Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HERRINGTON English
habitational name from Herrington in County Durham, England
HESTER English
This surname is derived from a given name, which is the Latin form of Esther.
HESTITONA Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HEYER English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HIBBARD English
English: variant of Hilbert.
HIBBERTS English
A variant of Hibbert, ultimately coming from Hilbert to begin with.
HIBBS English
This possibly derived from a medieval diminutive, similar to Hobbs for Robert.
HICK English
From the medieval personal name HICKE. The substitution of H- as the initial resulted from the inability of the English to cope with the velar Norman R-.
HIDDLESTON English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
HIELD English (British)
Olde English pre 7th Century. Topographical name meaning slope.
HIGGINBOTHAM English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire now known as Oakenbottom. The history of the place name is somewhat confused, but it is probably composed of the Old English elements ǣcen or ācen "oaken" and botme "broad valley"... [more]
HIGGINS English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of Hick.
HIGGINSON English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of Hick.
HIGHLAND English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HIGHLANDER English
Name given to a person who lived in the high lands of England.
HILBERT English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HILDERSLEY English
Meadow of the hilldweller.
HILLIARD English
English: from the Norman female personal name Hildiarde, Hildegard, composed of the Germanic elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + gard ‘fortress’, ‘stronghold’. The surname has been in Ireland since the 17th century.
HILLS English
Variant of Hill.
HINCKLEY English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
HIND English, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
HINDLEY English
English (Lancashire): habitational name from a place near Manchester, so named from Old English hind ‘female deer’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
HINGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINGESTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINGSTON English
The distribution of the Hingston surname appears to be based around the South Hams area of Devon. The English Place Name Society volumes for Devon give the best indication of the source of the name... [more]
HINKLE American
Americanized spelling of Dutch and German Hinkel. Variant spelling of English Hinckley.
HINTON English (Archaic)
Comes from Old English heah meaning "high" and tun meaning "enclosure" or "settlement." A notable person with the surname is female author S.E Hinton.
HINXSTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINXTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HIPKIN English
English name meaning relative of Herbert
HISAW English
Of uncertain origin and meaning.
HISCOCK English
From a pet form of HICK.
HITCHINS English
Comes from the town Hitchin
HOAGLAND American
American form of Scandinavian topographical surnames, such as Swedish Högland or Norwegian Haugland, both essentially meaning "high land".
HOAR English
Nickname meaning gray haired.
HOCKENHULL English
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of Tarvin, Cheshire West and Chester.
HODGE English
From the given name Hodge, a medieval diminutive of Roger.
HODGE English
Nickname from Middle English hodge "hog", which occurs as a dialect variant of hogge, for example in Cheshire place names.
HODGSON English (British)
English patronymic form of the personal name Hodge, a pet form of Rodger. The surname in most cases originated in the North Yorskire Dales, where it is still common to the present day.
HODSEN English
Variant of Hodson.
HOERMAN English, German
Variant of Herman. Variant of Hörmann.
HOGG English
An occupational name for someone who herded swine.
HOIT English
A variant of Hoyt.
HOLBROOK English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLCOMB English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Greater Manchester, Oxfordshire, and Somerset, so named from Old English hol meaning "hollow", "sunken", "deep" + cumb meaning "valley".
HOLE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a depression or low-lying spot, from Old English holh "hole, hollow, depression".
HOLIDAY English
Variation of Holladay.
HOLL German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLADAY English
English: from Old English haligdæg ‘holy day’, ‘religious festival’. The reasons why this word should have become a surname are not clear; probably it was used as a byname for one born on a religious festival day.
HOLLANDER German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOLLEY English
English (chiefly Yorkshire) topographic name from Middle English holing, holi(e) ‘holly tree’. Compare Hollen.
HOLLIER English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOLLIMAN English
Possibly means "holly man"
HOLLING English
Location name for someone who lived near holly trees.
HOLLINGSHEAD English
Habitational name from a lost place in County Durham called Hollingside or Holmside, from Old English hole(g)n "holly" and sīde "hillside, slope"; there is a Hollingside Lane on the southern outskirts of Durham city... [more]
HOLLIS English
Topographic name for someone who lived where holly trees grew.
