Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CREESE English
This most interesting surname has two possible origins. Firstly it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English "creas", Middle English "crease", meaning "fine or elegant", which was a nickname given to an elegant person or one who dressed in fine or elegant clothes... [more]
CREIG Scottish, English
Derived from Scottish Gaelic crioch "border".
CREME English
Variant spelling of CREAM.
CRENSHAW English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
CRIBBS English (Rare)
Unknown origin. Likely either from the Old English given name Crispin, which derives from a Latin nickname meaning "curly-haired", or from the place Cribbis near Lauder, England.
CRICKS American
"living near a river." Comes from a similar origin of Rios
CRISPEN English
Variant spelling of CRISPIN.
CRISPIN English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name CRISPIN.
CROAKER English
Meant "person from Crèvecoeur", the name of various places in northern France ("heartbreak", an allusion to the poverty of the local soil).
CROCK English
Meaning "barrel," signifying one who made or worked with barrels.
CROCKETT English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
CROFTER English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
CROMPTON English
Derived from the Old English word "Crometun"
CROMWELL English
Habitational name from places in Nottinghamshire and West Yorkshire named Cromwell, from Old English crumb "bent, crooked" and well(a) "spring, stream".
CROOK Scottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
CROOKS English
Patrynomic for Crook.
CROSTHWAITE English
Means the clering of the cross
CROW English
From Middle English crow, Old English crawa, applied as a nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion or for someone thought to resemble the bird in some other way.
CROWE English
Variant of CROW.
CROWLEY Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
CROWNER English
Means "coroner" (from Anglo-Norman corouner "coroner", a derivative of Old French coroune "crown").
CROWTHER English
Originally meant "person who plays the crowd (an ancient Celtic stringed instrument)". It was borne by British entertainer Leslie Crowther (1933-1996).
CROZIER English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
CRUISE English
Variant of CRUSE, which is the Americanized spelling of KRUSE.
CRUMB English
From the English word "crumb".
CRUMP English
Originally a nickname for a crippled or deformed person, from Middle English cromp, crump meaning "bent, crooked, stooping" (from Old English crumb).
CRUSOE English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
CUFF English
From the english word "cuff"
CULBERT Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULBERTSON English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
CULLIMORE English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
CULLY English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same CONNLA).
CULPEPER English
Variant of CULPEPPER. Known bearers of this surname include: Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1664), an English herbalist, physician and astrologer; and English colonial administrator Thomas Culpeper, 2nd Baron Culpeper (1635-1689), governor of Virginia 1680-1683... [more]
CULPEPPER English
Means "person who collects, prepares and/or sells herbs and spices" (from Middle English cullen "to pick" + pepper).
CULVER English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
CULVÉRT French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMBERBATCH English
Name for someone from Comberbach in North Cheshire. May come from etymological elements meaning "stream in a valley."
CUMBERLAND English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
CUMMING Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUNDALL English
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
CUNLIFFE English
Originally meant "person from Cunliffe", Lancashire ("slope with a crevice" (literally "cunt-cliff")).
CUNNINGTON English (American)
Scottish linked to {Marshall}
CURRIER English
Occupational surname meaning "a worker who prepared leather".
CURRY Scottish, English
Scottish and northern English: variant of CURRIE.
CURTIN Irish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see MCCURTAIN)... [more]
CUTHBERT English
Derived from the name CUTHBERT
CUTHBERTSON English, Scottish
Patronymic surname from the personal name CUTHBERT.
CUTLER English
Means "maker of swords & knives."
CUTTER English
This surname is derived from an occupation. 'the cutter,' i.e. cloth-cutter
CYPRESS English
Translation of German Zypress, a topographic name for someone living near a cypress tree or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a cypress, Middle High German zipres(se) (from Italian cipressa, Latin cupressus), or possibly of any of various Greek family names derived from kyparissos ‘cypress’, as for example Kyparissis, Kyparissos, Kyparissiadis, etc.
CYPRIAN English
Possibly an altered spelling of French Cyprien, from a medieval personal name, from Latin Cyprianus (originally an ethnic name for an inhabitant of Cyprus), or a shortened form of Greek Kyprianos, Kyprianis, Kyprianidis, ethnic names for an inhabitant of Cyprus (Greek Kypros), or patronymics from the personal name Kyprianos (of the same derivation)... [more]
CYRUS English
From the given name CYRUS. A notable bearer is American singer and songwriter, Miley Cyrus (1992-).
