Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is Paradiso36.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Abakumov Russian
Means "son of Abakum".
Abril Spanish, Portuguese
from an old personal name, Abril, based on the name of the month (from Latin Aprilis, "April").
Agathangelou Greek (Cypriot)
Patronymic from the genitive form of Agathangelos. Genitive patronymics are particularly associated with Cyprus.
Ahumada Spanish
topographic or habitational name from a place named with ahumar "to smoke", possibly denoting a place where ham and other meats were smoked or alternatively a place that had been cleared for settlement by burning... [more]
Álamo Spanish, Portuguese
Either a topographic name from álamo "poplar" or a habitational name from any of several places in Spain and Portugal named with this word.
Alcaide Spanish, Portuguese
Ancient occupational or status name from alcaide from Arabic al-qāʾid "the leader, the commander" (see Kaid)... [more]
Alcázar Spanish
Habitational name from any of various places for example in the provinces of Ciudad Real Cuenca and Granada named with the word alcázar "citadel" or "palace" (from Arabic al "the" and qaṣr "fortress" a borrowing of Latin castrum; see Castro).
Alemán Spanish
from alemán an ethnic name for a German also used as a nickname for a Spanish person having some connection with Germany.
Alexandre French, Portuguese
From the given name Alexandre.
Amstad German
topographic name from Middle Low German am "at the" and stade "bank shore".
Aragón Spanish
Habitational name from Aragon Spain which was an independent kingdom from 1035 to 1479. It took its name from the river Aragón which arises in its northwestern corner... [more]
Arcangeli Italian
Meaning "archangel" in Italian.
Arévalo Spanish
Habitational name from any of the places called Arévalo in the provinces of Ávila and Soria of pre-Roman origin.
Arminio Spanish, Italian, Sicilian
From the given name Arminio.
Arrowsmith English
Given to someone who made arrows from the Old English elements arwe "arrow" and smiþ "smith".
Auger French
From the given name Auger.
Bailly French, English
French cognate of Bailey, as well as an English variant; derived from Old French baillif "bailiff" (from Latin baiulus).
Bandiera Italian
from bandiera "banner flag" hence presumably a status name for a standard bearer. Italian cognate of Banner.
Banville French, English, Irish
From a place in france derived from the Germanic name Bada and French ville "village, town".
Barile Italian
From Italian barile "barrel" either an occupational name for a Cooper or a nickname for a fat man.
Barilla Italian
Occupational name from medieval Greek barellas "cooper" from Italian barella "barrel" with the suffix (e)as.
Bataille French
nickname for a bellicose man from bataille "battle" (from Latin battualia) or a habitational name from (La) Bataille the name of several places in France all named as the site of a battle in former times.
Bauknecht German, Upper German
Occupational name for a farm worker from Middle High German buknecht "plowboy, farmhand" derived from the elements bu "farm" and kneht "servant, apprentice".
Bayle French
Occupational name for a Bailiff from Old French Bailli "bailiff" (from Latin baiulus).
Beau French
Nickname for a handsome man (perhaps also ironically for an ugly one) from Old French beu bel "beautiful, handsome" (from Late Latin bellus)... [more]
Becerra Spanish, Galician
Nickname probably for a high-spirited person from becerra "young cow, heifer". It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a cowherd.
Benfield English
habitational name from one or more of the numerous places in England called Benfield or Binfield which are named from Middle English bent "bent-grass" and feld "open country" or "land converted to arable use" (Old English beonet and feld).
Benito Spanish
From the given name Benito.
Bérard French
From the given name Bérard.
Bergschneider German
topographic name for someone living by a mountain trail (as in cut into the hillside) from Berg "mountain hill" and Schneit "trail path running on a border" (Old High German sneita).
Berkeley English
From any of the locations called Berkeley derived the elements beorc "birch" and leah "clearing, wood" meaning "birch clearing"... [more]
Bermejo Spanish
Originally a nickname for a man with red hair or a ruddy complexion, from Spanish bermejo "reddish, ruddy" (itself from Latin vermiculus "little worm", from vermis "worm", since a crimson dye was obtained from the bodies of worms).
Bernier French
From the personal name Bernier composed of the ancient Germanic elements bern "bear" and hari "army". Compare Barney and Barnier.
Bertin French
From the given name Bertin a diminutive of the ancient Germanic personal name Berhto a short form of various compound names formed with berht "bright famous".
Besson French, Provençal, Occitan
Southern French nickname from Occitan besson "twin" (from Latin bis) or from the various places (Le) Besson in southern France.
Beste French, English
Nickname from Middle English beste Old French beste "beast animal" (especially those used for food or work) applied either as a metonymic occupational name for someone who looked after beasts such as a herdsman or as a nickname for someone thought to resemble an animal... [more]
Biedermann German, Jewish
nickname for an honest man from a compound of Middle High German biderbe "honorable" and man "man". Jewish surname adopted because of its honorific meaning from German bieder "honest, upright" and mann "man".
Biehl German
From Middle Low German bil "hatchet", Middle High German biel; given to someone who made or used hatchets.
