Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
RALPH English
From a Middle English personal name composed of Germanic rad "counsel, advice" and wolf "wolf". This was first introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Ráðulfr, and was reinforced after the Conquest by the Norman form Ra(d)ulf... [more]
RAMBERT English
From the Old French male personal name Rainbert (see Rainbird). It was borne by Dame Marie Rambert (original name Cyvia Rabbam, later Miriam Rambach; 1888-1982), a Polish-born British ballet dancer and choreographer.
RAMSBOTTOM English (British)
A topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. It is also a habitational name from a market town with the same name, located in Greater Manchester, England.
RANDLE English
English: variant spelling of Randall or Americanized spelling of Randel.
RANDOLPH English, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
RANGER English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RANNELLS English
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Rannulf, Ranel, of continental Germanic origin.
RAPSON English
Means "son of Rab" or "son of Rap". Both Rab and Rap are diminutives of Robert.
RASBERRY English
Possibly a habitational name from Ratsbury in Lynton, Devon.
RASMUSON English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Rasmussen.
RASPBERRY English
Variant spelling of Rasberry.
RATCLIFF English
Habitational name from any of the places, in various parts of England, called Ratcliff(e), Radcliffe, Redcliff, or Radclive, all of which derive their names from Old English rēad meaning "red" + clif meaning "cliff", "slope", "riverbank".
RATHBONE English
Of unknown origin, but might denote a person with short legs. From Olde English rhath, meaning "short, and bon, "legs".
RAU English
From a medieval personal name, a variant of RALPH.
RAVENEL English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
RAVENHILL English
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
RAVENSCAR English (British)
From the name of a coastal village called Ravenscar, located in the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England.
RAVENSWOOD English (American)
Ravenswood is a gothic surname.
RAWLS English
From the Olde German and Anglo-Saxon personal name Rolf. Originally derived from the Norse-Viking pre 7th Century 'Hrolfr' meaning "Fame-Wolf".
RAYFORD American
From a Germanic personal name with the elements ric- meaning "powerful" and -frid meaning "peace".
RAYMOND English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
RAYNES English (American)
Patronymic version of many Germanic names with the first element starting with "ragin"
READE English
English variant spelling of Read.
READING English
Habitational name from the county seat of Berkshire, which gets its name from Old English Readingas ‘people of Read(a)’, a byname meaning ‘red’. Topographic name for someone who lived in a clearing, an unattested Old English ryding.
REASON English
A different form of Raison.
RED English
Variant of Read (1).
REDDEN English
Location name meaning "clearing or cleared woodland." Communities called Redden include one in Roxburghshire, Scotland and another in Somerset, England. A notable bearer is actor Billy Redden who played the dueling banjoist Lonnie in the 1972 film 'Deliverance.'
REDDICK English
Habitational name from Redwick in Gloucestershire, named in Old English with hreod "reeds" and wic "outlying settlement".
REDDING English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDDISH English
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. 'of Reddish,' a village near Stockport, Cheshire.
REDHAGE English
This surname originated in Germany
REDPATH Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Berwickshire, probably so called from Old English read ‘red’ + pæð ‘path’. This name is also common in northeastern England.
REDVERS English (British)
Variant of Revere originating in Devon.
REDWOOD English
Name possibly derived from the colour of the bark of trees or the name of the town Reedworth between Durham and Devon
REEDUS English
Reedus is of unknown English origin.
REIDHEAD English
The origins of the Reidhead surname are uncertain. In some instances, it was no doubt derived from the Old English word "read," meaning "red," and was a nickname that came to be a surname. Either way, we may conclude that it meant "red-haired" or "ruddy complexioned."
RELPH English
From the Old French male personal name Riulf, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "power-wolf" (cf. Riculf).
RENDALL Scottish, English
Variant of Randall. Habitational name from Rendall in Orkney. Possibly also an Americanization of Swedish Rendahl.