DABB English
Variant of DOBB, a pet form of ROBERT.
D'ABBADIE French, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
DAFT English
This is an English surname which was especially associated with the Midland counties of the country. It derived from the Old English word of the pre-7th century "gedaeft" meaning "meek" or "mild", and as such it was a pre-Medieval personal name of some kind of popularity.
DAGGETT English
Derived from the Old French word "Dague", meaning knife or dagger, and as such was a Norman introduction into England after the 1066 Conquest. The name is a medieval metonymic for one who habitually carried a dagger, or who was a manufacturer of such weapons.
DAINTITH English
From a medieval nickname (roughly equivalent to "precious") applied to a dearly loved person (from Middle English deinteth "pleasure, titbit", from Old French deintiet).
DAINTRY English
Means "person from Daventry", Northamptonshire ("Dafa's tree"). The place-name is traditionally pronounced "daintry".
DAINTY English
From a medieval nickname meaning "handsome, pleasant" (from Middle English deinte, from Old French deint(i)é). This was borne by Billy Dainty (1927-1986), a British comedian.
DAISY English (American)
Taken from the given name DAISY
DAKE English
The origins of the name Dake are from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from the personal name David. Daw was a common diminutive of David in the Middle Ages. The surname is a compound of daw and kin, and literally means "the kin of David."
DALLIMORE English
An English surname probably derived from the French de la mare, meaning "of the sea", though some contend that "mare" springs from the English word moor. This surname probably arose after the Norman conquest of Britain.
DALLOWAY English
Meant "person from Dallaway", West Midlands (perhaps from a Norman personal name, "person from (de) Alluyes", northern France). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Dalloway, central figure of the eponymous novel (1925) by Virginia Woolf.
DAME French, English
From the old French dame, "lady" ultimately from Latin domina, "mistress".
DAMON English, Scottish
From the personal name Damon, from a classical Greek name, a derivative of damān "to kill". Compare DAMIAN.
DAN Romanian, Vietnamese, English, Danish
Ethnic name in various European languages (including Danish and English) meaning ‘Dane’. ... [more]
DANCER English
Occupational name for someone who dances.
DANCY French, English
Denoted a person from Annecy, France.
DANFORTH English
Probably a habitational name, perhaps from Darnford in Suffolk, Great Durnford in Wiltshire, or Dernford Farm in Sawston, Cambridgeshire, all named from Old English dierne ‘hidden’ + ford ‘ford’.
DANGER English (Rare), Popular Culture
This has been seen in records of the most uncommon American surnames. It has also been used in popular culture, in the show Henry Danger. Although, it's not the character's actual last name.
DANGERFIELD English
Habitational name, with fused preposition d(e), for someone from any of the various places in northern France called Angerville, from the Old Norse personal name Ásgeirr (from áss "god" and geirr "spear") and Old French ville "settlement, village"... [more]
DANIELLE American
From the given name DANIELLE.
DANISON English
Means "Son of Dan" or a contracted form of DANIELSON.
DANSER German, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
DANVERS Irish, English
For someone from Anvers, which is the French name of a port called Antwerp, located in what is now Belgium.
D'ARCY English, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
DARCY English
Variant of D'ARCY.
DARDEN English
A habitation name in Northumberland of uncertain origin.
DARE English
This interesting surname has two possible derivations. Firstly, it may derive from the Olde English pre-7th Century personal name "Deora", Middle English "Dere", which is in part a short form of various compound names with the first element "deor", dear, and in part a byname meaning "Beloved"... [more]
DARK English
Nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion, from Middle English darke, Old English deorc "dark". In England, the surname is most frequent in the West Country.
DARLEY English
Means "person from Darley", Derbyshire ("glade frequented by deer").
DARLING Literature, English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from Middle English derling, Old English deorling ‘darling’, ‘beloved one’, a derivative of deor ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ (see DEAR)... [more]
DARLINGTON English
From Old English Dearthington believed to be the settlement of Deornoth's people (unclear root + ing a family group + ton an enclosed farm or homestead).