Bier German, Jewish
from Middle High German bier "beer" German bier Yiddish bir a metonymic occupational name for a brewer of beer or a tavern owner or in some cases perhaps a nickname for a beer drinker.
Bierbrauer German
occupational name for a brewer German bierbrauer. Derived from the elements bier "beer" and brauen "to brew".
Bigot French
Either from Old French bigot possibly meaning "beggar" or from the Norman interjection bî got ("by God"), used as a pejorative nickname for the Normans... [more]
Blessing German, English
Either a German patronymic from a variant of the personal name Blasius or a nickname for a bald person from Middle High German blas "bald bare"... [more]
Blitzer German, Jewish
Variant of Blitz. from German blitzer "lightning" (Middle High German blicze) presumably a nickname for a fast mover.
Blond French
Nickname from old French blund blond "fair-haired" a word of ancient Germanic origin.
Blondeau French
Diminutive of Blond.
Blondel French
From old French blondel a diminutive of blond "blond, fair" variant of Blond.
Blondin French
Diminutive of Blond, nickname for someone with fair hair.
Blumenschein German
from Middle High German bluomenschin "flower splendor" from the elements bluomo "bloom" and sconi "beautiful" probably a topographic or habitational name referring to a house distinguished by a sign depicting a bunch of flowers or decorated with flower designs or noted for its flower garden.
Bonfiglio Italian
From the given name Bonfiglio an omen or well-wishing name meaning "good son" from bono "good" and‎ figlio "child, son"... [more]
Bourbon French
habitational name from a village in Allier the site of the (now ruined) castle of Bourbon or from another place called (Le) Bourbon mainly in the southern part of France. The placename is derived from a Celtic and pre-Celtic element borb- denoting a hot spring.
Bourcard French, German (Gallicized)
From the given name Bourcard, variant of Bouchard, and frenchified form of Burckhardt.
Bourgeois French
from bourgeois "burgher" (from Old French burgeis from burc "fortified town") a status name for an inhabitant and (usually) freeman of a fortified town (see Bourg)... [more]
Bourguin French
From the medieval name Bourguin the French form of Burgwin.
Boutet French
from a pet form of the ancient Germanic personal name Boto a short form of any of various names composed with the element bod "messenger"... [more]
Bradfield English
habitational name from any of the places in Berkshire Devon Essex Suffolk South Yorkshire and elsewhere named Bradfield from Old English brad "broad" and feld "open country" meaning "wide field".
Branciforte Italian, Sicilian
nickname from branchi "claws hands" (plural of branca) and forte "strong" meaning "strong claw".
Brandenburg German
habitational name from Brandenburg the name of a province its principal city and numerous other places.
Brando Italian, Portuguese
from the ancient Germanic (Langobardic) personal name Brando a short form of various compound personal names formed with brand "sword" particularly Aldobrando and Ildebrando... [more]
Brassard French
Derivative of bras "arm" most likely applied as a nickname denoting a person with strong arms or perhaps a pugilist.
Breitkreutz German
probably a nickname for a person with a broad butt. Breitkreutz replaced an earlier more transparent form of the surname Breitarsch the use of kreuz (literally "cross") as a euphemism for "buttocks" first occurring in the 17th century... [more]
Brenton English
habitational name primarily from Brenton near Exminster possibly named in Old English as Bryningtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Bryni" (a personal name from Old English bryne "fire flame") or "Bryni's town".
Breuer German, Jewish
occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale from Middle High German briuwer "brewer". Cognitive of Brewer.
Brindisi Italian
habitational name from Brindisi a port of southern Italy named in Latin as Brundisium.
Brinsley English
From a place meaning "brun's clearing" or "brown clearing" with the elements brun "brown" and leah "meadow, clearing".
Brunel French
Diminutive of Brun meaning "brown". Variant of Lebrun and Brunet.
Buisson French, Haitian Creole (Rare)
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area of scrub land or by a prominent clump of bushes from (Old) French buisson "bush scrub" (a diminutive of bois "wood"); or a habitational name from (Le) Buisson the name of several places in various parts of France named with this word.
Burel French
metonymic occupational name for a worker in the wool trade or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in brown from Old French burel borel a diminutive of boure "frieze" a type of coarse reddish brown woolen cloth with long hairs (from Late Latin burra "coarse untreated wool").
Caesar German (Latinized)
Humanistic retranslation of Kaiser into Latin.
Calafiore Italian, Sicilian
altered form of Calaciura from the Greek name Kalokiourēs a variant of Kalokyrēs Kalokyrios meaning "good man".
Calandra Italian
from calandra "skylark" (from Latin calandra) probably a nickname for someone with a fine singing voice.
Calderone Italian
From the Latin word Caldaria "cauldron". Given to someone who worked as a tinker or tinsmith. Italian cognitive of Calderón.
Candy English
perhaps from Middle English candi "crystallized cane sugar" (via French from Persian qand "sugar") and used as a metonymic occupational name for a sugar merchant... [more]
Capri Italian
habitational name for someone from Capri the island in the Bay of Naples.
Caprio Italian
from Latin caprae ‘goats’ or possibly from Greek kapros "(wild) boar" and so a metonymic occupational name for a goatherd or swineherd or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a goat or boar.
