Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
 more filters...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
DEMMA English
Possibly an Anglicization of the Italian surname Demma, a metronymic from the personal name Emma.
DEMPSTER Manx, English, Scottish
The name for a judge or arbiter of minor disputes, from Old English dem(e)stre, a derivative of the verb demian ‘to judge or pronounce judgement’. Although this was originally a feminine form of the masculine demere, by the Middle English period the suffix -stre had lost its feminine force, and the term was used of both sexes... [more]
DENBY English
Means "person from Denby", Derbyshire or Yorkshire ("farmstead of the Danes").
DENHAM English
From the name of various places in England, most of which meant "farm in the valley" (from Old English denu "valley" + ham "homestead"). Notable bearers of the surname included John Denham (1615-1669), an English poet; British Labour politician John Denham (1953-); and British actor Maurice Denham (1909-2002).
DENNING English
Derived from the Old English name DYNNA.
DENNINGTON English
Habitational name from a place in Suffolk, recorded in Domesday Book as Dingifetuna, from the Old English female personal name Denegifu (composed of the elements Dene meaning "Dane" + gifu meaning "gift") + Old English tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
DENSON English (Rare)
Meaning "Son of Dennis" or "Son of Dean"
DENTON English
"Valley Town" in Old English, where the given name Denton comes from.
DENVER English
English surname, composed of the Old English elements Dene "Dane" and fær "passage, crossing," hence "Dane crossing."
DERADO English
We think it is Italina?
DERBYSHIRE English
Shire of Derby; one who came from Derbyshire, a county in England.
DERRICOTT English
Habitational name, possibly a variant of Darracott, from Darracott in Devon. However, the present-day concentration of the form Derricott in the West Midlands and Shropshire suggests that this may be a distinct name, from a different source, now lost.
DERRY Irish, English
English variant of Deary, or alternatively a nickname for a merchant or tradesman, from Anglo-French darree ‘pennyworth’, from Old French denree. ... [more]
DERWENT English
Originating from Derwent River in England.
DERWIN English
Variant of Darwin.
DEVALL French, English
Devall (also DeVall) is a surname of Norman origin with both English and French ties.Its meaning is derived from French the town of Deville, Ardennes. It was first recorded in England in the Domesday Book.In France, the surname is derived from 'de Val' meaning 'of the valley.'
DEVALSON English
Meaning, "son of Deval."
DEVON English
Regional name for someone from the county of Devon. In origin, this is from an ancient British tribal name, Latin Dumnonii, perhaps meaning "worshipers of the god Dumnonos".
DEWDNEY English
From the Old French personal name Dieudonné, literally "gift of God".
DIAMOND English
English variant of Dayman (see Day). Forms with the excrescent d are not found before the 17th century; they are at least in part the result of folk etymology.
DICKENSHEETS English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Dickenscheid, a habitational name from a place named Dickenschied in the Hunsrück region. The place name is from Middle High German dicke ‘thicket’, ‘woods’ + -scheid (often schied) ‘border area’ (i.e. ridge, watershed), ‘settler’s piece of cleared (wood)land’.
DICKERMAN English, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
DICKERSON English
English (mainly East Anglia): patronymic from a pet form of Dick
DILKE English
Means son of DILK.
DILL English
Nickname from Middle English dell, dill, dull "dull, foolish".
DILLION Irish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
DIMOND English, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
DINN English
From a short form of the personal name Dinis, a variant of Dennis.
DISON English
Son of Di
DOBB English
From a nickname of Robert, a variant is Dobbs.
DOBBE English
From the medieval personal name Dobbe, one of several pet forms of Robert in which the initial letter was altered. Compare Hobbs.
DOBBS English
English Patronymic from an old nickname for Robert
DOBELL English (Australian)
Sir William. 1899–1970, Australian portrait and landscape painter. Awarded the Archibald prize (1943) for his famous painting of Joshua Smith which resulted in a heated clash between the conservatives and the moderns and led to a lawsuit.
DOBSON English, Scottish
Patronymic from the personal name Dobbe. This is also established in Ireland, notably County Leitrim.
DOBY English
From a diminutive of the given name Dob or Dobbe, itself a medieval diminutive of Robert (one of several rhyming nicknames of Robert in which the initial letter was altered; compare Hobbs).
DOCKER English
Docker is a locational surname from Docker, Westmoreland and Docker, Lancashire. May also refer to the occupation of dockers.
DODDS English
From dod, meaning "something rounded" in German.
