Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
FARADAY English
From an English surname meaning "servant of Fair", Fair being derived from Old English fæger used as a personal name.
FARAND English (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
FARMAN English
(i) from an Old Norse personal name denoting literally a seafarer or travelling trader, brought into English via French; (ii) "itinerant trader, pedlar", from Middle English fareman "traveller"
FARRAGUT Breton, French, Catalan, American
A Breton-French surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was American naval flag officer David Farragut (1801-1870), who is known for serving during the American Civil War. His father was of Catalan ancestry... [more]
FARRAR English (British)
Northern English: occupational name for a smith or worker in iron, from Middle English and Old French farrour, ferour, from medieval Latin ferrator, an agent derivative of ferrare ‘to shoe horses’, from ferrum ‘iron’, in medieval Latin ‘horseshoe’... [more]
FARRIMOND English
From Faramund, a Norman personal name of Germanic origin.
FARROW English
Northern English: hyper-corrected form of FARRAR, occupational name for a smith or worker in iron. The original -ar or -er ending of this name came to be regarded as an error, and was changed to -ow.
FARTHING English
(i) "someone who lives on a 'farthing' of land" (i.e. a quarter of a larger area); (ii) from a medieval nickname based on farthing "1/4 penny", perhaps applied to someone who paid a farthing in rent; (iii) from the Old Norse male personal name Farthegn, literally "voyaging warrior"
FASTOLF English
From the Old Norse male personal name Fastúlfr, literally "strong wolf". It was borne by Sir John Fastolf (1380-1459), an English soldier whose name was adapted by Shakespeare as "Falstaff".
FAUCETT English
Locational surname from various British places: Fawcett in Cumberland, Facit in Lancashire, Forcett in North Yorkshire, or Fa’side Castle in East Lothian, Scotland. The linguistic origins of the name arise variously from, in Cumberland and Lancashire, "multi-coloured hillside" in 7th century Old English fag or fah, "brightly coloured, variegated, flowery" with side, "slope"; in North Yorkshire from Old English ford, "ford", and sete, "house, settlement"; or, reputedly, in East Lothian, "fox on a hillside"... [more]
FAWKES English
From the Norman personal name Faulques or Fauques, which was derived from a Germanic nickname meaning literally "falcon". A famous bearer of the surname was Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), the English Catholic conspirator... [more]
FAYE French, English
Refers to one who came from Fay or Faye (meaning "beech tree") in France.
FAYRE English
Variation of Fair.
FAZAKERLEY English
Means "person from Fazakerley", Liverpool ("glade by the borderland").
FEATHERSTONHAUGH English
Indicates a person lived in or near Featherstonhaugh in Northumberland, England. From Old English feðere "feather", stān "stone", and healh "corner."
FELKER English
The surname Felker was a patronymic surname, created from a form of the medieval personal name Philip. It was also a habitational name from a place name in Oxfordshire. Forms of the name such as de Filking(es) are found in this region from the 12th and 13th centuries.
FELL English
From Middle English fell ”high ground”, ultimately derived from Old Norse fjall, describing one who lived on a mountain.
FELL English, German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a furrier, from Middle English fell, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel, all of which mean "skin, hide, pelt". Yiddish fel refers to untanned hide, in contrast to pelts "tanned hide" (see Pilcher).
FELLER English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle English fell, Middle Low German, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel "hide, pelt". See also Fell.
FELLOWS English
English: patronymic from Fellow, from Middle English felagh, felaw late Old English feolaga ‘partner’, ‘shareholder’ (Old Norse félagi, from fé ‘fee’, ‘money’ + legja to lay down)... [more]
FELTON English
A habitation name composed of the elements feld-, meaning "field or pasture" and -tun, meaning "settlement."
FENIMORE English
From a medieval nickname meaning literally "fine love" (from Old French fin amour).
FENLEY English
This surname may be:... [more]
FENNER English
A surname of either Old French origin, allegedly meaning “huntsman”, or else more probably referring to those who were brought over from the Low Countries to assist in draining the “fens” or wetlands of England and Ireland – a process which lasted from the 9th to the 18th centuries.
FENNING English
Topographic name for a fen dweller, from a derivative of Old English fenn (see Fenn).
FENWAY English
Meaning, "through the fens," itself meaning, "through the marsh."
FENWICK English
Means "person from Fenwick", Northumberland, Strathclyde and Yorkshire ("dairy farm in fenland"). The name is pronounced as "Fennick". It belongs to a chain of department stores, founded in Newcastle in 1882 by John Fenwick (1846-1905).
