Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BROWNING English
English: from the Middle English and Old English personal name Bruning, originally a patronymic from the byname Brun (see Brown).
BROWNLEE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BROWNLEY English, Scottish
Variant spelling of "Brownlee". Brown field in Old English.
BRUBAKER American
American form of Brubacher
BRUCKER English
Variant spelling of BROOKER.
BRUCKMAN German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUGGER German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
BRUMBY Australian (Rare), English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr ‘well’ + býr ‘farmstead’, ‘village’.
BRUNEY English
First found in Languedoc, France, possibly meaning "brown."
BRUNSWICK English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUCK English
From the given name Buck.
BUCKINGHAM English
Habitational name from the former county seat of the county of Buckinghamshire, Old English Buccingahamm "water meadow (Old English hamm) of the people of (-inga-) Bucc(a)".
BUCKLAND English
Habitational name from any of the many places in southern England (including nine in Devon) named Buckland, from Old English boc "book" and land "land", i.e. land held by right of a written charter, as opposed to folcland, land held by right of custom.
BUCKMAN English
Occupational name for a goatherd (Middle English bukkeman) or scholar (Old English bucman "book man"). It could also be a shortened form of BUCKINGHAM or a variant of BUCKNAM.
BUCKS English
Variant of "Buck"; a deer.
BUCKSON English
Either a patronymic from Buck, or possibly an altered form of Buxton.
BUCKWALTER English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Buchwalder.
BUCSIS English (Canadian)
Perhaps of Hungarian origin, but the original surname is not known.
BUDD English
Originated from the Old English personal name Budda, from the word budda, which means "beetle" or "to swell." Specifically of Celtic Welsh origin.
BUDGE English
Nickname from Norman French buge "mouth" (Late Latin bucca), applied either to someone with a large or misshapen mouth or to someone who made excessive use of his mouth, i.e. a garrulous, indiscreet, or gluttonous person... [more]
BUELTER German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
BUFFORD English
Meaning unknown.
BUFORD English, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BUGG English
From the Old Norse nickname Buggi, literally "fat man", or from a medieval nickname for an eccentric or strangely behaved person (from Middle English bugge "bogeyman, scarecrow").
BUGGLY English
Variant of Bugg.
BUGGS African American (Anglicized, Modern)
I do not know much about this surname except to say that an employee at my job has Buggs as their surname.
BULLIVANT English
From a medieval nickname for a "good chap" or amiable companion (from Old French bon enfant, literally "good child").
BULSTRODE English
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
BUMPUS English
(i) from a medieval nickname for a vigorous walker (from Old French bon "good" + pas "pace"); (ii) perhaps "person who lives by a place through which travel is easy" (from Old French bon "good" + pas "passage")
BUNCH English
English: nickname for a hunchback, from Middle English bunche ‘hump’, ‘swelling’ (of unknown origin).
BUNDY English (American)
This surname is most recognizable in North America as belonging to the serial killer named Ted Bundy who committed his crimes in the 1970s.
BUNTING English, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
BUONO Italian, English
Nickname derived from Italian buono "good".
BURBAGE English
English: habitational name from places in Wiltshire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire, so named with Old English burh ‘fort’ + bæc ‘hill’, ‘ridge’ (dative bece).
BURBRIDGE English
English: perhaps a variant of Burbage, altered by folk etymology, or possibly a habitational name from a lost place so named.
BURCH English
Variant of Birch.
BURDON English
From 'bur' meaning "fort" and 'don' meaning "hill"
BURGER English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURGESS English, Scottish
Derived from the Middle English word burge(i)s or the Old French burgeis which both meant "inhabitant and (usually) freeman of a fortified town" (compare Burke).
BURK English, Irish
Variant of BURKE
BURKEN English
English variant of Birkin (see Burkins).
BURKETT English
English: from an Old English personal name, Burgheard, composed of the elements burh, burg ‘fort’ (see Burke) + heard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. ... [more]
BURKINS English
English variant of Birkin, Burkin, a habitational name from the parish of Birkin in West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bircen ‘birch grove’, a derivative of birce (see Birch).
BURKS English
English variant spelling of Birks.