HOLLISTER English
English: occupational name for a brothelkeeper; originally a feminine form of Hollier.
HOLLOMAN English (British)
Nickname, perhaps ironic, from Middle English holy ‘holy’ + man ‘man’.
HOLLOWAY Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
HOLM Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from Old Norse holmr, meaning "islet".
HOLTER English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
HOLWELL English
Originating from "Haligwiella", this surname means "Lives by the Holy Spring"
HOME English, Scottish
English and Scottish variant spelling of Holme.
HONEYBALL English
From Honeyball, a medieval personal name of uncertain origin: perhaps an alteration of Annabel, or alternatively from a Germanic compound name meaning literally "bear-cub brave" (i.e. deriving from the elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and bald "bold, brave").
HOOD English, Scottish, Irish
English and Scottish: metonymic occupational name for a maker of hoods or a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive hood, from Middle English hod(de), hood, hud ‘hood’. Some early examples with prepositions seem to be topographic names, referring to a place where there was a hood-shaped hill or a natural shelter or overhang, providing protection from the elements... [more]
HOOK English
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "at the hook," from residence in the bend or sudden turn of a lane or valley.
HOOKHAM English
This surname may derive from Old English hóc meaning "hook, angle" and hám meaning "village, hamlet, dwelling."
HORNBY English
A habitational name from locations called Hornby in northern England, though predominantly associated with Lancashire. Derived from the Norse horni meaning "horn" and býr meaning "farm" or "settlement".
HORNSBY English
A habitational name from Cumbria, derived from the Norse Ormr meaning "serpent" and býr meaning "farm". Similar in form to Hornby, Hornsby is a widespread surname in northern England.
HORVITZ English (American)
Surname of Richard Steven Horvitz, a voice actor in Angry Beavers, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, and Invader Zim.
HOSEASON English
Means "son of Hosea", a personal name that was originally probably Osie, a pet-form of Oswald, but came to be associated with the biblical personal name Hosea.
HOSKIN English
From the Middle English personal name OSEKIN.
HOSKINS English
Patronymic form of HOSKIN.
HOSKINSON English
Patronymic form of HOSKIN.
HOSMER English
From the Old English name Osmaer, a combination of the Old English elements oss, meaning "god", and maer, meaning "fame".
HOTALING English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Hoogteijling, an indirect occupational name for a productive farmer, from hoogh ‘high’ + teling ‘cultivation’, ‘breeding’.
HOTCHKISS English
Patronymic from Hodgkin, a pet form of Hodge.
HOUGH English
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cheshire and Derbyshire, so named from Old English hoh ‘spur of a hill’ (literally ‘heel’). This widespread surname is especially common in Lancashire... [more]
HOUGHTON English
English habitational name from any of the various places so called. The majority, with examples in at least fourteen counties, get the name from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ (literally ‘heel’) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
HOUSER English
Variant of HOUSE.
HOWDYSHELL American, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
HOY English
Metonymic occupational name for a sailor, from Middle Dutch hoey "cargo ship".
HOYT English
Generally a topographical name for someone who lived on a hill or other high ground. As such Hoyt is related to words such as heights or high. Hoyt is also possibly a nickname for a tall, thin person where the original meaning is said to be "long stick".
HUBBLE English
From the Norman personal name Hubald, composed of the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind, spirit" and bald "bold, brave".
HUBERT German, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
From a Germanic given name composed of the elements hug "heart", "mind", "spirit" and berht "bright", "famous".
HUCK English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Ūhtrǣd, literally "dawn-power".
HUCKABY English
Means "person from Huccaby", Devon (perhaps "crooked river-bend"), or "person from Uckerby", Yorkshire ("Úkyrri's or Útkári's farmstead").
HUCKLE English
English surname
HUDDLESTUN English
Variant spelling of Huddleston.
