Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
LEDGER English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’... [more]
LEDWICK English
A variation of the given name LUDWIG.
LEECH English, Scottish
A physician.
LEEDS English
From the city of Leeds in Yorkshire. The name was first attested in the form Loidis in AD 731. In the Domesday Book of 1086, it is recorded as 'Ledes'. This name is thought to have ultimately been derived from an earlier Celtic name... [more]
LEEMING English
Habitational name from either of two places, in West Yorkshire near Keighley and in North Yorkshire near Northallerton. Both are named with a river name, derived from the Old English word lēoma "gleam, sparkle".
LEES English
Possibly a variation of the surname Lee.
LELAND English
derived from the Old English elements leah (wood, clearing, meadow) or læge (fallow) and land (land, area). The name was indicative of one who lived near a clearing or piece of fallow land.
LEMON English, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name LEFMAN, Old English LEOFMAN, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’... [more]
LEMON African American
This surname is a Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’, and mann ‘man’, person. This surname came to be used as a nickname for a lover or sweetheart, from Middle English Lemman.
LEMONS English
Variant of LEMON
LENTON English
Habitational name from Lenton in Nottinghamshire, which is named from the river on which it stands, the Leen (see Leen) + Old English tun 'settlement', 'enclosure'.
LEO English
From the Old French personal name LEON.
LEPLEY English
From a byname for a cobbler.
LESATZ English
Unknown origin (I mean by I don't know its origins). Popular in Michigan during the early 20th century.
LETCHER English
Topographic name for someone who lived beside a stream. From Old English læcc, plus the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
LETHBRIDGE English
Believed to have derived from a location in Devonshire around the 16th century.
LEVAN French, English
Comes from le vent, meaning "the wind."
LEVANT English
Derived from the Italian word levante, meaning "rising" and the French word levant, meaning "to rise". The term entered the English language in 1497 and was used to describe the "Mediterranean lands east of Italy" by referring to the rising of the sun in the east... [more]
LEVER French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
LEVERETT English
Diminutive of LEVER, from the Middle English personal name LEFRED, Old English LEOFRED, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + red ‘counsel’.
LEVEROCK Anglo-Saxon, English
It goes back those Anglo-Saxon tribes that once ruled over Britain. Such a name was given to a person who was given the nickname Laverock, which was the Old English word that described a person who was a good singer or someone who had a cheery personality.
LEVERTON English
This surname combines the Old English personal female name LEOFWARU or the Old English word læfer meaning "rush, reed" with another Old English word tún meaning "enclosure, field, farm, dwelling." The etymology with the female name addition fits in with the town of the same name in Berkshire while the etymology with the word addition fits in with the one in Lincolnshire.
LEVINSON English, Jewish
Means "son of LEVI".
LEVY English, French, Jewish
There are three possible sources of this surname. ... [more]
LEWISON English
A surname meaning ‘son of Lewis.’
LICKFOLD English
Derives from a hamlet in West Sussex, England. All known holders, worldwide, of this rare surname can be traced back to Lickfolds who lived within 20 miles of Lickfold in the 16th century.
LIDDIARD English
From Celtic place names in England meaning "gray hill".
LIDDINGTON English, Scottish (Rare)
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "of Liddington", a parish in Rutland, near Uppingham; a parish in Wiltshire, near Swindon.
LIEBER English, German, Polish, Jewish
From the given name LIEBER.
LIGHT English
Nickname for a happy, cheerful person, from Middle English lyght, Old English lēoht "light (not dark), bright, cheerful".
LIGHTFOOT English
English (chiefly northern England, especially Liverpool): nickname for a messenger or for a fast runner, from Middle English lyght ‘light’, ‘nimble’, ‘quick’ (Old English lioht) + fote ‘foot’.
LIGHTHALL English
A habitational name from a place called Lightollars in Lancashire, so named from Old English leoht ‘light-colored’ + alor ‘alder’. The surname, however, is not found in current English sources.
LIGNE English
A variation of the names Ling, LIN and others.
LILLEY English
Derived from the female given name ELIZABETH
LILLICRAP English
From a medieval nickname for someone with very fair hair (literally "lily-head").
LILLIS Irish, English
Metronymic from LILLY.
LILLY English
Derived from Lilly, a pet name for ELIZABETH. It was also used as a nickname for someone with fair skin or hair, and is derived from Old English lilie meaning "lily (the flower)"... [more]
LILLYWHITE English
From a medieval nickname for someone with very fair hair or complexion. It was borne by English cricketers James Lillywhite (1842-1929), first captain of England, and William Lillywhite (1792-1854), pioneer of overarm bowling, uncle of James... [more]
LIND Swedish, English
Derived from Swedish and Middle English lind "lime tree".