DODGE English
Possibly a nickname from Middle English dogge "dog" (Old English docga, dogga).
DODGEN English
From a pet form of Dogge (see Dodge).
DODGSON English
Patronymic form of Dodge.
DODSON English (British)
Means "son of Dodd" (see DUDDA).
DOE English
An English nickname for a gentle person from the word for a female deer. Originally a female first name transferred to use as a surname. Well known in American law as a hypothetical surname for a person unnamed in legal proceedings, as in Jane Doe or John Doe.
DOGG English
From the word dog this is the stage surname of American rapper Snoop Dogg born Calvin Broadus Jr. (b. 1971)
DOLE English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: from Middle English dole ‘portion of land’ (Old English dal ‘share’, ‘portion’). The term could denote land within the common field, a boundary mark, or a unit of area; so the name may be of topographic origin or a status name... [more]
DOLL South German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
DOLLANGANGER English
The name of the family in the Dollanganger series by V.C. Andrews.
DOLLAR Scottish, English (American)
Scottish: habitational name from Dollar in Clackmannanshire.... [more]
DOLPHIN English, Irish
Derived from the Old Norse personal name Dólgfinnr.
DOME English
Occupational name from the Old English root doma, dema ‘judge’, ‘arbiter’. Compare Dempster.
DONSON English
Means "son of Don
DOOLITTLE English
From a medieval nickname applied to a lazy man (from Middle English do "do" + little "little"). It was borne by the American poet Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961). A fictional bearer is Eliza Doolittle, the flower seller in Bernard Shaw's 'Pygmalion' (1913); and a variant spelling was borne by Dr Dolittle, the physician who had the ability to talk to animals, in the series of books written by Hugh Lofting from 1920.
DORMAN English
From the Old English personal name Deormann, composed of Old English deor (see Dear) + mann 'man'. This surname became established in Ireland in the 17th century; sometimes it is found as a variant of Dornan.
DORN German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
DOSSAT English, Scottish
Possibly from French origins (used predominantly in Louisiana in the United States).
DOSSETT English
Recorded in several forms including Dowsett, Dosset, and Dossit, this is an English surname. ... [more]
DOUGHTY English
Doughty. This interesting surname of English origin is a nickname for a powerful or brave man, especially a champion jouster, deriving from the Middle English "doughty", Olde English pre 7th Century dohtig dyhtig meaning "valiant" or "strong"... [more]
DOW Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOWNARD English
Downard comes from England as a diminutive of Downhead in Somerset and Donhead in Wiltshire.
DOWNS English
This surname is derived from the Old English element dun meaning "hill, mountain, moor." This denotes someone who lives in a down (in other words, a ridge of chalk hills or elevated rolling grassland).
DOWRICK English
This name is found fairy widely in Cornwall, England.
DOWSON English
Either a patronymic surname derived from the given name Dow, a medieval variant of Daw (which was a diminutive of David), or else a metronymic form of the medieval feminine name Dowce, literally "sweet, pleasant", from Old French dolz, dous (cf... [more]
DRAGON French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
DRAGOO American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
DRAKEFORD English
The first element of this locational surname is probably derived from the personal name Draca or Draki (see Drake), while the second element is derived from Old English ford meaning "ford"... [more]
DRANSFIELD English
Means "Drains the fields".
DRAY English
From Middle English dregh, probably as a nickname from any of its several senses: "lasting", "patient", "slow", "tedious", "doughty". Alternatively, in some cases, the name may derive from Old English drýge "dry, withered", also applied as a nickname.
DRAYDEN English
It means man whore straight up man whore and a dick.
DRAYTON English
I had a maternal grandfather with the surname Drayton who came from Shrewsbury, Shropshire but cannot find any reference.
DRIGGERS American
Corruption of the Spanish surname Rodriguez. Originated in 17th century Virginia as a former slave by that surname was integrated into free society.
DRING English
Means "young man" (from Old Norse drengr).
DRIVER English
Occupational name for a driver of horses or oxen attached to a cart or plow, or of loose cattle, from a Middle English agent derivative of Old English drīfan ‘to drive’.
DRUMMER English
Locational name from a place called Drummer, near Chadderton in Lancashire. The meaning is possibly from the pre 7th century Olde English 'drum' meaning "a ridge".
DRURY English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DRYDEN English
Possibly from an English place name meaning "dry valley" from the Old English elements drȳġe "dry" and denu "valley". A notable bearer was the English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright John Dryden (1631-1700).