BURL English
Old English occupational name originally meaning "cup bearer" or "butler" for one who dispensed wine and had charge of the cellar. Eventually the name came to mean the chief servant of a royal or noble household and was replaced by the French language inspired named 'Butler,' akin to the world "bottler".
BURLEY English
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
BURLINGTON English
Habitational name from Bridlington in East Yorkshire, from Old English Bretlintun meaning BERHTEL's town.
BURNETT English
Scottish and English: descriptive nickname from Old French burnete, a diminutive of brun "brown" (see Brown).
BURNEY English, Irish
Form of the French place name of 'Bernay' or adapted from the personal name Bjorn, ultimately meaning "bear".
BURNLEY English
English (Lancashire and Yorkshire): habitational name from Burnley in Lancashire, so named with the Old English river name Brun (from brun ‘brown’ or burna ‘stream’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
BURRIS English
Variant of English BURROWS or German BÖRRIES.
BURROUGHS English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, Old English "beorg", a cognate of Old High German berg "hill", ‘mountain’ (see Berg). This name has become confused with derivatives of Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke)... [more]
BURROW English
Used to describe someone who lives in a burrow, which makes this surname’s meaning “he whom lives in a burrow.”
BURROWS English
Variant of Burroughs. A name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, also may be a further derivation from Old English bur "bower" and hus "house".
BURT English
From the given name, which is a short form of Burton.
BUSBY English
Habitational name from a place in North Yorkshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Buschebi, from Old Norse buskr "bush, shrub" or an Old Norse personal name Buski and býr "homestead, village", or from some other place so called.
BUSFIELD English
This is a locational surname and originates from the hamlet of 'Bousfield', eight miles from the town of Appleby in Cumberland. This hamlet was controlled by Norse Vikings for several centuries until the Norman invasion of 1066... [more]
BUSHE English
Variant of Bush.
BUSSE German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BUTTER English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
BUTTERFIELD English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere ‘butter’ + feld ‘open country’.
BUTTERFLY English
From the insect Butterfly this Surname is borne by Star Butterfly from Star Vs. the forces of evil.
BUTTERWORTH English (British)
From places called Butterworth in England. Derived Old English butere ‘butter’ + worð ‘enclosure’.
BUTTERY English (British)
The baker in Old English.
BUXTON English
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
BYAM English
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
BYCRAFT English (American, Rare, ?)
Found mostly in the American Great Lakes region and Canada, likely a singular extended family. Likely of 6th century English descent, though there are very few English natives who bear the name. Name either refers to the occupation running some sort of mill machine, the original holder living near a croft (enclosed pasture or tillage) or implies "craftiness" of its original holder.
BYERS Scottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
BYRE English
Probably derived from Old English bȳre "farm, barn".
BYRON English
An English place name, earlier Byram, from byre, meaning "farm" and the suffix -ham meaning "homestead". Famously borne by the aristocratic poet, Lord Byron.
BYRUM English
Variant of Byron.
BYTHESEA English (British)
Habitational name for someone who lived near the sea, this name is nearly extinct in England today.
BYTHEWOOD English (British)
A nearly extinct habitational surname for one who lived near, by or around a wooded (forested) area.
CABELL Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
CABLE English
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
CABUCOS English
Decended from Old English meaning "leader."
CADBURY English
Derived from Norman French
CAESAR Ancient Roman, English
An Ancient Roman political title that indicated a military leader. A famous bearer was Julius Caesar, Roman general, dictator, and politician. In modern times, the surname is used to refer to an individual with a tyrannical attitude, which references the connotative meaning of the word "caesar", meaning "a dictator".
CAINE French, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someone with a bad temper.
CAKE English
From the Middle English cake denoting a flat loaf made from fine flour (Old Norse kaka), hence a metonymic occupational name for a baker who specialized in fancy breads. It was first attested as a surname in the 13th century (Norfolk, Northamptonshire).
CAL English
Possibly from the given name Cal.
CALAWAY English
Variant spelling of Callaway.
CALEB American
Caleb norwood
CALLANDER Scottish, English, Swedish (Rare)
Habitational name from various places so named in Scotland. ... [more]
CALLEN English (Rare)
From the forename Callen
CALLENDER English
Occupational name for a person who finished freshly woven cloth by passing it between heavy rollers to compress the weave. From Old Franch calandrier, calandreur.
