ + sone ‘son’.
GOODYEAR English (American), English (Canadian)
Derived from the Medieval English phrase "goodyeare", a term meaning "good year".
GOOT English
Variant of Good.
GORHAM English
A name originating from Kent, England believed to come from the elements gara and ham meaning "from a triangular shaped homestead." Compare Gore.
GOSLING English
1. variant of Joslin - see Jocelyn, Jocelyn. ... [more]
GOTHAM English
English: habitational name from Gotham in Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English gat ‘goat’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘water meadow’.
GOULDING English, Anglo-Saxon
From the late Old English personal name Golding.
GRACE English
From the given name Grace
GRAFF English
Metonymic occupational name for a clerk or scribe, from Anglo-Norman French grafe "quill, pen" (a derivative of grafer "to write", Late Latin grafare, from Greek graphein).
GRANGE English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
GRANT English, Scottish
From a medieval personal name, probably a survival into Middle English of the Old English byname Granta (see Grantham).
GRANTHAM English
Habitational name from Grantham in Lincolnshire, of uncertain origin. The final element is Old English hām "homestead"; the first may be Old English grand "gravel" or perhaps a personal name Granta, which probably originated as a byname meaning "snarler"... [more]
GRASS English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
GRAVE English
Occupational name from Middle English greyve "steward", from Old Norse greifi or Low German greve
GRAVE English
Topographic name, a variant of Grove.
GRAVES English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
GRAVES French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
GRAVES English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
GRAYLING English (British)
Uncommon surname of unclear origin; possible medieval locational name, or a derivative of the French surname Grail or the diminutive Graillon.... [more]
GREASBY English
One who came from Greasby, a parish on the Wirral Peninsula, in Cheshire, now Merseyside.
GREELEY English, Norman
English (of Norman origin): nickname for someone with a pock-marked face, from Old Northern French greslé ‘pitted’, ‘scarred’ (from gresle ‘hailstone’, of Germanic origin).
GREENALL English
From Lincolnshire in England, meaning "green hill".
GREENGRASS English
Notable bearers include film director Paul Greengrass and baseball player Jim Greengrass.
GREENLAW English
From one of two placenames, located near the Anglo-Scottish border. Named with Old English grēne, 'green' and halw, 'hill, mound'.
GREENLEAF English
From Old English grēne "green" and lēaf "leaf", presumably applied as a nickname, the significance of which is now lost.
GREENLEE English
habitational name from any of various minor places, for example in Staffordshire, so named from Old English grene ‘green’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
GREENWALD American
Partly Americanized form of German and Jewish Grün(e)wald (see Grunwald). ... [more]
GREENWAY English
Originally given to a person who lived near a grassy path, from Middle English grene "green" and weye "road, path" (cf. Way).... [more]
GREENWOOD English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a dense forest, from Middle English grene "green" and wode "wood", or a habitational name from a minor place so named, as for example Greenwood in Heathfield, East Sussex.
GREGERSON English
Means "son of Gregory/Greg"
GREGSON English
Means "son of GREG"
GRIGGS English
Means "son of Grigg", Grigg being a short form of Gregory.
GRIMES English, Irish
The surname Grimes means 'son of Grimme'. It is also an anglicized version of the Irish surnames 'O Gormghaile', and 'O Goirmleadhaigh' from Ulster.... [more]
GRIMKÉ English (American)
Meaning unknown. This was the surname of Sarah (1792-1873) and Angelina (1805-1879) Grimké, sisters who opposed slavery and supported women's rights.
GRIMM English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name GRÍMR derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
GRISWOLD English
meaning: from the gray forest.
GROVE English, American
Americanized spelling of the French surname Le Grou(x)or Le Greux (see Groulx)
GROVE English
Name for someone who lived by a grove or thicket, Middle English grove, Old English graf.
GROW English
Likely from the English word "grow".
GRUNDY English
Probably a Middle English metathesized form of the Old French personal name Gondri, Gundric (see Gundry).
GRYLLS English (Rare)
There was an old and distinguished family of Grylls of Tavistock (Devon) and Lanreath (Cornwall) in the 17th century; two high sheriffs of the county then bore the name. The manor of Gryils (commonly mispronounced Garles), near the rocks called the Gryils or Garles, from which they probably derive their name, is in the parish of Lesneweth in that county.