LINDBERGH Swedish (Rare), English (Rare)
Rare variant spelling of LINDBERG. A famous bearer was American aviator Charles Lindbergh (1902-1974) who was the first person to fly non-stop from America to mainland Europe in 1927.
LINDELL German, English
Derived from the German linde, meaning "lime tree."
LINDERMAN English (Rare)
From the given name Lynn, combined with the surname mann.
LINDLEY English, German
English habitational name from either of two places in West Yorkshire called Lindley, or from Linley in Shropshire and Wiltshire, all named from Old English lin ‘flax’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘glade’, with epenthetic -d-, or from another Lindley in West Yorkshire (near Otley), named in Old English as ‘lime wood’, from lind ‘lime tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
LINEBERRY English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of LEINBERG.
LINGARD English
Habitational name from Lingart, Lancashire, or Lingards Wood in Marsden, West Yorkshire.
LINGERFELT American (South)
Americanized spelling of German Lingenfeld, a habitational name from a place so named in the Palatinate.
LINK English
Comes from Old English word "hlinc"
LINLEY English
This surname can be derived from a place of the same name in Shropshire, which is derived from Old English lín meaning "flax, linen" and leah meaning "clearing." As a modern surname, it can also be a variant of Lindley (Lindley is used in 2 places in Yorkshire), which is derived from Old English lind meaning "lime tree" and leah.
LINN Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of LYNE. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
LINNANE Irish, English
Anglicized form of O'LENNON.
LINNEY English
From an Old English female personal name LINDGIFU, LINDGEOFU, composed of the elements lind ‘lime (wood)’, i.e. ‘shield’ (a transferred sense) + gifu, geofu ‘gift’.
LINZEY English
This is a variant of LINDSEY.
LIONS English
Variant of LYONS influencd by the spelling of the word lion
LIPPINCOTT English
A habitational name meaning "of Luffincott," a parish in Devon, England. Named from Old English uncertain first element + cot ‘cottage’.
LISLE Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of LYLE.
LITTLEJOHN Scottish, English
Distinguishing epithet for the smallest of two or more bearers of the common personal name JOHN. Compare MEIKLEJOHN... [more]
LITTLEWOOD English (British)
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a locational or topographical surname. If the former, it derives from any of several minor places in West Yorkshire, such as Littlewood in Wooldale near Holmfirth, all of which are so called from the Olde English pre 7th Century "lytel", little, small, and "wudu", wood... [more]
LIVELY English
A modern English surname possibly derived from a lost village called Laefer-leah which would give it the meaning "the farm by the lake".... [more]
LIVELY English
Nickname from Middle English lifly, "lively", "nimble".
LIVINGSTON English, Scottish
This surname is thought to be derived from Middle English Levingestun meaning "Leving's town" or "Leving's settlement."
LOAFMAN English (American)
Americanized spelling of German LAUFMANN.
LOCK English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
LOCKE English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of LOCK. ... [more]
LOCKETT English
Diminutive of the male given name LUKE.
LOCKLEAR English
Variant of LOCKYER. Locklear is an occupational name of anglo-saxon origin meaning "locksmith".
LOCKLEY English
Refers to the region of Loxley in Staffordshire, England.
LOCKYEAR English
Variant spelling of LOCKYER.
LOCKYER English
Variant of LOCKLEAR. Lockyer is an occupational name of anglo-saxon origin meaning "locksmith".
LODGE English
Local name for someone who lived in a small cottage or temporary dwelling, Middle English logge (Old French loge, of Germanic origin). The term was used in particular of a cabin erected by masons working on the site of a particular construction project, such as a church or cathedral, and so it was probably in many cases equivalent to an occupational name for a mason... [more]
LOKIER English (British)
Variant of LOCKYER, an occupational name for a locksmith.
LOMAS English, Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Variant spelling of "Lomax", meaning a steam pool devoted from Lumhalghs, Lancs. Also variant spelling of "Lennox", meaning Elmwood in Gaelic.
LOMAX English
Lomax is a territorial surname, derived from the hamlet of Lumhalghs, near Bury, Greater Manchester, and meaning "pool nook" or "recess". Notable persons with the surname Lomax include: Alan Lomax (1915–2002) American musicologist, son of John Avery Lomax... [more]
LONGBOTTOM English, Literature, Popular Culture
English (West Yorkshire) topographic name for someone who lived in a long valley, from Middle English long + botme, bothem ‘valley bottom’. Given the surname’s present-day distribution, Longbottom in Luddenden Foot, West Yorkshire, may be the origin, but there are also two places called Long Bottom in Hampshire, two in Wiltshire, and Longbottom Farm in Somerset and in Wiltshire.