RENSHAW English, Scottish
A habitational surname from any of the so-called or like-sounding places in the United Kingdom. These include Renishaw in Derbyshire, Ramshaw in Durham, the lost Renshaw in Cheshire and Radshaw in Yorkshire... [more]
RESTON English
Location name from northern England meaning "brush wood settlement" or place where brush wood, also known as rispe, grew.
REVELL English
From a medieval nickname for someone who is full of noisy enthusiasm and energy (from Middle English revel "festivity, tumult").
REVELS American
from the surname Revel, a variant of Revell, a Middle English and Old French name referring to festivity
REVERE English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
REX English, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
REXFORD American
American form of German 'Rexforth' thought to mean "kings crossing".
REYNOLD English
From the given name Reynold
RHINE German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RHODE American
Comes from the state 'Rhode Island' in America
RIAL English
Variant of Royle.
RIBCHESTER English
This name originates from the small village in Lancashire that shares the same name. Interestingly, most people with the name 'Ribchester' are in Lancashire, but a lot are also found in Newcastle Upon Tyne.
RICHE English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RICHERS English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
RICHIE English (Rare), Italian
Diminutive form of Richard. It could also have been a nickname for one who was rich or wealthy, or, in Italy, a variant of Ricci. Famous bearers include American musician Lionel Richie (1949-).
RICHMOND English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places so named, in northern France as well as in England. These are named with the Old French elements riche "rich, splendid" and mont "hill"... [more]
RICKMAN English
Means "son of Rick". A famous bearer was American Alan Rickman (1946-2016).
RIDDELL Scottish, English
From a Norman personal name, Ridel. Reaney explains this as a nickname from Old French ridel ‘small hill’ (a diminutive of ride ‘fold’, of Germanic origin), but a more probable source is a Germanic personal name derived from the element rīd ‘ride’.
RIDEOUT English
Means "outrider (a municipal or monastic official in the Middle Ages whose job was to ride around the country collecting dues and supervising manors)".
RIDGEWAY English
Comes from Middle English 'riggewey', hence a topographic name for someone who lived by such a route or a habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Cheshire, Derbyshire, Dorset, and Staffordshire.
RIDGWAY English
Variant spelling of Ridgeway.
RIDOUT English
A variant of the other surname Rideout.
RIGHT English
Variant spelling of Wright.
RINGER English
Derived from the occupation of "ringer" as in a bell ringer or a person who makes rings.
RIPPER English
Means "maker, seller or carrier of baskets" (from a derivative of Middle English rip "basket").
RITCH English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGS French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RITTMAN German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
RIVET French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
RIVETT English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
RO English
Possibly a variant of Rowe.
ROBBS English
This possibly means "Son of Rob(ert)".
ROBERTSSEN English
English variant of Robertsson.
ROBESON English
This is possibly a variant of Robson.
ROBEY English
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
ROBIN Scottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROBINS English
Southern English patronymic from the personal name Robin.
ROBY English
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
ROCHESTER English
Means "person from Rochester", Kent (probably "Roman town or fort called Rovi"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mr Rochester, the Byronic hero of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
ROCK English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a notable crag or outcrop, from Middle English rokke "rock" (see Roach), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Rock in Northumberland.
ROCKFORD English
An altered spelling of English Rochford; alternatively it may be an Americanized form of French Rochefort or Italian Roccaforte.
ROCKWELL English
Means "person from Rockwell", Buckinghamshire and Somerset (respectively "wood frequented by rooks" and "well frequented by rooks"). Famous bearers include American illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) and Utah pioneer Porter Rockwell (1813-1878).
RODHAM English
From Roddam in Northumberland. The name is thought to have derived from Germanic *rodum, meaning 'forest clearing'.
RODMAN English
The surname Rodman is an ancient English surname, derived from a trade name, "men who were by the tenure or customs of their lands to ride with or for the lord of the manor about his business". The most famous bearer of this name is the basketball player Dennis Rodman.