CALLOWAY American (Modern, Rare)
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
CALWELL English
I guess a differently spelled form of CALDWELL. I don't know.... [more]
CAMM English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name for someone from Caen in Normandy, France.English: habitational name from Cam in Gloucestershire, named for the Cam river, a Celtic river name meaning ‘crooked’, ‘winding’.Scottish and Welsh: possibly a nickname from Gaelic and Welsh cam ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, ‘cross-eyed’.Americanized spelling of German Kamm.
CAMOYS English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a snub nose (from Old French camus "snub nose").
CAMPER English
Respelling of German Kamper or Kämpfer (see Kampfer). The surname Camper is recorded in England, in the London and Essex area, in the 19th century; its origin is uncertain, but it may have been taken there from continental Europe.
CAMPING English
The English form of Campana, means bells.
CANADA French, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
CANDLIN English
Derived from the medieval English, male first name Gandelyn, of unknown meaning.
CANDY English
Unexplained.There was a family of this name in Roussillon, France, descended from a partisan of James II named Kennedy, who was exiled in France in the 17th century. The family died out in France in 1868, but may have had an American branch.
CANNING English, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANT English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel", or from a medieval nickname for someone who was continually singing (in either case from Old Northern French cant "song").
CANTELLOW English
Means "person from Canteleu, Canteloup, etc.", the name of various places in northern France ("song of the wolf").
CANTERBURY English
Habitational name from Canterbury in Kent, named in Old English as Cantwaraburg "fortified town (burgh) of the people (wara) of Kent".
CANTWELL Irish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CAPEL English
From the Domesday Book of 1086, from the old French word 'capele' meaning chapel.
CAPLIN English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel" (from Old Northern French capelain, a variant of standard Old French chapelain (cf. Chaplin)).
CAPSHAW English
Unexplained. Perhaps a habitational name from Cadshaw near Blackburn, Lancashire, although the surname is not found in England.
CAPULET English
This is the last name of Juliet from William Shakepeare's tragedy, Romeo and Juliet.
CARAWAY English
Probably means "spice merchant" (from Middle English carewei "caraway").
CARBONELL English
From a medieval nickname for a dark-haired or swarthy person, from Anglo-Norman carbonel, literally "little charcoal".
CARD English
English: metonymic occupational name for someone who carded wool (i.e. disentangled it), preparatory to spinning, from Middle English, Old French card(e) ‘carder’, an implement used for this purpose... [more]
CARDWELL English
From the traditionally British surname, which is a variant of the British surname Caldwell, a from the Old English cald "cold" and well(a) "spring, stream".
CARE English
Occupational name for a locksmith, Middle English keyere, kayer, an agent derivative of keye.
CARESS English (Gallicized, Rare)
It is my Family name,
CARGILL Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
CARISBROOK English
Carisbrooke is a village on the Isle of Wight; the name is thought to mean "Carey's brook". When in 1917 the British royal family changed its name from the "House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha" to the "House of Windsor" and renounced all German titles, the title of Marquess of Carisbrooke was created for the erstwhile German Prince Alexander of Battenberg.
CARLING English (American)
Americanized form of German Garling or Gerling.
CARMACK English
Anyone with information about this last name please edit.
CARMICHAEL Scottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CARNELL English
A crossbowman or archer who protected castles and fortresses.
CARNER German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
CAROSO English (American)
Surname of Panther Caroso from the Star Fox 64 series.
CARPUS English (Rare, ?)
Possibly from the given name Carpus.
CARRAWAY English (British)
The name Carraway belongs to the early history of Britain, it's origins lie with the Anglo-Saxons. It is a product of their having lived on a road near a field or piece of land that was triangular in shape... [more]
CARRELL English
English: from Old French carrel, ‘pillow’, ‘bolster’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of these. In some cases perhaps an altered spelling of Irish Carroll. In other cases perhaps an altered spelling of French Carrel.
CARRINGTON English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
CARSTAIRS English (British)
From the manor or barony of the same name in the parish of Carstairs (= 1170 Casteltarres, 'Castle of Tarres').