LONGFELLOW English
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline.
LOOK English
Habitational name from Look in Puncknowle, Dorset, named in Old English with luce ‘enclosure’.
LOOK English, Scottish
From a vernacular pet form of LUCAS.
LOOMIS English
Derived from Lomax (Lumhalghs), near Bury, Lancashire, which means "pool nook/recess."
LORAH American
Americanized form of French Loreaux, from a variant of the personal name LOREL, a pet form of LAURENT... [more]
LORD English
A surname derived from someone of a lordly manner, or perhaps one who had earned the title in some contest of skill or had played the part of the ‘Lord of Misrule’ in the Yuletide festivities.... [more]
LORIMER English
Means "maker or seller of metal items of a horse's harness and associated equipment (e.g. bits and spurs)" (from Anglo-Norman loremier, a derivative of Old French lorain "harness").
LORING English
Means "son of Lorin", where Lorin is a medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LOSHAW English
English name this is the last name of singer Avril Lavigne’s Mother Judith Rosanne Loshaw
LOTSPEICH English
possibly from Bavarian lott ‘mud’ + speich ‘spittle’, ‘moist dirt’, either a topographic name for someone who lived on land in a muddy area or a nickname for someone who had a dirty appearance... [more]
LOTT English
from a medieval personal name brought to England by the Normans, of uncertain origin. It may be the Hebrew personal name Lot ‘covering’, which was relatively popular in northern France, or a reduced form of various names formed with the diminutive suffix -lot (originally a combination of -el + -ot), commonly used with women’s names.
LOUD English
from the English word "loud", given to a loud or, in jest, quiet person
LOVE English, Scottish
From Anglo-Norman French lo(u)ve meaning "female wolf."
LOVECRAFT English
An English surname coming from the Old English lufu, meaning "love, desire", and cæft, meaning "strength, skill".... [more]
LOVEDAY English
Means either (i) "person particularly associated with a 'loveday'" (a day when, by custom, old differences were settled and reconciliations were made); or (ii) from the medieval female personal name LOVEDAY, a descendant of Old English Lēofdæg, literally "beloved day"... [more]
LOVEJOY English
Combination of Middle English love(n), luve(n) "to love" and joie "joy".
LOVELACE English
From a medieval nickname for a woman-chaser or lothario (from Old English lufulēas, literally "without love", hence "fancy-free"). The English poet Richard Lovelace (1618-1657) was a famous bearer.
LOVELAND English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, possibly meaning "Lufa's land" in Old English or "leaf land" in Norwegian.
LOVELOCK English
From a medieval nickname for a dandy or a man conceited about his appearance (from lovelock, a term for an elaborately curled lock of hair). This surname is borne by British scientist James Lovelock (1919-), formulator of the "Gaia" concept.
LOVEN Norwegian (Rare), American (Rare)
From a farm (later renamed to Låvi) in Aurland municipality in Sogn og Fjordane fylke.... [more]
LOVETT English, French
From Ango-Norman French "louvet" meaning "young wolf".
LOWEHART English
Variation of Lowheart, used to denote people who seem to show a lack of consideration through expression
LOWERY English, Irish
Irish variant of LOWRY
LOWES English
Patronymic from of LOW derived from Middle English lowe meaning "hill, mound".
LOWRIE English
Variant of LOWRY. A famous bearer of the surname is baseball infielder Jed Lowrie.
LOXLEY English
English: habitational name from any of various minor places named Loxley, as for example one in Warwickshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Locc + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
LUCERO English, Spanish
The surname "Lucero" was derived from English conquerers who came from England, most likely someone who worked for a king or queen. The term Lucero refers to a "star" or "light carrier" when the English traveled to Spain, the Spanish people gave them the name "Lucero" but earlier was spelled with an "s or Lusero"... [more]
LUCIAN English (British, Rare)
Derived from the given name LUCIAN
LUDGATE English
Not Available.
LUDLOW English
Habitational name from a place in Shropshire, so named from the Old English river name Hlude (from hlud 'loud', 'roaring') referring to the Teme river + hlaw 'hill'.
LUGG English
English (Devon) probably from a local vernacular derivative of LUCAS. However, Reaney posits an Old English personal name, Lugga, from which this name could be derived.
LUKE English
From a derivative of LUCAS. This was (and is) the common vernacular form of the name, being the one by which the author of the fourth Gospel is known in English.
LUKEHART English (American)
Americanized form of German LUCKHARDT.