Cardenal Spanish, Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish cognitive of Cardinal. This surname is common in Nicaragua.
Cardinal English, French
from Middle English, Old French cardinal "cardinal", a church dignitary (Latin cardinalis, originally an adjective meaning "crucial")... [more]
Cardo Spanish, Italian
From cardo "thistle, cardoon" (from Latin carduus) either a topographic or occupational name for using wool carder thistles, or from the given name Cardo a short form of given names Accardo, Biancardo, or Riccardo.
Cardon French
from the name of several places in southern France called (Le) Cardon. Or from Old Norman French cardon "thistle" (a diminutive of carde from Latin carduus) hence a topographic name for someone who lived on land overgrown with thistles an occupational name for someone who carded wool (originally a process carried out with thistles and teasels) or perhaps a nickname for a prickly and unapproachable person... [more]
Cardone Italian, Sicilian
From Sicilian carduni "thistle, teasel, cardoon" possibly a topographic name but also could mean "rough, uncouth, stingy, or miserly".
Castagna Italian
From Italian castagna "chestnut" (from Latin castanea) for someone who worked with chestnuts. Variant of Castagno and Italian cognitive of Chastain.
Castagno Italian
For someone who lived near a chestnut tree from castagno "chestnut" (from latin castanea). Variant of Castagna and Italian cognitive of Chastain.
Castel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Late Latin castellum "castle" (a diminutive of Latin castrum "fort Roman walled city") or a habitational name from any of several places called (Le) Castel... [more]
Cavaleri Italian, Sicilian
occupational name from Sicilian cavaleri "rider mounted soldier knight". It was also used as a patrician title. See Cavaliere.
Cavallaro Italian, Sicilian
either a variant under Spanish influence of Cavaliere or an occupational name for a keeper or dealer in horses Sicilian cavaddaru.
Centore Italian
from cento ore "hundred gold pieces" hence probably a nickname for a wealthy person.
Cerise French, Italian
Italian habitational name from La Cerise or Torrent-La Cerise placenames in Valle d'Aosta from French cerise "cherry"; and French occupational name from cerise "cherry" (from Latin cerasus) applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or sold cherries.
Cesare Italian
From the given name Cesare.
Chamberlin French
French cognate of Chamberlain. Occupational name for an official in charge of the private chambers of his master from Old French chamberlenc "chamberlain".
Champagne French
regional name for someone from Champagne, named in Latin as Campania (from campus "plain", "flat land")... [more]
Chapelle French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a chapel from French chapelle "chapel" or from several places in France and Belgium called (La) Chapelle and variant of Lachapelle, Capelle, and Chappelle.
Chapuis French
Occupational name from Old French chapuis "carpenter joiner" a derivative of chapuiser "to cut" (from Late Latin cappulare). Variant of Chappuis.
Charlier French, Walloon
Occupational name for a cartwright wheelwright from Old French charrelier a derivative of charrel "cart" a diminutive of char "cart carriage".
Charlot French
It's from the given name Charlot a pet form of Charles. Variant of Charles.
Châtelain French
from châtelain "lord (of the manor)" Old French chastelain (from Latin castellanus a derivative of castellum "castle") applied either as a status name for the governor or constable of a castle or as an ironic nickname.
Chaumont French
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Chaumont "bald mountain" from the elements chals caux "bald" and mont "mountain" (ultimately from Latin calvus mons) for example in Cher Orne Jura Haute-Savoie.
Cherubin French, Polish
nickname from Old French chérubin and polish cherubin ‘cherub’, from ecclesiastical Latin cherubin.
Cherubini Italian
Means "son of Cherubino".
Cherubino Italian
Italian cognitive of Cherubin, from the given name Cherubino or the nickname of the same word from Ecclesiastical Latin Cherubin.
Chesbrough English
habitational name from Cheeseburn in Northumberland early recorded as Cheseburgh possibly from Old English cis "gravel" and burh "stronghold"... [more]
Chevrier French
Occupational name for a goatherd from an agent derivative of chèvre "goat" (from Latin capra "nanny goat").
Christophe French
From the given name Christophe.
Ciminera Italian
from a dialect variant of ciminiera "chimney" hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who built chimneys or worked a furnace oven or kiln with a chimney or a nickname for a tall thin person.
Claver English, Catalan
occupational name from Old French clavier Catalan claver "keeper of the keys doorkeeper" (from Latin clavarius from clavis "key").
Clemons English
Means "son of Clement". Variant of Clement.
Clerc French
Occupational or status name for a member of a minor religious order or for a scholar Old French clerc from Late Latin clericus from Greek klērikos a derivative of klēros "inheritance legacy" with reference to the priestly tribe of Levites (see Levy ) "whose inheritance was the Lord"... [more]
Clerico Italian
Occupational or status name for a member of a minor religious order or for a scholar from Late Latin clericus (see Clerc ). Italian cognitive of Clark.
Cochet French
Either from cochet a diminutive of coq "rooster" used as a nickname for a vain conceited or womanizing individual. Or possibly also a habitational name from (Le) Cochet the name of several places in various parts of France.