HUFFINGTON English
Means "Uffa's town". A famous bearer is Arianna Huffington, born Αριάδνη-Άννα Στασινοπούλου
HUMBLE English
Nickname for a meek or lowly person, from Middle English, Old French (h)umble (Latin humilis "lowly", a derivative of humus "ground").
HUMPHERY English, Irish
English and Irish: variant of Humphrey.
HUMPHREYS Welsh, English
Patronymic form of Humphrey. A famous bearer was Murray Humphreys (1899-1965), an American mobster of Welsh descent.
HUMPHRIES English, Welsh
Patronymic from Humphrey.
HUNGATE English
A habitational name from Old English hund,'hound', and Old Norse gata, 'gate'.
HUNTINGTON English
English: habitational name from any of several places so called, named with the genitive plural huntena of Old English hunta ‘hunter’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’ or dun ‘hill’ (the forms in -ton and -don having become inextricably confused)... [more]
HURD English
Variant of Heard.
HURLEY English, Irish
Meaning is "from a corner clearing" in Old English. Also an anglicized form of an Irish name meaning "sea tide" or "sea valor".
HURRELL English, Norman
English (of Norman origin) from a derivative of Old French hurer ‘to bristle or ruffle’, ‘to stand on end’ (see Huron).
HURRY English
From a Norman form of the Middle English personal name Wol(f)rich (with the addition of an inorganic initial H-).
HUSHOUR English
English. Maybe means tailor or carpenter
HUSSEY English, Irish
As an English surname, it comes from two distinct sources. It is either of Norman origin, derived from Houssaye, the name of an area in Seine-Maritime which ultimately derives from Old French hous "holly"; or it is from a Middle English nickname given to a woman who was the mistress of a household, from an alteration of husewif "housewife"... [more]
HUTCH English
From the medieval personal name Huche, a pet form of Hugh.
HUTCHINS English
Southern English patronymic from the medieval personal name Hutchin, a pet form of Hugh.
HUTCHINSON English
Means "son of HUTCHIN".
HUTTON English, Scottish
Scottish and northern English habitational name from any of the numerous places so called from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
HUXFORD English
Habitational name from a place in Devon called Huxford (preserved in the name of Huxford Farm), from the Old English personal name Hōcc or the Old English word hōc ‘hook or angle of land’ + ford ‘ford’.
HYATT English
English (mainly London and Surrey): possibly a topographic name from Middle English hegh, hie ‘high’ + yate ‘gate’. ... [more]
HYDE English
Topographic name for someone living on (and farming) a hide of land, Old English hī(gi)d. This was a variable measure of land, differing from place to place and time to time, and seems from the etymology to have been originally fixed as the amount necessary to support one (extended) family (Old English hīgan, hīwan "household")... [more]
HYLAN Scottish, English
Variation of the surname Hyland.
HYMEL American
Possibly an altered form of HUMMEL.
HYNDESTAN Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTANE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
ICKES German, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
IDDENDEN English (Rare)
Iden as a village name is to be found in both the counties of Kent and Sussex, and describes a pasture, or strictly speaking an area within a marsh suitable for pasture. The origination is the pre 6th century phrase ig-denn with ig meaning an island... [more]
IDDON English
From the Old Norse female personal name Idunn, literally probably "perform love" (cf. Idony).
IDEN English
Habitational name from a place called Iden Green in Benenden, Kent, or Iden Manor in Staplehurst, Kent, or from Iden in East Sussex. All these places are named in Old English as meaning "pasture by the yew trees", from ig meaning "yew" + denn meaning "pasture".
ILES English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
IMPEY English
From Impey, the name of various places in England, derived from Old English *imphaga, *imphæg "sapling enclosure". Alternatively it could have indicated a person who lived near an enclosure of young trees.
INCHBALD English
From the medieval male personal name Ingebald, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin and meaning literally "brave Ingel" (Ingel was a different form of Engel - a shortened form of various Germanic compound personal names (e.g. Engelbert and Engelhard) that begin with Engel-; the two main sources of that were Angel "Angle" (the name of the Germanic people) and Ingal, an extended form of Ing (the name of a Germanic god)).