DRYER English
From an agent derivative of Old English dr̄gean "to dry"; possibly an occupational name for a drier of cloth. In the Middle Ages, after cloth had been dyed and fulled, it was stretched out in tenterfields to dry.
DUCHESNE French, English
Variant of Duchêne. From the old French chesne meaning "oak", denoted a person who lived near an oak tree or an oak forest.
DUCK English, Irish
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUCKWORTH English
Habitational name from Duckworth Fold, in the borough of Bury, Lancashire, which is named from Old English fuce "duck" and wor{dh} "enclosure".
DUDDRIDGE English
It is locational from a "lost" medieval village probably called Doderige, since that is the spelling in the first name recording (see below). It is estimated that some three thousand villages and hamlets have disappeared from the maps of Britain over the past thousand years... [more]
DUFFIELD English
The meaning is dove field or open country. It's origin is the Yorkshire area named after a few places there.... [more]
DUGGAN Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DUMBLEDORE English (?), Literature, Popular Culture
This is the surname of Albus Dumbledore, a major character in the Harry Potter-universe created by English author J. K. Rowling.
DUMMITT English
Habitational name from Dumart-en-Ponthieu in Somme, France.
DUNFORD English
Derived either from Dunford Bridge in Yorkshire (named after the River Don and the English word “Ford”), or from Dunford House in Yorkshire (named after “Dunn’s Ford”). One known bearer is US General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
DUNNE Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
DURDEN English
A different form of Dearden. A fictional bearer is Tyler Durden, a character from Chuck Palahniuk's 'Fight Club' (1996) and its subsequent film adaptation (1999).
DURHAM English
Denotes a person from either the town of Durham, or elsewhere in County Durham, in England. Durham is derived from the Old English element dun, meaning "hill," and the Old Norse holmr, meaning "island."
DURWARD English, Scottish (?)
Means "guardian of the door, door-keeper" (cf. Durward). A fictional bearer of the surname is Quentin Durward, eponymous hero of the novel (1823) by Sir Walter Scott.
DUTTON English
habitational name from any of the places called Dutton, especially those in Cheshire and Lancashire. The first of these is named from Old English dun ‘hill’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the second is from Old English personal name Dudd + Old English tun.
DUXBURY English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, recorded in the early 13th century as D(e)ukesbiri, from the genitive case of the Old English personal name Deowuc or Duc(c) (both of uncertain origin) + Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke).
DYE English, Welsh
English: from a pet form of the personal name Dennis. In Britain the surname is most common in Norfolk, but frequent also in Yorkshire. Welsh is also suggested, but 1881 and UK both show this as an East Anglian name - very few in Wales.
DYLAN English
From the given name Dylan.
EADE English (British, ?)
Originally derived from the Old English Eadwig, which meant "prosperity / fortune in war." Surname found mainly in Scotland and northern England. Americanized spelling of Norwegian Eide. Also see the similar given names: Adam, Edwy, Eda, and Edith.
EAGLE English
Nickname for a lordly, impressive, or sharp-eyed man, from Middle English egle "eagle" (from Old French aigle, from Latin aquila).
EAGLEBURGER English (American)
Americanized form of German Adelberger, a habitational name for someone from a place called Adelberg near Stuttgart.
EALEY English
Variant of ELY.
EAMES English
Probably from the possessive case of the Middle English word eam ‘uncle’, denoting a retainer in the household of the uncle of some important local person. Possibly also a variant of Ames.
EARENFIGHT English
appears in early American history in Pennsylvania and New Jerssey. Jacob Earenfight fought in the Battle of Princeton in the American Revolutionary War.
EARHART English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ehrhardt.
EARLY Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EARNSHAW English
Means "person from Earnshaw", Lancashire ("Earn's nook of land" - Earn from an Old English personal name meaning literally "eagle"). In fiction this surname is borne by Catherine Earnshaw, her brother Hindley and her nephew Hareton, characters in Emily Brontë's 'Wuthering Heights' (1847).
EAST English
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "east", east, and is topographical for someone who lived in the eastern part of a town or settlement, or outside it to the east... [more]
EASTBURN English
Habitational name from either of two places, one in Humberside and one in West Yorkshire, so named from Old English ēast, ēasten "east" and burna "stream".
EASTERBROOK English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a brook to the east of a main settlement, from Middle English easter meaning "eastern" + brook meaning "stream".