Coco Italian, Sicilian
occupational name for a cook a seller of cooked meats or a keeper of an eating house from southern Italian coco "cook" (from Latin cocus coquus).
Colgate English
habitational name from Colgates in Kent named with Old English col "charcoal" and gæt "gate" indicating a gate leading into woodland where charcoal was burned... [more]
Collin French
From Collin a diminutive of Nicolas. Variant of Colin
Colomb French
from Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columbus) applied as a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of pigeons or doves... [more]
Colomban French
From the given name Colomban.
Colombe French
Either from the given name Colombe or a habitational name from a place in France named La Colombe... [more]
Colonna Italian
topographic name from colonna "column" (from Latin columna).
Colville Scottish, English
Derived from the place Colleville in Normandy, France. With the Scandinavian name Koli and French ville "town, village".
Combe French
Either a topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine from combe "narrow valley ravine" (from Latin cumba a word of Gaulish origin); or a habitational name from Combe the name of several places in the southern part of France of the same etymology.
Combès French
Either a topographic name from combe "narrow valley ravine" (see Combe ) or a habitational name from any of various places in southern France for example in Hérault named Combes.
Comte French
Nickname for someone who worked for a count or for someone acting haughty from Old French conte cunte "count". French cognitive of Conte and variant of Lecomte.
Conejo Spanish
Spanish for rabbit from Latin "cuniculus". Given to someone who hunted rabbits.
Confalone Italian
from gonfalone "standard banner" from Old French gonfalon (of ancient Germanic origin) a metonymic occupational name for a standard bearer either in a military context or as the officer of a guild responsible for carrying the banner in religious processions... [more]
Coniglio Italian
From coniglio "rabbit" (from Latin cuniculus ) applied as a nickname for a timid person or a metonymic occupational name for a dealer in rabbits. Italian cognitive of Coelho.
Cordier French
Given to someone who worked or made with cord and or strings from old French corde "string".
Cornelio Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
From the given name Cornelio. Cognitive of Cornell and Cornelius.
Cornu French
Means foolish in French variant of Le Cornu.
Coronado Spanish
from coronado "crowned" past participle of coronare "to crown" (from Latin corona "crown") applied as a nickname for someone who behaved in an imperious manner or derived from the village Coronado in Galacia.
Cott English
From the Old English personal name Cotta. Possibly an altered spelling of French Cotte, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of chain mail, from Old French cot(t)e ‘coat of mail’, ‘surcoat’... [more]
Coulombe French
Variant of Colombe and Colomb.
Coulon French
From Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columba) used as a metonymic occupational name for a breeder.
Cresta Italian, Romansh
Derived from Italian and Romansh cresta "crest" (ultimately from Latin crista). This name was perhaps applied as a topographic name for someone who lived by the crest of a mountain or as a nickname with reference to the comb of a rooster.
Croix French
French cognate of Cross.
Cusimanno Italian, Sicilian
from the personal name Cusimano which may be a fusion of two Christian saints' names: Cosma and Damiano with a loss of the last syllable of one and the first of the other... [more]
Cuvelier French, Walloon, Flemish
Occupational name for a Cooper derived from an agent in Old French cuve "vat tun". Also found in the Netherlands.
Dalby English, Danish, Norwegian
From any of the locations call Dalby from the old Norse elements dalr "valley" and byr "farm, settlement" meaning "valley settlement". Used by one of the catholic martyrs of England Robert Dalby... [more]
D'Amour French
Patronymic from Amour, this name was a nickname for an amorous man or a love child.
Dauphin French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Dauphin a medieval form of Delphinus.
Dauphiné French
habitational name from the Dauphiné region of southeastern France.
Daus German
From Middle Low German dūs denoting the "two on a die or , the ace in cards" hence a nickname for a passionate card or dice player.
Delage French
From the dialect word age "hedge" for someone who lived by a hedge or from the various places in France called L'Age.
Delahaye French, Walloon
Variant with fused preposition de "from" of Lahaye. This surname is also found in the Flemish part of Belgium.
Delannoy French, Flemish, Walloon
From the various locations in northern France and Belgium called Lannoy with the element de "from".
Demand German
from Middle Low German demant "diamond" a metonymic occupational name for either a cutter or dealer in diamonds.
Demontigny French
habitational name with fused preposition de "from" for someone from any of several places in various parts of France named Montigny (see Montigny).
Denholm English, Scottish
habitational name from Denholm in southern Scotland near Hawick (Roxburghshire) formerly Denham from the elements denu "valley" and ham "homestead" or holmr "island"... [more]
Denier French, French (Swiss), English, English (British, Rare)
from Old French denier (from Latin denarius) "penny" originally the name of a copper coin or penny later a term for money in general hence probably an occupational name for a moneyer or minter... [more]
Denyer English
Variant of Denier.
Diana Italian
From the female given name Diana.
Dieu French, Walloon
From French dieu "god" given as a nickname for someone who played Christ in medieval mysteries or for a presumptious or an overly religious person, or from a short for of the given name Dieudonné.