FERRAND French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
FETT English
Nickname from Old French fait, Middle English fet meaning "suitable", "comely".
FEVEREL English
From a Middle English form of February, probably used as a nickname either for someone born in that month or for someone with a suitably frosty demeanor. In fiction, this surname was borne by the central character of George Meredith's novel 'The Ordeal of Richard Feverel' (1859).
FEY German, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
FFELAN English
Anglisized version of the Gaelic Ó Faoláin meaning "descendent of Faolán", a given name meaning "wolf".
FIANDER English (British)
The Fiander surname may have it's origins in Normandy, France (possibly from the old-French "Vyandre"), but is an English (British) surname from the Dorset county region. The Fiander name can also be found in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, Canada the origins of which can be traced back to the mid-1700's in the village of Milton Abbas, Dorsetshire.
FIELD English, Scottish, Irish, Jewish (Anglicized)
English: topographic name for someone who lived on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into cultivation, from Old English feld ‘pasture’, ‘open country’, as opposed on the one hand to æcer ‘cultivated soil’, ‘enclosed land’ (see Acker) and on the other to weald ‘wooded land’, ‘forest’ (see Wald)... [more]
FIELDER English
Southern English from Middle English felder ‘dweller by the open country’.
FIELDHOUSE English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a house in open pasture land. Reaney draws attention to the form de Felhouse (Staffordshire 1332), and suggests that this may have become Fellows.
FIELDING English
Topographic name from an Old English felding ‘dweller in open country’.
FIELDMAN English
This surname most likely means, "Field Man", if it's not derived from the English words themselves.
FIFER German, American, Slovene
Americanized and Slovenian spelling of German Pfeiffer.
FIFIELD English
Local. Has the same signification as Manorfield. Lands held in fee or fief, for which the individual pays service or owes rent.
FIGGIS English
From a medieval nickname for a trustworthy person (from the Anglo-Norman form of Old French fichais "loyal").
FILKINS English
Means either (i) "person from Filkins", Oxfordshire ("settlement of Filica's people"); or "son of Filkin", a medieval personal name meaning literally "little Phil", from Philip.
FILLERY English
From a medieval nickname derived from Anglo-Norman fitz le rei "son of the king" (see also Fitzroy), probably applied mainly (and ironically) to an illegitimate person or to someone who put on quasi-royal airs.
FINCH English
English: nickname from Middle English finch ‘finch’ (Old English finc). In the Middle Ages this bird had a reputation for stupidity. It may perhaps also in part represent a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught finches and sold them as songsters or for the cooking pot... [more]
FINCK English, German
From the German word for "finch" a type of bird
FINE English (?)
English nickname for a clever or elegant man, from Old French fin ‘fine’, ‘delicate’, ‘skilled’, ‘cunning’ (originally a noun from Latin finis ‘end’, ‘extremity’, ‘boundary’, later used also as an adjective in the sense ‘ultimate’, ‘excellent’).
FINGER English, German, Jewish
Probably applied as a nickname for a man who had some peculiarity of the fingers, such as possessing a supernumerary one or having lost one or more of them through injury, or for someone who was small in stature or considered insignificant... [more]
FINK German, Slovene, English, Jewish
Nickname for a lively or cheerful person, Jewish ornamental name derived from the Germanic word for "finch", and German translation of Slovene Šinkovec which is from šcinkovec or šcinkavec meaning "finch".
FIRMAN English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants Firman and Firmin. Expressed in Latin as Firminus.
FIRTH English, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
FISK English (British)
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone supposedly resembling a fish in some way, from Old Norse fiskr ‘fish’ (cognate with Old English fisc).
FISKE English, Norwegian
From the traditionally Norwegian habitational surname, from the Old Norse fiskr "fish" and vin "meadow". In England and Denmark it was a surname denoting someone who was a "fisherman" or earned their living from selling fish.
FITZHUGH English
English (Northamptonshire): Anglo-Norman French patronymic (see Fitzgerald) from the personal name Hugh.
FLACK English
probably from Middle English flack, flak "turf", "sod" (as found in the place name Flatmoor, in Cambridgeshire), and hence perhaps an occupational name for a turf cutter.
FLAKE English
Surname. Meaning, "lives by a swamp."
FLANDERS English
Given to a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands (compare Fleming).