GUDGEON English
from Middle English gojon, gogen, Old French gougon ‘gudgeon’ (the fish) (Latin gobio, genitive gobionis), applied as a nickname or perhaps as a metonymic occupational name for a seller of these fish... [more]
GUEST English
Nickname for a stranger or newcomer to a community, from Middle English g(h)est meaning "guest", "visitor" (from Old Norse gestr, absorbing the cognate Old English giest).
GULLICK English
From the Middle English personal name Gullake, a descendant of Old English Gūthlāc, literally "battle-sport".
GULLIVER English
From a medieval nickname for a greedy person (from Old French goulafre "glutton"). Jonathan Swift used it in his satire 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726), about the shipwrecked ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, whose adventures "offer opportunities for a wide-ranging and often savage lampooning of human stupidity and vice."
GUMM English
From a nickname or byname from Middle English gome, Old English guma "man".
GUNDRY English
From Gondri, Gundric, an Old French personal name introduced to Britain by the Normans, composed of the Germanic elements gund "battle" and rīc "power(ful)".
GUPPY English
English habitational name from a place in Wootton Fitzpaine, Dorset, Gupehegh in Middle English. This is named with the Old English personal name Guppa (a short form of Guðbeorht "battle bright") + (ge)hæg "enclosure"... [more]
GUY English
Occupational name for a guide, Old French gui (a derivative of gui(d)er "to guide", of Germanic origin).
GUY English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
HACKNEY English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hackney in Greater London, named from an Old English personal name Haca (genitive Hacan) combined with ēg "island, dry ground in marshland".
HACKNEY English, Scottish
From Middle English hakenei (Old French haquenée), an ambling horse, especially one considered suitable for women to ride; perhaps therefore a metonymic occupational name for a stablehand... [more]
HADDON English
Derived from the Old English word had meaning "heathland" and the Old English suffix -don meaning "hill"; hence, the "heathland hill" or the "heather-covered hill".... [more]
HAGSTROM English
Anglicized form of Swedish HAGSTRÖM.
HAILES Scottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
HAINEY Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish, English
(Celtic) A lost me devil village in Scotland; or one who came from Hanney island in Berkshire.
HAIRFIELD English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
HAIZLIP English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
HALDON English (Rare)
From a place name in Devon, England.
HALLETT English
Derived from the given name Hallet (see ADALHARD).
HALLEY English
Location name combining the elements hall as in "large house" and lee meaning "field or clearing."
HALLIE English
Spelling variant of Halley.
HALLIWELL English
Northern English (Lancashire) habitational name from a place near Manchester called Halliwell, from Old English halig ‘holy’ + well(a) ‘well’, ‘spring’, or from any of the numerous other places named with these elements (see Hollowell).
HALLMARK English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
HALLOW English
English: topographic name from Middle English hal(l)owes ‘nooks’, ‘hollows’, from Old English halh (see Hale). In some cases the name may be genitive, rather than plural, in form, with the sense ‘relative or servant of the dweller in the nook’.
HALLOWELL English
The ancestors of the name Hallowell date back to the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the Hallowell family lived near a holy spring having derived from the Old English terms halli, which meant "holy", and welle, which meant "spring".
HALLWELL English
Related to Halliwell, this surname means "Lives by the Holy Spring"
HALPRIN English
Halprin is the last name of the main character the book called Ashfall by Mike Mullin.
HALVERSON English
Anglicized form of Norwegian or Danish Halvorsen.
HAM English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
HAMER English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
HAMES English, Welsh, Scottish
Son of "Amy", in Old English. An ancient Leicestershire surname.
HAMILL English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
HAMLIN English
From an Old English word meaning "home" or "homestead" and a diminutive suffix -lin.
HAMMER German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
HAMMERSLEY English (Modern)
From southern England. From homersley meaning homestead, that later changed to hamersley
HAMMERSMITH German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
HAMP English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HAMSON English
A variant of Hampson.
HANCE English
Allegedly a patronymic from the personal name Hann.
HANES English, Welsh
variant spelling of Haynes.
HANKIN English
From the given name Hankin
HANKS English
Patronymic form of HANK.
HANLIN Scottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish Hanlon.
HANNAM English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
HAPPYGOD English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
HARBIN English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins, and is derived from the personal names Rabin, Robin, and Robert. It has the English prefix 'har', which means gray.... [more]
HARBOR English
English: variant spelling of Harbour.