LULL English
From an Old English personal name, Lulla.
LUMB English, Anglo-Saxon
Lumb valley system in Yorkshire, England.... [more]
LUNDY English
Either (i) "person from Lundie", the name of various places in Scotland (meaning "place by a marsh"); or (ii) a different form of MCALINDEN.
LUNN Norwegian, English
Derived from LUND, which in turn comes from the Old Norse lundr, meaning "grove of trees".
LUSTER English
Variant of LESTER.
LUTTER Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of LUTER.... [more]
LUXON English
English (Cornwall and Devon) variant of LUXTON.
LUXTON English
English habitational name from a minor place, probably one of two in Devon, so called from the possessive form of the Middle English personal name or surname LUGG (from Old English Lugga) + Middle English tune, tone ‘settlement’ (Old English tun).
LYELL English
English
LYLE English
Derived from Norman French l'isle "island".
LYMAN English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see LAYMAN). ... [more]
LYN English, Scottish
Variant of LYNN.
LYND English
Variant of LUND.
LYNDERMAN English (Modern, Rare)
Variant of Linderman
LYNESS Northern Irish, Irish, English
Variant of LINES or anglicized form of Mac Aleenan.
LYNLEY English
Variant spelling of LINDLEY.
LYNX Southern African, English
Meaning "lynx" in English.
LYONS English, Irish
Is a surname with a variety of origins, from England, Ireland, Scotland, or perhaps France. ... [more]
MABBETT English
From a pet-form of the medieval female personal name Mabbe, a shortened form of AMABEL (ultimately from Latin amābilis "lovable")... [more]
MABRY English, Irish
Variant spelling of MAYBERRY.
MACDOOF English, Scottish
It is based off of a book character (or two given names into one).... [more]
MACE English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English MÆSSA, which came to be taken as a pet form of MATTHEW.... [more]
MACHEN English
Occupational name for a stonemason, Anglo-Norman French machun, a Norman dialect variant of Old French masson (see MASON).
MACHUCA American (Hispanic, Hispanicized, Modern, Rare)
in Spanish and Portuguese Machuca means "to squash" or "to crush." it is a Hispanic surname
MACKLIN English, Scottish
Meaning unknown, but it might be related to MACLEAN.
MACMILLAN Scottish, English
A Scottish family name. The origin of the name is said to derive from the origin of the Scottish Clan MacMillan. The progenitor of the Clan was said to be Airbertach, Hebridean prince of the old royal house of Moray... [more]
MADELEY English
English: habitational name from places so named in Shropshire and Staffordshire, named in Old English with the personal name MADA + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
MADKINS English
Metronymic from a pet form of the personal name MADDE.
MADREN English
Probably a habitational name from Madron in Cornwall. Alternatively, possibly from Madryn in Gwynedd, Wales.
MAGGS English
Metronymic from the medieval personal name MAG.
MAGILL English
scottish/irish
MAGNUSON English
Means "Son of MAGNUS".
MAHLOY English (American)
Mahloy is a misspelling of Malloy by Charles Malloy's (b. 1898, Scotland) elementary school teacher in the Ireland. The surname Malloy is derived from the pre 10th century Old Gaelic name O'Maolmhuidh, meaning the descendant of the Great Chief.
MAIN Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
MAINE Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of MAIN.
MAISON English
Variant spelling of MASON.
MAITLAND English, Scottish
Possibly from Mautalant, the name of a place in Pontorson, France meaning "inhospitable" or "bad temper" in Norman French (ultimately from Late Latin malum "bad" and talentum "inclination, disposition"), which was so named because of its unproductive soil; or perhaps it was originally a nickname for an ungracious individual, derived from the same source.
MAKEPEACE English
From a medieval nickname for a skilled conciliator. It was borne by English cricketer Harry Makepeace (1881-1952).
MAKICE American (Modern, Rare)
Taken as a new common familyname by Kevin McGrew Isbister and Amy Elizabeth Clendening. They scrambled their initials (KMI and AEC), and came up with “Makice” as their family name.
MALE English
Nickname for a virile man, from Middle English male meaning "masculine".
MALIN English, French, Dutch
From the given name MALIN (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
MALLARD English
Either (i) from the Old French male personal name Malhard, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin and meaning literally "council-brave"; or (ii) from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a male wild duck.
MALLOWS English
From Anglo-Saxon origins, meaning "The cross or mark on the hill". This surname is taken from the location 'Mallows Green' in England.