Digby English
Derived from the name of an English town, itself derived from a combination of Old English dic "dyke, ditch" and Old Norse býr "farm, town".
Di Taranto Italian
Habitational name for someone from the city of Taranto the provincial capital of Apulia. Variant of Taranto and Tarantino.
Dolce Italian, Sicilian
From the medieval name Dolce meaning "sweet, pleasant" derived from Latin dulcis.
Dolfi Italian
From the given name Dolfo a diminutive or short form of Germanic names that end with dolfo Adolfo, Gandolfo, and Rodolfo making it a cognitive of Dolph.
Dorn German, English
German cognate and English variant of Thorn from Middle High German dorn "thorn" (from ancient Germanic þurnaz).
Doucet French
Nickname for a gentle minded person from French doux "sweet" (from Latin dulcis).
Duca Italian
from the title of rank duca "duke" (from Latin dux genitive ducis "leader") an occupational name for someone who lived or worked in the household of a duke or a nickname for someone who gave himself airs and graces like a duke... [more]
Duchemin French
Either a topographic name with fused preposition and definite article du "from the" for someone who lived beside a path from chemin "path way" (from Late Latin caminus a word of Gaulish origin); or a habitational name for someone from Le Chemin the name of several places in various parts of France.
Dumoulin French, Walloon
Variant with fused preposition and definite article du "from the" of Moulin meaning "from the mill" and This surname is also found in the Flemish part of Belgium and in the Netherlands.
Dunstan English
Either from the given name Dunstan or habitational name from Dunston (Derbyshire Lincolnshire Norfolk) from the Old English personal name Dunn and tun "settlement"... [more]
Duplain French
topographic name from Old French plain an adjective meaning "flat" and a noun meaning "plain" with fused preposition and definite article du "from the".
Duque Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese cognate of Duke. from duque "duke" (from Latin dux genitive ducis "leader") an occupational name for someone who worked in the household of a duke or as a nickname for someone who gave himself airs and graces.
Eastwood English
Either a habitational name from any of various places called Eastwood such as in Keighley, Rotherham or Todmorden (all Yorkshire) or Eastwood in Nottinghamshire... [more]
Eichacker German
Topographic name meaning "oak field. from Middle High German eiche "oak" and acker "field".
Eichenbaum German, Jewish
German cognate of Eikenboom, from Middle High German eich "oak" and boum "tree".
Eichenlaub German, Jewish
Derived from Eichenlau, a topographic name from Middle High German eichen "oaks" and loh "forest clearing", reinterpreted through folk etymology as Eichenlaub, meaning "oak leaf".
Eigen German
Either a status name from Middle High German aigen "unfree; serf" denoting (in the Middle Ages) someone with service obligations to a secular or ecclesiastical authority (also in Switzerland); or from eigen "inherited property" denoting a free landowner (without feudal obligations)... [more]
Eisenmenger German
occupational name for an "iron dealer" from Middle High German isarn "iron" and mengære "dealer".
Eisenstein German, Jewish
topographic name for someone who lived by a place where iron ore was extracted or perhaps a habitational name from a place called for its iron works. Jewish artificial compound of German isarn "iron" and stein "stone".
Enea Italian
From the given name Enea the Italian form of Aeneas.
Engländer German, Jewish
German ethnic name from Engländer "Englishman" and Jewish artificial name distributed at random by Austrian clerks.
Ercole Italian
From the given name Ercole.
Erwin English, German, Irish, Scottish
From the given name Erwin. From the Middle English personal name Everwin Erwin perhaps from Old English Eoforwine (eofor "boar" and wine "friend") but mostly from an Old French form of the cognate ancient Germanic name Everwin or from a different ancient Germanic name Herewin with loss of initial H- (first element hari heri "army")... [more]
Escoto Spanish
ethnic name from escoto originally denoting a Gaelic speaker from Ireland or Scotland; later a Scot someone from Scotland. Spanish cognitive of Scott.
Escribano Spanish
An occupational name from escribano "scribe" (from Late Latin scriba "scribe" genitive scribanis from Latin scriba genitive scribae).
Escudero Spanish
An occupational name for a squire a young man of good birth attendant on a knight or shield bearer escudero (medieval Latin scutarius a derivative of Latin scutum "shield")... [more]
Espada Portuguese, Spanish
metonymic occupational name for an armorer or a swordsman from espada "sword" (from Latin spata from Greek spathe originally denoting a broad two-edged sword without a point)... [more]
Esprit French
From the given name Esprit.
Etzel German, Upper German
from the given name Etzel and Atzilo a short form of any of the ancient Germanic personal names beginning with adal "noble"... [more]
Falcón Spanish, South American
Originally a nickname from falcón, an archaic variant of Spanish halcón "falcon" (from Latin falco). It is a cognate of Falco.
Farley English
habitational name from any of various places called Farley of which there are examples in Berkshire Derbyshire Hampshire Kent Somerset Gloucestershire Staffordshire Surrey Wiltshire Shropshire and Sussex... [more]
Farlow English
Habitational name from a place in Shropshire so named from Old English fearn "fern" and hlaw "hill tumulus".