EASTLEY English
A Saxon village called East Leah has been recorded to have existed since 932 AD. (Leah is an ancient Anglo-Saxon word meaning 'a clearing in a forest'). There is additional evidence of this settlement in a survey from the time which details land in North Stoneham being granted by King Æthelstan to his military aid, Alfred in 932 AD... [more]
EATHERTON English
Probably a variant spelling of Atherton.
EBEN English
Meaning unknown. It could be from the given name Eden, from the place name Eden, meaning "Place Of Pleasure".
EBENEEZER English
Obtained from the given name Ebenezer
EBERT German, American
Believed to be a variant of Herbert or of Everett.
ECHELBARGER English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Eichelberger.
ECKLAND English (Rare), Norwegian (Anglicized, Rare, Expatriate), Swedish (Anglicized, Expatriate)
Possibly a variant of Ecklund. It might also be an anglicization of the rare Swedish surname Ekland or of a Norwegian name derived from several farmsteads named with eik "oak" and land "land".
ECKLUND English
English spelling of Swedish EKLUND.
EDDY American
A common surname used among people whose ancestry originates from the United Kingdom (England, Ireland and Scottland etc.) Shelia Eddy is an American who was convicted in 2014 for the murder of Skylar Neese in the state of West Virginia.
EDGE English
Topographic name, especially in Lancashire and the West Midlands, for someone who lived on or by a hillside or ridge, from Old English ecg "edge".
EDGELL English
Probably derived from the Old English given name Ecgwulf.
EDGELY English
A surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a place name taken from either a village in Cheshire or one in Shropshire. The name means “park by the wood” in Old English.
EDGERLY English
Habitational name from any of numerous minor places named Edgerley, Edgerely, or Hedgerley.
EDGERTON English
From a place name meaning either "settlement of Ecghere" or "settlement of Ecgheard" (see Ekkehard).
EDMEADES English
Meant "son of Edmede", from a medieval nickname for a self-effacing person (literally "humble", from Old English ēadmēde "easy mind").
EDMISON English, Scottish
Patronymic surname meaning “Son of Edmund!”.
EDMUNDS English, Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Edmund (see Edmond).
EDMUNDSON English
Means "son of Edmund".
EDSON English
Patronymic or metronymic from Eade.
EFRON English
Meaning unknown. This surname is famously used by actor Zac Efron.
EGGLESTON English
Habitational name from a place in County Durham so called, or from Egglestone in North Yorkshire, both named in Old English as Egleston, probably from the Old English personal name Ecgel (unattested) + tūn ‘settlement’, ‘farmstead’.
ELAM English
English habitational name for someone from a place called Elham, in Kent, or a lost place of this name in Crayford, Kent. The first is derived from Old English el ‘eel’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’... [more]
ELDEN English
Variant of Eldon.
ELDON English
Habitation name from the Old English personal name Ella- and -don from dun meaning "hill."
ELESTIAL English (British, Modern, Rare)
First used as a surname in September 2000, first appearing on a birth certificate in July 2009. Meaning "protected by angels"; the origin is an adopted surname from a type of quartz crystal, often referred to as a new millennium crystal... [more]
ELIAS Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name Elias. Compare Ellis.
ELICH German, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
ELIE American
From Rembrandt and Giacomo Elie, professional footballers for Genoa FC and Juventus FC.
ELIZABETH American
From the given name Elizabeth.
ELKINS English
Patronymic of Elkin.
ELLENDER English
English variant of Allender.
ELLENS English
Metronymic from Ellen (1).
ELLINGHAM English
Habitational name from places so named in Hampshire, Northumbria, and Norfolk. The first of these is named from Old English Edlingaham ‘homestead (Old English ham) of the people of Edla’, a personal name derived from a short form of the various compound names with a first element ead ‘prosperity’, ‘fortune’; the others may have the same origin or incorporate the personal name Ella (see Ellington).
ELLINGTON English
English habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire, Kent, Northumbria, and North Yorkshire; most are so named from Old English Ellingtun ‘settlement (Old English tun) associated with Ella’, a short form of the various compound names with a first element ælf ‘elf’, but the one in Kent has its first element from the Old English byname Ealda meaning ‘old’.
ELMORE English
An English habitational name from Elmore in Gloucestershire, named from Old English elm ‘elm’ + ofer ‘river bank’ or ofer ‘ridge’.
ELPHEE English
Derived from the Old English given name Ælfwig.
ELRIC English, Anime
From the medieval English givin name Elric. Notable bearers were the Fullmetal Alchemist characters Edward and Alphonse Elric, as well as their mother, Trisha Elric.