FLANNER English
This early occupational and mainly 'midlands' English surname, is actually of pre-medieval French origins. Introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066, it derives from the French word flaonet meaning a 'little flan', and described a maker of patisserie or pancakes.
FLASH English
Means "person who lives near a pool" (Middle English flasshe "pool, marsh").
FLECK English
Meaning unknown. It is used in the 2019 movie Joker as the real name of the titular character played by actor Joaquin Phoenix.
FLEETWOOD English
Means "From the town of Fleetwood, in Lancaster".
FLENOT American (South, ?)
I think this could be a French Indian name however, it may be misspelled, and I don't know the correct spelling.
FLINT English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
FLOOK English
Derived from the Old Norse name Flóki.
FLOWER English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
FLOWER English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
FLOWER English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
FLOWERS English
Patronymic from Flower.
FLUTE English
From the English word flute which is an instrument.
FLYTE English
Means "stream" from Old English fleot.
FOOT English
Variant of Foote.
FOOTE English
Nickname for someone with a peculiarity or deformity of the foot, from Middle English fot (Old English fot), or in some cases from the cognate Old Norse byname Fótr.
FORDE English, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
FORDHAM English
Habitational name from any of the places in Cambridgeshire, Essex, and Norfolk named Fordham, from Old English ford ‘ford’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’.
FORE English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Fahr.
FORSTER English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
FOSSOYEUR American
A surname meaning "Gravedigger" in French.
FOUCH English
not sure how i can up with this but i used it for my hp professor oc
FOULKES English (Anglicized, ?)
English variant spelling of Foulks.
FOULKS English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also Volk.
FOWL English, Popular Culture
This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and derives from the Old English pre 7th Century word fugol, "fowl", "bird", which was used as a byname and as a personal name. The medieval form of the word was the Middle English development foul, fowl(e), used as a continuation of the Old English personal name and also as a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a bird.
FOXWELL English
Means "fox stream", from Old English fox and well(a), meaning stream.
FOXWORTH English
"dweller at the homestead infested by foxes." or "house of Fox" aka Foxworthy... [more]
FOXX English
Variant of Fox.
FRALEY English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
FRAMPTON English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
FRANCK English, French
From the given name Franck.
FRANKLAND English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
FRANKS English
This surname is derived from the given name Frank.
FRANKSON English
This surname means "son of Frank."
FRAY French, English
From the German surname FREY or the Old French given name FRAY.
FREDERICK English
Derived from the given name Frederick.
FREDERICKS English
Patronymic from Frederick.
FREE English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
FREELING English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
FRENCH English, Anglo-Saxon
Ethnic name for someone from France, Middle English frensche, or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who adopted French airs. Variant of Anglo-Norman French Frain.
FRETT English
English from Middle English frette, Old French frete ‘interlaced work (in metal and precious stones)’ such as was used for hair ornaments and the like, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such pieces.
FREWIN English
From the Middle English personal name Frewine, literally "noble or generous friend".
FRIEND English
Nickname for a companionable person, from Middle English frend "friend" (Old English freond). In the Middle Ages the term was also used to denote a relative or kinsman, and the surname may also have been acquired by someone who belonged to the family of someone who was a more important figure in the community
FRISBY English
Means "person from Frisby", Leicestershire ("farmstead of the Frisians"). A frisbee is a plastic disc thrown from person to person as a game; the trademarked name, registered in 1959 by Fred Morrison, was inspired by the Frisbie bakery of Bridgeport, Connecticut, whose pie tins were the original models for the plastic discs.
FRIZZELL English (Rare)
Either (i) from Friseal, the Scottish Gaelic form of Fraser; or (ii) from a medieval nickname applied to someone who dressed in a showy or gaudy style (from Old French frisel "decoration, ribbon").
FROGGATT English
Topographical name from the village of Froggatt in Derbyshire.
FROUD English
From the Old English personal name Frōda or Old Norse Fróthi, both meaning literally "wise" or "prudent". A variant spelling was borne by British historian James Anthony Froude (1818-1894).
FULCHER English
English (chiefly East Anglia): from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + hari, heri ‘army’, which was introduced into England from France by the Normans; isolated examples may derive from the cognate Old English Folchere or Old Norse Folkar, but these names were far less common.
FULLERTON English
Habitational name from a place in Scotland. Derived from Old English fugol "bird" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
FURLONG English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
FURMAN Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
FURNESS English (British)
It originated from the river in England.
FYFE English
From the place 'Fyfe'
FYLER English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Feiler.