Favier French
Occupational name for a grower of beans or a bean merchant derived from Latin faba "bean".
Feather English
from Middle English fether fedder "feather" or perhaps a shortened form of Middle English fetherer applied as a metonymic occupational name for a trader in feathers and down a maker of quilts or possibly a maker of pens... [more]
Feder German, Jewish
metonymic occupational name for a trader in feathers or in quill pens from Middle High German vedere German feder "feather quill pen"... [more]
Feltham English
Habitational name from either of two places so named Feltham: one southwest of London in Middlesex and the other in Somerset... [more]
Fenster German, Jewish
Occupational name for a window maker from Middle High German venster German fenster "window".
Fico Italian
from fico "fig" (from Latin ficus) applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or sold figs a topographic name for someone who lived in an area where figs grew or a habitational name from a place called with this word such as the district so named in Valderice Trapani province Sicily.
Figuier French (Rare)
From French figuier meaning "fig tree" (ultimately from Latin ficus; a cognate of Figueroa), possibly indicating a person who lived near a fig tree or one who owned a plantation of fig trees.
Fincham English
habitational name from a place in Norfolk so called from Old English finc "finch" and ham "homestead".
Finster German, Jewish
Nickname from German finster "dark, gloomy" or Yiddish fintster (Middle High German vinster). The name may have referred to a person's habitual character or it may have been acquired as a result of some now irrecoverable anecdote... [more]
Fischmann German, Jewish
Cognate of Fishman. occupational name for a fish seller from Middle High German visch Yiddish fish (German fisch) "fish" and Middle High German and Yiddish man (German mann) "man".
Fishwick English
habitational name from a place in Lancashire so named from Old English fisc "fish" and wic "building"... [more]
Flamand French
ethnic name for a Fleming someone from Flanders from Old French flamenc.
Flandre French
French cognate of Flanders, given to someone from Flanders (which is called Flandre in French).
Fleisch German
Metonymic occupational name for a butcher. Derived from Middle High German fleisch or vleisch "flesh meat".
Fleischhacker German, Jewish
Occupational name for a butcher from German fleisch "flesh meat", and an agent derivative of hacken "to chop or cut".
Fleischhauer German
Occupational name for a butcher from Middle High German fleisch or vleisch "flesh meat" and an agent derivative of Middle High German houwen "to cut". Variant of Fleischauer.
Fleischmann German, Jewish
occupational name for a butcher literally "meatman, butcher" from Middle High German fleisch "flesh, meat" and man "man".
Flemming German, English
German cognate and English variant of Fleming, an ethnic name for someone from Flanders Middle High German vlaeminc... [more]
Fleury French, English
Either a habitational name from Fleury the name of several places in various parts of France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Florus (from Latin florus "blooming flowering") and the locative suffix -acum or from the given name Fleury.
Font Catalan, Occitan, Spanish, French
topographic name for someone living near a spring or well Catalan and Occitan font "spring well" (from Latin fons genitive fontis).
Foresta Italian
Italian cognate of Forest, a derivative of Late Latin forestis "forest".
Fort French, Walloon, English, Catalan
Either a nickname from Old French Middle English Catalan fort "strong brave" (from Latin fortis). Compare Lefort... [more]
Forton English
Habitational name from any of the places in Hampshire Lancashire Shropshire and Staffordshire named Forton from Old English ford "ford" and tun "settlement enclosure".
Foti Italian, Sicilian
from the Greek personal name Photes Photios a derivative of Greek phos (genitive photos) "light".
Fouquet French
From a pet form or a diminutive of Fouques.
Fragola Italian
apparently from fragola "strawberry" probably applied as either a topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of wild strawberries a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of soft fruits or a nickname for someone with a conspicuous strawberry mark.
Francia Italian, Spanish
From Latin Francia "France" an ethnic name for a Frenchman.
Frankenberg German, Jewish
habitational name from a place in northern Hesse named as "fort (Old High German burg) of the Franks". From German franken and berg "mountain hill mountain"... [more]
Freimann German
German cognate of Freeman. from Middle High German vriman "free man" status name in the feudal system for a free man as opposed to a bondman or serf derived from the elements fri "free" and man "man".
Frischkorn German, Jewish
An occupational name for a farmer composed of German frisch "fresh" and korn "grain".
Froment French, Walloon, English
from French froment "wheat" (from Latin frumentum "grain") probably applied as a nickname for a peasant or as metonymic occupational name for a dealer in wheat... [more]
Frühling German (Rare)
Nickname from Middle High German vrüelinc German frühling "spring" in some cases for an early-born child from früh "early" and the suffix -ling denoting affiliation.
Galant French
Original French cognitive of Galante.
Galea Spanish, Italian, Maltese
From Spanish galea "galleon, warship" presumably a metonymic occupational name for a shipwright or a sailor. Italian habitational name from Galea in Calabria.
Galland French
Nickname for a cheerful or high-spirited or bold person from Old French galant "lively vivacious" also "bold valiant" (the meanings "gallant" and "attentive to women" developed only in the 16th century) the present participle of Old French galer "to be in good humor to enjoy oneself" a word of ancient Germanic origin... [more]
Gallogly Irish, Irish (Anglicized)
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac An Ghalloglaigh from galloglach "foreign warrior" or "galloglass"... [more]
Gallois French
From Gallois meaning "Welsh".