CASE English
From Anglo-Norman French cas(s)e "case, container" (from Latin capsa), hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of boxes or chests.
CASH English
Variant of Case.
CASPERSON English
Means "Son of Casper".
CASSEL English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
CASSELL English
Either (i) "person from Cassel", northern France, or "person from Kassel", Germany ("fort"); or (ii) a different form of Castle ("person who lives by or lives or works in a castle"). Cassell & Company is a British publishing company, established in 1848 by John Cassell (1817-1865).
CASTON English
A habitational name from a place named Caston, which is from the unattested Old English personal name Catt or the Old Norse personal name Káti + Old English tūn meaning ‘farmstead, settlement’.
CATCHPOLE English
Meant "bailiff, especially (originally) one who could seize domestic animals in lieu of tax or debt" (from Anglo-Norman cachepol, from cacher "to chase" + pol "chicken").
CATER English
Comes from the English word "caterer".
CATES English
English patronymic from the Old Norse byname Káti (from káti ‘boy’).
CATLETT American (South)
There are several towns in the American South named Catlett.
CATT English
Variant of Cat.
CATT English
Nickname from the animal, Middle English catte "cat". The word is found in similar forms in most European languages from very early times (e.g. Gaelic cath, Slavic kotu). Domestic cats were unknown in Europe in classical times, when weasels fulfilled many of their functions, for example in hunting rodents... [more]
CATTLEY English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
CATTRALL English
This surname is of Old Scandinavian origin, is an English locational name from Catterall, near Garstang in Lancashire, which appeared as "Catrehala" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and "Caterhale" in the Book of Fees of 1212... [more]
CAVE Norman, French, English
A name of various possible origins. As a Norman French name Cave can mean "bald" from cauf or it can mean "worker in a wine cellar" or "one who dwelt in or near a cave". As an English name Cave refers to a Yorkshire river whose fast current inspired the name meaning "swift".
CAVELL English
Nickname for a bald man, from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French cauf.
CAVERLY English
English surname, a variant of the English surname Calverley, itself derived from the Old English calf "calf" and leag "field, clearing".
CAWOOD English
Traditional English habitational surname meaning "jackdaw wood" from the Old English ca referring to 'jackdaw' (a member of the crow family), and wudu 'wood'.
CAWTHORNE English
Means "person from Cawthorn or Cawthorne", both in Yorkshire ("cold thorn bush").
CENA English (American), English
Cena is a prominently used English name. It is derived from the word "see", however it rather than referring to the ability to see it, what it actually refers to is the inability to see as the other half of the name ("-na") means "naw" a synonym for "no"... [more]
CEPHAS English
Transferred use of the given name Cephas.
CEPHUS English
Possibly a variation of Cephas
CESTARE English (American, Modern)
There is a similar name, Sastre, which is the Spanish form of the surname Sarto, meaning "tailor." The name CESTARE is phonetically similar to Sastre and could be a derivative of that name.... [more]
CHADBURN English (Rare)
Form the wildcat brook
CHALAIRE American (South, Rare, ?)
Chalaire is a very rare surname, few people in the United States have the family name and might be raised in the United States. Around 99 people have been found who wears Chalaire as their family name... [more]
CHALLENGER English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a touchy or quarrelsome person (from a derivative of Middle English chalangen "to challenge"). A fictional bearer is Professor George Challenger, irascible scientist and explorer, leader of the expedition to Amazonia in Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Lost World' (1912).
CHAMPION English (Rare)
From an English and French surname.
CHAMPLIN Belgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
CHANTRY English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel" or "one who lives by a chantry chapel". A chantry was a type of chapel, one endowed for the singing of Masses for the soul of the founder (from Old French chanterie, from chanter "to sing").
CHAPEL English
English form of Chappell. Derived from the Old French word chape meaning "cape", "hooded cloak" or "hat". This surname is for a person who makes hats / capes or a wearer of hats and / or capes... [more]
CHARLES French, Welsh, English
Derived from the given name Charles.
CHARLESON English
Patronymic from the personal name Charles.
CHARLESTON English
Means "son of Charles."
CHARLTON English
An Extremely kind person
CHARNES American
History and origin unknown.