IND English (?)
Meaning deweller at the end of a villiage (Gypsy)
INGALLS English, Scandinavian (Anglicized)
Patronymic from the Anglo-Scandinavian personal name Ingell, Old Norse Ingjaldr.... [more]
INGLE English
Derived from the Old Norse given names INGIALDR or INGÓLF.
INGOLD English
Derived from the given names Ingell (see INGLE), INGJALDR or INGWALD.
INGOLDSBY English
Habitational name from Ingoldsby in Lincolnshire, named from the Old Norse personal name Ingjaldr + bý meaning "farmstead", "settlement".
INMAN English (British)
Anglo-Saxon in Origin. Occupational surname given to a person who "tended a lodge or an inn". Surname first found in Lancashire, England.
IOANE English (New Zealand), English (Australian), American, Samoan, Polynesian, Romanian
May come from the given name John or variants of this name, such as Ion.
IRELAND English, Scottish
Ethnic name for someone from Ireland, Old English Iraland. The country gets its name from the genitive case of Old English Iras "Irishmen" and land "land". The stem Ir- is taken from the Celtic name for Ireland, Èriu, earlier Everiu... [more]
IRETON English
Habitational name from either of two places in Derbyshire called Ireton, or one in North Yorkshire called Irton. All of these are named from the genitive case of Old Norse Íri ‘Irishmen’ (see Ireland) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.... [more]
IRISH English
Derived from Ireland
IRONS English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from Airaines in Somme, so named from Latin harenas (accusative case) ‘sands’. The form of the name has been altered as a result of folk etymology, an association of the name with the metal... [more]
ISAAC Jewish, English, Welsh, French
Derived from the given name Isaac.
ISHAM English
The name of a village in Northamptonshire, England from the Celtic name of a local river Ise and the Anglo-Saxon term for a small settlement or homestead -ham.
ISLEY English
Of Old English origin, derived from a place named Hesli, meaning "a hazel wood or grove".
ISOM English
Variant of Isham.
ISSAC English, Spanish
From the given name Issac.
IVANS English
Meaning "son of Ivan
IVES English
Means "son of Ive", a medieval male personal name, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin, a shortened form of any of a range of compound names beginning with īv "yew" (cf... [more]
IVEY Anglo-Saxon, English
Anglo-Saxon: Ivey is a variant of the Anglo-Saxon baptismal name Ive. It is the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of "Son of Ive".... [more]
IVORY English
Habitational name from Ivry-la-Bataille in Eure, northern France.
IVSEN English (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of IBSEN or IVERSEN.
IYKOFOS American
A surname means "Twilight" in Greek.
JACE English (Rare)
Derived from the given name Jace
JACEY American
Derrived from the given name Jacey
JACKS English
Possibly derived as a diminutive of the given name Jack. A famous bearer is Canadian singer-songwriter Terry Jacks, best known for his 1974 single 'Seasons in the Sun.'
JACOBI Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOWAY English (American)
Altered form of the personal name Jacques.
JAGGER English
English (West Yorkshire): occupational name from Middle English jagger ‘carter’, ‘peddler’, an agent derivative of Middle English jag ‘pack’, ‘load’ (of unknown origin). ... [more]
JAKESON English
It means "son of Jake"
JANISON American (Modern, Rare)
Means son of Jane. Extremely rare surname.
JASMINE English, Japanese
means a fragrant shrub or flower used as perfume
JASON English
Probably a patronymic from James or any of various other personal names beginning with J-.
JAY English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
JAYE English
Variant of Jay.
JEFFERIES English
Derived from the given name Jeffrey.
JEFFREY English
From a Norman personal name that appears in Middle English as Geffrey and in Old French as Je(u)froi. Some authorities regard this as no more than a palatalized form of Godfrey, but early forms such as Galfridus and Gaufridus point to a first element from Germanic gala "to sing" or gawi "region, territory"... [more]
JEFSON English
"Son of Jef".
JENCKES English
"Back-formation" of Jenkin, a medieval diminutive of John.