HARBOUR English
Variant of French Arbour or a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from Old English herebeorg "shelter, lodging".
HARGREAVES English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HARGROVE English
English: variant of Hargrave.
HARKAWAY English
From a sporting phrase used to guide and incite hunting dogs.
HARKER English (British)
English (mainly northeastern England and West Yorkshire): habitational name from either of two places in Cumbria, or from one in the parish of Halsall, near Ormskirk, Lancashire. The Cumbrian places are probably named from Middle English hart ‘male deer’ + kerr ‘marshland’... [more]
HARKNESS Scottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name Hereca (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
HARLESS English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
HARLIN English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
HARMER English (British)
Meaning, of the Army or man of Armor, from the battle at Normandy, France. It was formerly a French last name Haremere after the battle at Normandy it moved on to England where it was shortened to Harmer.
HAROLD English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HARR English
Short form of Harris
HARRINGTON English
Comes from the three towns with this name in England.
HARROLD Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of Harold.
HARROW English
Means "person from Harrow", the district of northwest Greater London, or various places of the same name in Scotland ("heathen shrine").
HARRY English
From first name Harry.
HARTFORD English
Habitational name from Hertford, or from either of two places called Hartford, in Cheshire and Cumbria; all are named with Old English heorot ‘hart’ + ford ‘ford’.
HARTLEY English, Scottish
Derived from the Old English words meaning heorot meaning "hart" and leah meaning "clearing". Also from Scottish Ó hArtghaile meaning "descendant of Artghal". Hartley is also an English given name.
HARTON English
This surname is a habitational one, denoting someone who lived in a village in County Durham or in North Yorkshire.... [more]
HARTWELL English
Habitational name from places in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Staffordshire called Hartwell, from Old English heorot ‘stag’, ‘hart’ + wella ‘spring’, ‘stream’... [more]
HARVARD English
From the Old English given name Hereweard, composed of the elements here "army" and weard "guard", which was borne by an 11th-century thane of Lincolnshire, leader of resistance to the advancing Normans... [more]
HARWOOD English, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
HASCHAK English (American)
This may be influenced from the English word hashtag, meaning number.
HASHLEY American
Variant of Ashley (?).
HASKELL English
From the Norman personal name ASCHETIL.
HASLEY English
Habitational name of uncertain origin. The surname is common in London, and may be derived from Alsa (formerly Assey) in Stanstead Mountfitchet, Essex (recorded as Alsiesheye in 1268). nother possible source is Halsway in Somerset, named from Old English hals ‘neck’ + weg ‘way’, ‘road’.
HASSALL English
Means "person from Hassall", Cheshire ("witch's corner of land").
HASSELHOFF American
The surname of the singer, David Hasselhoff.
HATCH English
English (mainly Hampshire and Berkshire): topographic name from Middle English hacche ‘gate’, Old English hæcc (see Hatcher). In some cases the surname is habitational, from one of the many places named with this word... [more]
HATCHER English
Southern English: topographic name for someone who lived by a gate, from Middle English hacche (Old English hæcc) + the agent suffix -er. This normally denoted a gate marking the entrance to a forest or other enclosed piece of land, sometimes a floodgate or sluice-gate.
HAUPTMAN English (American), German
Variant spelling of Hauptmann.
HAVELOCK English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
HAVERFORD Welsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
HAWKS English
Variant of or patronymic from HAWK.
HAWLEY English, Anglo-Saxon
Means "hedged meadow". It comes from the English word haw, meaning "hedge", and Saxon word leg, meaning "meadow". The first name Hawley has the same meaning.
HAWTHORN English, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Hawthorne.
HAWTHORNE English, Scottish
English and Scottish: topographic name for someone who lived by a bush or hedge of hawthorn (Old English haguþorn, hægþorn, i.e. thorn used for making hedges and enclosures, Old English haga, (ge)hæg), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, such as Hawthorn in County Durham... [more]
HAY English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYCOCK English
English (West Midlands): from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Hay, formed with the Middle English hypocoristic suffix -cok (see Cocke).
HAYFORD English
English habitational name from several places called Heyford in Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire, or Hayford in Buckfastleigh, Devon, all named with Old English heg ‘hay’ + ford ‘ford’.