CHARNOCK English (Rare)
The locational surname originates from two places, Charnock Richard and Heath Charnock, which are both located in Lancashire, England.... [more]
CHATWIN English
Old English given name CEATTA combined with Old English (ge)wind "winding ascent".
CHAUCER English
Meaning a "worker who makes leggings or breeches". Notable bearer is author Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400), most well known for his classic 'The Canterbury Tales'.
CHAUNCEY American
Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Norman French habitation names Chancé or an American adaptation of a German place name of Schanze located on the Upper Rhine. Could also be a short form of Chancellor.
CHEDDER English (American)
this name comes from the name cheddar cheese
CHEEVER English
Means "goatherd", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a goat (e.g. in capriciousness) (in either case from Anglo-Norman chivere "goat"). It was borne by American author John Cheever (1912-1982).
CHENERY Medieval French, English (British, Anglicized, Modern)
Derived from the Old French "chesne" for oak tree, or "chesnai" for oak grove, from the medieval Latin "casnetum". As a topographical name, Cheyne denoted residence near a conspicuous oak tree, or in an oak forest.
CHERRY English
From Middle English chirie, cherye "cherry", hence a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of cherries, or possibly a nickname for someone with rosy cheeks.... [more]
CHESNEY English (?)
Came from France and has been shortened.
CHEW English
Habitational name from a place in Somerset named Chew Magna, which is named for the river on which it stands, a Celtic name, perhaps cognate with Welsh cyw ‘young animal or bird’, ‘chicken’.
CHILD English
Nickname from Middle English child meaning "child", "infant".
CHILDERS English
Probably a habitational name from some lost place named Childerhouse, from Old English cildra "child" and hus "house". This may have referred to some form of orphanage.
CHILDS English
patronymic from Child
CHILLINGWORTH English (Rare)
Notable as the surname of Hester Prynne's husband Roger Chillingworth in the 1850 novel 'The Scarlet Letter'
CHILTON English
Meaning, "A town by the River"
CHILVER English (British)
Means "ewe lamb" , (a young female sheep).
CHILVERS English
Means "son of Chilver" (probably from the Old English male personal name Cēolfrith, literally "ship-peace").
CHIPPERFIELD English
Derived from Hertfordshire Village of Chipperfield
CHIPS English (British)
Chips is a rare English (british) last name which is a nickname of Christopher and Charles
CHOATE English, Dutch
The names of Choate and Chute are believed to have been of common origin and derived from the residence of their first bearers at a place called Chute in Wiltshire, England. Certain historians, however, state that the name of Choate was of Dutch origin and was taken by its first bearers from their residence at a place of that name in the Netherlands.
CHOCK English
From English Shock or German Schöck
CHOICE English
Derived from the personal names Josse or Goce, which are derived from the Latin word "gaudere" and is a cognate in origin with the word "joy."
CHOLMONDELEY English
An aristocratic surname derived from a place name in Cheshire which means "Ceolmund's grove" in Old English.
CHOULES English (British, Rare)
The surname Choules is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a variant of Scholes, itself "a topographical name for someone who lived in a rough hut or shed", from the Northern Middle English 'scale, schole'... [more]
CHRISTENSON English
Anglicized form of Christensen
CHRISTINA English, Various
Derived from the name Christina
CHRISTMAS English
Either an occupational name for someone who was responsible for arrangement of festivities for Christmas day, or it might a nickname for someone who was born on Christmas.
CHRISWELL English
Likely originated in England. Creswell seems to be the oldest spelling then gradually giving way to Criswell and Chriswell.
CHURCHILL English
From English, meaning 'church hill'. Denoted one who lived by both a church and a hill. A famous bearer is Sir Winston Churchill, the famed Prime Minister of Britain during WW2.
CICCONE English
A diminutive of Francesco. A famous bearer is American singer Madonna Ciccone (1958-), better known as simply Madonna.
CINGESWELL English
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CINNAMOND Scottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CINWELL English
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CLAIRMONT English
Means "bright hill."
CLARENCE English
From the given name Clarence.
CLATTENBURG English (?)
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
CLAW English
The surname Claw is a very rare English surname.
CLAYBERG English
Meaning is unknown, but it most likely means "clay mountain", from surnames Clay "clay" and Berg "mountain".