RODWELL English
Rodwell, a name of Anglo-Saxon origin, is a locational surname deriving from any one of various places in Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, and Kent, England. In English, the meaning of the name Rodwell is "Lives by the spring near the road".
ROE English
Nickname for a timid person, derived from the Middle English ro meaning "roe"; also a midland and southern form of Ray.
ROEL English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
ROFFEY English
There are two small villages named "Roffey". One in England, near Horsham, and one in France, Burgundy. The name is of Norman orgin. First mentioned in (surviving English documents) in 1307 when a George Roffey buys a house... [more]
ROGER Scottish, English, North German, French, Catalan
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hrōd "renown" and gār, gēr "spear, lance", which was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Rog(i)er... [more]
ROHRLACH German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
ROLF English
From the Middle English personal name Rolf, composed of the Germanic elements hrōd "renown" and wulf "wolf". This name was especially popular among Nordic peoples in the contracted form Hrólfr, and seems to have reached England by two separate channels; partly through its use among pre-Conquest Scandinavian settlers, partly through its popularity among the Normans, who, however, generally used the form Rou(l) (see Rollo).
ROLFE English
Variant of Rolf.
ROLL Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
ROLLE English
Variant of Roll.
ROLLIN English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
ROLLS English
Possibly derived from the Latin word rotus, meaning "wheel". It would indicate one who built wheels as a living. A famous bearer was American inventor and entrepreneur Charles Rolls (1877-1910), founder of the Rolls-Royce Ltd along with Henry Royce (1863-1933).
ROLSTON English
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Rowlston in Lincolnshire, Rolleston in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, and Staffordshire, or Rowlstone in Herefordshire, near the Welsh border... [more]
ROMAN Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belorussian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROMINE English, Dutch
From Rome
ROMNEY English
English: habitational name from a place in Kent, so called from an obscure first element, rumen, + Old English ea ‘river’ (see Rye).
ROMP English, German
Likely a variant of Rump.
RONSON English
Means "son of RON"
ROOK English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rook (e.g. in having black hair or a harsh voice).
ROOME English
Variant of Rome.
ROOT English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
ROPER English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of rope, from an agent derivative of Old English rāp ‘rope’. See also ROOP.
ROSELAND English
Americanized form of Norwegian Røys(e)land; a habitational name from about 30 farmsteads, many in Agder, named from Old Norse reysi ‘heap of stones’ + land ‘land’, ‘farmstead’.
ROSEMAN English
From the Norman feminine name Rosamund.
ROSEVEAR Cornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
ROSEWOOD English
Denoting someone who came from a rose wood or grove.
ROSSEAU French, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
ROSSIE English
Possibly a variant of Rossi.
ROTHWELL English
An English surname meaning 'Lives by the red spring"
ROUBICHOU English
Diminutive of Robert.
ROUGH English
A topographic name referring to a dwelling with uncultivated ground, ultimately deriving from Olde English ruh meaning "rough".
ROUSE English
nickname for a person with red hair, from Middle English, Old French rous ‘red(-haired)’
ROVER English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
ROWELL English
From a diminutive of Rowland or Rolf or a location name meaning "rough hill".
ROWETT English
English from a medieval personal name composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wald ‘rule’, which was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the form Róaldr, and again later by the Normans in the form Rohald or Roald... [more]
ROWLEY English
Anglo Saxon Name- locational, comes from several places in England such as in Devonshire, Yorkshire, County Durham and Staffordshire. It means ' rough wood or clearing', from the Old English 'run' meaning rough and 'leah', meaning clearing in a wood.
ROWLING English
From diminutives for the given names Rollo or Rolf. Famous bearer is the author of the Harry Potter series, J. K. Rowling whose initials stand for Joanne Kathleen.