JENNER English
Occupational name for an engineer.
JENNESS English
English surname, a patronymic from the Middle English personal name Jan.
JEPSEN English
Variant of Jepson.
JEREMY English
From the given name Jeremy.
JESSEL English
From a pet-form of Jessop (a medieval male personal name - a different form of Joseph). A literary bearer is Miss Jessel, the governess who has charge of the two troubled and enigmatic children in Henry James's ghost story 'The Turn of the Screw' (1898).
JESSIE English
Possibly a variant of Jessey, an occupational name for someone making jesses (a short strap fastened around the leg of a bird used in falconry).
JESSUP English
From the given name Joseph.
JETSON English
A patronymic from the personal name Jutt, a pet form of Jordan. Compare Judson.
JEW English
Ethnic name for a Jew, from Middle English jeu meaning "Jew" from Old French giu.
JEWETT English
A mainly Northern English surname, derived from a pet form of Julian.
JEWITT English
Variant of Jewett.
JIMERSON English (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English Jameson, based on a pet form of the personal name.
JOB English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JOCELYN English
Another of the names brought to England in the eleventh century by the Normans, and mentioned in the Domesday Book. Originally a masculine name only.
JOELSON English
Means "son of Joel".
JOHN English
From the given name John. A famous bearer is Elton John.
JOLIE English
From the given name Jolie meaning pretty.
JONSON English
Variant of Johnson and English form of Johnsson
JORDISON English
Possibly meaning son of Jordan. This name is surname of American drummer Joey Jordison.
JORGENSON German, English
Respelling of Jørgensen or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOSEPHSEN English
Variant of Josephson meaning "Son of Joseph."
JOURDINE French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JOWETT English
From the medieval male personal name Jowet or the female personal name Jowette, both literally "little Jowe", a pet-form of Julian. This was borne was British theologian and classical scholar Benjamin Jowett (1817-1893).
JUDKINS English
Means "decsendent of JUD".
JULES English
Patronymic or metronymic from a short form of Julian.
JUSTICE English
Simply form the abstract noun "Justice"
JUSTIN French, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin Justinus, a derivative of Justus.
KAIGLER English (American)
Americanized spelling of Kegler.
KAINE English
Variant of Caine.
KAPITY English
Meaning unknown.
KARP English
From the given name Karp.
KAYE English
From the first name Kaye.
KEATE English
Variant of KEAT.
KEATON English
Variant of Keeton.
KEEL English
English habitational name from Keele in Staffordshire, named from Old English cy ‘cows’ + hyll ‘hill’, or from East and West Keal in Lincolnshire, which are named from Old Norse kjolr ‘ridge’... [more]
KEELER English
English: occupational name for a boatman or boatbuilder, from an agent derivative of Middle English kele ‘ship’, ‘barge’ (from Middle Dutch kiel). Americanized spelling of German Kühler, from a variant of an old personal name (see Keeling) or a variant of Kuhl.
KEENE English
Variant of KEEN.
KEENER English
Anglicized form of Kiener or Kühner.
KEETON English
Habitational name from a place called Ketton in Durham or one in Rutland or from Keaton in Ermington, Devon. The first is named from the Old English personal name Catta or the Old Norse personal name Káti and Old English tūn "settlement"; the second is probably from an old river name or tribal name Cētan (possibly a derivative of Celtic cēd "wood") and Old English ēa "river"; and the last possibly from Cornish kee "hedge, bank" and Old English tūn.
KELHAM English
Derived from the village of Kelham, near Newark-upon-Trent, Nottingham.
KELSHAW English
Derived from the villages of North or South Kelsey in Lincolnshire.
KEMPTON English
From the name of a place in Shropshire meaning "Cempa's town" or "warrior town", from a combination of either the Old English word cempa "warrior" or the byname derived from it and tun "farmstead, settlement".
KENDREW English
Variant of Andrew, possibly influenced by McAndrew. Notable namesake is Nobel Prize winning chemist John Kendrew (1917-1997).