GABBETT English
From the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name GABRIEL.
GABLE English
Northern English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a habitational name from a minor place named with Old Norse gafl ‘gable’, which was applied to a triangular-shaped hill. The mountain called Great Gable in Cumbria is named in this way.... [more]
GADBURY English
Habitational name from Cadborough, alias Gateborough, in Rye, Sussex, probably so named from Old English gāt meaning "goat" + beorg meaning "hill".
GADSBY English
Habitational name from Gaddesby in Leicestershire, recorded in Domesday Book as Gadesbi and so named from the Old Norse personal name Gaddr (or from Old Norse gaddr "spur (of land)") and býr "settlement".
GAFFNEY English (American)
This may sound like the female given name Daphne.
GAINES English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
GAINSBOROUGH English
From the city of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, England. A famous bearer of this surname includes English painter Thomas Gainsborough.
GAISFORD English
Habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
GALL Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
GALLANT English
Nickname for a cheerful or high-spirited person, from Old French, Middle English galant "bold, dashing, lively". The meanings "gallant" and "attentive to women" are further developments, which may lie behind some examples of the surname.
GALPIN English
English: occupational name for a messenger or scullion (in a monastery), from Old French galopin ‘page’, ‘turnspit’, from galoper ‘to gallop’.
GAMBLE English
from the Old Norse byname Gamall meaning "old", which was occasionally used in North England during the Middle Ages as a personal name. ... [more]
GAMMON English
From a medieval nickname applied to a merry or sportive person (from Middle English gamen "game"), or to someone who walked in a strange way or had some peculiarity of the legs (from Anglo-Norman gambon "ham").
GARINGTON English
Possibly from the given name Gareth.
GARLICK English
(i) "grower or seller of garlic"; (ii) perhaps from a medieval personal name descended from Old English Gārlāc, literally "spear-play"; (iii) an anglicization of the Belorussian Jewish name Garelick, literally "distiller"
GARRICK English
From the first name Garrick.
GARWOOD English
Comes from a lost locational name from the Olde English gara, referring to a "triangular piece of land" or to a "spearhead", and wudu meaning a "wood".
GASCOYNE English
Variant of Gascoigne, which was originally a regional name for someone from the province of Gascony, via Old French Gascogne.
GASKILL English
Meaning "Goat Shelter". English (Lancashire) habitual name from Gatesgill in Cumbria, so named from Old Norse geit ‘goat’ + skáli ‘shelter’. The surname is first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century.
GATES English
Topographic name for someone who lived by the gates of a medieval walled town. The Middle English singular gate is from the Old English plural, gatu, of geat "gate" (see Yates)... [more]
GATLIN English
English of uncertain origin; probably a variant of Catlin or Gadling, a nickname from Old English gœdeling ‘kinsman’, ‘companion’, but also ‘low fellow’.
GATLING English, German (Anglicized)
English variant of Gatlin. Possibly a respelling of German Gättling (see also Gatlin).
GATSBY English
A different form of Gadsby ("person from Gaddesby", Leicestershire ("Gaddr's farmstead")). A fictional bearer is Jay Gatsby, the central character of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel 'The Great Gatsby' (1925).
GAVIN Scottish, English
From the given name Gavin.
GAVITT English
Perhaps an altered spelling of the middle English Gabbett, which is from a pet form of the personal name GABRIEL.
GAWKRODGER English
From a medieval nickname meaning "clumsy Roger".
GAY English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
GAY English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
GAYDOS Hungarian, English
Anglicized spelling of Hungarian GAJDOS.
GAYE English
Possibly a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the archaic word "gay" meaning "happy". A famous bearer was the American singer Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
GAYLORD English
Derived from Old French gaillard meaning "high-spirited, boistrous".
GEAR English
Derived from the Germanic name element ger, meaning "spear".
GEARHART English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Gierhard, a variant of Gerhardt.
GEARING English
probably an Americanized spelling of Gehring
GEE Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GEORGIA English
From the given name Georgia.
GERALD English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
GERALDSON English
Means "son of Gerald".
GERE English
Variant of Geer, Gehr or Geary, all related to the Old High German element gēr (Old English gār, Old Norse geirr) meaning "spear, arrow". A famous bearer is American actor Richard Gere (b... [more]
GERMAN English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERRARD English
From the given name Gerrard.
GERRY English
Diminutive of names containing ger, meaning "spear".