ROWSON English (British, Anglicized)
The ancestors of the Rowson family first reached the shores of England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Their name is derived from the Norman given name Ralph. This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol.... [more]
ROYAL English
From the given name Royal.
RUDD English
A famous bearer is political activist Mark Rudd.
RUFF English
Variant of Rolf.
RUFFIN English
From the medieval French male personal name Ruffin, from Latin Rūfīnus, a derivative of Rūfus (literally "red-haired one"). A known bearer of the surname is US soul singer Jimmy Ruffin (1939-).
RUGBY English
From Rugby, Warwickshire. Originally named *Rocheberie, from Old English *Hrocaburg, 'Hroca's fort', the name was altered due to influence fort Danish settlers, with the second element being replaced with Old Norse byr, 'farm'.... [more]
RULE Scottish, English
Scottish name from the lands of Rule in the parish of Hobkirk, Roxburghshire. The derivation is from the River Rule which flows through the area, and is so called from the ancient Welsh word "rhull" meaning "hasty or rushing".... [more]
RUMBELOW English
Means "person from Rumbelow", the name of various locations in England ("three mounds").
RUMNEY English
Variant of Romney.
RUMPOLE English
A different form of Rumbold (from the Norman personal name Rumbald, of Germanic origin and probably meaning literally "fame-bold"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Horace Rumpole, the eccentric QC created by John Mortimer (originally for a 1975 television play).
RUNCIE English, Scottish
Derived from Latin runcinus, and related to the Old French "roncin", for a horse of little value. Middle English, Rouncy, as in Chaucer's Cantebury Tales.... [more]
RUSBY Scottish, English
Alternative spelling of Busby, a parish in Renfrewshire. A name well represented in the Penistone, and Cawthorne districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire.
RUTH English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
RUTLEDGE English, Scottish
Origin unknown
RUTT English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
RUTTER English
Either (i) "player of the rote (a medieval stringed instrument played by plucking)"; or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a dishonest or untrustworthy person (from Old French routier "robber, mugger")... [more]
RYALL English
From any of several places in England named from Old English ryge "rye" + hyll "hill".
RYALS English
English occupational surname.
RYCROFT English
Derived from Rycroft, in the parish of Birstall, Yorkshire
RYDELL Swedish, English
Swedish: ornamental name composed of the place name element ryd ‘woodland clearing’ + the common suffix -ell, from the Latin adjectival ending -elius.... [more]
RYERSON English (American)
Americanized spelling of Swedish Reierson or of any of its cognates, for example Dutch Ryerse, Ryersen or Norwegian and Danish Reiersen.
RYLE English
Habitational name from Royle in Lancashire (see Royle).
RYSER English
Variant of Reiser based on the English word riser.
SAFFEELS English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).
SAGE English (Modern)
From the English word sage (see Sage).
SAILER English
Variant spelling of Saylor.
SAILOR English
Variant of SAYLOR.
SAINT English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
SALE English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SALISBURY English
Habitational name from the city in Wiltshire, the Roman name of which was Sorviodunum (of British origin). In the Old English period the second element (from Celtic dun ‘fortress’) was dropped and Sorvio- (of unexplained meaning) became Searo- in Old English as the result of folk etymological association with Old English searu ‘armor’; to this an explanatory burh ‘fortress’, ‘manor’, ‘town’ was added... [more]
SALLOW English (Rare)
Sallow comes from the medieval word for willow tree. It is a location surname.
SALT Anglo-Saxon, English
Of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the town in Staffordshire.
SALTHOUSE English
"Salthouse" and other variants come from the place name in Northumberland.
SALTMARSH English
Last name of cricket player Ian Saltmarsh (1901-1970).
SAMWAYS English
From a medieval nickname for a fool (from Middle English samwis "foolish", literally "half-wise").
SAND English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived on patch of sandy soil, from the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish or Jewish name it was often purely ornamental.