DAUGHTRY English, Norman
English (of Norman origin) habitational name, with fused French preposition d(e), for someone from Hauterive in Orne, France, named from Old French haute rive ‘high bank’ (Latin alta ripa).
DAVENPORT English
Habitational name from a place in Cheshire named Davenport, from the Dane river (apparently named with a Celtic cognate of Middle Welsh dafnu "to drop, to trickle") and Old English port "market town".
DAVES English
Variant of DAVIS.
DAVEY English, Welsh
Derived from the given name DAVID. Alternately, it may be a variant spelling of Welsh DAVIES or DAVIS, which could be patronymic forms of DAVID, or corrupted forms of Dyfed, an older Welsh surname and the name of a county in Wales.
DAW English, Scottish
English and Scottish from a pet form of DAVID. ... [more]
DAWKINS English, Popular Culture
English patronymic from a pet form of DAW. ... [more]
DAWLEY English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
DAWS English
"Son of David"
DAX English
Either derived from the town of Dax in France or from the Old English given name Dæcca (of unknown meaning).
DEACON English
Originally for someone who worked as a deacon or was the son of one.
DEALE English
Originated in Kent
DEAR English (Anglicized, Rare)
Possibly from a nickname meaning "dear".
DEARDEN English
Meant "person from Dearden", Lancashire ("valley frequented by wild animals"). It was borne by British film director Basil Dearden (original name Basil Dear; 1911-1971).
DEARTH English
From a medieval nickname apparently based on Middle English derth "famine".
DEARY English
Nickname for a noisy or troublesome person, from Anglo-French de(s)rei ‘noise’, ‘trouble’, ‘turbulence’ (from Old French desroi). topographic for someone who lived by a deer enclosure, from Old English deor ‘deer’ + (ge)hæg ‘enclosure’.
DE ATH English
Probably a deliberate respelling of DEATH (i), intended to distance the name from its original signification.
DEATH English
(i) "death" (perhaps from the figure of Death as personified in medieval pageants); (ii) "person who gathers or sells wood for fuel" (from Middle English dethe "fuel, tinder")
DEATHRIDGE English
Name given to someone who lived near a cemetery on a ridge.
DEBLE English
This surname is of French derivation and was introduced to Britain by the Normans. It has two possible derivations, the first from the Roman (Latin) 'debil-is', which means literally "poorly" or "weak", and may have been a metonymic for a doctor or healer, whilst the second possible origin is a nickname derivation from the old French 'Theodore' to Tibald and Tibble or Dibble, Deble.
DEE Welsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Chinese (Latinized)
Welsh: nickname for a swarthy person, from Welsh du ‘dark’, ‘black’. ... [more]
DEEN English (American)
The History of the Name Deen Derives from England, over time spelling variations have existed. The name Deen is used by mostly American English people.
DEETZ English (American)
Surname of the characters, Delia, Charles and gothic daughter, Lydia from the movie and TV series, Beetlejuice.
DE GREY English
Variant of GREY.
DE LARA English
Means "from Lara", a Spanish and French habitational name.
DELEVINGNE French, English
Means "of the vine" in French. It is the surname of Poppy Delevingne and Cara Delevingne, both English actresses and models; it is also the surname of French-born photojournalist Lionel Delevingne
DELISLE English
From De L'Isle, "of the Isle, from the Isle" in French.
DELLINO English
A made up name used for roleplay.
DEMAR French, English
Combination of the French word de, meaning "from" and the Old French word maresc, meaning "marsh".
DEMMA English
Possibly an Anglicization of the Italian surname Demma, a metronymic from the personal name EMMA.
DEMPSTER Manx, English, Scottish
The name for a judge or arbiter of minor disputes, from Old English dem(e)stre, a derivative of the verb demian ‘to judge or pronounce judgement’. Although this was originally a feminine form of the masculine demere, by the Middle English period the suffix -stre had lost its feminine force, and the term was used of both sexes... [more]
DENBY English
Means "person from Denby", Derbyshire or Yorkshire ("farmstead of the Danes").
DENHAM English
From the name of various places in England, most of which meant "farm in the valley" (from Old English denu "valley" + ham "homestead"). Notable bearers of the surname included John Denham (1615-1669), an English poet; British Labour politician John Denham (1953-); and British actor Maurice Denham (1909-2002).