MALPASS English, Scottish, French
Habitational name from any of various places named Malpas, because of the difficulty of the terrain, from Old French mal pas "bad passage" (Latin malus passus). It is a common French minor place name, and places in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gwent, and elsewhere in England were given this name by Norman settlers... [more]
MANCHESTER English
Habitational name from the city in northwestern England, formerly part of Lancashire. This is so called from Mamucio (an ancient British name containing the element mammā "breast", and meaning "breast-shaped hill") combined with Old English ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (Latin castra "legionary camp").
MANESS English (American)
Probably a variant of MANES.
MANFORD English
Place name for "Munda's ford" from an Old English personal name Munda, the same element in the second syllable of Edmund and ford meaning a waterway crossing.
MANLEY English
Habitational name from places in Devon and Cheshire, named in Old English as "common wood or clearing", from (ge)mǣne "common, shared" and lēah "woodland clearing". The surname is still chiefly found in the regions around these villages.
MANNING English, Irish (Anglicized)
English patronymic from MANN. ... [more]
MANSELL English (Canadian), Norman
Of Norman origin, a habitational or regional name from Old French mansel ‘inhabitant of Le Mans or the surrounding area of Maine’. The place was originally named in Latin (ad) Ceromannos, from the name of the Gaulish tribe living there, the Ceromanni... [more]
MANSON English, Scottish
Manson is a surname of Scottish origin. It is an anglicised version of the Scandinavian name MAGNUSSON, meaning son of MAGNUS... [more]
MANTIA English (?)
This is my last name. I honestly don't know where it came from. But it's a last name because it's mine lol
MANTON English
Locational surname, derived from old English "the dweller near the chalky or sandy earth."
MAPES English
From the given name MABLE
MAPLE English
Name for a person who lived near a maple tree, from Middle English mapel, and Old English mapul.
MAPLES English
Variant of MAPLE, probably a name for plural MAPLE, a famous bearer of this name is Marla Maples (1963-).
MAPP English
From a variant of the medieval female personal name Mabbe, a shortened form of AMABEL. A fictional bearer is Elizabeth Mapp, busybodyish spinster in the 'Mapp and Lucia' novels of E.F. Benson.
MARANT English, French
Probably a variant of MORANT.
MARCH English
From the English word meaning, "to walk stiffly and proudly" or possibly from the month.
MARCHANT French, English, Spanish
Variant of MARCHAND, from French marchand meaning "merchant, mercantile". Though it is of French origin, it was transferred into the Spanish-speaking world, especially Chile, by French invasion of the Iberian Peninsula.
MARCUS English
Marcus is a surname derived from the given name of Ancient Roman pre-Christian origin derived either from Etruscan Marce of unknown meaning (possibly from the Etruscan "mar" which means "to harvest"), or referring to the god Mars... [more]
MARISON English (Rare)
Means “son of Mary”.
MARK English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
MARKES English
Variant spelling of MARKS.
MARKHAM English
English name from a place in Nottinghamshire, named in Old English as 'homestead at a (district) boundary', from mearc 'boundary' + ham 'homestead'. English surname used as an equivalent of Gaelic Ó Marcacháin 'descendant of Marcachán', a diminutive of Marcach (see Markey).
MARKLAND English
From Old English mearc meaning "boundary" and lanu meaning "lane", it is a habitational name from a place in the town of Wigan in Greater Manchester, England. It can also be a topographic name for someone who lived by a stretch of border or boundary land, or a status name for someone who held land with an annual value of one mark.
MARKLEY English
This surname means "border clearing" from Old English elements mearc meaning "border, mark" and leah meaning "clearing, grove."
MARKS English
This surname is derived either from the name MARK or from Old English mearc meaning "border, mark."
MARKSMAN English
An occupational surname indicating a person who was a hunter, especially a skilled one.
MARKSON English
This surname means "son of MARK."
MARPLE English
Means "boundary stream" from Old English maere (boundary), and pyll (stream).
MARRIOTT English, French
Derived from MARY.
MARS English
From the given name MARS
MARSH English
English: topographic name for someone who lived by or in a marsh or fen, Middle English mershe (Old English mersc), or a habitational name from any of various minor places named with this word, for example in Shropshire and Sussex.
MARSLAND English
Probably derived from some place named as being a boggy place, from Old English mersc meaning "marsh" and land meaning "land". Alternatively, it may be a variant of MARKLAND.
MARTELLE English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of MARTIN or MARTA.... [more]
MARVEL English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname (often ironic) for someone regarded as a prodigy; or (ii) "person from Merville", the name of two places in northern France ("smaller settlement" and "settlement belonging to a man with a Germanic name beginning with Meri-, literally 'famous'")... [more]
MASEY English, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name MACCIUS + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
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