SANDEMAN English
Scottish surname of famous merchant family engaged in banking in Scotland and London and in the Port Wine trade in London. The same family were earlier the founders of an obscure Protestant sect the Sandemanians.
SANDLER English
Norman origin. Habitational name from Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët in La Manche, which gets its name from the dedication of its church to St. Hilary, or alternatively from either of the places, in La Manche and Somme, called Saint-Lô... [more]
SANDWELL English
From a place called SANDWELL.
SANGUINEM American
Means "blood" in Latin.
SANGWIN English
From Middle English sanguine (blood) ,one of the four humours.
SANKEY English, Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, which derived from the name of an ancient British river, perhaps meaning "sacred, holy." ... [more]
SAPPINGFIELD American (Anglicized, Rare)
From the German name "Sappenfeld," a small town in Bavaria, Germany. (Pop. 380.) The town itself is named after an early resident named "Sappo;" in English, the name means "Sappo's Field." The name "Sappo" may mean noble (unconfirmed)... [more]
SARD English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
SARRÉ English
“apologetic”
SARVER English, Jewish
English and Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic) occupational name from Old French serveur (an agent derivative of server ‘to serve’), Yiddish sarver ‘servant’.
SATTERTHWAITE English
From a place in England named with Old English sætr "shielding" and Old Norse þveit "pasture".
SAVELL English
English variant of Saville.
SAVILLE English
A habitational name from an uncertain place in Northern France. This is most likely Sainville, named from Old French saisne, 'Saxon' and ville, indicating a settlement.
SAWTELL English (British)
A dialectal variant of Sewell, which was first recorded in early 13th-century England. The later addition of the 't' was for easier pronunciation.... [more]
SAX English, Norwegian
English from an Old Norse personal name, Saxi meaning ‘sword’.
SAXBY English (British)
Saxby is the surname of the character Stella Saxby from the book Awful Auntie, by David Walliams. Saxby means "Grand" .
SAXTON English
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, possibly also one in Cambridgeshire, both so named from Old English Seaxe "Saxons" and tūn "enclosure, settlement".
SAYWARD English (Rare)
English surname which was a variant of Seward.
SCAGGS English
Variant of Skaggs both of English origin and unknown meaning. Famous bearer is singer Boz Scaggs (1944-) of the Steve Miller Band and the band Toto.
SCARBOROUGH English
Habitational name from Scarborough on the coast of North Yorkshire, so named from the Old Norse byname Skarði + Old Norse borg "fortress", "fortified town".
SCHADE German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
SCHRAM German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
SCOGINGS English, Old Danish
A surname of Scandinavian origin from the old Norse and old Danish by-name "Skeggi" or "skoggi", meaning 'the bearded one'. Common in areas invaded and settled by Scandinavians in the 8th and 9th Centuries.
SCOTFORD English
Derived from Scotforth, the name of a village near Lancaster (in Lancashire) in England. The village's name means "ford of the Scot(s)" and is derived from Old English Scott "Scot" combined with Old English ford "ford".
SCOTLAND English
(i) "person from Scotland"; (ii) "person from Scotland or Scotlandwell", Perth and Kinross; (iii) from the Norman personal name Escotland, literally "territory of the Scots"
SEAGER English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name Segar, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]
SEAGLE English (American)
Americanized form of Jewish Segal or German Siegel.
SEAGRAVE English
Habitational name from a place in Leicestershire, recorded in Domesday Book as Satgrave and Setgrave; probably named from Old English (ge)set meaning "fold", "pen" (or sēað meaning "pit", "pool") + grāf meaning "grove" or græf meaning "ditch".
SEAN English
The stage Surname of English singer Jay Sean (born Kamaljit Singh Jhooti)
SEARS English
Version of Sayer. Used in the United States. Famous bearer of the name is Richard Warren Sears, one of the founders of Sears, Roebuck and Co.
SEASON English
Likely a corruption of the surname Searson, meaning "son of Saer".