DENLEY English
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place, probably so named from Old English denu 'valley' + leah 'woodland clearing'.
DENNING English
Derived from the Old English name DYNNA.
DENNINGTON English
Habitational name from a place in Suffolk, recorded in Domesday Book as Dingifetuna, from the Old English female personal name Denegifu (composed of the elements Dene meaning "Dane" + gifu meaning "gift") + Old English tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
DENSON English (Rare)
Meaning "Son of DENNIS" or "Son of DEAN"
DENTON English
"Valley Town" in Old English, where the given name DENTON comes from.
DENVER English
English surname, composed of the Old English elements Dene "Dane" and fær "passage, crossing," hence "Dane crossing."
DERADO English
We think it is Italina?
DERBYSHIRE English
Shire of Derby; one who came from Derbyshire, a county in England.
DERRICOTT English
Habitational name, possibly a variant of Darracott, from Darracott in Devon. However, the present-day concentration of the form Derricott in the West Midlands and Shropshire suggests that this may be a distinct name, from a different source, now lost.
DERRY Irish, English
English variant of DEARY, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree... [more]
DERWENT English
Originating from Derwent River in England.
DERWIN English
Variant of DARWIN.
DEVALL French, English
Devall (also DeVall) is a surname of Norman origin with both English and French ties.Its meaning is derived from French the town of Deville, Ardennes. It was first recorded in England in the Domesday Book.In France, the surname is derived from 'de Val' meaning 'of the valley.'
DEVALSON English
Meaning, "son of Deval."
DEVERAUX English, French
Variant spelling of DEVEREUX.
DEVEREAUX English
Variant form of DEVEREUX, based on the common English mis-pronunciation "Devero".
DEVON English
Regional name for someone from the county of Devon. In origin, this is from an ancient British tribal name, Latin Dumnonii, perhaps meaning "worshipers of the god Dumnonos".
DEVOY English
Anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Dubhuidhe ‘descendant of Dubhuidhe’, a name probably derived from dubh "dark, black" and buidhe "sallow".
DEWDNEY English
From the Old French personal name DIEUDONNÉ, literally "gift of God".
DIAMOND English
English variant of Dayman (see DAY). Forms with the excrescent d are not found before the 17th century; they are at least in part the result of folk etymology.
DICKENSHEETS English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Dickenscheid, a habitational name from a place named Dickenschied in the Hunsrück region. The place name is from Middle High German dicke ‘thicket’, ‘woods’ + -scheid (often schied) ‘border area’ (i.e. ridge, watershed), ‘settler’s piece of cleared (wood)land’.
DICKER English
Either an occupational name for a digger of ditches or a builder of dikes, or a topographic name for someone who lived by a ditch or dike, derived from Middle English dike or dik meaning "dyke.
DICKERMAN English, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
DICKERSON English
English (mainly East Anglia): patronymic from a pet form of Dick
DICKSON English (American)
This surname means son of Dick and son of Richard.
DILKE English
Means son of DILK.
DILL English
Nickname from Middle English dell, dill, dull "dull, foolish".
DILLION Irish, English
Possibly a variant of DILLON.
DIMOND English, Irish
English and Irish variant of DIAMOND.
DINN English
From a short form of the personal name Dinis, a variant of Dennis.
DISON English
Son of Di
DOBB English
From a nickname of Robert, a variant is Dobbs.
DOBBE English
From the medieval personal name Dobbe, one of several pet forms of ROBERT in which the initial letter was altered. Compare HOBBS.
DOBBS English
English Patronymic from an old nickname for ROBERT
DOBELL English (Australian)
Sir William. 1899–1970, Australian portrait and landscape painter. Awarded the Archibald prize (1943) for his famous painting of Joshua Smith which resulted in a heated clash between the conservatives and the moderns and led to a lawsuit.
DOBSON English, Scottish
Patronymic from the personal name DOBBE. This is also established in Ireland, notably County Leitrim.
DOBY English
From a diminutive of the given name Dob or Dobbe, itself a medieval diminutive of ROBERT (one of several rhyming nicknames of Robert in which the initial letter was altered; compare HOBBS).