HAYLING English
Either (i) "person from Hayling", Hampshire ("settlement of Hægel's people"); or (ii) from the Old Welsh personal name Heilyn, literally "cup-bearer" (see also Palin).
HAYLOCK English
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly from the Old English given name Hægluc, a diminutive of the unrecorded name *Hægel, found in various place names. Alternatively it could be a topographic surname originally referring to a person who lived on or near a hillock (i.e. a small hill; compare Hillock).
HAYMES Welsh, Scottish, English, Irish, Anglo-Saxon
Variant of 'Hayes', 'Haynes' or 'Hames'... [more]
HAYWORTH English
English: habitational name from Haywards Heath in Sussex, which was named in Old English as ‘enclosure with a hedge’, from hege ‘hedge’ + worð ‘enclosure’. The modern form, with its affix, arose much later on (Mills gives an example from 1544).
HAZARD English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HAZELDEN English
Means "person from Hazelden", the name of various places in England ("valley growing with hazel trees").
HAZELTON English
Hazel is referring to hazel trees, while ton is from old english tun meaning enclosure, so an enclosure of hazel trees, or an orchard of hazel trees.
HAZELWOOD English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Derbyshire, Suffolk, Surrey, and West Yorkshire, so called from Old English hæsel (or Old Norse hesli) ‘hazel (tree)’ + wudu ‘wood’; or a topographic name from this term.
HAZLETT English (British)
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hazel copse, Old English hæslett (a derivative of hæsel ‘hazel’). habitational name from Hazelhead or Hazlehead in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, derived from Old English hæsel ‘hazel’ + heafod ‘head’, here in the sense of ‘hill’; also a topographic name of similar etymological origin.
HAZZARD English
Variant spelling of Hazard.
HEACOCK English
variant spelling of Haycock
HEALEY English
Habitational surname for a person from Healey near Manchester, derived from Old English heah "high" + leah "wood", "clearing". There are various other places in northern England, such as Northumberland and Yorkshire, with the same name and etymology, and they may also have contributed to the surname.
HEARD English
Occupational name for a tender of animals, normally a cowherd or shepherd, from Middle English herde (Old English hi(e)rde).
HEART English
Variant of Hart.
HEATHCOTE English
English habitational name from any of various places called Heathcote, for example in Derbyshire and Warwickshire, from Old English h?ð ‘heathland’, ‘heather’ + cot ‘cottage’, ‘dwelling’.
HEATON English
Comes from "town (or farmstead) on a hill".... [more]
HEDDLE English
Famous bearer is William Heddle Nash (1894-1961), the English lyric tenor.
HEDGE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hedge, Middle English hegg(e). In the early Middle Ages, hedges were not merely dividers between fields, but had an important defensive function when planted around a settlement or enclosure.
HELLIWELL English
From various place names in United Kingdom. Derived from Olde English elements of "halig" meaning holy, and "waella", a spring.
HELMSLEY English
This English habitational name originates with the North Yorkshire village of Helmsley, named with the Old English personal name Helm and leah, meaning 'clearing'.
HELTON English
Habitational name from Helton in Cumbria, named in Old English probably with helde "slope" and tun "farmstead, settlement", or possibly a variant of Hilton. This is a common name in TN, KY, OH, TX, and GA.
HEMBER English
From the West Country area near Bristol.
HEMMINGS English
Derived from the given name HEMMING. It is the last name of the band member of Five Seconds of Summer (5sos), Luke Hemmings.
HEMSLEY English
English: habitational name from either of two places in North Yorkshire called Helmsley. The names are of different etymologies: the one near Rievaulx Abbey is from the Old English personal name Helm + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’, whereas Upper Helmsley, near York, is from the Old English personal name Hemele + Old English eg ‘island’, and had the form Hemelsey till at least the 14th century
HEMSWORTH English
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, England, meaning "Hymel's enclosure".
HENCE German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of Hentz derived from a German nickname for Hans or Heinrich or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENDESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENDRYX English
This name was derived from Hendrix and means "home ruler". This name is the 25841st most popular surname in the US.
HENGESDON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGESTES Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGSTETON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENKESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENLEY English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNE English
From a diminutive of Henry.
HENNEBERY English (American)
A berry and an alias used by March McQuin
HENNES English
From the diminutive of Henry.
HENNI English
A name coined by the contributor of this name, to describe himself
HENRIE English (Rare)
Derived from the given name Henrie, a variant of Henry.