ELSEGOOD English (British), English (Australian)
Derived from an Old English given name, possibly *Ælfgod or *Æðelgod, in which the second element is god "god". (Another source gives the meaning "temple-god", presumably from ealh and god.)... [more]
ELTRINGHAM English (British)
Meaning homestead
ELWELL English
Means "person from Elwell", Dorset (probably "spring from which omens can be read").
ELWOOD English
It's either from a place name in Gloucestershire, England called Ellwood that is derived from Old English ellern "elder tree" and wudu "wood", or a form of the Old English personal name Ælfweald, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and weald "rule".
EMBRY English, Scottish
ember, smoldering fire
EMERY English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’. The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
EMMER English
Derived from a nickname for EMERSON
EMMERLY English
From the given name Amalric.
EMORY English, Irish
English variant spelling of Emery.
EMSLEY English
A name that came from a family that lived in Yorkshire, where they derived the family name from Helmsley. Probably of Old English origin Helm and ley or leah, which means "a clearing in the woods."
ENFIELD English
Place in England. Like Uxbridge.
ENGELBERT German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
ENGLUND Swedish, English
Combination of Swedish äng "meadow" and lund "grove".
ENSIGN English
From the military rank.
ERLAND English
Derived from the Swedish given name Erland.
ESTES Welsh, Spanish, English
a popular surname derived from the House of Este. It is also said to derive from Old English and have the meaning "of the East." As a surname, it has been traced to southern England in the region of Kent, as early as the mid-16th century.
ETCHEBERRY Basque, English
From Basque etxe (house) and berri (new).
ETHERINGTON English (British)
An Old English surname from Kent, the village of Etherington, which derives from the Old English "Ethel"red' ing (meaning people of, coming from) and "ton" a town/village.
EUBANKS English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bank of yew trees, from Old English iw "yew" and bank "bank".
EVE English
Possibly from the given name Eve.
EVENRUD Norwegian, American
From the name of several farms in Eastern Norway.
EVEREST English
Surname of Norman origin, introduced into England after the Conquest of 1066, and is a locational name from "Evreux" in Eure, Normandy. The place is so called from having apparently been the capital of the "Eburovices", a Gaulish tribe.
EVERSON English
Patronymic from the personal name Ever. See also Evers.
EVERTON English
Habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Merseyside, and Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English eofor ‘wild boar’ + tun ‘settlement’.
EVESHAM English
Derived from the Old English homme or ham and Eof, the name of a swineherd in the service of Egwin, third bishop of Worcester.
EWELL English
Habitation name from the town of Ewell in Surrey or from Temple Ewell or Ewell Manor, both in Kent or Ewell Minnis near Dover. Originally from Old English Aewill meaning "river source" or "spring".
EYRE English
Derived from Middle English eyer, eir "heir", originally denoting a man who was designated to inherit or had already inherited the main property in a particular locality. The surname was borne by the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
EZELL American
Of uncertain origin. The name is found primarily in the southeastern United States, possibly as a variation of Israel or a form of Ezekiel.
FACKRELL English
It means woodcutter
FAILOR English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Failer or Fehler, variants of Feiler.
FAIR English, Irish
English: nickname meaning ‘handsome’, ‘beautiful’, ‘fair’, from Middle English fair, fayr, Old English fæger. The word was also occasionally used as a personal name in Middle English, applied to both men and women.... [more]
FAIRBROTHER English
From a medieval nickname probably meaning either "better-looking of two brothers" or "brother of a good-looking person", or perhaps in some cases "father's brother".
FAIREY English
Either (i) meant "person from Fairy Farm or Fairyhall", both in Essex (Fairy perhaps "pigsty"); or (ii) from a medieval nickname meaning "beautiful eye". This was borne by Fairey Aviation, a British aircraft company, producer of the biplane fighter-bomber Fairey Swordfish... [more]
FAIRFAX English
From a medieval nickname for someone with beautiful hair, from Old English fæger "fair" and feax "hair". It was borne by the English general Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cameron (1612-1671), commander of the Parliamentary army during the Civil War... [more]
FAIRWEATHER English, Scottish
Nickname for a person with a sunny temperament.
FALKE English
Variant of Falk
FALKNER English
Variant spelling of Faulkner.
FALLOW English, Jewish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of fallow land, Middle English falwe (Old English f(e)alg). This word was used to denote both land left uncultivated for a time to recover its fertility and land recently brought into cultivation.... [more]
FANCOURT English
Derived from the English surname Fancourt, which originated in the county of Bedfordshire in England.