GERSHON English, Hebrew
Hebrew One of the tribes of Israel ... [more]
GERVAIS English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
GIBBON English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
GIBBONS English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
GIDLOW English
The first recorded use of the name is from 1291; Robert de Gidlow was a freeholder in Aspull, Lancanshire, United Kingdom and the name occurs frequently down to the 17th century. The Gidlow family moved to the United States in the mid-18th century where the spelling was changed to Goodlow and eventually to Goodloe.
GIERC English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
GIFFORD English
Gifford is an English name for someone who comes from Giffords Hall in Suffolk. In Old English, it was Gyddingford, or "ford associated with Gydda." Alternatively, it could come from the Middle English nickname, "Giffard," from Old French meaning "chubby-cheeked."
GILBERTSON English
Means "son of Gilbert".
GILBY English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
GILFORD English
English or Welsh.
GILKESON English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
GILL English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a ravine or deep glen, Middle English gil(l), Old Norse gil "ravine"
GILLARD English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
GILLARD English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
GILLETTE English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
GILLIARD English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
GILLIBRAND English
From the Norman personal name Gillebrand, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "hostage-sword".
GILMORE English, Irish
Gilmore is a surname with several origins and meanings:... [more]
GILPIN English, Irish, Northern Irish
English: in the northeast, from the Gilpin river in Cumbria; in southern counties, probably a variant of Galpin. ... [more]
GILSTRAP English (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
GINGELL English
Either (i) from a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gangulf, literally "walking wolf"; or (ii) a different form of Gingold.
GIRLING English
From a medieval nickname applied to a brave man (or, with heavy irony, to a cowardly one), from Old French cuer de lion "lion heart".
GLAD English
From a short form of the various Old English personal names with a first element glæd "shining, joyful". Compare Gladwin.
GLAD English, Scandinavian
Nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English, Scandinavian glad "merry, jolly".
GLADNEY English
Probably means "bright island", from the Old English element glæd "bright" (cf. Glædwine) and the English element ney "island" (cf.... [more]
GLEAVE English
Means either "sword-maker" or "sword-seller", or else from a nickname applied to a skilled swordsman (in either case from Middle English gleyve "sword").
GLENDON Scottish, English
From the first name, which means "from the dark glen" in Scottish Gaelic.
GLISSEN English, Irish
Possible British version of the Irish surname Glasson from the the Gaelic word O’Glasain. Meaning green from the counties of Tipperary.
GOBER English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GOBLE English
From “Gobble”, meaning “to gorge, to guzzle”
GODIN English
Comes from the Germanic personal name Godin-, a pet form of any of various compound names beginning with god, got ‘god’. Compare Godbold, Goddard, and Godfrey.
GODWIN English
Derived from the first name Godwine.
GODWINSON English
Means "Son of Godwin". First born by Harold Godwinson. From his father Godwine, Earl of Wessex. Harold was defeated & killed during the battle of Hastings in 1066 by William the Bastard, now known as William the Conqueror.
GOLD English, German
From Old English, Old High German gold "gold", applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in gold, i.e. a refiner, jeweler, or gilder, or as a nickname for someone who either had many gold possessions or bright yellow hair.
GOLD English
From an Old English personal name Golda (or the feminine Golde), which persisted into the Middle Ages as a personal name. The name was in part a byname from gold "gold", and in part a short form of the various compound names with this first element.
GOLDEN English
From the English word golden which is the yellow color.
GOLDRING German, English, Jewish
This surname was probably given to someone who wore a gold ring.
GOLDSMITH English
Occupational name for a worker in gold, a compound of Old English gold "gold" and smið "smith". In North America it is very often an English translation of German or Jewish Goldschmidt.
GOLSTON English
The Gol part has uncertain meaning, but Ton means "Town".
GOODALL English
Habitational name from Gowdall in East Yorkshire, named from Old English golde "marigold" and Old English halh "nook, recess".
GOODALL English
From Middle English gode "good" and ale "ale, malt liquor", hence a metonymic occupational name for a brewer or an innkeeper.
GOODENOUGH English
From a medieval nickname probably applied either to someone of average abilities or to an easily satisfied person; also, perhaps from a medieval nickname meaning "good servant".
GOODFELLOW English
Generally explained as a nickname meaning 'good fellow' or 'good companion'.
GOODFRIEND English
Nickname for a reliable friend or neighbor, from Middle English gode meaning "good", and frend meaning "friend". It is an English translation and cognate of German Gutfreund, from Middle High German guot meaning "good" and vriunt meaning "friend".