Garand French
nickname or status name from the Old French legal term garant "guarantor". perhaps from a personal name based on the ancient Germanic element warin "protection shelter" or "guard".
Garde French
from Old French garde "watch", "protection"; an occupational name for someone who kept watch or guard, or a topographic name for someone who lived near a vantage point or watchtower.
Garten German, Jewish
metonymic occupational name for a gardener or overseer of a garden or enclosure. Originally the term denoted the keeper of an enclosure for deer later of a vineyard or smallholding from Middle High German garte "garden enclosure"... [more]
Garton English
habitational name from Garton or Garton on the Wolds in the East Yorkshire or from various minor places so named from Old English gara "triangular plot of land" and tun "farmstead".
Gascón Spanish
Spanish cognitive of Gascoigne. Habitational name for someone from the province of Gascony Old French Gascogne (see Gascoigne).
Gascon French
French cognitive of Gascoigne. Habitational name for someone from the province of Gascony Old French Gascogne (see Gascoigne).
Gaudin French
From the Old French personal name Gaudin Norman French Waldin Waudin a pet form of ancient Germanic names based on the element wald "rule power".
Gauvain French
From the given name Gauvain.
Gawthrop English
habitational name from any of several places in Yorkshire and Lancashire called Gawthorpe or Gowthorpe all of which are named from Old Norse gaukr "cuckoo" and þorp "enclosure" meaning "village where cuckoo's frequented".
General German
nickname for a mercenary (employed in royal services).
Généreux French
From the given name Généreux.
Genova Italian
habitational name from Genoa (Italian Genova) in Liguria which during the Middle Ages was one of the great seaports of the Mediterranean and a flourishing mercantile and financial center... [more]
Gerwin German
From the given name Gerwin.
Gildea Irish
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Dhé "son of the servant of God" from dia "God"... [more]
Gillooly Irish
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ghuala "son of the gluttonous lad" from gola "gullet gut".
Giorno Italian
From a short form of the name Bongiorno and means "day" in Italian.
Giove Italian
From Giove ("Jupiter") the name of the chief Roman deity perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually swore per Giove "by Jove". From Sicilian ggiòve iòvi "Thursday" applied as a personal name for someone born or baptized on that day of the week... [more]
Girgenti Italian, Sicilian
Habitational name for someone from Agrigento in Sicily which was called Girgenti until 1927.
Gloster English
habitational name from the city of Gloucester. The place originally bore the British name Glevum (apparently from a cognate of Welsh gloyw "bright") to which was added the Old English element ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (from Latin castrum "legionary camp")... [more]
Gloucester English
habitational name from the city of Gloucester. The place originally bore the British name Glevum (apparently from a cognate of Welsh gloyw "bright") to which was added the Old English element ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (from Latin castrum "legionary camp")... [more]
Gobert French, German, English
From the given name Gobert a compressed form of Godebert composed of the ancient Germanic elements god "good" or god/got "god" and berht "bright famous".
Godefroy French
From the given name Godefroy.
Goldmann German, Jewish
occupational name for someone who worked with gold denoting anything from a gold-miner to a maker of gold jewelry or a gilder (someone skilled in decorating surfaces with a very thin layer of gold leaf)... [more]
Goldschneider German
Means "gold cutter" in German, from the elements gold "gold" and snidan "to cut".
Gonthier French
Derived from the given name Gonthier.
Gosney English
from Middle English gosse "goose" and ei "island" (Old English gos and ieg)... [more]
Gottstein German
Topographic name from a field name meaning literally "God's rock" derived from the elements got "god" and stein "stone"... [more]
Goupil French
nickname for someone with red hair or for a cunning person from Old French goupil "fox" Late Latin vulpiculus a diminutive of classical Latin vulpes a distant cognate of Wolf . This was replaced as a vocabulary word during the Middle Ages by Renard originally a personal name.
Grainville French
Original French form of Granville, from locations in France called Grainville from the given name Guarin and ville "town" meaning "Guarin's town".
Grano Italian, Spanish
from grano "grain" (from Latin granum) probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a farmer or grain merchant.
Graupman German
Occupational name for someone who produced or dealt with grits and legumes, from early modern German graupe "pot barley" (bohemian krupa) and man "man".
Griebe German
Occupational name for a butcher or fat dealer from Middle High German griebe griube "rendered bacon pieces crackling".
Grosch German
Either a metonymic occupational name for a moneyer or possibly a nickname for an avaricious person from Middle High German Middle Low German grosche "groschen" a medieval thick silver coin its name ultimately derived from medieval Latin denarius grossus literally "thick coin".