DOCKER English
Docker is a locational surname from Docker, Westmoreland and Docker, Lancashire. May also refer to the occupation of dockers.
DODDS English
From dod, meaning "something rounded" in German.
DODGE English
Possibly a nickname from Middle English dogge "dog" (Old English docga, dogga).
DODGEN English
From a pet form of Dogge (see DODGE).
DODGSON English
Patronymic form of DODGE.
DODSON English (British)
Means "son of Dodd" (see DUDDA).
DOE English
An English nickname for a gentle person from the word for a female deer. Originally a female first name transferred to use as a surname. Well known in American law as a hypothetical surname for a person unnamed in legal proceedings, as in Jane Doe or John Doe.
DOGG English
From the word dog this is the stage surname of American rapper Snoop Dogg born Calvin Broadus Jr. (b. 1971)
DOLE English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
DOLL Upper German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
DOLLANGANGER English
The name of the family in the Dollanganger series by V.C. Andrews.
DOLLAR Scottish, English (American)
Scottish: habitational name from Dollar in Clackmannanshire.... [more]
DOLPHIN English, Irish
Derived from the Old Norse personal name DÓLGFINNR.
DOME English
Occupational name from the Old English root doma, dema ‘judge’, ‘arbiter’. Compare Dempster.
DONSON English
Means "son of DON
DOOLITTLE English
From a medieval nickname applied to a lazy man (from Middle English do "do" + little "little"). It was borne by the American poet Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961). A fictional bearer is Eliza Doolittle, the flower seller in Bernard Shaw's 'Pygmalion' (1913); and a variant spelling was borne by Dr Dolittle, the physician who had the ability to talk to animals, in the series of books written by Hugh Lofting from 1920.
DORMAN English
From the Old English personal name Deormann, composed of Old English deor (see Dear) + mann 'man'. This surname became established in Ireland in the 17th century; sometimes it is found as a variant of Dornan.
DORN German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
DOSSAT English, Scottish
Possibly from French origins (used predominantly in Louisiana in the United States).
DOSSETT English
Recorded in several forms including Dowsett, Dosset, and Dossit, this is an English surname. ... [more]
DOUBLEDAY English
Possibly from the nickname or byname do(u)bel meaning "the twin", or a combination of the given name Dobbel (a pet form of ROBERT) and Middle English day(e) meaning "servant".
DOUGHTY English
Doughty. This interesting surname of English origin is a nickname for a powerful or brave man, especially a champion jouster, deriving from the Middle English "doughty", Olde English pre 7th Century dohtig dyhtig meaning "valiant" or "strong"... [more]
DOW Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOWELL English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic name Dubhgall, composed of the elements dubh meaning "black" and gall, "stranger". This was used as a byname for Scandinavians, in particular to distinguish the dark-haired Danes from fair-haired Norwegians.
DOWNARD English
Downard comes from England as a diminutive of Downhead in Somerset and Donhead in Wiltshire.
DOWNS English
This surname is derived from the Old English element dun meaning "hill, mountain, moor." This denotes someone who lives in a down (in other words, a ridge of chalk hills or elevated rolling grassland).
DOWRICK English
This name is found fairy widely in Cornwall, England.
DOWSON English
Either a patronymic surname derived from the given name Dow, a medieval variant of DAW (which was a diminutive of DAVID), or else a metronymic form of the medieval feminine name Dowce, literally "sweet, pleasant", from Old French dolz, dous (cf... [more]
DRAGON French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
DRAGOO American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
DRAKEFORD English
The first element of this locational surname is probably derived from the personal name Draca or Draki (see DRAKE), while the second element is derived from Old English ford meaning "ford"... [more]
DRANSFIELD English
Means "Drains the fields".
DRAY English
From Middle English dregh, probably as a nickname from any of its several senses: "lasting", "patient", "slow", "tedious", "doughty". Alternatively, in some cases, the name may derive from Old English drýge "dry, withered", also applied as a nickname.
DRAYTON English
I had a maternal grandfather with the surname Drayton who came from Shrewsbury, Shropshire but cannot find any reference.
DRIGGERS American
Corruption of the Spanish surname RODRIGUEZ. Originated in 17th century Virginia as a former slave by that surname was integrated into free society.
DRING English
Means "young man" (from Old Norse drengr).
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