Grün German, Jewish
from Middle High German gruoni "green fresh raw" hence a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in green a topographic name for someone who lived in a green and leafy place or a habitational name for someone from a place called with this word such as Gruna Grunau in Silesia... [more]
Grünbaum German, Jewish
from Middle High German gruoni "green" and boum "tree" probably a topographic or habitational name referring to a house distinguished by the sign of a tree in leaf... [more]
Grünfeld German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places in northern and central Germany named Grünfeld named with elements meaning "green open country" derived from the elements gruoni "green" and feld "field"... [more]
Guadalajara Spanish
habitational name from Guadalajara in Castile named with Arabic wādī-al-ḥijāra (واد الحجرة o وادي الحجرة) "river of the stones".
Guardia Italian, Spanish
From Spanish and Italian guardia "guard watch" a topographic name for someone who lived by a watch place by a watchtower or a habitational name from any of numerous places called La Guardia named with the same word; or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept watch or for a member of the town guard... [more]
Gucciardo Italian, Sicilian
from the given name Gucciardo a cognate of French Guichard of ancient Germanic origin probably composed of the elements wig "battle" or wisa "experience" and hard "strong brave hardy"... [more]
Guerre French
French Cognitive of Guerra, from the element werra "war".
Guerrier French, Haitian Creole
Nickname for an aggressive person or occupational name for a soldier, from Old French guerrier "warrior". Cognate of Guerrero and Guerriero.
Guerry French
From the Germanic given name Wigric derived from the elements wig "battle" and ric "powerful".
Guichard French
From the medieval name Guichard derived form the Germanic name Wighard... [more]
Guignard French
from the old Germanic name Winhard composed of the elements win "friend" and hard "hard strong".
Guilbert French, Guernésiais
Either from the given name Guilbert the French form of Wilbert or a variant of Gilbert.
Guillard French
From the given name Willihard and French cognitive of Willard.
Guillotin French
From a diminutive of Guillaume and a variant of Guillot. A notable user is Joseph-Ignace Guillotin whom the guillotine was named after.
Guimond French
from the medieval French name Guimond from the Germanic name Wigmund composed of the ancient Germanic elements wig "battle combat" and mund "protection".
Guin French
From the given name Guin the French form of Wino a short form of names with the element win "friend".
Gülden Dutch, German
from gulden "golden" derived from vergulden vergolden "to gild" a metonymic occupational name for a craftsman who gilds objects; compare Guldner. From gulden the name of the coin (English guilder) applied as a topographic or habitational name referring to a house name such as In den silvren Gulden ("In the Silver Guilder") or from related verb meaning "to gild" applied as a topographic or habitational name referring to a house name such as De Gulden Hoeve ("The Gilded Farmhouse") or De Gulden Zwaan ("The Gilded Swan").
Gutjahr German, German (Swiss)
nickname for someone born on New Year's Day from a New Year's greeting meaning "Good year".
Gutknecht German, German (Swiss)
status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht). Derived from the elements guot "good" and kneht "servant, apprentice".
Gutmann German
German cognate of Goodman. from Middle High German guot man literally "good man, capable man" derived from the elements guot "good" and man "man"... [more]
Guyon French
From a diminutive of Guy 1.
Habermehl German
metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of oatmeal from Middle High German habaro "oats" and melo "flour".
Hadfield English
Habitational name from a place so named in Derbyshire named from Old English hæþ "heathland heather" and feld "field" meaning "heath open land".
Hagedorn German
German cognate of Hawthorne. Topographic name from Middle High German hagedorn "hawthorn" from hac "hedge" and dorn "thorn".
Hagelstein German
nickname for a hot-headed irascible man from Middle High German hagelstein "hailstone" derived from the elements hagel "hail" and stein "stone"
Hagen German, Dutch, Danish
from the ancient Germanic personal name Hagen a short form of various compound names formed with hag "enclosure protected place" as the first element.
Halfpenny English
Nickname probably for a tenant whose feudal obligations included a regular payment in cash or kind (for example bread or salt) of a halfpenny. From Old English healf "half" (from proto Germanic halbaz) and penning "penny" meaning "half penny".
Hallam English
Habitational name from Halam (Nottinghamshire) or from Kirk or West Hallam (Derbyshire) all named with the Old English dative plural halum "(at the) nooks or corners of land" (from Old English halh "nook recess"; see Hale)... [more]
Halligan Irish
shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁilleagán "descendant of Áilleagán" a double diminutive of áille "beauty".
Hamel French
topographic name for someone who lived and worked at an outlying farm dependent on the main village Old French hamel (a diminutive from an ancient Germanic element cognate with Old English hām "homestead"); or a habitational name from (Le) Hamel the name of several places in the northern part of France named with this word.
Hamon Breton, French, English
From the given name Hamon.
Handschuh German
Occupational name for a maker or seller of gloves or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore gloves from Middle High German hantschuoch "glove" literally "hand shoe" from the elements hant "hand" and schuh "shoe".
Hanna Irish, Scottish
from Gaelic Ó hAnnaigh "descendant of Annach" a personal name of uncertain origin or from Gaelic Ó hÉanna "descendant of Éanna" also unexplained but well attested... [more]
Harduin French
From the given name Harduin.
Hartnagel German
Occupational name for a nailsmith from the Middle High German elements hart "hard" and nagal "nail".
Hartranft German
descriptive nickname for a pauper from Middle High German harte "hard" and ranft "rind crust".